ULYSSES NOTESHEETS

Virtual Notesheets

Print edition: none.

MS: non-extant Notesheet details

Virtual sector 1


Sourced Notes: Irish Independent, 16 June 1904.
Virtual notesheet:
NON-EXTANT NOTES

 
Virtual: sector 1(a)
Births, Marriages and Deaths
BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, AND DEATHS.
Announcements of Births, Marriages and Deaths are charged at the prepaid rate of 1s. 6d. per insertion of five lines and 5d. for each additional 9 words. Advertisements of this class will not be inserted unless authenticated with the name and address of the subject, and should be addressed to the MANAGER. Irish Independent (16 June 1904), 1/1
Virtual: sector 1(b)
Bennett, Vancouver road, Forest Hill, London.
BIRTHS.
BENNETT—June 9, 1904, at 33 Vancouver road, Foresthill, London, the wife of Colin E. Bennett, M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P.Lond., of a daughter. Irish Independent (16 June 1904), 1/1
Virtual: sector 1(c)
Carr, Hanwell, London.
BIRTHS.
[…]
CARR—June 6, 1904, at “Nithsdale,” Hanwell, London, the wife of George H. Carr, of a daughter. Irish Independent (16 June 1904), 1/1
Virtual: sector 1(d)
Gordon, Barnfield Crescent, Exeter.
BIRTHS.
[…]
Gordon—June 11, 1904, at 3 Barnfield Crescent, Exeter, the wife of W. Gordon, M.D., F.R.C.P., of a son. Irish Independent (16 June 1904), 1/1
Virtual: sector 1(e)
Redmayne, at Iffley, Saint Anne's-on-Sea, the wife of William T. Redmayne, of a son.
BIRTHS.
[…]
REDMAYNE—June 12, 1904, at Iffley, St. Annes-on-Sea, the wife of William T. Redmayne, of a son. Irish Independent (16 June 1904), 1/1
Virtual: sector 1(f)
Playwood and Ridsdale, at Saint Jude's Kensington by the very reverend Dr Forrest, dean of Worcester
MARRIAGES.
[…]
HAYWOOD and RIDSDALE—June 8, 1904, at St. Jude's, Kensington, by the Very Rev. Dr. Forrest, Dean of Worcester, assisted by the Rev. W.H. Bliss, Vicar of Kew, Charles Burt Haywood, only surviving son of the late Thos. Bart Haywood and Mrs Haywood, of Woodbatch, Reigate, to Gladys Muriel, only daughter of Alfred Ridsdale, of Hatherley House, Kew gardens. Irish Independent (16 June 1904), 1/1
Virtual: sector 1(g)
Vincent and Gillett, Edward Vincent to Rotha Marion Gillett, daughter of Rosa and the late George Alfred Gillett, 179 Clapham road, Stockwell.
MARRIAGES.
[…]
VINCENT and GILLETT—June 9, 1904, at St. Margaret's, Westminster, by the Rev. T.B.F. Campbell, Edward Vincent, third son of Thomas Vincent, Whinburgh, Norfolk, to Rotha Marion Gillett, younger daughter of Rosa and the late George Alfred Gillett, 179 Clapham road, Stockwell. Irish Independent (16 June 1904), 1/1
Virtual: sector 1(h)
Wright and Flint
MARRIAGES.
[…]
WRIGHT and FLINT—June 14, 1904, at the parish church, Marlow, by the Rev. J.H. Light. Aubrey William, only son of Sidney Hasell Wright, of Thames Bank, Marlow, to Maud, youngest daughter of Samuel Flint, of Shelley House, Marlow. Irish Independent (16 June 1904), 1/1
Virtual: sector 1(i)
Bristow, at Whitehorse Lane, London.
DEATHS.
BRISTOW—June 11, 1904, at “Fernleigh,” Whitehorse lane, Thornton Heath, London, John Gosling Bristow. Irish Independent (16 June 1904), 1/1
Virtual: sector 1(j)
Cann, at Manor road, Stoke Newington, of gastritis and heart disease.
DEATHS.
[…]
CANN—June 12, 1904, at Manor road, Stoke Newington, Emma, daughter of the late W.A. Cann, of gastritis and heart disease. Irish Independent (16 June 1904), 1/1
Note: Entered in two stages, the second part probably at missing stage 2.
Virtual: sector 1(k)
Cockburn, at the Moat House, Chepstow.
DEATHS.
[…]
COCKBURN—June 10, 1904, at the Moat House, Chepstow, after a short illness, Frances Mary Cockburn, in the 60th year of her age. Irish Independent (16 June 1904), 1/1
Virtual: sector 1(l)
Dimsey, at Crouch End, the wife of David Griffiths Dimsey, late of the Admiralty.
DEATHS.
[…]
DIMSEY—June 13, 1904, at 4 Crouch Hall road, Crouch End, Martha Elizabeth, the wife of David Griffiths Dimsey, late of the Admiralty. Irish Independent (16 June 1904), 1/1
Virtual: sector 1(m)
Miller, Tottenham, aged 85.
DEATHS.
[…]
MILLER—June 14, 1904, at Northumberland Park, Tottenham, Sophia Miller, wife of the late Thomas Miller, of Edmonton, aged 85. Irish Independent (16 June 1904), 1/1
Virtual: sector 1(n)
Welsh, June 12 at 35 Canning street, Liverpool, Isabella Helen, eldest daughter of the late Alexander Welsh.
DEATHS.
[…]
WELSH—June 12, 1904, at 35 Canning street, Liverpool, Isabella Helen, eldest daughter of the late Alexander Welsh. Irish Independent (16 June 1904), 1/1
Virtual: sector 1(o)
Brilliantined
[Advertisement] Hampstead Highgate Express, 12 December 12 (1896), 1/1

Virtual sector 2


Sourced Notes: Irish Independent, 17 June 1904.
Virtual notesheet:
NON-EXTANT NOTES

 
Virtual: sector 2(a)
Quarter Mile Flat Handicap
DUBLIN UNIVERSITY BICYCLE AND HARRIERS' CLUB TOURNAMENT
[…]
The attendence. considering the adverse conditions, was very good, and at intervals the proceeedings were enlivened with a choice selection of music by the band of the 2nd Seaforth Highlanders.
[…]
Quarter Mile Flat Handicap&,dash; M.C. Greene, 13 yds, 1; H. Thrift, 2 yds, 2; T.M. Patey, 6, 3. Also:- C. Scaife, 11, 0; J.B. Jones, 13, 0; G.N. Morphy, 13, 0; F. Stevenson, 20, 0; C. Adderley, 20, 0; W.C. Huggard, 20, 0. Greene came out a hundred yards from home, and won a good race by two yards; a foot divided the second and third. Time 51 3-5 secs. Irish Independent (17 June 1904), 7/8
Virtual: sector 2(b)
M.C. Green, H. Thrift, T.M. Patey, C. Scaife, J.B. Joffs, G.N. Morphy, F. Stevenson, C. Adderly, W.C. Huggard
Dublin University Bicycle and Harriers' Clubs Tournament Quarter Mile Flat Handicap. M.C. Greene, 13 yds, 1; H. Thrift, 2 yds, 2; T.M. Patey, 6, 3. Also:- C. Scaife, 11, 0; J.B. Jones, 13, 0; G.N. Morphy, 13, 0; F. Stevenson, 20, 0; C. Adderley, 20, 0; W.C. Huggard, 20, 0. Greene came out a hundred yards from home, and won a good race by two yards; a foot divided the second and third. Time 51 3-5 secs. Irish Independent (17 June 1904), Sporting
Note: From the handicaps as given, and assuming the absence of J.J. Comyn, the true-to-life order of the onset of the pursuit as described in “Wandering Rocks” (lines 1258-60) should have been: F. Stevenson, C. Adderley, W.C. Huggard, M.C. Greene, J.B. Jones, G.N. Morphy, C. Scaife and H. Thrift. It may be a coincidence but, on the (microfilmed) copy in the National Library of Ireland that we consulted, there is a mark (bitched type?) just above the ‘n’ of ‘Jones’ which makes it appear to the casual or, perhaps, weak eye as ‘Joffes’, which, spoken aloud, may have occasioned Mr Budgen's ‘Joffs’, later altered by Joyce to ‘Jeffs’.

Virtual sector 3


Sourced Notes: Evening Telegraph
Virtual notesheet: Addenda to USH16
NON-EXTANT NOTES

 
Virtual: sector 3(a)
Evening Telegraph. Last Pink.
Evening Telegraph. Last Pink.. Evening Telegraph (16 June 1904), 1
Note: ‘Last Pink.’ is stamped above and to the left of the title to indicate it is the latest edition of the newspaper for the day, and includes the latest sporting results.
Virtual: sector 3(b)
Great battle Tokio.
The WAR. / BIG BATTLE AT TELISSA. / Japs Take 300 Prisoners and 14 Guns. / Russian Defeat.
The Russians lost 500 killed, 300 men taken prisoners, and 14 guns at Telissa. The Japanese casualties number 1,000. Telissa is on the Liao-Tong Peninsula.
(PRESS ASSOCIATION WAR SPECIAL.) Tokio, Thursday. Evening Telegraph (16 June 1904), 2/9
Virtual: sector 3(c)
Emigration swindle
Bogus Emigration Agent. / Case in the Police Court.
To-day in the Southern Divisional Police Court, before Mr. Swifte. James Wought, 27 Warren street and 49a Lower Clanbrassil street, was put forward on remand charged by detective-sergeant Sheahan and Detective-officer M‘Cabe with having on the 30th of May obtained £1 by false pretences from Benjamin Zaretsky, 32 Union street, Leeds. The defendant is said to have several aliases, including Richards, Sparks, Saphero and Charles and Co., Leeds. In the present case he was alleged to have represented himself as an emigration agent, and on that pretence obtained £1 from Zaretsky for a ticket to Canada, the money being sent to the defendant at College Green Post Office. The ticket was bogus. Evening Telegraph (16 June 1904), 3/2
Note: See also Sheet 12.002(p) et seq.
Virtual: sector 3(d)
£200 damages
Breach of Promise Action from Kilkenny. / AMUSING CORRESPONDENCE. / Verdict for £200.
To-day Mr. Justice Wright and a city common jury heard the case of Delany v. Burke. The plaintiff, Miss Margaret Delany, who is not yet 21, sued through her father, a cabinetmaker, at Abbeyview, Co. Kilkenny, the defendant, Frank P. Burke, a Revenue officer, Dean street Kilkenny, to recover £500 damages for breach of promise. Evening Telegraph (16 June 1904), 3/3
Virtual: sector 3(e)
Lovemaking in Irish
Breach of Promise Action from Kilkenny. / AMUSING CORRESPONDENCE.
The defendant appeared in person. Mr. Moloney, in opening the case, said the defendant was a Gaelic enthusiast in Kilkenny He had come from Glasgow in 1904, and had devoted his spare moments, apart from the usual romantic duties of an Inland Revenue officer, to promoting the spread of the Irish language and supporting the Gaelic League. Evening Telegraph (16 June 1904), 3/3
Virtual: sector 3(f)
Sporting
SPORTING. / ASCOT MEETING. / The Gold Cup. Evening Telegraph (16 June 1904), 3/8
Virtual: sector 3(g)
ASCOT MEETING. The Gold Cup.
SPORTING. / ASCOT MEETING. / The Gold Cup. / THE OUTSIDER WINS Evening Telegraph (16 June 1904), 3/8
Virtual: sector 3(h)
value 1,000 sovs., with 3,000 sovs. in specie in addition,
ASCOT MEETING. […]
3.0—The GOLD CUP, value 1,000 sovs., with 3,000 sovs. in specie in addition, out of which the second shall receive 700 sovs, and the third 300 sovs, added to a sweepstakes of 20 sovs each, h. ft., for entire colts and fillies. Two miles and a half. Evening Telegraph (16 June 1904), 3/8
Virtual: sector 3(i)
for entire colts and fillies
ASCOT MEETING. […]
3.0—The GOLD CUP, value 1,000 sovs., with 3,000 sovs. in specie in addition, out of which the second shall receive 700 sovs, and the third 300 sovs, added to a sweepstakes of 20 sovs each, h. ft., for entire colts and fillies. Two miles and a half. Evening Telegraph (16 June 1904), 3/8
Virtual: sector 3(j)
Throwaway by Rightaway—Theale, W. Lane 1
ASCOT MEETING. […]
Mr. F. Alexander's THROWAWAY, by Rightaway—Theale, 5 yrs. 9st 4lb W. Lane 1
Lord Howard de Walden's ZINFANDEL, 4 yrs, 9st M. Cannon 2
Mr. W. Bass's SCEPTRE, 5 yrs, 9st 1lb O. Madden 3
M. J. de Bremond's Maximum II., 5 yrs, 9st 4lb G. Stern 0 Evening Telegraph (16 June 1904), 3/8
Note: See also Sheet 16.018(w).
Virtual: sector 3(k)
Lord Howard de Walden's Zinfandel M. Cannon 2
ASCOT MEETING. […]
Mr. F. Alexander's THROWAWAY, by Rightaway—Theale, 5 yrs. 9st 4lb W. Lane 1
Lord Howard de Walden's ZINFANDEL, 4 yrs, 9st M. Cannon 2
Mr. W. Bass's SCEPTRE, 5 yrs, 9st 1lb O. Madden 3
M. J. de Bremond's Maximum II., 5 yrs, 9st 4lb G. Stern 0 Evening Telegraph (16 June 1904), 3/8
Note: See also Sheet 16.018(aa).
Virtual: sector 3(l)
Mr W Bass's Sceptre O. Madden 3
ASCOT MEETING. […]
Mr. F. Alexander's THROWAWAY, by Rightaway—Theale, 5 yrs. 9st 4lb W. Lane 1
Lord Howard de Walden's ZINFANDEL, 4 yrs, 9st M. Cannon 2
Mr. W. Bass's SCEPTRE, 5 yrs, 9st 1lb O. Madden 3
M. J. de Bremond's Maximum II., 5 yrs, 9st 4lb G. Stern 0 Evening Telegraph (16 June 1904), 3/8
Note: See also Sheet 16.018(ab).
Virtual: sector 3(m)
M. J. de Bremond's Maximum II G. Stern 0
ASCOT MEETING. […]
Mr. F. Alexander's THROWAWAY, by Rightaway—Theale, 5 yrs. 9st 4lb W. Lane 1
Lord Howard de Walden's ZINFANDEL, 4 yrs, 9st M. Cannon 2
Mr. W. Bass's SCEPTRE, 5 yrs, 9st 1lb O. Madden 3
M. J. de Bremond's Maximum II., 5 yrs, 9st 4lb G. Stern 0 Evening Telegraph (16 June 1904), 3/8
Virtual: sector 3(n)
Betting 5 to 4 on Zinfandel. 20 to 1 Throwaway (off)
ASCOT MEETING. […]
Betting—5 to 4 on Zinfandel, 7 to 4 agst Sceptre, 10 to 1 agst Maximum II., 20 to 1 agst Throwaway (off) Evening Telegraph (16 June 1904), 3/8
Virtual: sector 3(o)
Winner trained by Braime
ASCOT MEETING. […]
Mr. F. Alexander's THROWAWAY, by Rightaway—Theale, 5 yrs. 9st 4lb W. Lane 1
Lord Howard de Walden's ZINFANDEL, 4 yrs, 9st M. Cannon 2
Mr. W. Bass's SCEPTRE, 5 yrs, 9st 1lb O. Madden 3
M. J. de Bremond's Maximum II., 5 yrs, 9st 4lb G. Stern 0
(Winner trained by Braime.) Evening Telegraph (16 June 1904), 3/8
Note: See also UN2 (VI.D.7):005(i), Sheet 16.018(ad), and UN5 (NLI.5B):012(bm)
Virtual: sector 3(p)
Throwaway and Zinfandel took close order
The Gold Cup. THE OUTSIDER WINS […] Throwawey set a fair pace to Sceptre, with Maximum II, last, till fairly in the line for home, when Sceptre slightly headed Throwaway, and Zinfandel took close order with him. Throwaway, however, stayed on, and won cleverly at the finish by a length; three parts of a length divided second and third. Evening Telegraph (16 June 1904), 3/8
Virtual: sector 3(q)
cleverly
The Gold Cup. THE OUTSIDER WINS […] Throwawey set a fair pace to Sceptre, with Maximum II, last, till fairly in the line for home, when Sceptre slightly headed Throwaway, and Zinfandel took close order with him. Throwaway, however, stayed on, and won cleverly at the finish by a length; three parts of a length divided second and third. Evening Telegraph (16 June 1904), 3/8

Virtual sector 4


Sourced Notes: miscellaneous
Virtual notesheet
NON-EXTANT NOTES

 
Virtual: sector 4(a)
Hel Wal Ak Lub Mor Ma
‘Ancient Intuitions’ … I can imagine them [‘a group of the ancestors lit up from within’] looking up at the fire in the sky, and calling out “El” if it was the light they adored, or if they rejoiced in the heat and light together they would name it “Hel.” Or if they saw death, and felt it as the stillness or ending of motion [end of 129] or breath, they would say “Mor.” Or if the fire acting on the water made it boil, they would instinctively combine the sound equivalents of water and fire, and “Wal” would be the symbol. If the fire of life was kindled in the body to generate its kind, the sound symbol would be “Lub.” When the axe was used to cut, its hardness would prompt the use of the hard or metallic affinity in sound, and “Ak” would be to cut or pierce. One extension of meaning after another would rapidly increase the wealth of significance, and recombinations of roots the power of expression. The root “M” with its sense of finality would suggest “Mi” to diminish, and as to measure a thing is to go to its ends, “Ma” would also mean to measure, and as to think a thing is to measure it, “Ma” would also come to be associated with thinking. A. E. (George Russell), The Candle of Vision (1918), 129f
Virtual: sector 4(b)
Did you hear my head snap?
In further illustration of the waking stage, showing how similar it was in 1906 to what it is now, and as a further description of the curious “snap” sensation, I subjoin an extract from the termination of a sitting with Henry James, Junior and Mr. Dorr in America in 1906.

I thought you were a stranger.
    Well, did you hear my head snap?
H. J. Jr. No.
    Didn't hear it? It is a funny sound. Don't you hear it at all? Sounds like wheels clicking together and then snaps. There it is again.
G.B.D. Now you are really back.

Oliver Lodge, The Survival of Man (1920) 280
Virtual: sector 4(c)
Spurgeon went to heaven 11.5 Sunday night. Not entered yet.
Mr. Spurgeon frequently gave expression to his dislike and mistrust of the antics of the Salvation Army. He was far from prim himself, but he held that if people were not “won over to Christ” by preaching, it was idle to bait the hook with mere sensationalism. Yet by a strange irony his closest friends, in announcing his death to his flock, actually improved on the extravagance of the Salvationists. Here is a copy of the telegram that was affixed to the rails of the Metropolitan Tabernacle the morning after his decease:

Mentone, 11.50. / Spurgeon's Tabernacle, London.

Our beloved pastor entered heaven 11.5 Sunday night.

How could his soul enter heaven at the very same moment? Is heaven in the atmosphere? He who asserts it is a very bold speculator. Is it out in the ether? If so, where? And how is it our telescopes cannot detect it? If heaven is a place, as it must be if it exists at all, it cannot very well be within the astronomical universe. Now the farthest stars are inconceivably remote. Our sun is more than 90,000,000 miles distant, and Sirius is more than 200,000 times farther off than the sun. There are stars so distant that their light takes more than a thousand years to reach us, and light travels at the rate of nearly two hundred thousands miles per second! It is difficult to imagine Spurgeon's soul travelling faster than that; and if heaven is somewhere out in the vast void, beyond the sweep of telescopes or the register of the camera, Spurgeon's soul has so far not "entered heaven" that its journey thither is only just begun.

G. W. Foote, Flowers of Freethought (1893) 35
Virtual: sector 4(d)
Who will go drive with Fergus now, and pierce the deep wood's woven shade, the shadows of the woods, and the white breast of the dim sea
Note: W.B. Yeats, “Who Goes with Fergus”, from The Rose (1893).

Who will go drive with Fergus now,
And pierce the deep wood's woven shade
,
And dance upon the level shore?
Young man, lift up your russet brow,
And lift your tender eyelids, maid,
And brood on hopes and fear no more.

And no more turn aside and brood
Upon love's bitter mystery;
For Fergus rules the brazen cars,
And rules the shadows of the wood,
And the white breast of the dim sea

And all dishevelled wandering stars.

Virtual: sector 4(e)
Come on, you triple extract of infamy!
He entered the tabernacle at great speed, leaped at a bound to the top of the table on the stage, smacked his hands together with a report like a rifle shot and raised his voice to a shriek, crying, “Come on, you forces of evil in Philadelphia, that have made the Church a doormat to wipe your dirty feet upon, come on, you triple extract of infamy, come on, you assassins of character, come on, you defamers of God and enemies of His Church; come on, you bull-necked, beetle-browed, hog-jowled, peanut-brained, weasel-eyed, four flushers of false alarms and excess baggage! The Evening Herald, Billy Sunday (1915), 2
Note: See also Sheet 14.004(ak).

Virtual sector 5


Sourced Notes: miscellaneous
Virtual notesheet
NON-EXTANT NOTES

 
Virtual: sector 5(a)
orange lodge
The sketch of Orangeism has been obtained from a man who was long the master of an orange lodge in Ireland, and has since been convinced of its affinity to masonry in every malign tendency. Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) xxiii
Virtual: sector 5(b)
swear that I will always hail, ever conceal, never reveal, any part or parts, art or arts,
I, James Dupeasy, of my own free will and accord, in presence of Almighty God, and this worshipful lodge of free and accepted Masons, erected to God and dedicated to the holy St. Johns, do hereby and hereon, most solemnly and sincerely promise and swear, that I will always hail, ever conceal, and never reveal, any part or parts, art or arts, point or points, of the secret arts and mysteries, of ancient Freemasonry, which I have received, am about to receive, or may hereafter be instructed in, to any person or persons, in the known world; Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 34
Note: See also UN7 (V.A.2):010(bb)
Virtual: sector 5(c)
in the rough sands of the sea, a cabletow's length from the shore, at low water mark, where the tide ebbs and flows
To all which I do most solemnly, and sincerely, promise and swear, without the least equivocation, mental reservation, or self-evasion of mind in me, whatever; binding myself under no less penalty, than to have my throat cut across, from ear to ear, my tongue torn out by the roots, and my body buried in the rough sands of the sea, a cable-tow's length from the shore, at low water mark, where the tide ebbs and flows twice in twenty-four hours; so help me God, and keep me stedfast in the due performance of the same. Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 35
Virtual: sector 5(d)
kiss the book
W. M. In token of your sincerity you will now kiss the book on which your hand rests. [Candidate kisses the book.] Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 35
Virtual: sector 5(e)
taking hold of left breast, arm forms square: the sign and dueguard of fellowcraft
The sign is given by taking hold of the left breast, with the right hand, as though you intended to tear out a piece of it, then draw your hand with the fingers partly clenched, from the left to the right side, with some quickness, and dropping it down by your side. The due-guard is given by raising the left arm until that part of it between the elbow and shoulder is perfectly horizontal; and raising the rest of the arm in a vertical position, so that part of the arm below the elbow, and that part above it forms a square. This is the due-guard. The two are always given together by Masons, and are called the sign and due-guard of a fellow craft: they would not be recognized by a Mason, if given separately. Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 60f
Virtual: sector 5(f)
pass of Ephraim: Shibboleth
The Ephraimites being highly incensed for not being called to fight and share in the rich spoils of the Amonitish war, assembled a mighty army and passed over the river Jordan to give Jephtha battle; but he being apprized of their approach, called together the men of Israel and gave them battle, and put them to flight; and, to make his victory more complete, he ordered guards to be placed on the different passes on the banks of the river Jordan, and commanded, if the Ephraimites passed that way, they should pronounce the word Shibboleth; but they, being of a different tribe, pronounced it Sibboleth, which trifling defect proved them spies, and cost them their lives; and there fell that day, at the different passes on the banks of the river Jordan, forty and two thousand. Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 64
Virtual: sector 5(g)
past master
PAST MASTER'S DEGREE.

When a master Mason is elected master of a lodge, he must necessarily receive this degree, before he takes the master's chair; in which case it is conferred by individual past masters, who organize themselves into a lodge for that purpose; and confer this degree as hereafter described.

Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 102
Virtual: sector 5(h)
worshipful master, ~
This lodge consists of seven officers, viz.: 1. Right worshipful master; 2. Senior warden; 3. Junior warden; 4. Secre tary; 5. Treasurer; 6. Senior deacon; 7 Junior deacon. All the officers and members, as many as may be present, keep their hats on, when the lodge is open and at work on this degree. Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 102
Virtual: sector 5(i)
~ keep hats on
This lodge consists of seven officers, viz.: 1. Right worshipful master; 2. Senior warden; 3. Junior warden; 4. Secre tary; 5. Treasurer; 6. Senior deacon; 7 Junior deacon. All the officers and members, as many as may be present, keep their hats on, when the lodge is open and at work on this degree. Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 102
Virtual: sector 5(j)
the sign of admiration
As they strike the following verses, each brother throws his hands up, (turning up his eyes,) and giving the sign of admiration,[!] as before described, holds them in that position through the two verses.

Almighty Jehovah, descend now, and fill
This lodge with thy glory, our hearts with good-will;
Preside at our meeting, assist us to find
True pleasure in teaching good will to mankind. […]

Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 116f
Virtual: sector 5(k)
in the attitude of
The members all kneel and join hands, as in opening; and while in this attitude the most excellent reads the following passage of scripture: 2 Chron. vii. 1, 4. Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 117
Note: See also Sheet 19.005(ac) below.
Virtual: sector 5(l)
bowed upon the ground
And when all the children of Israel saw how the fire came down, and the glory of the Lord upon the house, they bowed themselves with their face to the ground upon the pavement, and worshipped, and praised the Lord, Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 117
Virtual: sector 5(m)
most excellent master
The most excellent master now kneels, and joins hands with the rest. They all then repeat in concert the words, “For he is good, for his mercy endureth for ever,” six times, each time bowing their heads low towards the floor. Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 117
Virtual: sector 5(n)
Rahab
And Joshua the son of Nun, sent out of Shittim two men to spy secretly, saying, Go, view the land, even Jericho. And they went, and came into a harlot's house, named Rahab, and lodged there. Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 173
Virtual: sector 5(o)
secret monitor, grip palm with one finger
SECRET MONITOR. […] Grips are given and received in the same admonishing way. When you take the hand of a brother, if you grip him in the centre of the hand, with two fingers, it means desist; if you grip with one finger, it means proceed. Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 170
Virtual: sector 5(p)
giving the sign of a heroine of Jericho
The grand hailing sign of distress is given by raising the right hand and arm to an angle of forty-five degrees, holding between the thumb and fore-finger a handkerchief, which hangs perpendicularly. […]

At length he [William Wallace] saw a hand rise from the surface of the water, holding a handkerchief and giving the grand hailing sign of distress of a heroine of Jericho

Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 175f
Virtual: sector 5(q)
knights of the red cross
The king of Persia, desirous of perpetuating a remembrance of those interesting events which had occasioned a renewal of the friendship which had formerly subsisted between himself and Zerubbabel, instituted, on this occasion, a new order, and called it ‘the order of knights of the east.’ They afterwards assumed the title of ‘knights of the eagle.’ In France they were known as ‘knights of the sword;’ and in Palestine, as ‘knights of the red cross.’ They were afterwards incorporated with the knight templars. Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 185f and passim
Virtual: sector 5(r)
giving the signs of the knights templar
The sir knights being assembled and seated, as in plate 21, the encampment is opened with the same ceremonies that the red cross council is, except the addition of giving the signs and words of the knight templar […] Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 205
Virtual: sector 5(s)
pilgrim warrior's pass ~
The senior warden then invests the candidate with the pilgrim warrior's pass, which is Maher-shalal-hashbaz. It is given by four cuts of the sword and under an arch of steel. Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 211f
Virtual: sector 5(aa)
~ Maher-shalal-hashbaz
The senior warden then invests the candidate with the pilgrim warrior's pass, which is Maher-shalal-hashbaz. It is given by four cuts of the sword and under an arch of steel. Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 211f
Virtual: sector 5(ab)
secret master
SECRET MASTER.

The lodge of secret masters is spread with black. The master represents Solomon coming to the temple to elect seven experts. He is styled, most powerful.

Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 244
Virtual: sector 5(ac)
in the attitude of listening
Candidate being in the antichamber, the captain of the guards orders two or three of them to take from him his hat, sword, and the decorations of a perfect master, and then to place him by the door, (partly open) with his hands across, in the attitude of listening. Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 248
Note: See also Sheet 19.005(k) above.
Virtual: sector 5(ad)
draw the right hand from the left shoulder to the right hip
The first sign is to clinch the right hand, then draw it from the left shoulder to the right hip. The second is to cross the arms, then let them fall on the right hip. Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 249
Virtual: sector 5(ae)
elected knights of nine
ELECTED KNIGHTS OF NINE.

This chapter represents the audience chamber of Solomon, and is to be decorated with white and red hangings#[E2]#[80]#[94]the red with white flames.

There are nine lights in the east, and eight in the west. The master represents Solomon, seated in the east, with a table be fore him, covered with black, and is styled, most potent.

Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 252ff
Virtual: sector 5(af)
Strike at the forehead with the poniard ~
ELECTED KNIGHTS OF NINE. […] The following method of giving the sign, is considered by well instructed Masons, as more correct than the above.

Strike at the forehead with the poniard—the brother will answer by carrying his hands to his forehead, as if to examine the supposed wound, plunge the poniard at the breast, crying ‘Nekum,‘ (i.e. vengeance)—the brother replies by carrying his hand to his heart, saying, ‘Necar.’

Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 255
Virtual: sector 5(ag)
~ Nekum!
ELECTED KNIGHTS OF NINE. […] The following method of giving the sign, is considered by well instructed Masons, as more correct than the above.

Strike at the forehead with the poniard—the brother will answer by carrying his hands to his forehead, as if to examine the supposed wound, plunge the poniard at the breast, crying ‘Nekum,‘ (i.e. vengeance)—the brother replies by carrying his hand to his heart, saying, ‘Necar.’

Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 255
Virtual: sector 5(ah)
Grand elect, perfect and sublime
GRAND ELECT, PERFECT, AND SUBLIME MASON. The following signs, words, &c. are more generally used by perfect Masons, in North America.
First sign.—Same as the due-guard of a master Mason.
Second sign.—Bring your right hand to your left cheek, extending it as though to guard that side of the face; your left is to support the right elbow; apply the left hand in the same manner to the right cheek, supporting the left elbow with the right hand. It is pretended that Moses placed himself in these attitudes when he saw the burning bush.
Third sign.—Give the sign of admiration, and then place three fingers of the right hand on the lips. Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 257
Virtual: sector 5(ai)
fingers at the lips
GRAND ELECT, PERFECT, AND SUBLIME MASON. The following signs, words, &c. are more generally used by perfect Masons, in North America.
[…]
Third sign.—Give the sign of admiration, and then place three fingers of the right hand on the lips. Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 257f
Virtual: sector 5(aj)
Mahak-makar-a-bak

First pass-word. “Shibboleth,” repeated thrice.
Second pass-word. “Heleniham.”
Third pass-word. “Mahak-makar-a-bak.” This is translated Masonically, “God be praised, we have finished it.”
First covered word. “Gibulum.”
Second covered word. “Mahabin.”
Third covered word. “Adonai.”
Grand word. “Jehovah.” This word is given by repeating alternately the names of the Hebrew letters used in the word Jehovah, “Jod,” “He,” “Vau,” “Ha,”

Avery Allyn, A Ritual of Freemasonry (1831) 258
Virtual: sector 5(ak)
The ruffin cly the nab of the Harman beck
Thomas Dekker. Lanthorne and Candle-light […]

The Ruffin cly the nab of the Harman beck.
If we mawnd Pannam, lap or Ruff-peck.

[…]

Thus Englished:

The Dieull take the Constable's Head
If we beg Bacon, Butter-milke or bread.

Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), xliv
Virtual: sector 5(al)
I vowed that I never would leave her, / She turned out a cruel deceiver.

Tho I vowed that I never would leave her,
She turned out a cruel deceiver
;
Tootle tum, tootle tum, tootle tum, tootle tum,
Tootle tum, tootle tum tay.

Arthur Lloyd, I vowed that I never would leave her (ca. 1870), chorus
Note: See also UN7 (V.A.2):012(m). Joyce probably quoted the song from memory.

Virtual sector 6


Sourced Notes: Greene's Saints and Symbols.
Virtual notesheet:
NON-EXTANT NOTES

 
Virtual: sector 6(a)
anvils
ANVIL. S. Eloy, Lo, or Eligius, A.D. 659. Patron saint of Bologna, and of blacksmiths and horses. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 2
Virtual: sector 6(b)
arrows
ARROWS. S. Ursula, V.M. Dates vary from 237 to 451. Patron saint of young girls, and women engaged in the education of their own sex.
S. Giles, Hermit, A.D. 725. Patron saint of Edinburgh, and of woods, lepers, cripples, and beggars.
S. Sebastian, M., A.D. 288. Patron saint against the plague and pestilence. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 3
Virtual: sector 6(c)
axes
AXE. S. Matthias, Apostle, M.
S. Proculus, M , circa 303. Patron saint of Bologna.
S Martina, V.M., A.D. 230 E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 3
Virtual: sector 6(d)
beehives
BEEHIVE. S. Bernard of Clairvaux, A.D. 1153. Founder of the Cistercian Order of reformed Benedictines.
S. Ambrose, A.D. 397. One of the Four Latin Fathers of the Church. Patron saint of Milan. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 4
Virtual: sector 6(e)
bells
BELLS. S. Anthony, Hermit, A.D. 357.
S. Pol de Lon, A.D. 573. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 5
Virtual: sector 6(f)
boxes of ointment
BOX OF OINTMENT. SS. Cosmo and Damian, MM., A.D. 301. Patron saints of the Medici, and of medicine. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 6
Virtual: sector 6(g)
cruses
BREAD AND CRUSE OF WATER. S. Pol de Leon, A.D. 573. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 6
Virtual: sector 6(h)
candles
CANDLES. S. Erasmus or Elmo, M., A.D. 296.
S. Genovieve, A.D. 509. Patron saint of Paris. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 6
Virtual: sector 6(i)
fetters
CHAINS AND FETTERS. S. Leonard, A.D. 559. Patron saint of prisoners and slaves. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 7
Virtual: sector 6(j)
babes in a tub
CHILDREN, THREE IN A TUB. S. Nicholas of Myra, A.D. 326. Patron saint of Russia,and many seaports; also of children, especially schoolboys, sailors, merchants, travellers, and against thieves. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 8
Virtual: sector 6(k)
crutches
CRUTCHES. S. Anthony, Hermit, A.D. 357.
S. Romualdo, A.D. 1027. Founder of the Order of Camaldolesi, reformed Benedictines.
S. John Gualberto, A.D. 1073. Founder of the Vallombrosan Order of reformed Benedictines. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 10
Virtual: sector 6(l)
bellows
DEMON HOLDING BELLOWS. S. Genevieve, A.D. 509. Patron saint of Paris. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 11
Virtual: sector 6(m)
dragons
DRAGON. S. George, M., A.D. 303. Patron saint of England, Germany, and Venice, and of soldiers and armourers.
S. Sylvester, Pope, A.D. 335.
S. Mercuriale, 2nd century. Bishop of Forli.
S. Theodore, M., A.D. 319. Patron saint of Venice.
S. Margaret, V.M., A.D. 306.
S. Martha of Bethany, A.D. 84. Patron saint of cooks and housewives.
S. Pol de Leon, A.D. 573. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 12
Virtual: sector 6(n)
eyes on a dish
EYES ON A DISH. S. Lucy, V.M., A.D. 303 Patron saint of Syracuse, and against diseases of the eye. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 13
Virtual: sector 6(o)
beards
HAIR AND BEARD LONG. S. Paul the Hermit of Thebes, A.D. 344.
S. Onofrio, 4th or 5th century. Hermit of Thebes. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 15
Virtual: sector 6(p)
hawks
HAWK. S. Quirinus the Tribune, A.D. 130. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 15
Virtual: sector 6(q)
hogs
HOG. S. Anthony, Hermit, A.D. 357. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 17
Virtual: sector 6(r)
inkhorns
INK-HORN. S. Bernard of Clairvaux, A.D. 1153 Founder of the Cistercian Order of reformed Benedictines. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 17
Virtual: sector 6(s)
keys
KEYS. S. Peter, Apostle, M.
S. Hippolytus, M., A.D. 258. The gaoler of S. Laurence.
S. Martha of Bethany, A.D. 84. Patron saint of cooks and housewives. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 18
Virtual: sector 6(t)
ladles
LADLE. S. Martha of Bethany, A.D. 84 Patron saint of cooks and housewives. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 18
Virtual: sector 6(u)
lamps
LAMP. S. Lucy, V.M., A.D. 303. Patron saint of Syracuse, and against diseases of the eye. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 18
Virtual: sector 6(v)
lilies
LILY. S. Joseph.
S. Dominic, A.D. 1221. Founder of the Dominican Order.
S. Francis of Assisi, A.D. 1226. Founder of the Franciscan Order.
S. Miniato, M., A.D. 254,.
S. Antony of Padua, A.D. 1231.
S. Casimir of Poland, A.D. 1483.
S. Francis Xavier, A.D. 1552. Patron saint of India.
S. Philip Neri, A.D. 1595. Founder of the Order of the Oratorians.
S. Scholastica, A.D. 543. Sister of S. Benedict.
S. Clara, A.D. 1253. Founder of the Order of Franciscan nuns called Poor Clares.
S. Catherine of Siena, A.D. 1380.
S. Euphemia, V.M., 807.
S. Filomena, V.M., A.D. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 19
Virtual: sector 6(aa)
loaves
LOAVES. S. Mary of Egypt, A.D. 433. Patron saint of penitents and anchorites.
S. Genevieve, A.D. 509. Patron saint of Paris. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 20
Virtual: sector 6(ab)
millstones
MILLSTONE. S. Victor of Marseilles, M., A.D. 303.
S. Florian. A patron saint of Austria.
S. Christina, M., A.D. 295. Patron saint of Bolsena, and one of the patron saints of Venice. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 20
Virtual: sector 6(ac)
aspergills
ROD, or ASPERGES. S. Benedict, A.D. 543. Founder of the Benedictine Order. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 23
Note: An aspergill is a device used for sprinkling holy water.
Virtual: sector 6(ad)
shears
PINCERS OR SHEARS, PALM. S. Agatha, V.M., A.D. 251. Patron saint of Malta and Catania. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 22
Virtual: sector 6(ae)
snakes
SERPENTS. S. Verdiana, A.D. 1242. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 24
Virtual: sector 6(af)
shells
SHELL. S. James the Great, Apostle, M. Patron saint of Spain. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 24
Virtual: sector 6(ag)
stags' horns
STAG WITH CRUCIFIX BETWEEN ITS HORNS. S. Eustace, M., A.D. 118.
S. Hubert, A.D. 727. Bishop of Liege. Patron saint of the chase and dogs. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 26
Virtual: sector 6(ah)
stars
STARS. S. Dominic, A.D. 1221. Founder of the Dominican Order.
S. Thomas Aquinas, A.D. 1274.
S. Nicholas of Tolentino, A.D. 1309.
S. Swidbert, A.D. 713.
S. John Nepomuc, A.D. 1393. Patron saint of silence, bridges, and running water. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 26
Virtual: sector 6(ai)
trees
TREE. S. Boniface, A.D. 755. Archbishop of Mayence. Apostle and first Primate of Germany.
S. Pantaleon of Nicomedia, M., 4th century. Patron saint of physicians.
S. Bavon, A.D. 657. Patron sain/ of Ghent and Haarlem.
S. Zenobio of Florence, A.D. 417 E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 28
Virtual: sector 6(aj)
unicorns
UNICORN. S. Justina of Antioch, V.M., A.D. 304.
S. Justina of Padua, V.M., A.D. 303. Patron saint of Padua and Venice. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 29
Virtual: sector 6(ak)
wallets
WALLET. S. James the Great, Apostle, M. Patron saint of Spain.
S. Felix de Cantalice, A.D. 1587. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 29
Virtual: sector 6(al)
palms and harps and swords
e.g. p.28, SWORD. CROWN. PALM.. S. Justina of Padua, V.M., A.D. 303. Patron Saint of Padua and Venice. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), passim
Virtual: sector 6(am)
S. Barbara
S. BARBARA, A.D. 303, Dec. 4. Patron saint of Ferrara and Mantua, arms, armourers, and fortifications, and against thunder and lightning. S. Barbara was the only daughter of Dioscorus, a noble of Heliopolis. Her father loved her so much, that fearing he should lose her by marriage, he hid her from the eyes of man in a high tower. Here she spent her time in thought and study, which brought her to the conclusion that her father's gods could not be the true ones. Hearing of the fame of Origen she wrote to him for instruction, and he sent her one of his disciples in the disguise of a physician, who converted and baptized her. One day, after this, she told the workmen engaged on her tower to build three windows, instead of two as they had planned, saying to her father that she desired it because it was through three windows (the Trinity) that the soul received light. Thus he saw she was a Christian, and filled with rage would have killed her, but she escaped to the top of her tower, and was carried thence by angels. A shepherd showed Dioscorus her place of concealment, whence he dragged her by the hair, and finding imprisonment and ill-treatment powerless to move her, he gave her up to the proconsul. Under his orders she suffered cruel tortures; but as all was in vain, her father carried her off to a mountain and beheaded her himself. As he was descending the mountain a great storm of thunder and lightning arose, and utterly consumed him. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 44
Virtual: sector 6(an)
Spoleto
S. BENEDICT, A.D. 543, March 21, founder of the Benedictine Order, was born in Spoleto, of noble parents, and was educated in Rome; but the evil he saw in the world so disgusted him, that when he was fifteen he retired from it and lived as a hermit. […] E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 46ff
Virtual: sector 6(ao)
S. Scholastica
S. BENEDICT […] Now S. Benedict had a sister, S. SCHOLASTICA, who had formed a society of nuns not far from her brother. He visited her once a year, and the last time, Scholastica, feeling that it was so, begged him not to depart; but as he persisted, a great storm came on in answer to her prayers, and he was obliged to remain longer with her. Three days after he saw her soul in the form of a dove flying to heaven. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 48
Virtual: sector 6(ap)
S. Bride
S. BRIDGET, or BRIDE, of Ireland, A.D. 500, Feb. 1, was baptized by S. Patrick, and as she grew up devoted herself to good works in the service of God. She was very beautiful, and her father was anxious she should marry a powerful chief, but she utterly refused, retreating for solitude to a grove of oaks once sacred to idol-worship. Here she worked so many miracles that crowds gathered round her, and thus she formed the convent of Kildare, (or “place of the oak”), which afterwards became so celebrated. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 53
Virtual: sector 6(aq)
S. Felix de Cantalice
S. FELIX DE CANTALICE, A.D. 1587, May 8, was born in Umbria of very poor parents. Having entered a Capuchin monastery, he was afterwards sent to the Capuccini at Rome, where he was appointed to beg for the daily food of the brotherhood. There had never before been known such plenty as he brought in; and it is related that when he was begging one stormy night, a radiant child met him, who gave him a loaf of bread, and blessing him vanished. S. Felix spent forty-five years at the Capuccini, where his life was an example of devotion and self-denial. He was the first saint of the Capuchin order. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 81
Virtual: sector 6(ar)
SS. Gervasisus and Protasius
SS. GERVASIUS and PROTASIUS, A.D. 69, June 19, were twin brothers, who suffered martyrdom at Milan at the same time as SS. Nazarus and Celsus, S. Gervasius being beaten to death with loaded scourges, and S. Protasius beheaded. Their bodies had been buried by one of the Christians in his garden, and the site, having been forgotten, the Church of SS. Nabor and Felix had been built over it. Here, 300 years later, S. Ambrose was praying, being at that time filled with the desire to obtain some relics for a new church he had just built, when he had a vision of SS. Peter and Paul, leading two young men clothed in white, and he was told they were the martyrs Gervasius and Protasius, and that their bodies reposed beneath the church. Search having been made, two gigantic bodies were found, with the heads severed, and in the tomb a writing revealing their history. These relics were carried in grand procession, healing all who touched them, to the new church, which was dedicated in the names of SS. Gervasius and Protasius. But later S. Ambrose himself was buried there, and it thenceforward took his name, and is still famous as S. Ambrogio Maggiore. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 94
Virtual: sector 6(as)
S. Herman-Joseph
S. HERMAN-JOSEPH, A.D. 1236, April 7, was born at Cologne, of very poor parents. Once, while praying before an image of the Blessed Virgin, he longed to make her an offering, and having nothing but an apple, which was all he had for his dinner, he offered that to her in trustful love. This was so pleasing to her, that she took the apple and gave it to the Infant Christ in her arms, and both smiled upon Herman. Herman afterwards entered the Order of the Premonstratesians, and the Blessed Virgin favoured him with many visions, in one of which she put a ring on his finger and called him her espoused, and in consequence of this he received the second name of Joseph. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 100
Virtual: sector 6(at)
S. Isidore Arator
S. ISIDORE the Ploughman, A.D. 1170, May 10, was a poor ignorant labourer, whose cruel master would not allow him time for devotion; until going into the fields one day he saw S. Isidore wrapt in prayer, while two angels were ploughing for him; after which he treated him with greater respect. Another day, when his master thirsted, S. Isidore struck a rock with his ox goad, and water immediately flowed from it. He restored to life his master's child who had fallen into a well, and performed various other miracles. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 105
Note: Latin: Arator, ploughman.
Virtual: sector 6(au)
S. Ives of Brittany
S. IVES, or Yvo of Bretagne, A.D. 1303, May 19, patron saint of lawyers, was of a noble Breton family, and from a child evinced a saintly disposition. He studied the law in Paris, living as strictly as a hermit, and devoting much of his time to prayer and charity. On his return to Brittany the Bishop of Treguier appointed him judge advocate of his diocese. He pleaded for widows and orphans gratuitously, and often reconciled enemies by his exhortations, and prevented their appealing to the law. At length he became a priest, but still used his legal knowledge for the aid of the poor and ignorant. The fatigue of his many good works and self-mortification finally so wore him out that he died. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 105
Virtual: sector 6(av)
S. James the Less
S. JAMES the Less, Apostle and Martyr, May 1. He was a relation of our Lord, and said to have borne such a strong resemblance to Him that it was this which made the kiss of Judas necessary. He was the first Bishop of Jerusalem, and suffered martyrdom from the Scribes and Pharisees, being thrown from a parapet of the temple, and finally slain with a fuller's club by one of the mob below. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 107
Virtual: sector 6(ba)
S. John Nepomuc
S. JOHN NEPOMUC, A.D. 1393, May 16. Patron saint of silence, and against slander, of bridges and running water, and protector of the Order of the Jesuits. He was confessor to the wife of Wenceslaus IV., Emperor of Germany, a bad and cruel man, who endeavoured to extract from him by bribes and threats the confessions of the Empress. Furious at finding all his endeavours vain, the Emperor threw S. John into a dungeon and tortured him. The Empress, deeply distressed, at length succeeded in obtaining his release, and tended his wounds with her own hands. He returned for a short time to the court, but the Emperor soon repeated his demand, and, mad with rage at the silence of the saint, ordered his guards to throw him from a bridge into the river Moldau. As he sank five stars in the form of a crown appeared over the spot. When the Emperor saw it he fled in terror from his palace to the fortress of Carlstein; but the empress found the body, and buried it with all honour in the Church of the Holy Cross. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 116
Virtual: sector 6(bb)
S. Julian Hospitator
S. JULIAN HOSPITATOR, A.D. 313, Jan. 9, patron saint of travellers, boatmen, and wandering minstrels, was a rich count, who lived in great state, and spent his time in feasting and hunting. One day, after he had pursued a deer for a great distance, it turned and spoke to him, saying, “Thou who pursuest me to death shalt cause the death of thy father and mother.” Horrified at this prophecy, and hoping to prevent the possibility of its fulfilment, he would not return home, but at once rode away to another country. Here be took service under the king, and greatly distinguished himself. He also married and lived happily, quite forgetting the terrible prophecy. But meantime his parents, distressed at his loss, did not cease to search for him, and at length came to his castle. Julian, was absent at the time, but his wife, hearing who they were, gave them welcome and put them in her own chamber to rest. When he returned he went straight to his chamber, and, not recognizing his parents at once, by a fatal mistake slew them both in a fit of rage. When he learnt what he had done he was stupefied with horror, but at length, rousing himself, determined to spend the rest of his life in devotion to God's service, that so he might be forgiven his fearful sin. He and his wife left that country, and established themselves in a cell near a great river, which was so often swollen by mountain torrents that many were drowned in endeavouring to cross it. Here he founded a hospital, and occupied himself with tending the sick and taking all who asked him across the river. One night, while a storm was raging, he heard a voice calling to him, and going out he found a leprous youth lying on the opposite shore. Julian ferried him across, and, as he seemed almost dying from cold and exhaustion, laid him on his own bed and watched him tenderly. Just as morning dawned a light shone from the leper's face, and he rose up, saying, “Julian, the Lord hath sent me to thee, for thy penitence is accepted, and thy rest is at hand”, and then vanished from their sight. Julian and his wife fell down and praised God for His mercy, and soon afterwards they both died peacefully. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 119f
Virtual: sector 6(bc)
S. Martha of Bethany
S. MARTHA of Bethany, A.D. 84, July 29. Patron saint of cooks and housewives. The old legends always regard Mary Magdalene as identical with Mary of Bethany, and according to them it was Martha who guided her sinning sister to the feet of Christ. After the Ascension, when the whole family were driven to Marseilles (see the legend of S. MARY MAGDALENE), Martha taught the people in the neighbourhood of Aix. Now at that time a terrible dragon, called the “Tarasque,” lived in the River Rhone, and ravaged all the country. But when Martha came there she completely overcame him, by sprinkling him with holy water, and bound him fast by her girdle, so that the people were able to approach and slay him. Afterwards a church was built on the spot, and the city of Tarascon rose around it. She spent her whole life in good works, and the honour has been assigned to her of being the first to found a religious community of women. She died peacefully, surrounded by her own people. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 132
Virtual: sector 6(bd)
S. Mary of Egypt
S. MARY of Egypt, A.D. 433, April 2, was a native of Alexandria, who even exceeded Mary Magdalene in the wickedness of her life. After nearly twenty years of complete abandonment to sin, she felt a sudden desire to join a large company whom she beheld embarking for Jerusalem to celebrate the Feast of the Cross. She accompanied them on their journey, but when she attempted, like them, to enter the Church of Jerusalem, some invisible power held her back, and it was impossible for her to cross the threshold. Then she knew it was by reason of her sins, and was struck with remorse and horror at her former evil life. She prayed earnestly, and humbled herself before God, and at last was enabled to enter the church on her knees. Full of repentance she determined to spend the rest of her life in solitude and penance; and taking with her nothing but three loaves, she went forth into the desert. Here she dwelt alone for forty-seven years, her loaves by a miracle never failing, and her hair growing long enough to be a covering when her garments dropped to pieces. At length she was discovered by an aged priest, named Zosimus, whom she begged to keep silence about her, and to return at the end of a year to administer the last sacraments to her before her death. He complied with her request, but on his return found himself unable to cross the Jordan, and Mary was miraculously brought over it to come to him. Having received the Blessed Sacrament, and absolution from all her sins, she once more desired Zosimus to depart for a year. On his second return he found her lying dead, with a request that he would bury her written on the sand near her. As he was too old to accomplish this alone, a lion came out of the desert and helped him. Then Zosimus went back and spread abroad the story of God's mercy to the penitent woman. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 138f
Virtual: sector 6(be)
S. Phocas of Sinope
S. PHOCAS, A.D. 303, July 3. Patron saint of gardens and gardeners, lived outside the gate of the city of Sinope, in Pontus, and supported himself on the produce of his garden, giving all beyond absolute necessities to the poor, and entertaining all homeless travellers who came to him. One night two strangers asked for admittance, and he received them most hospitably, setting before them the best he could provide. Then they told him that they were in search of a certain Phocas, who had been denounced as a Christian, and that wherever they found him they were to put him to death. Phocas said nothing, but having shown them their bedchamber, went out and dug a grave among the flowers in his garden. The next morning he told his guests that he was the Phocas they sought. At first they recoiled from shedding the blood of their host; but when he declared himself ready and willing to die for God, they beheaded him on the edge of the grave he had himself dug, and buried him there. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 161
Virtual: sector 6(bf)
S. Rosa di Lima
S. ROSA DI LIMA, A.D. 1617, Aug. 30, was born in Peru, and from her earliest years showed a disposition to asceticism. When obliged to wear a wreath of roses, she arranged it so that the thorns should pierce her, and destroyed her beauty with quicklime to discourage her numerous suitors. She toiled night and day to support her parents, chiefly working with her needle. She became a member of the Third Order of S. Dominic, and died at the age of thirty. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 168
Virtual: sector 6(bg)
S. Rosa di Viterbo
S. ROSA DI VITERBO, A.D. 1261, May 8, was a member of the Third Order of S. Francis, and did a good work in Viterbo, where, by her preaching and example, she drew many to the service of Christ. Her boundless charity made her greatly beloved by all the people. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 168f
Virtual: sector 6(bh)
S. Stephen Protomartyr
S. STEPHEN, Protomartyr, Dec. 26. Nothing is related of S. Stephen beyond what we read in the Acts of the Apostles There is a legend which tells that, 400 years after his death, Gamaliel appeared in a vision to a priest, and revealed to him that he had buried the body of S. Stephen in his own garden, together with that of Nicodemus and other saints. The relics were found, and attested by many miracles, and those of S. Stephen were brought to Rome and deposited in the sepulchre of S. Laurence. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 173
Virtual: sector 6(bi)
S. Thomas Aquinas
S. THOMAS AQUINAS, A.D. 1274, March 7. This saint, known as the “Angelical Doctor,” was born in Calabria, of a noble family, and was related to many of the crowned heads of Europe. He was early noted for his piety, and gentleness and sweetness of temper, and when only seventeen entered the Dominican Order at Naples. His family were so enraged at this step that they seized and carried him home; but his resolution was not to be moved, and he converted his two sisters, who helped him to escape. He returned at once to his convent, where he concealed his great learning from a sense of humility, so that it was long unsuspected, and he was even nicknamed “Bos,” the ox, for his apparent dulness. However, he gradually gained a reputation, which steadily increased, and he became the greatest theologian of his age. Various high offices were offered him, but he refused them all. He died at the Cistercian convent of Fossa-Nova, spending his last strength in an effort to finish his Commentary on the Song of Solomon. His theological works are very numerous, and of great value. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 178f
Virtual: sector 6(bj)
S. Ursula and the eleven thousand virgins
S. URSULA AND THE ELEVEN THOUSAND VIRGINS, A.D. 237, or 383, or 451, Oct 21. S. Ursula is the patron saint of girls, especially schoolgirls, and women occupied in the education of their own sex. She was the daughter of the King of Brittany, and the fame of her beauty and learning spread so far that many princes desired to marry her; but she rejected them all. Among her suitors was Conon, son of the King of Britain, to whom she sent a message that under three conditions only would she accept him; first, that he must be baptized; secondly, that he would give her as companions ten of the noblest ladies of his kingdom, each with a thousand virgins as attendants, and a thousand also for herself; thirdly, that they should spend three years in visiting sacred shrines. She thought that her demand was impossible, or, if by any means it could be fulfilled, eleven thousand virgins would be saved. The messengers took back such an account of Ursula's wisdom and beauty, that Conon did not rest till he had gathered together eleven thousand virgins, and brought them to Brittany. Then S. Ursula assembled them in a green meadow, and there preached to them so eloquently, that they were all converted, and received baptism in a stream flowing near. A large fleet of ships was prepared to take the virgins on their voyage. Accounts differ as to whether Conon accompanied them or remained in Brittany, but many bishops went with them. They had no sailors, the virgins themselves managing the vessels with the greatest skill; yet by some mistake they sailed north instead of south, and were driven up the Rhine as far as Cologne. Here it was revealed to S. Ursula that she and her companions should suffer martyrdom on that spot, and they all rejoiced greatly. They then proceeded up the river, and having crossed the Alps by the miraculous aid of angels, at length reached Rome. The Pope Cyriacus was much amazed at beholding such a company; but, when Ursula explained the cause of their coming and implored his blessing, he received them gladly. Now Conon, impatient at the absence of his bride, had followed her by a different route, and arrived in Rome the same day. He knelt with Ursula before the Pope, and received baptism at his hands, after which he no longer desired to marry her, but only to share her crown of martyrdom. Having performed their devotions at the shrine of SS. Peter and Paul, the whole company set out to return home. But at Cologne a tribe of Huns, instigated by some wicked officers, who feared that the whole Roman army in Germany would become converted, fell upon the virgins and slew them all. They met their fate without resistance, and rejoicing at their martyrdom. The King of the Huns was greatly struck by the noble bearing of S. Ursula, and wished to make her his wife; but she rejected him with scorn. This so enraged the barbarian that he bent his bow and pierced her with three arrows. Thus she died, and her spirit was born by angels to heaven. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 180f
Virtual: sector 6(bk)
S. Vincent
S. VINCENT DE PAULE, A.D. 1660, July 19, founder of hospitals for deserted children, and of the Order of Sisters of Charity, was born in Gascony, and entered the Franciscan Order at the age of twenty. E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 184
Virtual: sector 6(bl)
Benedictine monks: Carthusians, Camaldolesi, Cistercians, Olivetans, Oratorians and Vallombrosans
NOTES ON THE MONASTIC ORDERS

The oldest and most important Order is that of —

THE BENEDICTINES,

founded by S. Benedict, and distinguished by a habit entirely black. This Order, having been reformed at different times, embraces the following branches: —

The Camaldolesi, founded by S. Romualdo.
The Carthusians, founded by S. Bruno.
The Cistercians, founded by S. Bernard of Clairvaux.
The Olivetani, founded by S. Bernard dei Tolomei.
The Oratorians, founded by S. Philip Neri.
The Vallombrosans, founded by S. John Gualberto.

Of these the Camaldolesi, the Carthusians, the Cistercians, and the Olivetani are habited in white; the Oratorians in black; and the Vallombrosans in light grey.

E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), [190]
Virtual: sector 6(bm)
Augustine: Brigittines, Premonstratesians, Servi, and Trinitarians, Order of Peter Nolasco

THE AUGUSTINE ORDER,

claiming S. Augustine as its founder, comprises the minor Orders of —

The Brigittines, founded by S. Bridget of Sweden: habit, black.
The Premonstratesians, founded by S. Norbert: habit, black or brown, with a white cloak.
The Servi, founded by S. Philip Benozzi: habit, black.
The Trinitarians, founded by S. John de Matha: habit, white, with a blue and red cross on the breast.
The Order of Mercy, founded by S. Peter Nolasco: habit, white, with a badge of the arms of the King of Aragon.

E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), [190]-191
Virtual: sector 6(bn)
Carmelites: the prophet Elijah, S. Albert of Vercelli

THE CARMELITES

claim as their founder the prophet Elijah, but were first definitely formed into an Order by S. Albert of Vercelli. The habit of the Order is dark brown with a long scapulary, and a white mantle. The reformed branch, known as —

The Scalzi, or barefooted Carmelites, was founded by S. Theresa.

E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 191
Virtual: sector 6(bo)
Dominicans

THE DOMINICAN ORDER,

founded by S. Dominic, is distinguished by a white habit under a long black cloak with a hood.

E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 191
Virtual: sector 6(bp)
Franciscans, brown or grey habits: Capuchins, Cordeliers, Minimes, Observants and Poor Clares

THE FRANCISCAN ORDER,

founded by S. Francis of Assisi, and distinguished by a brown or grey habit bound by a knotted cord, embraces the following reformed branches: —

The Capuchins, dark brown habit, with a long pointed hood.
The Cordeliers, brown habit.
The Minimes, founded by S.Francis de Paula: brown habit, short scapulary with rounded ends, and a knotted cord.
The Observants, founded by S. Bernardino of Siena: grey habit, and cord.
The Poor Clares, Franciscan nuns, founded by S. Clara: grey or brown habit, and cord.

E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 191
Virtual: sector 6(bq)
Jesuits: Ignatius Loyola

THE JESUITS,

founded by Ignatius Loyola, are distinguished by a straight black cassock and square cap.

E. A. Greene, Saints and Their Symbols (1913), 191

Virtual sector 7


Sourced Notes: Fortune-Telling by Cards
Virtual notesheet:
NON-EXTANT NOTES

 
Virtual: sector 7(a)
two red eights promise new garments
Two red tens coming together foretell a wedding, and two red eights promise new garments to the inquirer. P.R.S. Foli, Fortune-Telling by Cards (1904), 34
Virtual: sector 7(b)
between two sevens prison
A court card placed between two cards of the same grade—for instance, two nines, two sevens, &c., shows that the one represented by that card is threatened by the clutches of the law, and may be lodged at His Majesty's expense. P.R.S. Foli, Fortune-Telling by Cards (1904), 34
Virtual: sector 7(c)
the wish card
The wish card, the nine of hearts, and the ten of hearts in a great measure counteract the mischief represented by the spades. P.R.S. Foli, Fortune-Telling by Cards (1904), 37f
Note: See also UN7 (V.A.2):006(aa).
Virtual: sector 7(d)
eight of diamonds: rise in society.
Nine [of diamonds] * * * Rise in social position.
Eight [of diamonds] * * * Success with speculation. P.R.S. Foli, Fortune-Telling by Cards (1904), 47
Virtual: sector 7(e)
a man who is neither fair nor dark
King [of Clubs] * * * A man who is neither fair nor dark. P.R.S. Foli, Fortune-Telling by Cards (1904), 47
Virtual: sector 7(f)
ten of spades: a journey by land
Ten [of spades] * * * A journey by land. P.R.S. Foli, Fortune-Telling by Cards (1904), 47
Note: See also UN7 (V.A.2):038(t).
Virtual: sector 7(g)
depending on the way the lady's face is turned count the seventh card from the queen
Now, from the queen of hearts we will proceed to count seven, taking into consideration the way the lady's face is turned. It is to the left, consequently the seventh card from her is the queen of spades, the seventh from which is the king of hearts, and the seventh again is the ten of hearts. P.R.S. Foli, Fortune-Telling by Cards (1904), 49
Virtual: sector 7(h)
three queens together scandal
Three queens together generally betoken some mischief or scandal, but as they are guarded by kings it will probably not amount to much. P.R.S. Foli, Fortune-Telling by Cards (1904), 50
Virtual: sector 7(i)
a letter is on its way
The ace of clubs shows that a letter is on its way. P.R.S. Foli, Fortune-Telling by Cards (1904), 55
Virtual: sector 7(j)
pair the cards and see if the lady will meet a rich man
Now we will pair the cards and see if any more meaning can be extracted from them. On land and on the water this lady will meet a rich man who will entertain a strong affection for her. P.R.S. Foli, Fortune-Telling by Cards (1904), 50
Virtual: sector 7(k)
a dark man in some perplexity
I must not omit to mention that the cards are paired from the extreme ends of the horse-shoe. Thus the king of hearts and the ten of diamonds, knave of hearts and ten of spades, &c. The business appears again, and a dark man seems to be in some perplexity. P.R.S. Foli, Fortune-Telling by Cards (1904), 50
Virtual: sector 7(l)
comes out
Whenever this seven comes out near the nine of hearts, the wish card, it is a token of some signal success for the inquirer. P.R.S. Foli, Fortune-Telling by Cards (1904), 92 and passim

Virtual sector 8


MS NLI-13.016v
UNUSED ULYSSES NOTES

 
Virtual: sector 8(a)
LB stutters
Virtual: sector 8(b)
girl & old men
Virtual: sector 8(c)
black glasses
Virtual: sector 8(d)
jewesses dresses
Virtual: sector 8(e)
[cairer]
Virtual: sector 8(f)
[asta] hasta / luego
Note: Spanish: hasta luego!, so long!
Virtual: sector 8(g)
hasta otra
Note: Spanish: hasta otra, until another time
Virtual: sector 8(h)
dorm / dur[?] / Duert
Note: Spanish: dorm, sleeping
Virtual: sector 8(i)
gü / guerra
Note: Spanish: guerra, war
Virtual: sector 8(j)
Duermeta niño hermoso [??] / viene el [coco]
Note: Spanish: Duermeta niño hermoso [??] / viene el, sleep beautiful child ... comes the ... [coco]
Virtual: sector 8(k)
Senhor
Note: Spanish: Señor, Sir
Virtual: sector 8(l)
[END]