FINNEGANS WAKE NOTEBOOKS

N53 (VI.B.46): Fall Paris

Facsimile edition: James Joyce Archive vol. 40, ed. Danis Rose.
Print edition: The Index Manuscript (Colchester: AWN Press, 1979), ed. Danis Rose.
Manuscript: Buffalo VI.B.46, December 1937-February 1938 Notebook details
N53 (VI.B.46): front cover recto(a)
 
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N53 (VI.B.46): front cover verso(a)
 
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N53 (VI.B.46): page ffr(a)
 
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N53 (VI.B.46): front flyleaf verso(a)
Oper 39 67 [sideways]
N53 (VI.B.46): 1(a)
FALL
Note: Index title. Underlined in violet.
N53 (VI.B.46): 1(b)
tuitim (I)
Note: Irish tuitim: a fall.
N53 (VI.B.46): 1(c)
cwymp (W) Green
Note: Welsh cwymp: a fall.
N53 (VI.B.46): 2(a)
 
Note: BLANK page
N53 (VI.B.46): 3(a)
HEN
N53 (VI.B.46): 3(b)
cearc (coileach) Blue
Note: Irish cearc: a hen [in text with Ir. ceart: correct]. Coileach: a cock.
N53 (VI.B.46): 3(c)
iar
Note: Irish iar: west, or remote.
N53 (VI.B.46): 4(a)
WAR & PEACE
N53 (VI.B.46): 4(b)
cogadh Green
Note: Irish cogadh: war.
N53 (VI.B.46): 4(c)
siothcain Blue
Note: Irish síocháin: peace. In context with ‘secure’ and Irish rhyme Siúl, siúl, siúl arún, Siúl go socair, Agus siúl go ciúin: Go, go, go, my dear, go securely and calmly go.
N53 (VI.B.46): 4(d)
the rhytel in his hedd, (W) Green
Note: The riddle (rattle) in his head. Welsh rhyfel: war; hedd: peace.
N53 (VI.B.46): 4(e)
militopaco Blue
Note: Esperanto paco: peace.
N53 (VI.B.46): 5(a)
fathach (I) Blue
Note: Irish fathach: [a] giant.
N53 (VI.B.46): 5(b)
cawraidd (W) Green
Note: Welsh cawraidd: [a] giant; in context with ‘coward’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 5(c)
gafr
Note: Welsh gafr: a goat. Repeated below on page N53 (VI.B.46):007(e).
N53 (VI.B.46): 6(a)
CLOUD
N53 (VI.B.46): 6(b)
neal, scamall,
Note: Irish néall and scammall both mean ‘cloud’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 6(c)
cymyloga Mts Blue
Note: Welsh cwmwl cloud; cymylu: cloudy.
N53 (VI.B.46): 6(d)
nubo Blue
Note: Latin nubes, a cloud; nubo: to cover, to wed.
N53 (VI.B.46): 7(a)
GOAT
N53 (VI.B.46): 7(b)
pocan Blue
Note: Irish pocán: a little he-goat.
N53 (VI.B.46): 7(c)
gabhar Orange
Note: Irish gabhar: a goat. In text with 'gabardine'.
N53 (VI.B.46): 7(d)
(minnseog) Blue
Note: Irish minnseóg: a young she-goat.
N53 (VI.B.46): 7(e)
gafr Blue
Note: Welsh gafr: a goat. See also N53 (VI.B.46):005(c).
N53 (VI.B.46): 8(a)
RAINBOW
N53 (VI.B.46): 8(b)
tuar ceatha
Note: Irish tuar ceatha: rainbow.
N53 (VI.B.46): 8(c)
enfys Blue
Note: Welsh enfys: rainbow.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(a)
Roumansch Not cancelled
Note: Title. The Rhaeto-Romansch group of dialects is that version of the Latin language spoken in the formerly remote Alpine valleys of the Roman province of Rhetia (now approximately the land of Switzerland). Romansch itself (or ‘Ladin’) splits into Engadine (spoken in the valley of the Inn river), and Sursilvan and Sutsilvan (spoken on the west and east banks of the Rhine, respectively). Romansch was recognised in 1938 as the fourth (if perhaps least) official language of Switzerland.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(b)
ester Blue
Note: Column one (left) starts here. Romansch ester: (adj,) strange, exotic, esoteric; (noun) he or that which is strange or foreign.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(c)
pleda Blue
Note: Romansch pled: a word, speech; pledar: to plead, to speak.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(d)
scoula Blue
Note: Romansch scoula: school.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(e)
furlan Blue
Note: Romansch furlan: a little rascal. Furlan: Friulan.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(f)
ladin Blue
Note: Romansch Ladin: (n.) the Romansch language; (adj) nimble.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(g)
proxen
Note: Romansch proxim: approximate.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(h)
lavurdi Blue
Note: Romansch lavurdi: work day. English, lavatory.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(i)
prim Blue
Note: Romansch premi: (n.) prize.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(j)
pign, pugn Not cancelled
Note: Romansch pign: pine, fir; pugn: a fist, a ball.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(k)
stumi Blue
Note: Romansch stummi or stomi: stomach.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(l)
periglus Blue
Note: Romansch prigulus: bad, sick, dangerous.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(m)
penats Blue
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(n)
famas Blue
Note: Romansch fama: fame; fam: hunger.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(o)
evnan Blue
Note: Romansch evna: saucepan, kettle.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(p)
combra Blue
Note: Romansch combra: chamber, room.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(q)
clav Blue
Note: Romansch clav: key.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(r)
secret Blue
Note: Romansch secret: (adj) secret; (noun) lavatory.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(s)
marchadant Blue
Note: Romansch marchadaunt: merchant.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(t)
grup
Note: Romansch grup: a roll of coins; a knot of wood.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(u)
savonnen / dealingh Blue
Note: Romansch savuner: to soap, persuade; savun soap. Popular song, Savourneen Deelish.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(v)
tuot Blue
Note: Romansch tuot: all, entire, totality. [Column two, centre, starts here.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(w)
ensemen
Note: Romansch ensemen: together
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(x)
oustriar Blue
Note: Romansch ustrir: to grill or roast; ustria: inn, tavern
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(y)
pur war Blue
Note: Romansch pur: (adj) pure, clean; (noun) peasant; pür: poor, sickly.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(z)
feighten Blue
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(aa)
piabella Blue
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(ab)
famalgia Blue
Note: Romansch famiglia: family; famaglia: servants.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(ac)
god Blue
Note: Romansch god: forest, wood.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(ad)
davos / h Blue
Note: Romansch davos: (prep.) behind; (noun) nates, buttocks.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(ae)
mallaura Blue
Note: Romansch malaura: storm, bad weather.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(af)
neblas Blue
Note: Romansch nebla: fog, cloud.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(ag)
[distractus]
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(ah)
suffel Blue
Note: Romansch suffel: wind, breeze.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(ai)
dargur / (wildbach) Blue
Note: Romansch dargun: a stream, mountain torrent (German Wildbach).
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(aj)
lavimia Blue
Note: Romansch lavina: avalanche.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(ak)
ruschnant
Note: Romansch ruschnont: (adj) creeping, crawling.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(al)
gletsch Blue
Note: Romansch glatsch: ice.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(am)
Anni Roner Blue
Note: Rona is a village in the circuit of Oberhalbstein. Popular song, Little Anny Rooney.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(an)
inviern Blue
Note: Romansch Inviern: Winter.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(ao)
pianotunar Blue
Note: Column 3 [right] begins here. Romansch piano: piano, a plane surface; tunêr to thunder.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(ap)
alp Blue
Note: Romansch alp: alp, mountain; an Alpine pasture.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(aq)
vinars Blue
Note: Romansch vinars: brandy. In text with Latin in vino veritas: drink speaks.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(ar)
tulban
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(as)
buc (not
Note: Romansch buc: not.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(at)
hiert (o)
Note: Romansch hoert or iert: garden, orchard.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(au)
vich
Note: Romansch vich: a village, hamlet.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(av)
crap (stone)
Note: Romansch crap: a stone.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(aw)
fe fo fom Blue
Note: Romansch : faith; : fire; fom: hunger.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(ax)
painch
Note: Romansch painch: butter.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(ay)
grass
Note: Romansch grass: fat.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(az)
pilzen / = bullious Blue
Note: Romansch buliu: mushroom, fungus (German Pilz).
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(ba)
senaf & / piber Blue
Note: Romansch senaf: charlock, a species of wild mustard; pibe: pepper. ?Salt and pepper.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(bb)
persics / (peaches) Blue
Note: Romansch persic: a peach.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(bc)
prems
Note: Romansch prem: a plum.
N53 (VI.B.46): 9(bd)
armelians Blue
Note: Romansch armelian: an apricot.
N53 (VI.B.46): 10(a)
pomeranzia Blue
Note: Romansch pomeranza: an orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 10(b)
a timblespoon Blue
Note: Romansch:
N53 (VI.B.46): 10(c)
sorvient / survient
Note: Romansch sorvient or survient: a (man)servant
N53 (VI.B.46): 10(d)
Englandina Blue
Note: Engiadina (Engadine) is the Swiss part of the valley of the Inn, some fifty miles in length. Eglantine is the dog-rose, used for making rose-hip wine.
N53 (VI.B.46): 10(e)
peckla Blue
Note: Romansch peclas: a cake made on Shrove Tuesday.
N53 (VI.B.46): 10(f)
Hosch! / Intra Blue
Note: Romansch Hoscha!: Enter!; intrar: to enter.
N53 (VI.B.46): 10(g)
pad (boy) / paddy
N53 (VI.B.46): 10(h)
mat / matta
Note: Romansch mat: a boy; matta: a girl.
N53 (VI.B.46): 10(i)
her pitschens Blue
Note: Romansch pitschen: small, slight
N53 (VI.B.46): 10(j)
Ni(claus) Red
Note: Romansch ni … ni: neither … nor.
N53 (VI.B.46): 10(k)
vale Blue
Note: Romansch vali: velvet, a velvet ribbon.
N53 (VI.B.46): 10(l)
annanov Blue
Note: Romansch:
N53 (VI.B.46): 10(m)
Esnekerry pudden Blue
Note: Romansch: ?. Enniskerry is a village near Dublin, of no particular culinary note.
N53 (VI.B.46): 11(a)
blank]
N53 (VI.B.46): 12(a)
blank
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(a)
Basque
Note: Title. The rugged Basque language (natively, Euskera, Eskuara, Heskuara, Eskoarea, or sometimes Eskoara) is spoken on both sides of the Pyrenean Mountains. If one excludes its agglutinative nature&emdash;shared with Finnish, Turkish, and some other languages — it stands magnificiently isolated as a language, being sui generis. There are six principal dialects differing slightly among themselves. It is written today in a modified Latin alphabet; its original alphabet is no longer known. The language is directly referred to by name at FW 102.16, 121.05, 230.06, 233.35, 287f4, 329.01, 507.15, 566.33, and 577.01.
Note: Index title. Underlined in violet.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(b)
Yinko Green
Note: Basque Yinko: God. Column One, left, begins here.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(c)
izarra etoile Blue
Note: Basque izar[-a]: [a] star (French étoile).
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(d)
Eliza Green
  • FW unlocated
Note: Basque Eliza: church, église. Use at
  • FW 328.36
  • 2010
  • 1939 (II.3:1.5) is from VI.B.46.013(aa) below.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(e)
(f)esta / (p)asco Blue
Note: Basque Besta: Fiesta. Pazko: Easter.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(f)
mendecost
Note: Basque Mendekoste: Pentecost.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(g)
eguerry Xmas Blue
Note: Basque Equerri: Christmas.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(h)
egun Blue
Note: Basque Egun: Today.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(i)
gau on Orange
Note: Basque Gau on: Good night. [In text with ‘Go on!’]
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(j)
erho (mad) Green
Note: Basque ertzo: mad, demented, insane.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(k)
concor (bossu) Green
Note: Basque konkor: hunchbacked (French bossu).
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(l)
handi (big) Blue
Note: Basque handi: great, strange.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(m)
supher (proud)
Note: Basque supher: proud.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(n)
zorrow (stomach)
Note: Basque zorro: stomach.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(o)
aleguera Blue
Note: Basque alaguera: joyous, ecstatic.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(p)
gogor (deaf) Blue
Note: Basque gogor signifies hard, obdurate; gor is used to mean ‘deaf’, hard of hearing.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(q)
Lelizza Green
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(r)
goibal (sad) Blue
  • FW unlocated
Note: Column Two, right, begins here. Basque goibel: obscure, sad.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(s)
chimista (eclair) Green
Note: Basque chimista: lightning (French éclair).
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(t)
ethurr (snow) Green
Note: Basque elhur (also, edur, elur): snow.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(u)
choria (bird) Green
Note: Basque chori(a): (the) small bird.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(v)
ur eau Blue
Note: Basque ur: water, eau.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(w)
hiri (town) Green
Note: Basque (h)iri: hamlet, village.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(x)
zango
Note: Basque zango: calf (of leg)
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(y)
zahar (old) Green
Note: Basque zahar: old, aged.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(z)
gazeley
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(aa)
buruzburn Blue
Note: Basque buruzburn: tête-à-tête.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(ab)
elizabeliza Green
Note: Basque Elizabelza: Black church.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(ac)
gorygory rouge Blue
Note: Basque gori: red, rouge.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(ad)
liffey ([cow])
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(ae)
bisquebasque Blue
Note: Ce mot n'est pas du Basque. Il est probablement forgé sur le modèle populaire français “bisque, bisque, rage”.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(af)
la piza in chiza
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(ag)
esquare Blue
Note: Esquare or Eskuara: Basque. English, esquire.
N53 (VI.B.46): 13(ah)
peloted Blue
Note: Pelota is a fast hand-ball game played by the Basques.
N53 (VI.B.46): 14(a)
barkatu (pardon)
Note: Basque barkatu!: pardon!
N53 (VI.B.46): 14(b)
eskermila Green
Note: Basque Esker!: Thanks! (In text with Basque asko: many, much.)
N53 (VI.B.46): 14(c)
drink arnou
Note: Basque Arno: Wine.
N53 (VI.B.46): 14(d)
uria pluie Blue
Note: Basque euri: rain, la pluie.
N53 (VI.B.46): 14(f)
halabiz (amen)
Note: Basque (h)alabiz: Amen.
N53 (VI.B.46): 14(g)
horizon Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 14(h)
pfaffe Red
Note: German Pfaffe [derogatory]: priest.
N53 (VI.B.46): 14(i)
[congiering] tricks H Red
Note: Conjuring tricks.
N53 (VI.B.46): 14(j)
Theatre of Orange Red
Note: Roman theatre at Orange. In text with Greek theatron: theatre; also with derisive phrase, The answer is a lemon.
N53 (VI.B.46): 14(k)
Strength through Joy Red
Note: German Kraft durch Freude: Strength through Joy. This was the name given to an organisation controlled by the Deutsche Arbeitsfront (Labour front) during the Nazi period. It looked after cultural, sport and tourist businesses.
N53 (VI.B.46): 14(l)
all the Europe Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 14(m)
Seg 44.20
N53 (VI.B.46): 15(a)
Taylour
N53 (VI.B.46): 15(b)
the Diggings / woodenhenge Red
Note: Diggings: any active archaeological site. Woodenhenge in Wiltshire was discovered by aerial photography in 1925. It consists of six concentric elliptical rings set out in a series of white chalk marks (holes that once held stout upright poles). The long axis of the system is oriented towards the midsummer sunrise.
N53 (VI.B.46): 15(c)
horned cairn Blue
Note: The ‘horned cairn’ is a type of megalithic chamber-tomb found in Scotland and Northern Ireland. It typically exhibits an elongated rectangular or trapezoid passage with an unroofed semi-circular forecourt (the horns) at one or both ends.
N53 (VI.B.46): 15(d)
cyst Red
Note: A cist is a sepulchral chamber excavated in rock, or formed of slabs placed on edge and covered with one or more horizontal slabs.
N53 (VI.B.46): 15(e)
H found drugged in field Blue
N53 (VI.B.46): 15(f)
gen Bon / 1st [causes] / [empr]
N53 (VI.B.46): 15(g)
“copper” E. conditional Red
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 15(h)
lough Neagh's Monster
Note: Loughs Neagh and Ness.
N53 (VI.B.46): 15(i)
not bath twice in / same R Red
Note: In text with Latin alvus: womb; salve: hail; and vale: goodbye, adieu.
N53 (VI.B.46): 15(j)
[spokesham] Red
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 15(k)
ein Para [??] ist [??] / nun [??] Red
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 16(a)
day's reasons Green
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):143(c)
Why, Jim? / Well, dey's reasons. But you wouldn't tell on me ef I 'uz to tell you, would you, Huck? Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) VIII
N53 (VI.B.46): 16(b)
foe (4) Green
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):143(e)
You know dat one-laigged nigger dat b'longs to old Misto Bradish? Well, he sot up a bank, en say anybody dat put in a dollar would gif fo' dollars mo' at de en' er de year. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) VIII
N53 (VI.B.46): 16(c)
considerable Green
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):143(b)
But I noticed dey wuz a nigger trader roun' de place considerable lately, en I begin to git oneasy. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) VIII
N53 (VI.B.46): 16(d)
he 'lowed to Red
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):142(g)
The first fellow said he 'lowed to tell it to his old woman — she would think it was pretty good; but he said that warn't nothing to some things he had said in his time. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) VII
N53 (VI.B.46): 16(e)
has you Green
  • FW unlocated
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):142(j)
“… How long you ben on de islan'? / Since the night I got killed. / No! W'y, what has you lived on? But you got a gun. / Oh, yes, you got a gun. Dat's good. Now you kill sumfn en I'll make up de fire.” Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) VII
N53 (VI.B.46): 16(f)
most starved Green
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):142(i)
“And ain't you had nothing but that rubbage to eat? / No, sah — nuffin else. / Well, you must be 'most starved, ain't you?” Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) VII
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(a)
H.F.
Huckleberry Finn Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) title-page
Note: Index title. Written in blue crayon. Underlined in blue.
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(b)
trading scow Green
Note: Start of Column One, Left. Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):148(b)
So the question was, what to do? I said, paddle ashore the first time a light showed, and tell them pap was behind, coming along with a trading-scow, and was a green hand at the business, and wanted to know how far it was to Cairo. Jim thought it was a good idea, so we took a smoke on it and waited. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XVI
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(c)
lightning bug Green
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):148(a)
But it warn't. It was Jack-o-lanterns, or lightning-bugs; so he set down again; and went to watching, same as before. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XVI
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(d)
how do that come Orange
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):147(b) and was retransferred to N52 (VI.B.42):178(f)
No, Jim; you couldn't understand a word they said — not a single word. / Well, now, I be ding-busted! How do dat come? Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XIV
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(e)
cat my dogs Blue
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):147(h)
“Well, den, I reck'n I did dream it, Huck; but dog my cats ef it ain't de powerfullest dream I ever see. En I hain't had no dream b'fo' dat's tired me like dis one.” Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XV
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(f)
I be dingbusted Blue
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):147(a)
No, Jim; you couldn't understand a word they said — not a single word. / Well, now, I be ding-busted! How do dat come?” Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XIV
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(g)
see her good Blue
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):147(c)
We could hear her [the steamboat] pounding along, but we didn't see her good till she was close. She aimed right for us. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XVI
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(h)
tired like everything Blue
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):147(g)
“Well, den, I reck'n I did dream it, Huck; but dog my cats ef it ain't de powerfullest dream I ever see. En I hain't had no dream b'fo' dat's tired me like dis one.” / “Oh, well, that's all right, because a dream does tire a body like everything, sometimes. But this one was a staving dream — tell me about it, Jim.” Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XV
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(i)
I judge Blue
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):147(d)
I judged the raft must be butting into the bank every now and then, or else it would get further ahead and clear out of hearing — itr was floating a little faster than I was. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XV
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(j)
Dad Orange
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):147(e) and was retransferred to N52 (VI.B.42):178(f).
Dad fetch it, how is I gwyne to dream all dat in ten minutes?” Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XV
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(k)
My Georges Blue
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):146(e)
My George! It's the beatenest thing I ever struck. And then what did you do?” Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XIII
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(l)
the beatenest thing ever Blue
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):146(f)
“My George! It's the beatenest thing I ever struck. And then what did you do?” Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XIII
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(m)
how in the nation Red
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):146(d)
“Good land! what are they doin' there [on the wreck], for gracious sakes? / Well, they didn't go there a-purpose./ I bet they didn't! Why, gracious goodness, there ain't no chance for 'em if they don't git off mighty quick! Why, how in the nation did they ever git into such a scrape?” Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XIII
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(n)
for gracious sake Orange
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):146(b)
“Good land! what are they doin' there [on the wreck], for gracious sakes? / Well, they didn't go there a-purpose./ I bet they didn't! Why, gracious goodness, there ain't no chance for 'em if they don't git off mighty quick! Why, how in the nation did they ever git into such a scrape?” Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XIII
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(o)
great goodness, Orange
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):146(c)
“Good land! what are they doin' there [on the wreck], for gracious sakes? / Well, they didn't go there a-purpose./ I bet they didn't! Why, great goodness, there ain't no chance for 'em if they don't git off mighty quick! Why, how in the nation did they ever git into such a scrape?” Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XIII
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(p)
mornings, — Orange
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):145(b)
Mornings, before daylight, I slipped into corn fields and borrowed a watermelon, or a mushroom, or a punkin, or some new corn, or things of that kind. Pap always said it warn't no harm to borrow things … Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XII
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(q)
— , anyway Blue
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):144(f)
I never see pap when he didn't want the chicken himself, but that is what he used to say, anyway. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XII
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(r)
to don't
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):145(g); see also N53 (VI.B.46):017(ac).
“Please to don't poke fun at a poor girl like me, mum. If I'm in the way, here, I'll — ” Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XI
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(s)
not for pie Orange
“Do you reckon Tom Sawyer would ever go by this thing? Not for pie, he wouldn't. He'd call it an adventure — that's what he'd call it; and he'd land on that wreck if it was his last act.” Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XII
Note: Column Two, right, starts here. Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):145(d)
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(t)
a texas Blue
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):145(c). texas = the uppermost structure of a river-steamer.
“Watchman your grandmothger,” I says; “there ain't nothing to watch but the texas and the pilot-house, and do you reckon anybody's going to resk his life for a texas and a pilot-house such a night as this, when it's likely to break up and wash off down the river any minute?” Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XII
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(u)
a towhead Red
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):147(f)
Well, the second night a fog begun to come on, and we made for a tow-head to tie to, for it wouldn't do to try to run in fog. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XV
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(v)
long as he — Blue
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):145(e)
So I said I didn't care what was the reason they [the men and dogs] didn't get us, as long as they didn't. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XII
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(w)
clumb Green
  • FW unlocated
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):145(h)
Pretty soon we struck the forward end of the skylight, and clumb onto it; and the next step fetched us in frnt of the captain's door, which was open, and, by Jimminy, away down through the texas-hall we see a light! Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XII
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(x)
huckburied feign Green
Huckleberry Finn Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) title-page
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):145(g)
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(y)
carelessest Green
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):144(a)
I've always reckoned that looking at the new moon over your left shoulder is one of the carelessest and foolishest things a body can do. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) X
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(z)
setting on a cheer Red
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):144(c)
“Come in,” says the woman, and I did. She says: “Take a cheer.” Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XI
Note: Only occurrence of cheer in this sense
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(aa)
he'd druider Blue
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):144(b)
he said courts mustn't interfere and separate families if they could help it; said he'd druther not take a child away from its father. So Judge Thatcher and the widow had to quit on the business. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) V
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(ab)
cottonwood Green
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):144(h)
we paddled over to the tow-head and hid in the cottonwoods and was safe. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XIX
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(ac)
to don't — Blue
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):144(g). See also N53 (VI.B.46):017(r).
“Please to don't poke fun at a poor girl like me, mum. If I'm in the way, here, I'll — ” Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XI
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(ad)
throw true Red
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):144(d)
She showed me a bar of lead, twisted up into a knot, and said she was a good shot with it generly, but she'd wrenched her arm a day or two ago, and didn't know whether she could throw true, now. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XI
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(ae)
a power of Orange
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):144(e)
The fifth night below St. Louis we had a big storm after midnight, with a power of thunder and lightning Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) XII
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(af)
worth 2 bits Red
Note: Unit derives from N52 (VI.B.42):143(g)
We got an old tin lantern, and a butcher knife without any handle, and a brannew Barlow knife worth two bits in any store, and a lot of tallow candles, and a tin candlestick, and a gourd, and a tin cup, and a ratty old bed-quilt off the bed, and a reticule with needles and pins and beeswax and buttons … Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) IX
N53 (VI.B.46): 17(ag)
to suspicion Red
I begun to suspicion [suspect] something. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xvi
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(a)
, no how, Blue
And besides I didn't go much on clothes, nohow. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xix
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(b)
no slouch of a / name, Red
It ain't no slouch of a name to spell right off without studying. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xvii
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(c)
sawlog, Orange
They had big brass dog-irons that could hold up a saw-log. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xvii
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(d)
they wouldn't took Blue
They wouldn't took any money for her. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xvii
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(e)
give you the / fantods Blue
They was all nice pictures, I reckon, but I didn't somehow seem to take to them, because if ever I was down a little they always give me the fan-tods. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xvii
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(f)
seemed to me, Blue
The young woman in the pictures had a kind of nice sweet face, but there was so many arms it made her look too spidery, seemed to me. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xvii
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(g)
anywheres, Blue
Col. Grangerford was very tall and very slim, and had a darkish-paly complexion, not a sign of red in it anywheres. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xviii
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(h)
our duty to you, / sir Orange
Then Tom and Bob … mixed a glass of bitters and handed it to him … and then they bowed and said, Our duty to you, sir, and madam. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xviii
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(i)
couldn't come it Green
They couldn't come it. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xviii
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(j)
took out after Green
Then the men see them, and jumped on their horses and took out after them. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xviii
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(k)
I ought to told Blue
I judged I ought to told her father about that paper. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xviii
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(l)
the big water Green
So don't lose no time, Jim, but just shove off for the big water [the Mississippi] as fast as ever you can. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xviii
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(m)
camp meeting Orange
Everybody that warn't too young or too sick or too old was gone to a camp-meeting [Methodist assembly] Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xx
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(n)
sternwheel ~ Blue
See a steamboat, coughing along up stream, so far off towards the other side you wouldn't tell nothing about her only whether she was stern-wheel or side-wheel. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xix
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(o)
~ sidewheel Red
See a steamboat, coughing along up stream, so far off towards the other side you wouldn't tell nothing about her only whether she was stern-wheel or side-wheel. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xix
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(p)
nation glad Orange
I'm nation sorry for you. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xix
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(q)
has brung Green
Trouble has done it, Bilgewater, tropuble has done it. Trouble has brung these grey hairs and this premature balditude. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xix
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(r)
balditude Red
Trouble has done it, Bilgewater, trouble has done it. Trouble has brung these grey hairs and this premature balditude. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xix
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(s)
the duke done it Blue
The duke done it, and Jim and me was pretty glad to see it. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xix
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(t)
soured on him Orange
But the duke kind of soured on him. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xix
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(u)
1horse battle Red
Uncle Ben, who's got a little one-horse place on the river. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xx
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(v)
shuck tick Blue
My bed was a straw tick — better than Jim's, which was a cornshuck tick. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xx
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(w)
fitten for Green
I should a reckoned the difference in rank would have sejested to you that a corn-shuck bed warn't fitten for me to sleep on. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xx
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(x)
My souls Blue
My souls, how the wind did scream along. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xx
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(y)
Royalty? Orange
But the histrionic muse is the darling. Have you ever trod the boards, Royalty? Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xx
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(z)
shed his coat Blue
The duke shed his coat. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xx
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(aa)
tow linen Blue
Some of the children didn't have any clothes but just a tow-linen shirt. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xx
N53 (VI.B.46): 18(ab)
huckabuck / finn
Huckaback, like tow-linen, is a fabric. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. title
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(a)
jempson weeds / jaqueson island Orange
Note: Columm One, left, begins here.
The gardens had … hardly anything in them but jimpson-weeds, and sunflowers and ash-piles. ... [Chap. (vii):] I was away below the ferry now. I rose up and there was Jackson's Island, about two mile and a half down stream, heavy-timbered and standing up out of the middle of the river, big and dark and solid, like a steamboat without any lights. (vii) Jackson's Island's the place. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. (xxi)
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(b)
every which way Blue
The fences … leaned every which-way. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxi
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(c)
chaw
Gimme a chaw 'v tobacker. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxi
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(d)
niggerhead Green
You borry'd store tobacker and paid back nigger head [an inferior black plug tobacco]. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxi
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(e)
sassed Green
Everybody yelled at him, and laughed at him, and sassed him, and he sassed back. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxi
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(f)
spoon vittles Orange
… meat first and spoon vittles to top off on Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxi
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(g)
the shines he cut Green
It would made a cow laugh to see the shines that old idiot cut. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxiii
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(h)
shin it Orange
Walk fast now, … and then shin for the raft like the dickens was after you. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxiii
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(i)
a sure-enough
They all came riding in … looking just like a gang of sure-enough queens. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxii
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(j)
every last word Blue
The king told him everything … — every last word of it. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxiv
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(k)
most leastways Green
Everybody, most, leastways women, cried for joy to see them again. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxv
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(l)
soul butter Orange
Music is a good thing; and after all that soul butter and hog-wash, I never see it freshen up things so. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxv
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(m)
plenty good enough Green
The duke's room was pretty small, but plenty good enough, and so was my cubby. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxvi
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(n)
to brisken up Orange
All sorts of little knick-knacks and jim-cracks around, like girls brisken up up a room with. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxvi
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(o)
a stretcher (lie) Green
He's told some stretchers, I reckon; and I said I wouldn't swallow it all; and that's every bit and grain I did say. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxvi
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(p)
every bit & grain Green
He's told some stretchers, I reckon; and I said I wouldn't swallow it all; and that's every bit and grain I did say. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxvi
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(q)
had the most sand Green
had the most sand [courage] Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxix
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(r)
to give / hark from / the tomb Blue
Note: Column 2, right, begins here.
Then Susan she waltzed in, and if you'll believe me, she did give Hare-lip hark from the tomb. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxvvi
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(s)
along about / noon Green
So the next day after the funeral, along about noon-time, the girl's joy got the first jolt. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxvii
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(t)
poison long Blue
The funeral sermon was … poison long. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxvii
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(u)
give him / down the / banks Blue
He gave me down the banks [gave out to me] for not coming and telling him. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxviii
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(v)
like a / muggins Blue
Why, you talk like a muggins [idiot] Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxviii
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(w)
nary a Green
But no, nary a pale did they turn. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxix
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(x)
neighbours Green
Neighbors, I don't know whether the new couple is frauds or not, but if these two arn't frauds, I am an idiot. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxix
N53 (VI.B.46): 19(z)
sure as / you were / born Blue
I fairly flew … and sure as you are born I did clip it along. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxix
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(a)
the (dead) beats Green
Note: Column 1, left, starts here.
She'd light out and save me, and blow on our dead-beats. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxix
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(b)
the cold shake Green
… if we ever got the least show [chance] we would give them the cold shake, and clear out and leave them behind. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxi
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(c)
No sirreebob Orange
No-sirree-bob, they ain't no trouble 'bout that speculation, you bet you. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxi
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(d)
to kinder Blue
I most dropped in my tracks I was so scared. Well, I tried the best I could to kinder soften it up somehow. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxi
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(e)
drop in my tracks Blue
I most dropped in my tracks I was so scared. Well, I tried the best I could to kinder soften it up somehow. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxi
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(f)
being brung up Orange
I would take up wickedness again, which was in my line, being brung up [reared] to it. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxi
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(g)
keep yr eyes peeled Blue
I kept my eyes peeled, but didn't see nobody around. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxi
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(h)
began to study Green
… he started to tell me the truth but when he … begun to study [think about it] and think again. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxi
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(i)
the road to Lafayette Blue
… he lives forty miles back in the country, on the road to Lafayette Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxi
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(j)
work his jaw Blue
… but mind you don't work your jaw [talk] any between here and there. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxi
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(k)
ash hopper Red
… one little hut all by itself away down against the back fence, and … [an] ash-hopper [a box for ashes for making soap], and a big kettle to bile soap in. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxii
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(l)
a many a time Blue
Now I can have a good look at you; and, laws-a-me, I've been hungry for it a many and a many a time. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxii
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(m)
laws sake Green
You don't look as much like your mother as I reckoned you would, but, law sakes, I don't care for that. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxii
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(n)
lawsame Green
Now I can have a good look at you; and, laws-a-me, I've been hungry for it a many and a many a time. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxii
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(o)
up a stump Blue
Well, I see I was up a stump — and up it good. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxii
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(p)
by jings Blue
By jings, I most slumped through the floor. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxii
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(q)
tribe
… and the rest of the tribe [family]. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxii
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(r)
it hit him where / he lived Blue
And he wanted to know about it right off; because it was a grand adventure, and mysterious, and so it hit him where he lived. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxiii
Note: Column 2, right, starts here.
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(s)
he lays over ~ Green
Everybody made a rush for the front door, because, of course, a stranger don't come every year, and so he lays over [beats] the yaller fever, for interest, when he does come. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxiii
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(t)
~ the yaller fever
Everybody made a rush for the front door, because, of ocurse, a stranger don't come every year, and so he lays over [beats] the yaller fever, for interest, when he does come. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxiii
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(u)
meeky like Green
  • FW unlocated
He warn't a boy to meeky along up that yard like a sheep; no, he come ca'm and importent, like the ram. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxiii
N53 (VI.B.46): 20(v)
whilst I think / of it Blue
Now, whilst I think of it, we got to hunt up something to make a saw out of. Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, (ed. unknown) Chap. xxxv
N53 (VI.B.46): 21(a)
Lambeg drum Red
Note: Lambeg drums are large shallow drums made of sheepskin treated with whiskey. They are beaten with schoolmasters' canes. The Orange-Protestant rallying cry — No Surrender!! — is aggressively inscribed on the drums. They are pounded especially on the ‘twalfth’: 12 July.
N53 (VI.B.46): 21(b)
New Irel. Heights ~ Red
Note: New Ireland is a heavily-forested, mountainous island of volcanic origin in the Melanesian group in the Bismarck Archipelago.
N53 (VI.B.46): 21(c)
~ 200 mls. l ~
Note: New Ireland is both narrow and long, being some two hundred miles in length.
N53 (VI.B.46): 21(d)
~ Austr. mandate ~ Red
Note: New Ireland was mandated by the League of Nations to Australia.
N53 (VI.B.46): 21(e)
~ Bism. archipel ~ Red
Note: New Ireland is a heavily-forested, mountainous island of volcanic origin in the Melanesian group in the Bismarck Archipelago.
N53 (VI.B.46): 21(f)
~ Melanesia ~ Red
Note: New Ireland is a heavily-forested, mountainous island of volcanic origin in the Melanesian group in the Bismarck Archipelago.
N53 (VI.B.46): 21(g)
Bougainville
Note: Bougainville is one of the Solomon Islands and is part of the Australian trust territory of New Guinea.
N53 (VI.B.46): 21(h)
volcanic
Note: New Ireland is a heavily-forested, mountainous island of volcanic origin in the Melanesian group in the Bismarck Archipelago.
N53 (VI.B.46): 21(i)
H tries on wig
N53 (VI.B.46): 21(j)
he was giddy, fell H Blue
N53 (VI.B.46): 21(k)
to kidnap H Blue
  • FW unlocated
Note: 595.35 entered level 0.
N53 (VI.B.46): 21(l)
62 rue de la [Breton] / Danielle / [??]
N53 (VI.B.46): 22(a)
What does X? Red
What does Caros, king of ships?” said the son of the now mournful Ossian, “Spreads he the wings of his pride, bard of the times of old?” James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) THE WAR OF CAROS Book I, 250
N53 (VI.B.46): 22(b)
balva stream = silent Red
‘Three days he stayed unseen, alone, before he came to Lamor's halls; the mossy halls of his fathers, at the stream of Balva’
252n: Balva signifies ‘a silent stream’ James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) THE WAR OF CAROS Book I, 252
N53 (VI.B.46): 22(c)
roll soul to me
Awake the voice of thy string; roll my soul to me. It is a stream that has failed. Malvina, pour the song! James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) CATHLIN OF CLUTHA Book I, 260
N53 (VI.B.46): 22(d)
crantara
It may not be diagreeabe to the reader to lay here before him the ceremony of the ‘cran-tara’, which was of a similar nature, and, till very lately, used in the Highlands. When the news of an enemy came to the residence of a chief, he immediately killed a goat with his own sword, dipped the end of an half-burnt piece of wood in the blood, and gave it to one of his servants, to be carried to the next hamlet. From hamlet to hamlet this tessera was carried with the utmost expedition, and, in the space of a few hours, the whole clan were in arms, and convened in an appointed place; the name of which was the only word that accompanied the delivery of the Cran-tara. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) CATHLIN OF CLUTHA Book I, 261n
N53 (VI.B.46): 22(e)
Tonthena I. star
From three ships, they marked my shield on the wave, as I looked on nightly Tonthena, red traveller between the clouds.
263n: Ton-thena, fire of the wave was the remarkable star […] which led Larthon to Ireland. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) CATHLIN OF CLUTHA Book I, 263
N53 (VI.B.46): 22(f)
be thine the secret hill / = eve of battle Red
Oscar of Lego … be thine the secret hill tonight.

264n: This passage alludes to the well-known custom among the ancient kings of Scotland, to retire from their army on the night preceding a battle.] James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) CATHLIN OF CLUTHA Book I, 264f
N53 (VI.B.46): 22(g)
son of rock = echo Red
She went and she called on Armor. Nought answered, but the son of the rock.
295n: By the son of the rock the poet means the echoing back of the human voice from a rock. The vulgar were of opinion, that this repetition of sound was made by a spirit within the rock; and they, on that account, called it mac talla; the son who dwells in the rock. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) THE SONGS OF SELMA Book I, 295
N53 (VI.B.46): 22(h)
loads the wind
He saw fierce Erath on the shore. He seized and bound him to an oak. Thick wind the thongs of the hide around his limbs. He loads the wind with his groans. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) THE SONGS OF SELMA Book I, 295f
N53 (VI.B.46): 22(i)
Ossian = voice of Cona Red
They praised the voice of Cona.
297n: Ossian is smetimes poetically called the voice of Cona. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) THE SONGS OF SELMA Book I, 297
N53 (VI.B.46): 22(j)
hell's angel Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 22(k)
lover's lane
N53 (VI.B.46): 22(l)
cook general
N53 (VI.B.46): 22(m)
pilgrim to Cz-d Red
Note: Chapelizod. In text with peregrine.
N53 (VI.B.46): 22(n)
Never!
N53 (VI.B.46): 22(o)
Potterton Restfields Red
Note: Potter's Field: a cemetery for strangers in Jerusalem; generally, a place to bury paupers and unknowns.
N53 (VI.B.46): 22(p)
label on church Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 22(q)
pension for shouter
N53 (VI.B.46): 23(a)
thou art with years gone Blue
Strife of gloomy U-thorno, why should I mark thy wounds! Thou art with the years that are gone; thou fadest on my soul! James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) CATH-LODA Book I, 148
N53 (VI.B.46): 23(b)
Caravon Blue
O Carun of the streams! Why do I behold thy waters rolling in blood?
161n: Carun or Cara-on, a ‘winding river’. — This river retains still the name of Carron, and falls into the Forth some miles to the North of Falkirk. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) COMALA Book I, 161
Note: See also N53 (VI.B.46):024(d)
N53 (VI.B.46): 23(c)
let 1 virgin mourn thee Blue
Confusion pursue thee over thy plains! ruin overtake thee, thou king of the world! few be thy steps to the grave; and let one virgin mourn thee! James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) COMALA Book I, 163
N53 (VI.B.46): 23(d)
in his terrors Blue
A blast came from the mountain, on its wings was the spirit of Loda. He came to the place in his terrors, and shook his dusky spear. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) CARRIC-THURA Book I, 176
Note: In text with French terroir: soil.
N53 (VI.B.46): 23(e)
Frothal
But Frothal, Sora's wrathful king, sits in sadness beneath a tree. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) CARRIC-THURA Book I, 178
N53 (VI.B.46): 23(f)
Balclootha
“It was in the days of peace,” replied the great Clessamore, “ … I came in my bounding ship, to Balclutha's walls of towers.”
191n: Balclutha, i.e. the town of Clyde, probably the Alcluth of Bede. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) CARTHON Book I, 191
N53 (VI.B.46): 23(g)
deer see ghosts Blue
The deer of the mountains avoid the place, for he beholds a dim ghost standing there.
189n: It was the opinion of the times, that deer saw the ghosts of the dead. To this day, when beasts suddenly start without any apparent cause; the vulgar think that they see the spirits of the deceased. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) CARTHON Book I, 189
N53 (VI.B.46): 23(h)
tell name to foe = lache
To tell one's name to an enemy was reckoned, in those days of heroism, a manifest evasion of fighting him; for if it was once known, that friendship subsisted, of old, between the ancestors of the combatants, the battle immediately ceased; and the ancient amity of their forefathers was renewed. A man who tells his name to his enemy, was of old an igominious term for a coward. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) CARTHON Book I, 200n
N53 (VI.B.46): 23(i)
mild beam of wave = star Blue
It was in the days of the king, while yet my locks were young, that I marked Concathlin, on high, from Ocean's nightly wave.
208n: Con-cathlin, mild beam of the wave. What star was so called of old is not easily ascertained. Some now distinguish the pole-star by that name. A song, which is still in repute, among the sea-faring part of the Highlanders, alludes to this passage of Ossian. The author commends the knowledge of Ossian in sea affairs, a merit, which, perhaps, few of us moderns will allow him, or any in the age in which he lived. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) OINA-MORUL Book I, 208
Note: See also N54 (VI.B.45):117(f).
N53 (VI.B.46): 23(j)
smoke about fire = court Blue
The sentiments of a certain old bard are agreeable to this observation. He, poetically, compares a great man to a fire kindled in a desert place. “Those that pay court to him, says he, are rolling large around him, like the smoke about the fire. This smoke gives the fire a great appearance at a distance, but it is but an empty vapour itself, and varying its form at every breeze. When the trunk, which fed the fire, is consumed, the smoke departs on all the winds. So the flatterers forsake their chief, when his power declines.” James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) OINA-MORUL Book I, 209n
N53 (VI.B.46): 23(k)
Croona R Blue
Beneath the voice of the king, we moved to Crona of the streams, Toscar of grassy Lutha, and Ossian, young in fields.
214n: Crona, murmuring, was the name of a small stream, which discharged itself in (he river Carron. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) COLNA-DONA Book I, 214
N53 (VI.B.46): 23(l)
in rage of his love
The sea rolls round the dark isle of Tromathon. I sit in my tears in my cave! Nor do I sit alone, O Gaul! the dark chief of Cuthal is there. He is there in the rage of his love. What can Oithona do? James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) OITHONA Book I, 222
N53 (VI.B.46): 23(m)
receive me, my friends, / from night Blue
The waves dark-tumble on the lake, and lash its rocky sides […] Hark! the hail rattles round. The flaky snow descends. The tops of the tors are white. The stormy winds do abate. Various is the night, and cold; receive me, my friends, from night. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) CROMA Book I, 236n
N53 (VI.B.46): 23(n)
darktumble Blue
The waves dark-tumble on the lake, and lash its rocky sides. The boat is brimful in the cove; the oars on the rocking tide. A maid sits sad beside the rock, and eyes the rolling stream. Her lover promised to come. She saw his boat, when yet it was light, on the lake. Is this his broken boat on the shore? Are these his groans on the wind? James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) CROMA Book I, 236n
N53 (VI.B.46): 23(o)
various night Blue
Hark! the hail rattles round. The flaky snow descends. The tops of the tors are white. The stormy winds do abate. Various is the night, and cold; receive me, my friends, from night. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) CROMA Book I, 236n
N53 (VI.B.46): 23(p)
small eyebrows
Caol-mhal, a woman with small eye-brows; small eye-brows were a distinguishing part of beauty in Ossian's time; and he seldom fails to give them to the fine women of his poems. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) CALTHON AND COLMAL Book I, 241n
N53 (VI.B.46): 24(a)
love of 2 [??]
N53 (VI.B.46): 24(b)
they must touch
N53 (VI.B.46): 24(c)
Ossian last of race / — blind
It is presumed, as undisputed, that a traditional history of a great hero or chief, called Fion, Fion na Gael, or, as it is modernized, Fingal, exists, and has immemorially existed, in the Highlands and islands of Scotland, and that certain poems or ballads containing the exploits of him and his associate heroes, were the favourite lore of the natives of those districts. The general belief of the existence of such heroic personages, and the great poet OSSIAN, the son of FINGAL, by whom their exploits were sung, is as universal in the Highlands as the belief of any ancient fact whatsoever. It is recorded in proverbs, which pass through all ranks and conditions of men. Ossian dall, BLIND OSSIAN, is a person as well known as strong SAMSON or wise SOLOMON. […] Ossian, “an deigh nam fiannOSSIAN, the last of his race, is proverbial, to signify a man who has had the misfortune to survive his kindred. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) A PRELIMINARY DISCOURSE Book I, xivf
N53 (VI.B.46): 24(d)
Caravon winding R
In one of the many lamentations on the death of Oscar, a battle which he fought against Caros, king of ships, on the banks of the winding Carun, is mentioned among his great actions.
9n: Car avon, winding river James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) THE AERA OF OSSIAN Book I, 9
Note: See also N53 (VI.B.46):023(b)
N53 (VI.B.46): 24(e)
Scuit wanderer Blue
They were not, therefore, improperly called, by their neighbours, scuite, or the wandering nation; which is evidently the origin of the Roman name of Scoti. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) THE POEMS OF OSSIAN Book I, 21
N53 (VI.B.46): 24(f)
Scalders
Though the Goths, under which name we usually comprehend all the Scandinavian tribes, were a people altogether fierce and martial, and noted, to a proverb, for their ignorance of the liberal arts, yet they too, from the earliest times, had their poets and their songs. Their poets were distinguished by the title of Scalders, and their songs were termed Vyses. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) THE POEMS OF OSSIAN Book I, 50
N53 (VI.B.46): 24(g)
Christus caput noster / Coronet te bonis
Olaus Wormius, in the appendix to his Treatise de Literatura Runica, has given a particular account of the Gothic poetry, commonly called Runic, from Runes, which signifies the Gothic letters. He inform us that there were no fewer than one hundred and thirty six different kinds of measure of verse used in their vyses; and though we are accustomed to call rhyme a Gothic invention, he says expressly, that among all these measures, rhyme, or correspondence of final syllables, was never employed. […] As an example of this measure, Olaus gives us these two Latin lines, constructed exactly according to the above rules of Runic verse:

Christus caput nostrum
Coronet te bonis

The initial letters of Christus, Caput, and Coronet, make the three corresponding letters of the distich. In the first line, the first syllables of Christus and of nostrum; in the second line, the on in coronet and in bonis make the requisite correspondence of syllables.

James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) THE POEMS OF OSSIAN Book I, 50f
N53 (VI.B.46): 24(h)
Pugnavimus ensibus
This Lodbrog was a king of Denmark, who lived in the eighth century, famous for his wars and victories; and at the same time an eminent Scalder or poet. It was his misfortune to fall at last into the hands of one of his enemies, by whom he was thrown into prison, and condemned to be destroyed by serpents. In this situation he solaced himself with rehearsing all the exploits of his life. The poem is divided into twenty nine stanzas, of ten lines each; and every stanza begins with these words, Pagnavimus Ensibus, We have fought with our swords. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) THE POEMS OF OSSIAN Book I, 51f
N53 (VI.B.46): 24(i)
duan (canto) Not cancelled
DUAN first.
135n: The bards distinguished those compositions, in which the narration is often interrupted, by episodes and apostrophes, by the name of Duan. Since the extinction of the order of the bards, it has been a general name for all ancient compositions in verse. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) CATH-LODA Book I, 135
N53 (VI.B.46): 24(j)
a tale of the times of old
A TALE of the times of old! James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) CATH-LODA Book I, 135
N53 (VI.B.46): 24(k)
Wind ruffler of shamrock leaves
Go, son of Loda! his words are wind to Fingal: wind that, to and fro, drives the thistle, in autumn's dusky vale. James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) CATH-LODA Book I, 136
Note: Joyce substitutes the Irish shamrock for the Scottish thistle.
N53 (VI.B.46): 24(l)
Misty Loda, house of spirit / of men Blue
U-thorno, that riseth in waters! on whose sides are the meteors of nights! I behold the dark moon descending, behind the resounding woods. On thy top dwells the misty Loda: the house of the spirits of men! James MacPherson, The Poems of Ossian (1806) CATH-LODA Book I, 143
N53 (VI.B.46): 24(m)
compatriot of V. of Milo Blue
Note: The famous statue, the Venus de Milo, was discovered at Melos in 1820. It is said to have been sculpted by a craftsman in Antioch in 150 BC.
N53 (VI.B.46): 24(n)
frieze Blue
Note: Frieze: a rough cloth; also, an architectural term denoting a decorated band running along the top of a room wall.
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(a)
Beche La Mar
Note: Bêche-la-Mar is a simple patois developed to ease communication between the natives of the Melanesian islands and the Europeans they encountered while trading. Its name, also given as Sandalwood English, derives from two commodies traded — sandalwood, a fragrant wood from the tree Santalum album, and Bêche-le-mer (from the Portuguese bicho do mar, or ‘worm of the sea’), a sea slug highly prized by the Chinese as a delicacy. The vocabulary is simplistic, of necessity, and in the main English, while the syntax is almost comical.
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(b)
Two feller he feller go where? Green
Note: In Bêche-le-Mer words are of one form only and are commonly combined with such auxiliary expressions as ‘fellow’ or ‘b(e)long’. To give an example, fellow is employed after pronouns, as in ‘that fellow hat’ (that hat) and ‘me fellow’ (I, myself). ‘Fellow’ is also used after adjectives, as in ‘quick fellow’ (quick) and also after numerals, as in ‘two fellow’ (two). The plural is the same as the singular and is indicated by the use of numerals, as in ‘me two fellow Danis’ (Danis and I) and ‘two fellow he fellow go where’ (where are they going), or by using ‘all’, as in ‘all he walk’ (all are walking).
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(c)
long Green
Note: In Bêche-le-Mer the genitive case is expressed by the auxiliary ‘belong’, ‘long’, or ‘longa’, as in ‘missis belong you’ (your wife).
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(d)
longa villa finish. Not cancelled
Note: Bêche-le-Mer: along, long, and long, are words used as general prepositions, as in ‘two fellow he fall down long ground’ (they fell down onto the ground). Verbs have no tense forms. The future is indicated by the tag bymby (by and by), and the past by the tag been or finish. [Longaville is a character in Love's Labour Lost.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(e)
kill dead finish Orange
Note: Verbs in Bêche-le-Mer have no tense forms. The future is indicated by the tag bymby (by and by), and the past by the tag been or finish. The above thus means, Killed (dead).
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(f)
Harry [trader] Blue
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(g)
hodgepodge Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(h)
copperah Orange
Note: COPRA (a Spanish and Portuguese adaptation of the Malay kopperah, and Hindustani khopra, "the coco-nut"), the dried broken kernel of the coconut from which coconut oil is extracted by boiling and pressing. Copra is the form in which the product of the coconut is exported for commercial purposes.
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(i)
shake hands (Him be) Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(j)
who here Harry? Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(k)
white man Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(l)
he go g calaboosh Orange
Note: Calaboosh, after the Spanish calabozo (dungeon), is a term for a prison of whatever kind.
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(m)
wee wee man Red
Note: A ‘man-o-wee-wee’ is a Frenchman in the Bêche-le-Mer adaptation of oui.
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(n)
the is iselands Orange
Note: Islands.
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(o)
he make what name? Orange
Note: In Bêche-le-Mer the words ‘what name’ are used as a general interrogative, as in ‘he make what name’, meaning, What is he making?
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(p)
you stop time he been [short] Orange
Note: In Bêche-le-Mer the verb to be either omitted or is replaced by the tag stop, as in ‘he stop long ground’ meaning, He is on the ground.
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(q)
you tell him out Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(r)
you storyan Blue
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(s)
Him no capman nothing Green
N53 (VI.B.46): 25(t)
he fight him bloody face / belong you Orange
Note: This Bêche-le-Mer phrase seems to mean, if you fight that fellow you'll get a bloody face.
N53 (VI.B.46): 26(a)
you one — Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 26(b)
more better Orange
Note: In Bêche-le-Mer comparisons are exceptional. ‘More big’ and ‘more better’, meaning bigger and better, are sometimes used. ‘Too’ generally indicates ‘much’ or ‘very’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 26(c)
X more Y Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 26(d)
you look (see) Green
N53 (VI.B.46): 26(e)
Two feller he fall down long Red
Note: This Bêche-le-Mer expression means ‘They fell’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 26(f)
saltwater Orange
Note: Bêche-le-Mer: the Salt Water is the ocean.
N53 (VI.B.46): 26(g)
quickfeller Orange
Note: Bêche-le-Mer: the term for ‘quick’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 26(h)
missis blong Orange
Note: Bêche-le-Mer: this translates (missis belong X) as ‘X's wife’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 26(i)
he stop long ground Orange
Note: Bêche-le-Mer: loosely ‘he lay on the ground’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 26(j)
blood fall down
N53 (VI.B.46): 26(k)
Winchester (4)
Note: A ‘Winchester Quart’ is a half-gallon or a bottle of that capacity.
N53 (VI.B.46): 26(l)
bymby Orange
Note: Bêche-le-Mer:
N53 (VI.B.46): 26(m)
metink Green
Note: The Chinese pigeon expression for ‘I think (believe)’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 26(n)
he speak what name Orange
Note: In Bêche-le-Mer the words ‘what name’ are used as a general interrogative, as in ‘he speak what name’, meaning, What is he saying?
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(a)
Burmese
Note: Title. Underlined in red. Burmese is basically a monosyllabic language and admits of four tones. It is a member of the Tibeto-Burman branch of the Sino-Tibetan family of languages. Its alphabet was drawn from the Mon and assumed its distinctive oval shape from being written on palm leaves with a stylus.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(b)
(Medeo) Turanian) Orange
Note: Turianian is an obsolete name for a pseudo-family of languages. It was applied to almost all of those languages of Asiatic origin that are neither Aryan nor Semitic.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(c)
Nin (8) Orange
Note: Burmese shyit: 8. ‘Nin’, which Joyce seems to believe denotes 9, remains obscure.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(d)
buurman's Orange
Note: Burman/barman.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(e)
Province
Note: Burma, lying east of the Bay of Bengal, was a province of British India until 1937, when granted its own administration. It became independent in 1948.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(f)
Boorman's clock, Orange
Note: Burman.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(g)
a winny / on the tinny side Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(h)
kaikon hurdles) Green
Note: Burmese kai-kon: hurdle.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(i)
crores, Orange
Note: A crore denotes ten million (10,000,000) in the Indian numbering system.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(j)
wetma (sow) Orange
Note: Burmese wet-ma: a sow.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(k)
natigale (steer) Red
Note: This is obscure. The suffix -gale denotes offspring, whereas nats are a kind of spirit being that the Burmese believe people the world. English, nightingale.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(l)
kyat (tiger) Green
Note: Burmese kya: a tiger. In the above form, with ‘cat’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(m)
mangofish Orange
Note: ‘Mango-fish’, name given to several species of fish, including (Polynemus paradiseus, the paradise threadfin), found in south and southeast Asia in freshwater rivers where it is a valued food said to resemble smelt in taste.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(n)
fish ngaman Orange
Note: Burmese nga: fish. Nga-man is the Burmese equivalent to our Zodiacal sign of Capricorn and is a kind of sea-monster.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(o)
paddybird Orange
Note: The paddy-bird is a type of long-legged egret or heron that feeds in the paddyfields (ricefields).
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(p)
racoon Orange
Note: Possibly ‘rancoon’ is meant (which is how Joyce used it), a pun on Rangoon, the capital of Burma.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(q)
nano (milk Red
Note: Burmese nwa-no: milk.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(r)
you (jam) Orange
Note: Burmese ju: jam.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(s)
jaggery, Orange
Note: Jaggery, a coarse brown sugar made from the sap of palm trees.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(t)
durian Orange
Note: Durian, the prized fruit of the tree Durio zibethinus. It has a hard prickly rind and luscious cream-coloured pulp. It has been said of it that it is “offensive to some Peoples Noses, for it smells very like human Excrements, but when once tasted the Smell vanishes.” In text with Dorian Gray, the hero of Oscar Wilde's novel.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(u)
marian, Orange
Note: Marian, a small bitter Burmese fruit, related to the mango. In text with Maid Marion, Robin Hood's girlfriend.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(v)
Myama (B) Orange
Note: Burmese Myamma, or Burma.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(w)
pice Orange
Note: Pice: a small copper coin, once common in India. Four pices were the equivalent of one anna.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(x)
A yaung land (colour) Orange
Note: Obscure. A young land, a green land?
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(y)
sindat sitthing / on his sitbom saildior Orange
Note: Burmese sin: an elephant. Sinbad the Sailor, sitting.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(z)
Puhll the Punkah's ball Orange
Note: The popular Irish melody, Phil the Fluter's Ball (with chorus, ‘O hadn't we the gaiety at ...’), with punkah — a large fan made from cloth stretched on a rectangular frame suspended from the ceiling.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(aa)
the venetians Orange
  • FW unlocated
Note: Anglo Indian venetians are sequins or ducats of Venice: a small gold coin long current in India.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(ab)
track law Blue
Note: A horse-racing term.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(ac)
entire horse, Orange
  • FW unlocated
Note: That is, an ungelded horse.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(ad)
rishi Green
Note: Sanskrit rishi: a holy man or guru, a sage.
N53 (VI.B.46): 27(ae)
the province Orange
Note: Burma, lying east of the Bay of Bengal, was a province of British India until 1937, when it was granted its own administration. It became independent in 1948.
N53 (VI.B.46): 28(a)
Larne magnetic rock
N53 (VI.B.46): 28(b)
lubberline
Note: The line on the compass bowl that marks the position of the ship's head is called the ‘lubber line’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 28(c)
Hinter rock
N53 (VI.B.46): 28(d)
daly quit dublin
N53 (VI.B.46): 28(e)
primate of the Gaels Blue
N53 (VI.B.46): 28(f)
dead seas and oceans
N53 (VI.B.46): 28(g)
lentille d'eau
Note: French lentille d'eau: duckweed.
N53 (VI.B.46): 28(h)
extra city housing
N53 (VI.B.46): 28(i)
Mr Geo Rithers / 121 bis rue Clignancourt
N53 (VI.B.46): 28(j)
written on drum
N53 (VI.B.46): 28(k)
12 apostles 12 of [creed] ever
N53 (VI.B.46): 28(l)
Man names / not Satan or angel
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(a)
Provencal Not cancelled
Note: Index title. Underlined in orange, not crossed out. Provençal or Langue d'Oc. In FW, as the language of the troubadors, this language is specially associated with J and J. (At 144.10 with English, awfully provincial.)
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(b)
marrit (bad) Orange
Note: Derives from N52 (VI.B.42):164(f). Provençal marrit: bad.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(c)
flamifestoun / of galantifloures Orange
Note: Derives from N52 (VI.B.42):164(c). A bunch of flowers. Prov. flam — flame, flash; festoun — festoon; galant — gay, gallant; flour — flower, hue, virginity.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(d)
romeu & / jolio, Blue
Note: Derives from N52 (VI.B.42):164(c). Romeo and Juliet. Prov. roumiéu: pilgrim; jolio: jolly.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(e)
aurino, Orange
Note: Derives from N52 (VI.B.42):164(a). Provençal aurino: golden.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(f)
espès, Blue
Note: Derives from N52 (VI.B.42):164(b). Provençal espés: thick.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(g)
poulit, Orange
Note: Derives from N52 (VI.B.42):164(g). Provençal poulit: merry.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(h)
come in fou, Orange
Note: Provençal coume il fou: like an idiot.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(i)
cataras
Note: Provençal cataras: a (fat) tom-cat.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(j)
teto-dous, Orange
Note: Provençal teto-dous: soft head.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(k)
egregio
Note: Provençal egrèio: excellent.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(l)
liogotenante, Orange
Note: Provençal liòtenènt: lieutenant (Italian luogotenente).
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(m)
vespre, Blue
Note: Provençal vèspre: evening. In text with English, vestry.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(n)
[he] seed, Blue
Note: Provençal:
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(o)
acqueste, Blue
Note: Provençal acqueste: this.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(p)
rison Blue
Note: Provençal risou: a hedgehog. In text with English, reason.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(q)
, tel a Tartarin tastarin the / terascone tourtons, Orange
Note: Possibly, Like Tartarin the Tarascon [after the novel of that name by Alphonse Daudet) tasting tarts [Provençal tourtons — small cakes baked especially for children]. Prov. tastarin: somewhat; tartarin: a sort of monkey.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(r)
vestiment/ivorous chlamydophagian, Orange
Note: Both of these words, Latin and Greek respectively, mean ‘cloth-devouring’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(s)
es voes, ez noes nott voes Orange
Note: It goes, it does not go.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(t)
ges, noun, Orange
Note: Provençal ges noun: not at all.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(u)
malodi Orange
Note: Provençal malo-di: thanks to.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(v)
seenso, Blue
Note: Provençal:
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(w)
to reire of, Green
Note: Provençal reire: rear.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(x)
caspi Orange
Note: Provençal Caspi!: Christ!, Egad!
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(y)
osco, Orange
Note: Provençal Osco!: Bravo!
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(z)
an gent, si gient, Orange
Note: Provençal un gènt: a man; gients: men. In text with ‘giant’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(aa)
[make] Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(ab)
pasco, bisco, droulas Orange
Note: Provençal Pascor: Spring, Easter; bisco: impatience [but bisque is a kind of soup]; droulas: a fat chap.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(ac)
mutuurity, Orange
Note: Provençal matouret: penis. English, maturity.
N53 (VI.B.46): 29(ad)
finis erbo, Orange
Note: Provençal erbo: grass. French, fines herbes.
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(a)
our requisted, Orange
Note: Provençal requist: precious.
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(b)
caro caressime, Orange
Note: Provençal caro: face. complexion; carissime: sweetest, dearest.
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(c)
on grand carriero, Orange
Note: Provençal grand marriera: main street.
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(d)
a dernier cry of old provaunce Orange
Note: French Le dernier cri: the last word [latest fashion].
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(e)
felibre Red
Note: The Félibre is the literature of Provençe.
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(f)
mistral Orange
Note: Frédéric Mistral officially described the literature of Provençe as the Félibre when the Society Félibrige was inaugusrated at Châteauneuf-de-Gadagne on Saint Estelle's Day, 21 May, 1854.
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(g)
mireille Green
Note: A mireille or mirèio is a poem in twelve ‘chants’ written in 1859 by Mistral.
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(h)
fount Va[rr]el glacier Pi[?],
Note: Provençal ??
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(i)
Holy Balm, S. Mary's, Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(j)
Monster / chain
Note: The Tarascue was imagined to be a fabulous monster, a composite of beasts, that terrorised the inhabitants of the land around Tarascon until it was chastened by Saint Martha, who afterwards led it about with a chain of ribbon.
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(k)
the doc [doril] Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(l)
lausels, / li,
Note: Provençal li: the (article).
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(m)
her cousin of hers, Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(n)
chato, / [in our] omar,
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(o)
li trenno, Orange
Note: Provençal li trenno: the plait or tress. In text as 'bethreen'.
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(p)
a his friend, Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(q)
son [miuc] Orange
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(r)
Gardon, Orange
Note: The Gardon is a river in Languedoc.
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(s)
(h)eros, Blue
Note: Provençal:
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(t)
[wothers], [mothers] Orange
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(u)
selfthought, Blue
Note: Provençal:
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(v)
li pero, Blue
  • FW unlocated
Note: Provençal li pero: the pear.
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(w)
garlic [yen], Orange
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(x)
grasshopper Blue
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(y)
az Aiz-an Isabeau Blue
Note: Only ‘IsabeauC3 is crossed out. Provençal Aïz (cf. Aix-en-Provence, anciently the capital of Provence), hence Aiz-an-Isabeau as a Provençal Chapelizod . In text with rhythmn, ‘Hush-a-by baby, in the tree-top’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(aa)
Gleiso, Blue
Note: Provençal cléiso: church.
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(ab)
before of going, Orange
Note: Provençal:
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(ac)
Adew, Green
Note: Provençal adeu: adieu.
N53 (VI.B.46): 30(ad)
pass him before, Blue
Note: Provençal:
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(a)
es contro la Comuno, Blue
  • FW unlocated
Note: Provençal es contro la cuomuno: it is against the commune.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(b)
dieu de [noun], Red
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(c)
within himself ~ Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(d)
~ without — Not cancelled
Note: Provençal ??
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(e)
montagne, Orange
Note: Provençal mountagno: mountain.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(f)
aurihole, Orange
Note: Provençal auriho: ear. See also N53 (VI.B.46):031(ag)
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(g)
of so much is / he great Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(h)
one could not — Orange
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(i)
tron, Blue
Note: Provençal tron: thunderclap. In text with English ‘throne’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(j)
tromeire,
Note: Provençal trounèire: thunder.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(k)
uiau, Blue
Note: Provençal uiau: lightning.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(l)
lamp / esluci Green
Note: Provençal escluci: (in the Alps) lightning.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(m)
nivo, Orange
Note: Provençal nivo: cloud.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(n)
nieu, nivulon Blue
Note: Provençal nieu cloud; nivoulan: a cloudscape.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(o)
ribiero, Green
Note: Provençal ribierau: riverbed.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(p)
arc-de-sedo, Green
Note: Provençal arc-de-sedo: rainbow.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(q)
flume, fluvi Orange
Note: Provençal flume or flùvi: river.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(r)
riau, colo, Red
Note: Provençal riau: river valley, river basin; colo: mountain.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(s)
coulet, samoun,
Note: Provençal coulet: a hill; saumon: salmon.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(t)
troucho, Blue
Note: Provençal troucho: trout. In text with English, treacherous.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(u)
cigalo, Blue
Note: Provençal cigalo: cicada, grasshopper.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(v)
fornigo, Blue
Note: Provençal fournigo: ant.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(w)
souiros,
Note: Provençal souiras: harmful.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(x)
brouzida, Orange
Note: Provençal brounzido: snoring.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(y)
toumbalo Green
Note: Provençal toumbalo: cascade, waterfall.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(z)
casudo, Red
Note: Provençal casudo: fall.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(aa)
gibo, bosso, Green
Note: Provençal gibo: hump; bosso: hump.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(ab)
poulichinello / athahut (ale) Red
Note: Provençal Poulichinello: Punchinello. Atahut: bier, coffin.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(ac)
encho, tencho, Blue
Note: Provençal encò: home; tencho: a tench [fish].
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(ad)
plumo, posto, Red
Note: Provençal plumo: a pen; posto: post.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(ae)
neblo, Orange
Note: Provençal nèblo: fog.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(af)
sagares,
Note: Provençal sagarés: thick fog.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(ag)
uie, / auriho, Orange
Note: Provençal uei [iuei, ui, iue, or eui]: eye; auriho: ear. See also N53 (VI.B.46):031(f)
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(ah)
trancoped / taiocebo, chat, drole Red
Note: Provençal taio-cebo: an earwig. Chat or drole: a lad.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(ai)
pitouet, Blue
Note: Provençal pitouet: a lad, a young man.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(aj)
fiho, Orange
Note: Provençal fiho: a young miss.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(ak)
chato, Green
Note: Provençal chato: a young lady.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(al)
drolo, Red
Note: Provençal drolo: a young girl.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(am)
novi, / novo, ennovia, Orange
Note: Provençal novi or novio: a newly-wed, a fiancée. Ennouvia: to dress like a newly-wed; [of a man] to wed.
N53 (VI.B.46): 31(an)
aclapa Green
Note: Provençal aclapa: to heap over with stones.
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(a)
Noui, calendo,
Note: Provençal Nouve: Christmas; calèno: the twelve days which precede Christmas.
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(b)
gibous, Blue
  • FW unlocated
Note: Provençal gibous: hunchbacked. See unit N53 (VI.B.46):031(aa) above.
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(c)
ouso,
Note: Provençal ouso: hunchbacked.
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(d)
besoun, Orange
Note: Provençal besoun: a need, or requirement.
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(e)
ouno,
Note: Provençal ouo: hunchbacked; ounou: honour.
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(f)
neither norneither, Orange
Note: Provençal ??
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(g)
plantietoon
Note: Provençal plantoun: a sapling, a young tree
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(h)
bret (begue) Red
  • FW unlocated
Note: Provençal bret: a stutterer (French bègue).
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(i)
avons que de — / mastre que mastre,
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(j)
[fidsoones] / they were Orange
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(k)
alpin, Blue
Note: Provençal Alpin: Alpine.
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(l)
occitamila, Orange
Note: Provençal Oucitanio: the name by which the Midi was once called.
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(m)
saracen, wisegoths ~ Blue
Note: Provençal is a rich blending of Ligurian, Celtic, Phoenician, Greek, Latin, Gothic, and Saracen.
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(n)
~ gaul, Red
Note: Provençal is a rich blending of Ligurian, Celtic, Phoenician, Greek, Latin, Gothic, and Saracen.
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(o)
maywhatmay, Orange
Note: Provençal ???
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(p)
brin-brou Blue
Note: Provençal brin-brou: a racket, a commotion. In text with English, Brian Boru.
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(q)
be, me,
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(r)
provinc[ialisms], Blue
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(s)
ana liev Orange
Note: Provençal ana: to go (aller); liè: bed. Anna Livia, go to bed. Not in 1939 final text.
N53 (VI.B.46): 32(t)
cantalan, Blue
Note: Cantal is a high mountain in the Auverge.
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(a)
Hebrew
Note: Index title. Underlined in red.
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(b)
Aram (s of Sem) Orange
Note: Aram was the fifth son of Sem (Shem), the son of Noah, and progenitor of the people of Aram (Syria).
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(c)
Nehemia Red
Note: Nehemiah is a Book of the Old Testament anciently joined with the Book of Ezra, and in the Vulgate called II Esdras. It continues the history to the last jubilee (BC 445-413), some twelve years after the close of Ezra's book
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(d)
Coneyfarm Orange
Note: Cuneiform — wedge-shaped (applied to the wedge-shaped or arrow-headed characters [letters] of the ancient inscriptions of Persia, Assyria, etc.). The term ‘coney’ was used in the Old Testament to translate the Hebrew shaphan (the ‘hider’), a small pachyderm (Hyrax syriacus) that lived in the cliffs and rocks in Arabia and the Holy Land. “The conies are but a feeble folk, yet make they their houses in the rocks” (Proverbs 30:26; Psalms 104:18).
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(e)
the holy language Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(f)
La lecture! — [ben]Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(g)
talmud (teach) Red
Note: The Talmud (talmu'd: instruction) is a compilation of Jewish traditions and comprises the Mishnah — binding precepts (halakhoth) additional to and developed from the Pentateuch — and the Gemara — learned comments.
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(h)
Targum Orange
Note: The Targums (from the Chaldee targum — interpretation) are Aramaic versions of various divisions of the Old Testament. [In text with ‘arguments’.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(i)
mischnary, Orange
Note: The Talmud (talmu'd: instruction) is a compilation of Jewish traditions and comprises the Mishnah — binding precepts (halakhoth) additional to and developed from the Pentateuch — and the Gemara — learned comments. English, Missionary.
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(j)
Godhouse, Red
Note: That is, Beth-el.
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(k)
too greater than pardon Green
Note: Cf. Genesis 4.13, of Cain — My transgression is greater than pardon.
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(l)
the son of Strength Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(m)
son of wine, Orange
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(n)
v. vanitatum, Green
Note: Ecc. 11.2,14; 3.19; 11.8; 12.8 — Vanitas vanitatum, et omnia vanitas: Vanity of vanities, all is vanity.
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(o)
Mt. of God Green
Note: The Mount of God or of the Law is the massive granite Mount Horeb, one of three such that form the peaks of Mount Sinai.
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(p)
Phoenicia, ~ Orange
Note: ‘Punic’ is synonymous with ‘Carthaginian’ (Latin punicus, from Poenicus). [In text (2) with Venetian blinds.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(q)
~ Punic Red
Note: ‘Punic’ is synonymous with ‘Carthaginian’ (Latin punicus, from Poenicus).
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(r)
diasporation of Deusperation Orange
Note: Desperation of Desperations. The Diaspora is the name given to the body of Jews that were dispersed after the Captivity, after Deut. 28.25. Latin Deus: God.
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(s)
timid hearts of words Orange
Note: Transferred to N52 (VI.B.42):179(c)
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(t)
Massore (tradition) Orange
Note: Hebrew masoreth: bond. The Massora is the Hebrew text of the Bible and incorporates the grammatical doctrine of the schools. The post-biblical word has the sense of ‘tradiiton’. [The Jews were the first exegetes, or textual scholars.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(u)
qid, Orange
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(v)
dabar (word), Orange
Note: Hebrew dabhar: a word.
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(w)
rib (dispute) Green
Note: Hebrew rib: dispute, contention.
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(x)
qol (voix) ~ Orange
Note: Hebrew qôl: voice (French voix)
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(y)
~ munt (dead) Orange
Note: Hebrew mûth: to die.
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(z)
bat (fille) Green
Note: Hebrew bath: daughter (French fille).
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(aa)
gorban (offering) Red
Note: Hebrew qorban: an offering [as a symbol of a divine covenant].
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(ab)
sulhan (table) Red
Note: Hebrew shulhan: spread out; a table spread with food.
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(ac)
doubledaguesch (riddle) Orange
Note: The Hebrew daghesh is a sign, a point in the middle of certain letters, used to denote hard or explosive use, and with consonants generally to denote a strengthening best indicated by duplication. [In text with ‘doubly disguised’.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(ad)
enos (man) Red
Note: Hebrew enosh: a mortal. Enos, a magician, was the son of Seth.
N53 (VI.B.46): 33(ae)
holi (malade) Red
  • FW unlocated
Note: Hebrew holî: sick (French malade).
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(a)
Et it dit, to [mourras] mourir / et il sortit allantatrement, Orange
  • FW unlocated
Note: French, And he said, you [?] to die. And he departed forthwith.
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(b)
when / they were in the created being / of themselves, Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(c)
malchi (my king) Red
Note: Hebrew melekhi: my king.
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(d)
kiddosch, Orange
Note: Hebrew qadash: sanctification. Kiddush is the ceremony and prayer whereby the sanctity of the Sabbath or of another feast is proclaimed.
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(e)
Neomenie = ~ Orange
Note: Hebrew ro'sh hodesh (Num. 10.10, 28.11): the period and festival of the new moon. In ecclesiastical Latin called neomenia, after the Greek roots.
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(f)
~ Roch Hodech Red
Note: Hebrew ro'sh hodesh (Num. 10.10, 28.11): the period and festival of the new moon. In ecclesiastical Latin called neomenia, after the Greek roots.
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(g)
H [blows a / aramis] Orange
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(h)
omar of fle meal, Red
Note: The Hebrew omer was that amount or measure of manna that was gathered by each man on each morning, in the time of the Exodus (Ex. 16.16-36). Also, a sheaf cut at the beginning of the harvest and taken to the temple as wave-offering (Lev. 23.10).
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(i)
1st fruits, Red
Note: The Day of First Fruits (Hebrew Yom ha-Bikkurim) is one of the Biblical names for Pentecost.
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(j)
manna, Orange
Note: Transferred to text via N52 (VI.B.42):178(e). See also N53 (VI.B.46):040(k). Hebrew man: what? — Manna, a food described as small and rounded like coriander seed and tasting of honey and wafer (Ex. 16.15). It fed the Jews lost and starving in the Wilderness of Sin at the time of the Exodus.
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(k)
Cohounim, Red
Note: Hebrew kohen denotes a minister (sacerdos) elected to perform specific, usually exotic rites, including sacrifice. The kohanin were less exactly priests than soothsayers, ‘wizards who peeped and muttered’ (Is. 8.19).
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(l)
tent, tabernacle, log cabin, / mud cabin, loalav (palme) / etrog (cedar) Orange
Note: During the Feast of Tabernacles [Tents: Latin tabernacula] or hag hassuccoth pious Jews sleep in tents in commemoration of the Exodus. At this time are carried and shaken the aetrog or citron [not cedar] and the lulabh, a leaf of the palm Phoenix dactyllifera. When this latter is bound on the right with myrtle and on the left with citron it is understood to represent desert life.
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(m)
Hag Atseret / (Fête Cloture) ~ Orange
  • FW unlocated
Note: Simhat Torah (Rejoicing of the Law) is another Jewish feast, observed on the final day of the Festival of Tabernacles. Azaret (Termination) is the Rabbinic name for Pentecost in the Mishnah (hence Joyce's French fête clôture). Azaret is also taken to mean ‘solemn assembly’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(n)
~ Simhat Tora / (Joy of Law) Orange
Note: Simhat Torah (Rejoicing of the Law) is a Jewish feast observed on the final day of the Festival of Tabernacles. Azaret (Termination) is the Rabbinic name for Pentecost in the Mishnah (hence Joyce's French fête clôture). Azaret is also taken to mean ‘solemn assembly’. [In text with ‘somewhat torn’.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(o)
Omer, Red
  • FW unlocated
Note: The Hebrew omer was that amount or measure of manna that was gathered by each man on each morning, in the time of the Exodus (Ex. 16.16-36). Also, a sheaf cut at the beginning of the harvest and taken to the temple as wave-offering (Lev. 23.10).
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(p)
feast of / weeks, ~ Orange
Note: In Exodus 34.22 and Deut. 16.10, Pentecost is termed hag Shavout [Feast of Weeks].
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(q)
~ chavouot, Orange
Note: In Exodus 34.22 and Deut. 16.10, Pentecost is termed hag Shavout [Feast of Weeks].
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(r)
temple, / synagogue, Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(s)
before the / Vulgar Eire Orange
Note: English, Vulgar Era. Also, Irish Éire: Ireland.
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(t)
Meguilla
Note: Meggilloth [Rolls] is the name for five books in the Old Testament from the third and latest section of the Hagiographa [Sacred Scriptures] that are read with much solemnity by Jews on certain notable days.
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(u)
purim, ~ Orange
Note: The Feast of Purim (from the Assyrian word for ‘lot’ — puru) is a Spring celebration. It marks the massacre of the Jews by the Persians in 473 BC as related in the Book of Esther (9.26ff) and of their deliverance from Haman's seeking to exterminate them (in an early Final Solution).
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(v)
~ Haman Aman,
Note: The Feast of Purim (from the Assyrian word for ‘lot’ — puru) is a Spring celebration. It marks the massacre of the Jews by the Persians in 473 BC as related in the Book of Esther (9.26ff) and of their deliverance from Haman's seeking to exterminate them (in an early Final Solution).
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(w)
Matatias, ~ Orange
Note: Judas Maccabaeus, eldest son of the priest and Hasmonean Mattathias, led the insurgent Maccabees to victory in the time of Antiochus (165 BC). They recovered Jerusalem, purified the Temple and restored worship. [In text with Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 34(x)
~ Judas Maccabaeus, ~
Note: Judas Maccabaeus, eldest son of the priest and Hasmonean Mattathias, led the insurgent Maccabees to victory in the time of Antiochus (165 BC). They recovered Jerusalem, purified the Temple, and restored worship.
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(a)
hanoukah, Orange
Note: See unit (d) below.
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(b)
~ hasmonean,
Note: Judas Maccabaeus, eldest son of the priest and Hasmonean Mattathias, led the insurgent Maccabees to victory in the time of Antiochus (165 BC). They recovered Jerusalem, purified the Temple and restored worship. The Hasmoneans were an oscure Jewish sect and are referred to in the Talmud as hasidim rishonim — early priests.
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(c)
[draw] a ~
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(d)
hanouka lamp, Orange
Note: Hanukkah (Feast of Dedication or Feast of Lights) commemorates the re-dedication of the Temple by the Maccabees. [In text with ‘Hannigan’.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(e)
Aristobulis & Hyrcan, Orange
Note: John Hyrcanus II and Judas Aristobulus II were brothers who disputed the Hasmonean throne on the death of their mother Salome Alexandra in 67 BC.
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(f)
Titus, kotel maaravi, / hassidim,
Note: Titus, the son of Vespasian and the eleventh Roman emperor, in 70 AD captured and torched the city of Jerusalem after a siege. His reign was short: two years and two months. The Western (Wailing) Wall of Jerusalem is termed in Hebrew kotel maaravi.
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(g)
[ox pecks / to fish] Orange
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(h)
Ceder, Orange
Note: Seder is another term for Pentecost, which, in the piyyut on the conclusion of the prose part of the Haggadah (Narration) is called Siddur Pesah.
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(i)
alemon (to us) Green
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(j)
haftara (sanctification) Green
Note: Hebrew Haphtarah: Conclusion. This is the Lesson from one of the prophets which is associated with each lesson of the law [parashah] and read after it in the synagogue on the Sabbath.
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(k)
10 jews, Minian,
Note: The minyan is the least number of adult males — ten — allowed for liturgical assembly.
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(l)
[sea of comer / Levite, Dau] Red
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(m)
Harper
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(n)
Ruth, Booz, Orange
Note: Ruth, the widowed Moabitess, married Boaz [or Booz], the Bethlehemite, and so became ancestress of David and of Jesus. Transferred to text via N52 (VI.B.42):170(e) and N52 (VI.B.42):171(a).
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(o)
Jesses, Red
Note: Jesse was the grandson of Ruth and Booz and father of David (see I Sam. 16.10).
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(p)
guenara, Babl [Yeweh]
Note: Possibly references to Gemara and Babel.
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(q)
sefer tora Red
Note: Hebrew Torah — Law; saraph — serpent.
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(r)
on hearts, brow, arms, / doorpost, gates, mezouza, / tephilim, Orange
Note: Transferred to text via N52 (VI.B.42):179(i) and N52 (VI.B.42):181(a). The Mezouza (Hebrew mezuuzah — doorpost) is a prophylactic and atrotropaic parchment inscribed on one side with Deut. 6.4-9, 11.13-21, and on the other with the divine name Shaddai. It is placed in a small wooden, metal, or glass box or casket, which is attached to the doorpost. The Tephillin (Hebrew t'phillim: prayers) are two black-leather boxes fastened to leather straps containing Deut. 6.4-9, 11.13-21, and Ex. 13.1-16 inscribed on parchment. These phylacteries are laid on the arm and head of Jewish males of age at weekly morning service.
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(s)
dieu / de Jacob, Green
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(t)
artsa (terre) Red
Note: Hebrew eresh: land (French terre).
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(u)
yip / (fall) Orange
Note: Entered the text via N52 (VI.B.42):181(b). Hebrew yipol: to fall.
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(v)
mapqiq (qui fair [??]) Red
Note: Hebrew mappiq or ‘extender’ is a diacritic inserted in the letter He, when final, to indicate that it is to be articulated.
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(w)
malkah (queen)
Note: Hebrew malkah: queen regnant or queen consort.
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(x)
kol (tout) Orange
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(y)
metheg (frein) Red
Note: Hebrew methegh is a pause mark in their scripture; also, the term for a bit (part of a bridle).
N53 (VI.B.46): 35(z)
hokmah (sagesse) Red
Note: Hebrew Hokhmah means wisdom or sapience (French sagesse); as the Second Sephira it means Divine Sapience.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(a)
lamnah (why) Orange
Note: Transferred to text via N52 (VI.B.42):178(e). Hebrew lama: why.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(b)
mohorat (morrow) Red
Note: Hebrew mahar: tomorrow.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(c)
qodsimm (choses saintes) Orange
  • FW unlocated
Note: Hebrew qadoshim: holy persons (French choses saintes).
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(d)
qodes / (holiness) Orange
Note: Hebrew qodesh: holiness.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(e)
sores (racine) im Red
Note: Hebrew sores (plural sorashim): a root (French racine).
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(f)
halom (hen) Orange
Note: Hebrew halom: a dream. ‘Hen’ is erroneous.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(g)
hadissim (50) Red
Note: Hebrew hamishim: fifty.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(h)
nahlah (torrent)
Note: Hebrew nahal: fluent.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(i)
adi (ornant) Red
Note: Hebrew adi: a wreath, ring or ornament (Fr. ornant).
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(j)
ruah (esprit) Red
Note: Hebrew ruah: breath, wind, spirit (Fr. esprit).
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(k)
elouh, Orange
Note: Hebrew eli: high (an epiteth for God).
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(l)
roqia (firmament) Red
Note: Hebrew raqia: sky, firmament.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(m)
qayin,
Note: Hebrew Qayin: Cain.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(n)
lashon (langue) Red
Note: Hebrew lashon: tongue, language (Fr. langue).
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(o)
havon (sin) Green
Note: Entered the text via N52 (VI.B.42):182(a). Hebrew avon: sin.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(p)
Havvah (Eve) Red
Note: Hebrew Hawwah: Eve. In text with Anna, phrase — Have a banana, and Irish: ban: woman.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(q)
shomer (guardian) Red
Note: Hebrew shomer: watcher, guardian.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(r)
athma (breath) Red
Note: Hebrew athma: breath.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(s)
beteka
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(t)
hay (vivant) Red
Note: Hebrew hay: living (Fr. vivant).
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(u)
veha
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(v)
kolbetysdrael Orange
Note: Hebrew kol beth yisrael: all of the house of Israel. [In text with ‘cold wet drizzle’.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(w)
naym (eaux) Red
Note: Hebrew mayim: waters (Fr. eaux).
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(x)
shebi (captivity) Red
Note: Hebrew shebi: captivity.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(y)
ram (high) Red
Note: Hebrew ram: high.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(z)
beged (garment) / nahar (young man) Orange
Note: Hebrew beged: a piece of clothing; Na'ar: a young man.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(aa)
eseb (grass) Orange
Note: Hebrew esebh: herb, grass.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(ab)
zokrah (remember) Orange
Note: Hebrew zakhor: remember.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(ac)
sekem (epaule) Red
Note: Hebrew shekhem: shoulder (Fr. épaule).
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(ad)
honnein (pity me) Orange
Note: Hebrew hanneni: pity me [Psalm 9.14]
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(ae)
gadol (grand) Orange
Note: Hebrew ghadol: large (Fr. grand).
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(af)
ammi (my people), immi (ma / mère) Orange
Note: Entered the text via N52 (VI.B.42):181(c). Hebrew 'ami: my people; emi: my mother (Fr. ma mère).
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(ag)
hoq (statute) Red
Note: Hebrew hoq: statute, law.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(ah)
har harim, Green
Note: Hebrew har(im): mountain(s).
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(ai)
zayit (olive) Red
Note: Hebrew zayit: olive tree [Olea europa].
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(aj)
semmi (my name) Orange
Note: Entered the text via N52 (VI.B.42):181(c). Hebrew shemi: my name.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(ak)
soferim (writers) Red
Note: Hebrew sapherim: scribes., writers.
N53 (VI.B.46): 36(al)
lebab (coeur) Orange
Note: Entered the text via N52 (VI.B.42):181(d). Hebrew lebhabh: heart (Fr. coeur).
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(a)
|aHebrew Russiana|
Note: Index title. Underlined in violet.
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(b)
Rajdestvo, koza,
Note: Russian Razhdyestvó: Christmas; kaza: she-goat.
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(c)
dvoina, Brown
Note: Russian dvoinya: twins, duplicates.
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(d)
gorb(oun), khoromtz / geenitsa, navodnenie, / holm (hill)
Note: Russian gorboon: hunchback; gorb: a hump; kharanit: to bury, inter; gnutza: to oppress, to bend; navadnienye: a flood, inundation; kholm: a hill, hillock, small mountain.
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(e)
lossossinated, Brown
Note: Russian lasos: a salmon [in Russia a delicacy, especially and commonly at wakes]; lasasina: salmon-flesh.
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(f)
strikosa, muravie,
Note: Russian strekoza murav'ei: the dragon-fly and the ant [a fable by Ivan Krylov (FW 159.14)].
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(g)
lissa, Brown
Note: Russian lisa: a fox.
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(h)
volk, Red
Note: Russian volk: a wolf. [In text with 'vulgar' and song, The Volga Boat Song.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(i)
padenie petrorchka,
Note: Russian padyénye: a fall.
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(j)
pivo, Red
Note: Russian piva: beer.
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(k)
cernilo, Red
Note: Russian chernila: ink.
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(l)
pero, potchta,
Note: Russian peró: a pen, a feather; póchta: post, postage.
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(m)
touman (fog), Red
Note: Russian tuman: fog.
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(n)
glaz (oko) Orange
Note: Russian glaz: (biological) eye; ushkó: eye of needle. [In text with ‘glassy, okey-dokey’.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(o)
oucho, nevesta,
Note: Russian ukha: ear; nyevyésta: a bride.
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(p)
genik, Red
Note: Russian zhen'ech: a bridegroom.
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(q)
moknitza, Red
Note: Russian connotation is obscure.
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(r)
adeamasuldva, / [in] the tree of this,
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(s)
azores, / (lakes)
Note: Russian ózera: lake.
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(t)
Baltiskoya-Mare- Red
Note: Russian Balt'eskaye Mórye: Baltic Sea.
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(u)
strana (land) / malorassia Red
Note: Russian strana: land or region; Mala-rass'eya: Malorossiya, ‘Little Russia’ — a term used by Muscovites from the thirteenth century on to designate the Ukraine.
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(v)
gubernie, Red
Note: Russian Gubernya: Government.
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(w)
vastok (E), novigat / passalouista battyousk foolfellar,
Note: Russian Vastok: East; nabyegat: to stumble; pazhálusta: if you please; Batyushka: Little Father [a common form of address].
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(x)
doog & doorak (ass), Red
Note: Russian dooch: spirit; doorak: a fool. [Also, Irish phrase deoch an dorais — last drink, one for the road.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(y)
pagoda / (weather) Red
Note: Russian pagóda: weather.
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(z)
praechrysniyan,
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(aa)
graze (orage), Red
Note: Russian graza: thunderstorm (Fr. orage).
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(ab)
Slavabotch, / Slobabotch, Red
Note: Russian Sláva Bokh: Thank God!
N53 (VI.B.46): 37(ac)
zarkus (hot)
Note: Russian zharki: hot.
N53 (VI.B.46): 38(a)
Sacred quaternary
N53 (VI.B.46): 38(b)
myriad
N53 (VI.B.46): 38(c)
monad multiplied v / multiplied [??] of soul
N53 (VI.B.46): 38(d)
[D[?]] copyright &mash;
N53 (VI.B.46): 38(e)
H backbone changed Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 38(f)
Dr Chart Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 38(g)
[D[?]] carpets
N53 (VI.B.46): 38(h)
horse of Hunover
Note: The House of Hanover was the ruling dynasty of Great Britain from the time of the accession of George I in 1714.
N53 (VI.B.46): 38(i)
H excrater
N53 (VI.B.46): 38(j)
entrenous sticky / steel midgray dago / teatime / shadow nocturne / Samoan Blue
N53 (VI.B.46): 38(k)
yr red hand (Ulster)
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(a)
Hebrew
Note: Index title. Underlined in red.
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(b)
kol hoskah (all dark) Orange
Note: Hebrew kol: whole, all; hoshekh: darkness, obscurity, tenebrosity.
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(c)
sedeq (justice), Red
Note: Hebrew shedek: justice.
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(d)
zouz (lsd) Orange
Note: Hebrew zuz: a zuz, a silver coin anciently used.
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(e)
Heli, yom kipur,
Note: Heli was the father of Joseph the carpenter, foster-father of Jesus. Yom Kippurim [Day of Atonement] is the most solemn of the Jewish festivals. It marks the culmination of ten days of penitence at the start of the New Year activities and falls on the tenth day of Tishri (September-October), five days before the Festival of Tabernacles.
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(f)
establish for ever, Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(g)
creator he / has created, Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(h)
kurd, copt, berber, Orange
Note: Peoples of the Middle East: Kurds, Copts, and Berbers.
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(i)
Iro-European, Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(j)
bedouin, Orange
Note: Bedouins, nomadic desert Arabs.
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(k)
monotheism, Red
Note: Monotheists: believers in a single God.
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(l)
prophet, Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(m)
cohaleting Orange
Note: Hebrew qoheleth: preacher (Latin concionator).
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(n)
theotracrat, Orange
Note: Theocracy is a system of government by a sacerdotal order, such as the monotheistic Commonwealth of Israel from the Exodus to the election of Saul as king.
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(o)
Ismael, Orange
Note: Ishmael [God will hear] was the son of Abram and Agar (Gen. 17.15). He was expelled with his mother, a slave, but was sustained in the desert by an angel; it was prophesised that his seed would grow into a great people.
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(p)
erebusque Red
Note: Erebus is a place or space or state of utter darkness said to exist between Hades and Earth. [English, arabesque.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(q)
musaic, Red
Note: Mosaic, Muse.
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(r)
opened his mouth & / said, Orange
Note: Entered the text via N52 (VI.B.42):181(e).
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(s)
bone = ipse,
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(t)
Tholedoth tree Orange
Note: Genesis, past the Prologue, is divided into ten sections, each introduced by a superscription embodying the formula elleh toledoth — : these be the generations of — .
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(u)
[si faire] grand,
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(v)
Kain Kanman, Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(w)
Mac Eires,
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(aa)
middle, upper & lower
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(ab)
Ktal (A) Ketal (H) Ketala (Lr)
Note: There is a river, Ktal.
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(ac)
falla,
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(ad)
pehlvi,
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(ae)
[crt],
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(af)
[?]fal,
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(ag)
hazatanzy, Red
Note: Hebrew
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(ah)
cherub = griffin, Not cancelled
Note: The Cherubim are angels described as taking the form of men, with four wings to each and beneath these wings human hands, and with four faces to each: a human face, the face of an ox, that of a lion, and the face of an eagle. The Griffin is a fabulous animal having the head and wings of an eagle and the body and hind-quarters of a lion. It was believed by the Greeks to inhabit Scythia and to guard its gold.
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(ai)
R. Arvanda Red
Note: River Arvanda.
N53 (VI.B.46): 39(aj)
Meron, Bordj,
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(a)
Arg (Helmand) Veh (Oxus)
Note: The Oxus river.
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(b)
Arvand Red
Note: Unit repeated. The Arvanda river.
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(c)
Jaxartes Frat,
Note: The Jaxartes, an Asiatic river discharging into the Aral Sea. The Euphrates, the largest river of west Asia; it inundates annually the rich alluvial plain of Babylon.
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(d)
Krubeem, Orange
Note: [Crubeen (pig's trotter).]
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(e)
Didymus, Orange
Note: Didymus, meaning ‘twin’, is the name applied in St John to the apostle Thomas. Thomas derives ultimately from the Hebrew ta'om, meaning ‘twin’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(f)
Saul Paul Hegesippe Red
Note: Hegesippus, meaning ‘commander’, occurs several times as a name, including that of a supposed author of a Latin adaptation of Jewish Wars.
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(g)
kikikuki, Orange
Note: This is obscure. Hebrew tukkiyyim — peacocks — may refer.
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(h)
voice of the tartar, Red
Note: The voice of the turtle [dove]. [English, Tartar.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(i)
samite,
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(j)
jubalanttubalance, Green
Note: Jubal was the second son of Lamech and Adah. His half-brother was named Tubal-Cain. Tubal-Cain was a sharpener and hammerer of instruments of brass and iron (Gen. 4.22). Jubal was the father of all who handle the harp and organ (Gen. 4.21); according to Josephus (Ant. 1,2,2) he cultivated music and invented the psaltery and the cithara.
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(k)
manna (?!) Green
Note: See also N53 (VI.B.46):034(j).
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(l)
old spell, old style)
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(m)
Sokeman Brideth, Red
  • FW unlocated
Note: Sokeman: a tenant who provides bodyguard service (usually, for the King).
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(n)
I have slain / a man to my wounding & a young / man to my hurt. Green
  • FW unlocated
Note: The ‘Song of Lamech’ (Gen. 4.23ff) is distinguished by being the only example of antediluvian poetry. The song is said to glorify the use of weapons of war. It runs: Ada and Zillah, hear my voice; / Ye wives of Lamech, hark unto my words: / Surely a man have I slain for wounding me. / And a young man for bruising me. / If Cain shall be avenged sevenfold, / Then Lamech seven and seventyfold.
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(o)
If C. shall be / avenged 7fold surely L 7 7fold. Orange
Note: Entered the text via N52 (VI.B.42):182(a). The ‘Song of Lamech’ (Gen. 4.23ff) is distinguished by being the only example of antediluvian poetry. The song is said to glorify the use of weapons of war. It runs: Ada and Zillah, hear my voice; / Ye wives of Lamech, hark unto my words: / Surely a man have I slain for wounding me. / And a young man for bruising me. / If Cain shall be avenged sevenfold, / Then Lamech seven and seventyfold.
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(p)
Go to, let us, Orange
Note: Entered the text via N52 (VI.B.42):179(i) and N52 (VI.B.42):182(b). Cf. Genesis 11.3 — Go to, let us make brick.
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(q)
as thou goest from / which is a Mt of the E, Green
Note: Cf. Genesis 12.8 — …removed to a mountain on East.
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(r)
hatham,
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(s)
[god] of [Sem] ~ Red
  • FW unlocated
Note: Genesis 9.26-9 — And he said: Blessed be the Lord God of Sem, be Chanaan his servant. May God enlarge Japhet, and may he dwell in the tents of Sem, and Chanaan be his servant. / And Noe lived after the Flood three hundred and fifty years, and all his days were in the whole nine hundred and fifty years: and he died.
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(t)
G. shall enlarge Large. Red
Note: Entered the text via N52 (VI.B.42):182(d). Genesis 9.26-9 — And he said: Blessed be the Lord God of Sem, be Chanaan his servant. May God enlarge Japhet, and may he dwell in the tents of Sem, and Chanaan be his servant. / And Noe lived after the Flood three hundred and fifty years, and all his days were in the whole nine hundred and fifty years: and he died.
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(u)
100, 60, & 2: & he died,. Green
Note: Genesis 9.26-9 — And he said: Blessed be the Lord God of Sem, be Chanaan his servant. May God enlarge Japhet, and may he dwell in the tents of Sem, and Chanaan be his servant. / And Noe lived after the Flood three hundred and fifty years, and all his days were in the whole nine hundred and fifty years: and he died.
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(v)
Chronicles. Orange
Note: The Events of the Day (Hebrew dibhre hayyamim): I AND II CHRONICLES.
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(w)
let him exceedingly rejoice, yeah, ~ Orange
Note: Entered the text via N52 (VI.B.42):182(b). Psalm 68 is a triumphal; processional hymn, written to celebrate the transference of the Ark of the Lord from the house of Obed-edom to the New Tabernacle on Mount Zion that David had prepared to receive it. The Psalm is sometimes claimed to portend the advent and divinity of Jesus Christ. It runs: … Let the Just rejoice in the sight of God; yea, let them exceedingly rejoice … Thou art gone up on high; thou hast led captivity captive … His excellency is over Israel … extol him who rides upon the clouds … Lo, he doth send out his voice, yea, and that a mighty voice.
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(x)
~ led captivity captive, ~ Orange
Note: Psalm 68 is a triumphal; processional hymn, written to celebrate the transference of the Ark of the Lord from the house of Obed-edom to the New Tabernacle on Mount Zion that David had prepared to receive it. The Psalm is sometimes claimed to portend the advent and divinity of Jesus Christ. It runs: … Let the Just rejoice in the sight of God; yea, let them exceedingly rejoice … Thou art gone up on high; thou hast led captivity captive … His excellency is over Israel … extol him who rides upon the clouds … Lo, he doth send out his voice, yea, and that a mighty voice.
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(y)
~ his / excellency is over Israel, ~ Red
Note: Entered the text via N52 (VI.B.42):182(d). Psalm 68 is a triumphal; processional hymn, written to celebrate the transference of the Ark of the Lord from the house of Obed-edom to the New Tabernacle on Mount Zion that David had prepared to receive it. The Psalm is sometimes claimed to portend the advent and divinity of Jesus Christ. It runs: … Let the Just rejoice in the sight of God; yea, let them exceedingly rejoice … Thou art gone up on high; thou hast led captivity captive … His excellency is over Israel … extol him who rides upon the clouds … Lo, he doth send out his voice, yea, and that a mighty voice.
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(z)
~ extol, ~ Orange
Note: Psalm 68 is a triumphal; processional hymn, written to celebrate the transference of the Ark of the Lord from the house of Obed-edom to the New Tabernacle on Mount Zion that David had prepared to receive it. The Psalm is sometimes claimed to portend the advent and divinity of Jesus Christ. It runs: … Let the Just rejoice in the sight of God; yea, let them exceedingly rejoice … Thou art gone up on high; thou hast led captivity captive … His excellency is over Israel … extol him who rides upon the clouds … Lo, he doth send out his voice, yea, and that a mighty voice.
N53 (VI.B.46): 40(aa)
~ lo, & he has a / mighty voice Red
Note: Psalm 68 is a triumphal; processional hymn, written to celebrate the transference of the Ark of the Lord from the house of Obed-edom to the New Tabernacle on Mount Zion that David had prepared to receive it. The Psalm is sometimes claimed to portend the advent and divinity of Jesus Christ. It runs: … Let the Just rejoice in the sight of God; yea, let them exceedingly rejoice … Thou art gone up on high; thou hast led captivity captive … His excellency is over Israel … extol him who rides upon the clouds … Lo, he doth send out his voice, yea, and that a mighty voice.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(a)
Scand
Note: Index title. Underlined in red.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(b)
goth, bond, ragn, tyr, hap, / diar, fiorg, jotn, vear Green
Note: ‘God’ is a word common to all of the Germanic languages. It was, in heathen times, of neuter gender and was used almost exclusively in the plural number. This was not because these people thought of the gods as many, but rather it expressed a feeling for the multiform majesty of the divinity. The Völuspá [Song of the Sybil] — a poem of the Elder Edda written in Iceland in the eleventh century — writes of the history of the Norse gods and distinguishes a two-fold form of nomenclature: the esoteric influences&mash;nameless and without attributes — who ruled the world, and the exoteric and personalised gods. Of the first of these, we find the ‘deciding powers’ (Old Norse regin or rögn) and the ‘decision-making powers’ (ON bönd and höpt). [In the singular band and hapt.] Of the more manifested gods, two divine families were identified: the Aesir [singular: áss] — these include Odin, Thor, and Tyr — and the Vanir [sing.: Vanr] — these include Njord, Frey (the fertility god) and Freya (Frey's female counterpart). Fjorgynn [Earth] was the mother of Thor.
The etymology of these names is disputed. Grimm suggests that the former is cognate with Aesares, the gods of the Etruscans who formed a circle of implicitly involved powers known as dii consentes and complices — in exactly the same imagination as the ON bönd and höpt. Other commentators see the Aesir and Vanir as being the gods of the rulers and of the herders, respectively.
ON díar has two senses. The first is a general name for certain of the Aesir; the second for sacrifice-conducting priests or chiefs. Jötunn [with plural Jotnar] has the meaning of a ‘giant’. Vear is a poetic term for the gods in general.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(c)
Valtivar Green
Note: The suffix -tyr tags a god; thus tyr [with plural tivár] translates as ‘god’, and Val-tívar means ‘the gods of the slain’. Odin is sometimes given the name Val-tyr, or God of the Slain.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(d)
Tyr ([lawgiver] god) Red
Note: Tyr, or Tiw, was identified by the Romans with their Mars and was a god of battles and of contest. Also known as ‘law-maintaining’ Tyr, it was in an early period a god of some importance, to be eclipsed later by Odin and Thor.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(e)
a finn fall, Red
Note: Hear a pin fall. A Finn. Finnegan. Shelta fin: man.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(f)
PC Helmut Green
Note: ??The Finns believed that the clouds were a kind of helmet of God.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(g)
godh, Green
Note: See unit N53 (VI.B.46):041(b) above. With the advent and progress of Christianity, the ON word godh changed from being plural and neuter to being masculine and singular. [It is to noted that there is no connection between ON godh and the Goths. The Goths called themselves Gutans, and their word for god was gudh or guth.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(h)
boomster rocks. Red
Note: Dutch boom: tree.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(i)
rending / rogusrendering, recking Green
Note: Transferred to text via N52 (VI.B.42):179(b). In the Völuspá it is predicted that the world will end and all of the gods will be destroyed in the ultimate battle Ragnarok [the Fate of the Gods, from ON regin+rok]. After the battle, a new order will prevail. [In Finnegans Wake Ragnarok is associated with the noisy falling from the ladder of the hero Tim Finnegan.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(j)
upprrigin,
Note: A class of Norse gods, the Uppregin — those living on high — as distinct from the Hollregin — the beneficient gods.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(k)
reginnaels Green
Note: ?ON regin: the gods. Regional.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(l)
fiorg ([??]) Green
Note: Fjorgynn [Earth] was the mother of Thor.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(m)
from pl. / to s. from n to m; Red
Note: With the advent and progress of Christianity, the ON word godh changed from being plural and neuter to being masculine and singular.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(n)
old / high goth, Red
Note: Old High Goth is a combination of the names of the languages of the early Germans, Gothic and Old High German. In text with Latin sorer, sister, Danish krigsmaend, warrior, and Swedish sprog speech.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(o)
offgood, Green
Note: ON afgud means an ‘idol’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(p)
uplouderaman Orange
Note: Transferred to text via N52 (VI.B.42):179(a). Uppland is a province of Sweden.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(q)
common, / the threnning one's gods, Not cancelled
Note: This may obliquely refer to the Christian idea of a Trinity of hypostatic gods. Danish treenige Gud: threefold God. English, threne: lament.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(r)
tombaldoom world worrild Orange
Note: A tumbledown world: Raknarok.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(s)
Chr = 3person, Green
Note: A reference to the Catholic Trinity, with perhaps a kind of contraction implied.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(t)
the Aandt / and the Grosskorper Green
Note: The ant and the grasshopper. ON aand and andi signify the soul and the spirit [from anda to breathe]. German Grosskorper means simply ‘big body’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(u)
tri-sex-none goods, Green
Note: Three, six, nine. This may refer to the temple of Uppsala, in Uppland, where three idols stood side by side. One represented Odin and was invoked in times of war; the second, Thor, was invoked when famine or pestilence threatened; and the third, Frey, with a huge phallus, was invoked at fertility rites. The ON term tre-nith denoted a carving on a post of a person's likeness in an obscene posture.
N53 (VI.B.46): 41(v)
Ther, Red
Note: Presumably, Thor.
N53 (VI.B.46): 42(a)
phonemenon, Orange
Note: Phoneme, phenomenon.
N53 (VI.B.46): 42(b)
Umlaut
Note: Umlaut is a vowel change brought about by a vowel or semi-vowel in a following syllable (as in Middle English fixen deriving from fox). It is found in all of the Germanic languages with the exception of Gothic.
N53 (VI.B.46): 42(c)
fionian, Green
Note: Transferred to text via N52 (VI.B.42):179(f). Possibly a play on Fenian, Fionn, Finn, and ON fjon (hatred).
N53 (VI.B.46): 42(d)
paradigms, Red
Note: In the Germanic languages the word ‘god’ in its many forms constitutes a kind of paradigm and the sound common to each a sort of phoneme. The word is unique in shifting from neuter plural to masculine singular in the various languages as the Christians made headway — in Gothic, in Old High German, and so on, until it reached Icelandic — and in its never having assumed the masculine inflexive r or s. In Icelandic the root vowel shifted from o to u and the pronunciation of the g phoneme altered, so that godh became gudh, which was pronounced ‘gwudh’. To add to the general mess, in some text a vowel-free form gth is used.
N53 (VI.B.46): 42(e)
sealand, Green
Note: Transferred to text via N52 (VI.B.42):179(g). Zealand is a Danish province.
N53 (VI.B.46): 42(f)
w & n at both / sides of the bigbelt, Red
Note: ‘Big Belt’ is the name of a strait in Denmark.
N53 (VI.B.46): 42(g)
the / gawds, Green
Note: Transferred to text via N52 (VI.B.42):179(c). In the Germanic languages the word ‘god’ in its many forms constitutes a kind of paradigm and the sound common to each a sort of phoneme. The word is unique in shifting from neuter plural to masculine singular in the various languages as the Christians made headway — in Gothic, in Old High German, and so on, until it reached Icelandic — and in its never having assumed the masculine inflexive r or s. In Icelandic the root vowel shifted from o to u and the pronunciation of the g phoneme altered, so that godh became gudh, which was pronounced ‘gwudh’. To add to the general mess, in some text a vowel-free form gth is used.
N53 (VI.B.46): 42(h)
Gad, Green
Note: Transferred to text via N52 (VI.B.42):178(e). In the Germanic languages the word ‘god’ in its many forms constitutes a kind of paradigm and the sound common to each a sort of phoneme. The word is unique in shifting from neuter plural to masculine singular in the various languages as the Christians made headway — in Gothic, in Old High German, and so on, until it reached Icelandic — and in its never having assumed the masculine inflexive r or s. In Icelandic the root vowel shifted from o to u and the pronunciation of the g phoneme altered, so that godh became gudh, which was pronounced ‘gwudh’. To add to the general mess, in some text a vowel-free form gth is used.
N53 (VI.B.46): 42(i)
Vikin (Christ Bay) Green
Note: Vikin — meaning Inlet — was the name given to the province of Norway that lay around the Oslofjord.
N53 (VI.B.46): 42(j)
gth, Red
Note: Transferred to N52 (VI.B.42):179(d). The Ostrogoths, who were the first Teutons to be converted to Christianity, in the fourth century moved into the Roman province of Moesia in Northern Bulgaria and produced the first written text in a Germanic language, the Gothic Bible of Ulfilas or Wulfila. In it, God is given the name Guth and Gth.
N53 (VI.B.46): 42(k)
Gothia,
Note: Gothia or Gothland was the native land of the Goths, who migrated in the first century BC from Götaland in Sweden. Tacitus writes of them at the time of their inhabiting the lands of the lower Vistula. In the third century AD, they migrated to the Black Sea, where they split into two groups — Ostrogoths and Visigoths.
N53 (VI.B.46): 42(l)
gutther, Red
Note: Transferred to N52 (VI.B.42):178(e).
N53 (VI.B.46): 43(a)
Hebrew
Note: Index title. Underlined in red.
N53 (VI.B.46): 43(b)
[hedotus]
N53 (VI.B.46): 43(c)
She that tarrieth / at home divides the spoil. ~ Red
Note: Psalm 68 again — …she that tarrieth at home divides the spoil … Though ye have lien among the pots.
N53 (VI.B.46): 43(d)
~ though you have lien among / the pots, Green
Note: Entered the text via N52 (VI.B.42):182(c). Psalm 68 again — …she that tarrieth at home divides the spoil … Though ye have lien among the pots.
N53 (VI.B.46): 43(e)
the heavens of / heaven. Green
Note: Entered the text via N52 (VI.B.42):182(a). Psalm 115.16 — behold, the heaven and heaven of heavens.
N53 (VI.B.46): 44(a)
Madam reading
N53 (VI.B.46): 44(b)
Scarteen Black & Tans
Note: Scarteen House (built in the 1750s) is the name of the Ryan family home in Knocklong, Co Limerick. The “Scarteen Black and Tans” is the name of the family's pack of Kerry Beagle foxhounds.
N53 (VI.B.46): 44(c)
Litt — 63$.cd86
Note: Paris telephone number.
N53 (VI.B.46): 44(d)
pigskin Red
Note: (Racing slang) pigskin was used to mean a ‘saddle’ (as in Dickens, He was my governor, and no better master ever sat in pig-skin.
N53 (VI.B.46): 44(e)
muffle knuckle Red
Note: (Boxing slang) muffle: a boxing-glove (cf. Byron, Don Juan, ii.92 — For sometimes we must box without the muffle), used for protection of an from the boxer's knuckles.
N53 (VI.B.46): 44(f)
smooth (wagon) Not cancelled
N53 (VI.B.46): 44(g)
giraffe
N53 (VI.B.46): 44(h)
a wellstacked fillerouter Red
Note: Presumably a well-endowed female.
N53 (VI.B.46): 44(i)
foo Red
Note: ‘Foo foo’ (slang) was used to mean a person of no significance.
N53 (VI.B.46): 44(j)
plushfeverfraus Red
PLUSH — Stylish. [College] FEVER-FRAU — A lively girl. Maurice H. Weseen, A Dictionary of American Slang (1934) 192, 181
N53 (VI.B.46): 44(k)
popeyed pansies
POP-EYED PANSY — An unattractive girl. [College] Maurice H. Weseen, A Dictionary of American Slang (1934) 192
N53 (VI.B.46): 44(l)
whack
WHACK — To hit a baseball; a hit. [Baseball] Maurice H. Weseen, A Dictionary of American Slang (1934) 224
N53 (VI.B.46): 44(m)
dopy clonk Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 44(n)
pipe course Red
PIPE — An easy course. [College] Maurice H. Weseen, A Dictionary of American Slang (1934) 192
N53 (VI.B.46): 44(o)
anguish Red
ANGUISH — A course in English. [College] Maurice H. Weseen, A Dictionary of American Slang (1934) 173
N53 (VI.B.46): 44(p)
hanging a goober Red
HANG A GOOBER — To kiss a girl. Maurice H. Weseen, A Dictionary of American Slang (1934) 184
N53 (VI.B.46): 45(a)
Mime
Note: Index title. Underlined in red.
N53 (VI.B.46): 45(b)
Mass Taverner Red
Note: Possibly, John Taverner (1495-1595), an English composer celebrated for his elaborate Latin Church Music, which included sixteen entire Masses.
N53 (VI.B.46): 45(c)
mike / maggies (nuvoletta) Red
Note: The reference is to Joyce's ‘Mime of Mick, Nick and the Maggies’. Nuvoletta is the name given to the Issy figure in Joyce's fable of the Gripes.
N53 (VI.B.46): 46(a)
alsob / asthough
[In his ‘Philosophie des Als ob’ Vaihinger has elaborated — more clearly than Kant before him — the thesis that all our laws, definitions, and world views (I contend: all our concepts) eventually appear to be nothing but an ‘as though’]. German als ob: as though. Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 479
Note: Turquoise ink.
N53 (VI.B.46): 46(b)
hyacinth = / heliotrope Red
[The native way of ancient story-telling has indeed been overcome. An extreme example of such unscientific thinking is the Greek legend of the hyacinth's genesis … The sun god of the Hyakinth festival was associated personally with the flower.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 502
Note: Turquoise ink.
Hyacinthus, in Greek mythology, was loved by Apollo. Zephyrus — inflamed with jealousy — directed Apollo's quoit at the boy's head, killing him. From the blood thus spilled sprang the hyacinth flower. Klyt'ie was a nymph who died of grief upon being forsaken by Apollo. She was immortalised as the heliotrope flower.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 46(c)
Linnaeus / better - [names] ~
[When Linnaeus created a grammar and a logic for his nomenclature of plants, he either gave a better definition or invented new names for some thousand technical notions.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 507
Note: Turquoise ink. Carolus Linnaeus (Carl von Linné), 1707-1778, was the celebrated Swiss botanist who devised the modern system of nomenclature for plant species.
N53 (VI.B.46): 46(d)
~ Jews change names ~
[Yet, with his nomenclature of plants, Linnaeus has become perhaps the greatest language creator ever. … It had become necessary to create order, and since at that given moment Linnaeus had found a practical solution, his coincidental nomenclature became a power. About one hundred years ago, when the governments wanted to create some order in their data base of Jewish citizens and therefore, as a police measure, forced the Jews to choose a family name and a first name … all of a sudden a new nomenclature came into being.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 508
Note: Turquoise ink.
N53 (VI.B.46): 46(e)
~ Familien & Taufname / = flowers
[Linnaeus had undertaken the police task to provide every plant with a proper noun by giving it an identity, that is a family and a first name [dass er ihr einen Familiennamen und einen Taufnamen beilegte], whereas earlier botanists had actually given a description rather than a name to the plants they knew.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 508
Note: Turquoise ink.
N53 (VI.B.46): 46(f)
divers
Note: Turquoise ink.
N53 (VI.B.46): 46(g)
|asapphire samphirea| coast Red
Note: Turquoise ink.
Samphire is an umbelliferous plant to be found growing on cliff tops. [Here with ‘sapphire’.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 46(h)
24,000 / [sweet I.] rose
Note: Turquoise ink.
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(a)
Chinese Not cancelled
Note: Index title. Underlined in red, not crossed out.
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(b)
600-2000 mots (letters) / syllables Red
Note: All Chinese words, with only a few exceptions, are monosyllabic; those that are not are compounds of these monosyllables. The unit in the language is the morpheme (syllable) and not the phoneme (which is unknown). As the number of syllables is limited, it follows that in Chinese we encounter a vast number of homophones (words of identical sound). To differentiate between these (to a point) a system is used whereby different tones are superimposed on the syllables.
Mandarin (Kuan hua) — the officials' language — has been the received standard since 1911. This is based on the Peking dialect, which allows for each syllablle 18 possible initial consonants, 6 vowels and 4 final endings. This results in 424 possible syllables, and, allowing for diph- and triphthongs, we can increase this to about 1,000. Mandarin admits 4 tones, and thus the total amount of words (Fr. mots) is about 4,000-5,000. While one finds in China a number of mutually incomprehensible dialects, there is everywhere a common orthography (putting into writing). To each word there is assigned a single complex symbol or character. This arose from the earliest periods, when pictures were drawn to represent things or ideas, that is, from a purely ideographic system. The orthography developed from this into a logography — representations of words. To make matters inscrutable, there is therefore no alphabet. On the other hand, to each little picture is assigned universally only one meaning, though many different sounds as one goes from dialect to dialect.
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(c)
sujsi fantsie
Note: In Chinese, lexicography — in default of an alphabet — is not easy. One popular system of sorting is termed the fan-ts'ie (literally, to cut off in two directions). In this, each syllable is split into two parts, initial and final, by way of placing the character whose pronunciation is to be described (in whatevevr dialect is pertinent) between two other characters, necessarily known to the reader. These two characters indicate the initial and final sound, respectively. In this roundabout way, the character ching, for example, is recorded in the ‘ch’ and ‘ing’ parts of chi shing. A third symbol then indicates the correct tone. This seems to be illustrated by the entry ‘h(en) (m)an’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(d)
mothers of son,
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(e)
2nd. tone Green
Note: The number of Chinese homophones is reduced by a system of tones associated with each sound. Mandarin has 4 such tones to differentiate each common sound.
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(f)
maundarin tongue, Green
Note: Mandarin, the standard received Chinese dialect.
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(g)
man / of Arin Green
Note: Mandarin, the standard received Chinese dialect. [Here with ‘Man of Aran’ and ‘Érin’.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(h)
written & printed
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(i)
ideotism, Red
Note: The Chinese system of represented things in writing by pictures is called ideography.
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(j)
gram
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(k)
pron / distribute a word to / recommend a pronunciation Green
Note: In Chinese, lexicography — in default of an alphabet — is not easy. One popular system of sorting is termed the fan-ts'ie (literally, to cut off in two directions). In this, each syllable is split into two parts, initial and final, by way of placing the character whose pronunciation is to be described (in whatevevr dialect is pertinent) between two other characters, necessarily known to the reader. These two characters indicate the initial and final sound, respectively. In this roundabout way, the character ching, for example, is recorded in the ‘ch’ and ‘ing’ parts of chi shing. A third symbol then indicates the correct tone.
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(l)
mothers of (religion) Green
Note: Chinese:
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(m)
Eng. “r” = l à rebours, Green
Note: Chinese speakers tend to mispronounce the English /r/ phone as the /l/ phone (thus saying ‘mushlooms’ for ‘mushrooms’).
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(n)
pieng (soldier) Green
Note: Chinese ping: soldier. [In text with ping-pong, and ping (bell) with Zurich Spring festival Sechseläuten.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(o)
kuo (nation) Green
Note: Chinese kuo: nation.
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(p)
i (robe)
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(q)
ü fish Not cancelled
Note: Chinese yu: fish. [In FW the puzzling sentence “Gee each owe tea eye smells fish. That's U” can be explained as 'G h o t i' spells fish (Chinese yu), after George Bernard Shaw — pronounce as in ‘enouGH, wOmen and naTIon.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(r)
uang (roi) Green
Note: Chinese wang: king (Fr. roi).
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(s)
ai (aime)
Note: Chinese ai: affection.
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(t)
iang (sheep) Red
Note: Chinese yang: sheep.
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(u)
ts (mot) Red
Note: Chinese tsu: word (Fr. mot).
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(v)
t (sun) / s (son)
Note: Chinese tsi: son.
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(w)
foohr cantones (4)
Note: Cantontese is the most important dialect of the Yueh group and is spoken along the south coast of China, in Canton and in Hong Kong. It has in fact nine tones. [The Swiss Cantons are suggested by the above.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(x)
h(en) (m)an
Note: In Chinese, lexicography — in default of an alphabet — is not easy. One popular system of sorting is termed the fan-ts'ie (literally, to cut off in two directions). In this, each syllable is split into two parts, initial and final, by way of placing the character whose pronunciation is to be described (in whatevevr dialect is pertinent) between two other characters, necessarily known to the reader. These two characters indicate the initial and final sound, respectively. In this roundabout way, the character ching, for example, is recorded in the ‘ch’ and ‘ing’ parts of chi shing. A third symbol then indicates the correct tone. This seems to be illustrated here.
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(y)
all rogues lean to rhyme Green
Note: All roads lead to Rome.
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(z)
I intended to study = I was 15 / (lian ku) Green
Note: In the Lun yü, or Confucian discourses (first book, second chapter, fourth paragraph), one reads “At fifteen I was intend upon learning, at thirty I was composed (san shi er li: thirty then stand)”. An educated Chinaman would, by saying “I intended to study”, indicate that he has been fifteen at the time in question.
N53 (VI.B.46): 47(aa)
fu tsien La ren (cher pere et
Note: Chinese fu tsien: ignoble father [the polite Chinese expression for ‘dear father’ (Fr. cher père), as indeed ‘ the foolish one’ is ued to mean ‘my wife’).
N53 (VI.B.46): 48(a)
hankowchuff, Green
Note: Handkerchief. Hangchow is the capital city of Cheking province (to Marco Polo it was the ‘incomparable city’).
N53 (VI.B.46): 48(b)
buxers, Green
Note: The Boxer Uprising is the Western name for the 1899 insurrection of the I-ho t'uan — the harmonious and righteous fists. The Fists sought to expel all foreign devils from China.
N53 (VI.B.46): 48(c)
cowtaw, Green
Note: Chinese k'o-t'ou: to cowtow or knock the head, after the Chinese manner of submissive polite behaviour.
N53 (VI.B.46): 48(d)
full of face, Green
Note: The Chinese idea of ‘face’ or public esteem.
N53 (VI.B.46): 48(e)
covenant house,
N53 (VI.B.46): 48(f)
sun-yet-sun, Green
Note: Sun-yat-sen was the leader of the first Chinese Republic founded at the end of the Manchu Dynasty and incorporated in April 1911.
N53 (VI.B.46): 48(g)
be quiet or (before) Red
[… ‘or’ may be connected with a Proto-Germanic particle of time. I even think this use of ‘or’ has not yet died out; in the very common threat: ‘be quiet or …!’, ‘or’ can easily be replaced by ‘before’] [In text with Latin tacete: be quiet!] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 196
Note: Turquoise ink.
N53 (VI.B.46): 48(h)
andbut / andor Red
[It is therefore not impossible that originally the conjunctions and, but, or … were only poor aids to pursue one's thoughts … In Hebrew, for instance, there is only one particle for and, but, or.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 196
N53 (VI.B.46): 48(i)
gib mir ein Bier Red
  • FW unlocated
[A grammarian would probably regard it as an ellipsis when I knock on my glass in a pub instead of saying: “Ein Bier”.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 207
N53 (VI.B.46): 48(j)
hints
[The new findings of our critique of language have revealed that the admired syntax of our language is nothing but a convenient help for the person speaking to give his listener some hints about his mental state.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 241
N53 (VI.B.46): 48(k)
isteron proteron for pr. ist.
[The natural way of story-teling would be a proteron-isteron; language continuously falls back on an isteron-proteron.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 245
N53 (VI.B.46): 48(l)
[wheelbarrow]
N53 (VI.B.46): 48(m)
contradictory / truths
[… two contradictory opinions … cannot possibly be true at the same time.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 361
N53 (VI.B.46): 48(n)
excluded middle
[… for, in the conclusion, the middle term has vanished.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 434
Note: In logic, a proposition must be either true or not true. This is termed the law of the ‘excluded middle’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 48(o)
phenomenon / [origination]
[When Newton was struck by the bright idea to regard Kepeler's Laws and Galilei's law of falling bodies as one and the same phenomenon and called them Gravity, he must have thought he was linking the result of the most brilliant induction to the result of the most brilliant abstraction.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 460
N53 (VI.B.46): 49(a)
centipede = 11 legs
[The centipede does not have 100 legs; the milefoil does not have 1000 leaves.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 151
N53 (VI.B.46): 49(b)
achtzehn / dixhuit / duodeviginti / 3x6 = Bret / 2x9 = Welsh / 15+3 = Aztec / 11+7 = Maori / 12+6 = Apho Red
[In order to illustrate the diversity of numerical systems … the following Table — taken from a study by Hermann Schubert — is very instructive. The number 18, for example is composed in an least ten different ways: German (achtzehn: 8-10), French (dix-huit: 10-8), Latin (decem et octo: 10+8; or, duodeviginti: 20-2), Greek (8+10), Breton (3x6), Welsh (2x9), Aztec (15+3), New Zealand (11+7), Apho (12+6). Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 151
Note: Joyce applies this diversity of systems to the enumeration of the Leap Year Girls.
N53 (VI.B.46): 49(c)
algorithmiker / abacist
[… when in the thirteenth century the … Algorithmics [‘die Algorithmiker’), the disciples of the Arabs, beat the Abacists, the disciples of the Romans, our current arithmetics were invented.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 153
N53 (VI.B.46): 49(d)
two = thou / tat tvam asi / = thou art it too Red
[It would be nice if originally the number ‘two’ (frequently tva or dva) and the pronoun ‘thou’ would have been one and the same word … In that case, a long time ago, the famous sentence from the Vedas — Tat tvam asi — really would have meant: ‘Thou art my second self’] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 182
Note: In many languages the words ‘two’ and ‘thou’ are cognate. The Sanskrit phrase Tat-tvam-asi [from the Chandogya Upanishad] — That Thou Art — reveals the interconnectedness between the Brahma (the That) and the individual (the Thou). Tat-tva means ‘That which actually is’ and can be resolved into the elements tat and tvam meaning That and Thou, which (ahem!) more concisely expresses the same idea.
N53 (VI.B.46): 49(e)
sive, aut, vel (or)
[The sharpest observations have been made with reference to the different uses of or, since in Latin it can be translated with such divergent words as sive, aut and vel.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 195
N53 (VI.B.46): 50(a)
A name for Poddle / name of bed Red
[Names of rivers are proper names … In this sense, Donau is a notion like Peter Müller. And the comparison does not stop there because of the fact that Donau only denotes the river bed; for after all, Peter Müller too is only a bed, the sum of … vessels and organs through which a continuously-changing, daily-regenerated mass of blood is flowing.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 90
Note: The Poddle is a rivulet in Dublin. [In text with pissabed.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 50(b)
J the 2 prepositions / G the three conjunctions Red
[The reason why no grammar mentions ‘right’ and ‘left’ as prepositions … is probably that they are not as old as ‘above’ and ‘below’] … very often, one and the same word has to serve now as a preposition, now as a conjunction … Let us consider the three most common conjunctions: and, but, or.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 110, 192
N53 (VI.B.46): 50(c)
gute schöne hand
[In the Middle Ages there was a German word for ‘right’ (zese) that was replaced only later on by the metaphorical meaning of the good, the right hand (even today, people still say to children — Show your good nice hand (‘Gib das gute, das schöne Händchen’) Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 110
N53 (VI.B.46): 50(d)
van der Berg
[We have almost completely lost a case for the notion of ‘whence’, and therefore a particular preposition has been created to denote this direction, i.e. ‘from’ … most probably derived (cf. Greek apo) from the adverb ‘above’, that is (seen from below) the answer to the question, Whence?; from above, ‘abe’. In Switzerland one can still find such names as ‘Ab der Fluh’, corresponding to our ‘Von der Fluh’.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 111
Note: Van der Berg is a Dutch name.
N53 (VI.B.46): 50(e)
he had miss (taken)
[left margin: Vorsilben (Prefixes)] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 111
N53 (VI.B.46): 50(f)
whither is it? Red
[Whether the location to which the notions of before, after, above, and below refer is expressed in the dative or in the accusative does not depend on the preposition, but on the question ‘where’ or ‘whither’. (Cf. 108: The English can hardly feel the old cases in the adverbs here, hither, and hence. In German, the idea of an answer to the questions Whence? and Whither? … has been preserved.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 111
N53 (VI.B.46): 50(g)
il vient he is coming to come Red
[It is nice to see how in French the utmost proximity in time is conveyed by means of spatial expressions: Il vient d'arriver and Il va partir. Both expressions are in fact pleonasms. ‘He comes, he comes,’ i.e. He just came in; ‘He goes, he goes’, i.e. He just went out.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 120
N53 (VI.B.46): 50(h)
morning (tomorrow) Red
[‘Tomorrow’ originally denoted a particular part of the day — the morning … Not until the period of Old High German did ‘morgane’ mean ‘in the morning’, that is, the next morning. Analogously, the Latin word mane became demain in French and domani in Italian.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 122
N53 (VI.B.46): 50(i)
yesterday other day Red
[More complicated is the case of the word ‘yesterday’, [German gestern] cognate with Latin and Greek words which already denote ‘the day before’. In Germanic languages, however, ‘yesterday’ … denoted the other day, that is, tomorrow as well. Later on, the use of the ‘other day before’ replaced the other meaning in German, English, and Dutch.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 122
N53 (VI.B.46): 50(j)
in Winter (Norway)
[The etymology of the word ‘winter’ is very uncertain … but it is obviously older than the awareness of a regular return in the season. Often, when someone says ‘in the autumn’, ‘in the winter’, we still have the impression that it is conceived as a spatial concept, such as ‘in Norway’, ‘in Siberia’.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 125
N53 (VI.B.46): 50(k)
langeweile
Langeweile (boredom, tedium)]: [Language cannot create time concepts — spatial terms are needed to qualify time … Anyway, this linguistic usage is so old and so general that we do not notice the metaphor any more when, for example, we use the word ‘long’ to denote a certain length of time. [Thus in the word ‘Langeweile’] ‘Lang’ denotes a spatial dimension, and only in the second instance a temporal dimension. … ‘Weile’ (while) is related to Old Norse words for rest (hvild) and originally denoted ‘the resting place’ …] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 125
Note: Right margin
N53 (VI.B.46): 50(l)
after = because
[… the metaphorical use of temporal adverbs as causal notions leads directly to the most fundamental questions of human understanding. If the idea of cause is really projected onto the concept of time, as the most consistent sceptics have taught, and if the only thing we can say about phenomenoa is that they are successive and that there are no causal connections between them, then it would be wise to express the idea of cause exclusively with temporal adverbs; the wisest linguistic usage can be found in Austria, where, due to some unconscious scepticism, the use of ‘after’ is purely causal … Hume would be satisfied.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 126
N53 (VI.B.46): 50(m)
time organ
[Why is our world — the way it represents itself in language — so extremely spatial? Why do we find our bearings faster in three-dimensional space than in unidimensional time? … Because our visual faculty also serves as a space organ. Because our sense of hearing does not equally serve as a time organ.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 128
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(a)
Man
Le nom d'homme. Antoine Meillet, “Le nom d'homme” Linguistique historique et linguistique générale (1921) 272
Note: Index title. Underlined in red.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(b)
anthropos / aner Orange
L'allemand a deux noms de l'«homme» : l'un désigne le «mâle», l'individu capable de porter les armes, l'autre est le nom générique de l'espèce humaine : mann et mensch ; de même le néerlandais. Le second de ces noms est un dérivé du premier. Ni en français ni en anglais, on n'observe rien de pareil : homme et man servent à la fois pour l'une et pour l'autre notions. L'état de choses allemand concorde avec celui de la plupart des anciennes langues indo-européennes: le sanskrit oppose mánu[sdot]a[hdot] à virá[hdot] et à na (accusatif náram), le grec ánthropos (dont l'étymologie est obscure) à an[e]r, l'arménien mard (dont le sens premier est «mortel») à ayr (qui répond à grec an[e]r), le lituanien žmu~ et zmogùs à výras, le slave cloveku à moži, le gotique guma à wair, l'irlandais duine à fer, le latin enfin homo à uir.
[German has two names for “man”: one refers to the “male”, the individual able to bear arms, the other is the generic name of the human species: mann and mensch; similar in Dutch. The second of these names is a derivative of the first. Neither French nor English observe anything like it: man and man serve both for one and the other. The German words are consistent with most of the old Indo-European languages: Sanskrit opposes mánu[sdot]a[hdot] to virá[hdot] and to na (accusatif náram), the Greek ánthropos (whose etymology is obscure) to aner, the Armenian mard (whose prime meaning is “mortal”) to ayr (which answers to Greek aner), the Lithuanian žmu and zmogùs to výras, Slavic cloveku to moži, Gothic guma to wair, Irish duine to ferhomō to uir.] Antoine Meillet, “Le nom d'homme” Linguistique historique et linguistique générale (1921) 272
Note: Greek anthropos: man, human being; aner: man, male.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(c)
gentilmask / (Arm) / mard Red
L'allemand a deux noms de l'«homme» : l'un désigne le «mâle», l'individu capable de porter les armes, l'autre est le nom générique de l'espèce humaine : mann et mensch ; de même le néerlandais. Le second de ces noms est un dérivé du premier. Ni en français ni en anglais, on n'observe rien de pareil : homme et man servent à la fois pour l'une et pour l'autre notions. L'état de choses allemand concorde avec celui de la plupart des anciennes langues indo-européennes: le sanskrit oppose mánu[sdot]a[hdot] à virá[hdot] et à na (accusatif náram), le grec ánthropos (dont l'étymologie est obscure) à an[e]r, l'arménien mard (dont le sens premier est «mortel») à ayr (qui répond à grec an[e]r), le lituanien žmu~ et zmogùs à výras, le slave cloveku à moži, le gotique guma à wair, l'irlandais duine à fer, le latin enfin homo à uir. Antoine Meillet, “Le nom d'homme” Linguistique historique et linguistique générale (1921) 272
Note: Gentleman. Latin mas: male (of species). Farso mard: man.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(d)
ayr,
L'allemand a deux noms de l'«homme» : l'un désigne le «mâle», l'individu capable de porter les armes, l'autre est le nom générique de l'espèce humaine : mann et mensch ; de même le néerlandais. Le second de ces noms est un dérivé du premier. Ni en français ni en anglais, on n'observe rien de pareil : homme et man servent à la fois pour l'une et pour l'autre notions. L'état de choses allemand concorde avec celui de la plupart des anciennes langues indo-européennes: le sanskrit oppose mánu[sdot]a[hdot] à virá[hdot] et à na (accusatif náram), le grec ánthropos (dont l'étymologie est obscure) à an[e]r, l'arménien mard (dont le sens premier est «mortel») à ayr (qui répond à grec an[e]r), le lituanien žmu~ et zmogùs à výras, le slave cloveku à moži, le gotique guma à wair, l'irlandais duine à fer, le latin enfin homo à uir. Antoine Meillet, “Le nom d'homme” Linguistique historique et linguistique générale (1921) 272
Note: Armenian ajr, Turkish er: man. OIr. aire: nobleman.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(e)
andreia Orange
Si le latin uir a disparu des langues romanes, il en est resté un dérivé, mais dont, dès l'époque romaine, le lien avec uir était si relâché qu'on cessait d'unir les deux mots : uirtus. La uirtus, c'est l'ensemble des qualités qui font un «mâle», un «guerrier» : appellata est ex uiro uirtus, dit Cicéron dans les Tusculanes. C'est ce que le grec attique nommait andreía, la langue homérique enorée, la qualité de l'aner. Antoine Meillet, “Le nom d'homme” Linguistique historique et linguistique générale (1921) 273
Note: Greek andreia: manliness (Latin virtus).
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(f)
virtue, Orange
Mais, en latin, le mot a été affecté à désigner toute qualité morale, ce que le grec nommait aret[e] : faute d'avoir un mot propre, on s'est servi de uirtus pour rendre le mot grec, et ainsi le mot latin s'est empli d'un sens nouveau, qui le séparait définitivement de uir ; avec le christianisme, ce sens a pris une nuance nouvelle qui l'a isolé plus encore de uir. D'autre part, uirtus, qui désignait un mérite actif, a servi à désigner les propriétés actives d'un produit. Le français qui n'a aucun représentant de uir, a conservé ainsi uirtus, sous la forme vertu, avec la double valeur de «qualité morale» et de «propriété active (d'un objet)». On voit ici comment les classes sociales qui créent la culture agissent, sur le vocabulaire. Du reste, ce n'est plus guère que dans la langue littéraire et savante que vertu a gardé sa valeur. La prédominance des préoccupations matérielles, le souci d'une lutte âpre pour les meilleures situations sociales ont enlevé à la «vertu» beaucoup de son prestige. Dans la langue courante, un peu populaire, le mot «vertu» n'existe plus que dans des emplois ironiques : il faut de la vertu pour cela, il en a de la vertu ! Ainsi le mot qui désignait le mérite de l'homme fort ne sert plus dans le français familier d'aujourd'hui qu'à indiquer la naïveté de l'homme qui est trop «bon» pour son siècle, et qui par suite est la dupe des autres. Antoine Meillet, “Le nom d'homme” Linguistique historique et linguistique générale (1921) 273
Note: Originally meant manliness, and later goodness, or virtue.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(g)
arete,
Mais, en latin, le mot a été affecté à désigner toute qualité morale, ce que le grec nommait aret[e]: faute d'avoir un mot propre, on s'est servi de uirtus pour rendre le mot grec, et ainsi le mot latin s'est empli d'un sens nouveau, qui le séparait définitivement de uir ; avec le christianisme, ce sens a pris une nuance nouvelle qui l'a isolé plus encore de uir. D'autre part, uirtus, qui désignait un mérite actif, a servi à désigner les propriétés actives d'un produit. Le français qui n'a aucun représentant de uir, a conservé ainsi uirtus, sous la forme vertu, avec la double valeur de «qualité morale» et de «propriété active (d'un objet)». On voit ici comment les classes sociales qui créent la culture agissent, sur le vocabulaire. Du reste, ce n'est plus guère que dans la langue littéraire et savante que vertu a gardé sa valeur. La prédominance des préoccupations matérielles, le souci d'une lutte âpre pour les meilleures situations sociales ont enlevé à la «vertu» beaucoup de son prestige. Dans la langue courante, un peu populaire, le mot «vertu» n'existe plus que dans des emplois ironiques : il faut de la vertu pour cela, il en a de la vertu ! Ainsi le mot qui désignait le mérite de l'homme fort ne sert plus dans le français familier d'aujourd'hui qu'à indiquer la naïveté de l'homme qui est trop «bon» pour son siècle, et qui par suite est la dupe des autres. Antoine Meillet, “Le nom d'homme” Linguistique historique et linguistique générale (1921) 273
Note: Greek arete: virtue as goodness.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(h)
nemo, Orange
Le nom générique de l'«homme» en latin est homo. Le mot est ancien ; on en est averti dès l'abord par une alternance vocalique: à côté de homo, il y a une forme à vocalisme radical e, hemonem, attestée par Festus, et que d'ailleurs nemo, c'est-à-dire *ne-hemo «pas un homme» suffirait à indiquer. Antoine Meillet, “Le nom d'homme” Linguistique historique et linguistique générale (1921) 273-4
Note: Latin nemo: no man, nobody (ne + homo).
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(i)
goon,
On enseigne souvent que l'o de homo serait une altération phonétique de l'e de l'ancien hemo ; c'est une erreur; d'abord cette altération n'entrerait dans aucune règle connue; et surtout les autres langues du groupe italique ont aussi o, osque humuns valant homines, ombrien homonus valant hominibus, sans que rien y indique un passage de e à o. Des noms correspondants de l'«homme» se retrouvent, et encore avec un autre vocalisme, qui n'est ni e ni o, mais zéro, dans gotique guma, vieux haut allemand gomo (le mot, disparu aujourd'hui à l'état isolé, est celui qu'on a à la fin de bräuti-gam), et dans lituanien žm[u], vieux prussien smoy, toujours avec le même sens. Antoine Meillet, “Le nom d'homme” Linguistique historique et linguistique générale (1921) 273-4
Note: Greek gune: woman; OE guma: man.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(j)
zma, Orange
Le nom générique de l'«homme» en latin est homo. Le mot est ancien ; on en est averti dès l'abord par une alternance vocalique : à côté de homo, il y a une forme à vocalisme radical e, hemonem, attestée par Festus, et que d'ailleurs nemo, c'est-à-dire *ne-hemo «pas un homme» suffirait à indiquer. On enseigne souvent que l'o de homo serait une altération phonétique de l'e de l'ancien hemo ; c'est une erreur ; d'abord cette altération n'entrerait dans aucune règle connue ; et surtout les autres langues du groupe italique ont aussi o, osque humuns valant homines, ombrien homonus valant hominibus, sans que rien y indique un passage de e à o. Des noms correspondants de l'«homme» se retrouvent, et encore avec un autre vocalisme, qui n'est ni e ni o, mais zéro, dans gotique guma, vieux haut allemand gomo (le mot, disparu aujourd'hui à l'état isolé, est celui qu'on a à la fin de bräuti-gam), et dans lituanien žm[u], vieux prussien smoy, toujours avec le même sens. Antoine Meillet, “Le nom d'homme” Linguistique historique et linguistique générale (1921) 273-4
Note: Old Slavonic zena: woman.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(k)
earthwighter Orange
  • FW unlocated
Note:
  • FW 262.11
  • 2010
  • 1939 was entered too early to derive from this notebook. Wight: a person or creature. An ‘earthwighter’ would be a human being.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(l)
zembliance, Orange
Ce nom de la «terre» ne s'est pas conservé en germanique. Mais il subsiste en latin dans le dérivé humus qui a gardé le genre féminin (on en a des dérivés tels que humilis) et en baltique où il est le nom courant de la «terre» : lituanien žẽm[e], vieux prussien semme ; le mot slave correspondant est zemlja; le grec a khamaí «sur terre», et avec des formes phonétiques un peu différentes, khthon «terre». Les correspondants indo-iraniens sont d'usage courant. Latin homo et hemo, gotique guma, lituanien žmu~ sont des dérivés du thème *ghem-, *ghom-, *ghm-, qui était en indo-européen le principal nom de la «terre». Pour la forme, ces dérivés ne se comprennent que si on se reporte à l'indo-européen, où ils sont de type normal. Pour le sens, ils renvoient à un temps où, toute pensée étant de type religieux, il était naturel de désigner l'«homme» par les traits qui le distinguent des dieux : la mortalité, l'habitat sur la terre.

Antoine Meillet, “Le nom d'homme” Linguistique historique et linguistique générale (1921) 274-5
Note: Russian zyemlya, Polish zemla: Earth. Semblance.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(m)
ghem, ghom, Orange
Ce nom de la «terre» ne s'est pas conservé en germanique. Mais il subsiste en latin dans le dérivé humus qui a gardé le genre féminin (on en a des dérivés tels que humilis) et en baltique où il est le nom courant de la «terre» : lituanien žẽm[e], vieux prussien semme ; le mot slave correspondant est zemlja ; le grec a khamaí «sur terre», et avec des formes phonétiques un peu différentes, khthon «terre». Les correspondants indo-iraniens sont d'usage courant. Latin homo et hemo, gotique guma, lituanien žmu~ sont des dérivés du thème *ghem-, *ghom-, *ghm-, qui était en indo-européen le principal nom de la «terre». Pour la forme, ces dérivés ne se comprennent que si on se reporte à l'indo-européen, où ils sont de type normal. Pour le sens, ils renvoient à un temps où, toute pensée étant de type religieux, il était naturel de désigner l'«homme» par les traits qui le distinguent des dieux : la mortalité, l'habitat sur la terre.

Antoine Meillet, “Le nom d'homme” Linguistique historique et linguistique générale (1921) 274-5
Note: These words are versions of the Indo-European root khom or khem, meaning ‘man’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(n)
hume, far Red
le plus probable est qu'il faut partir d'un nominatif *hom du nom de la «terre» que le latin n'a pas gardé, et qui passait phonétiquement à *hum comme on a fur en face du grec ph[o]r ou cur qui représente quor. Antoine Meillet, “Le nom d'homme” Linguistique historique et linguistique générale (1921) 279
Note: See also source for N53 (VI.B.46):051(o) below: Irish fear [in text with duinne: person]; Latin homo, vir: man. Homo, human, and humus are cognate.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(o)
homo become vir, Orange
L'état de choses allemand concorde avec celui de la plupart des anciennes langues indo-européennes: le sanskrit oppose mánu[sdot]a[hdot] à virá[hdot] et à na (accusatif náram), le grec ánthropos (dont l'étymologie est obscure) à an[e]r, l'arménien mard (dont le sens premier est «mortel») à ayr (qui répond à grec an[e]r), le lituanien žmu~ et zmogùs à výras, le slave cloveku à moži, le gotique guma à wair, l'irlandais duine à fer, le latin enfin homo à uir. Antoine Meillet, “Le nom d'homme” Linguistique historique et linguistique générale (1921) 272
Note: See also N53 (VI.B.46):051(n) above. Latin homo, vir: man. Homo, human, and humus are cognate.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(p)
you take / her out of your vest pocket, Orange
Le résultat est que, pour le sentiment d'un Français du peuple, le mot «homme.» désigne avant tout l'opposé de la femme. Pour une femme du peuple, mon homme est la désignation constante du mari, comme la femme est la désignation universelle de l'épouse, même chez les gens qui parlent une langue distinguée. Antoine Meillet, “Le nom d'homme” Linguistique historique et linguistique générale (1921) 277
Note: As Eve was taken out of Adam, or woman from man.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(q)
commonist, Orange
La formation de humanus paraît du reste ancienne ; le lituanien a un dérivé žmo-gùs, et, au pluriel, žmónes «les hommes» ; le vieux prussien, smonenawins «l'homme». Mais, si la formation de humanus est ancienne, le mot a pris en latin savant un sens nouveau: Cicéron s'en sert pour traduire philánthropos, et d'humanitas pour traduire philanthopia, c'est-à-dire pour désigner tout ce que comporte la notion d'un homme cultivé, qui a reçu toute la culture de son temps. De par sa nature d'adjectif, le mot humain est d'ailleurs plus abstrait et plus général que le nom même de l'«homme».

Antoine Meillet, “Le nom d'homme” Linguistique historique et linguistique générale (1921) 279
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(r)
Il n'ya plus de Pyrenees, Orange
L'influence française était à l'apogée; on appelait le maréchal de Luxembourg le tapissier de Notre-Dame, tant il y avait envoyé de drapeaux ennemis, et, en 1700, le roi pouvait dire à son petit-fils Philippe d'Anjou, qui allait régner en Espagne: Il n'ya plus de Pyrénées!
[TABLE DES MOTS] 106: Louis XIV | Il n'ya plus de Pyrénées E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 48
Note: Louis XIV (1638-1715) is reputed to have said, There are no more Pyrenees — on the occasion of his declaration of Philip, Duke of Anjou, as king of Spain (1700).
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(s)
ce gros garçon gâtera tout. Red
Il était, du rest, très bon pour les pauvres et déclarait: J'aime mieux voir les courtisans rire de mon avarice, que le peuple pleurer de mes dépenses. Son successeur ne l'imita guère en cela. Louis XII avait dit de lui: Ce gros garçon gâtera tout. François Ier illustra cependant son règne par l'amour des letters et des arts.
[TABLE DES MOTS] 106: Louis XII | Ce gros garçon gâtera tout. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 32
Note: ‘This fat fellow will spoil everything’: a remark made by Louis XII (1462-1515) regarding his son-in-law, the Ccmte d'Angouleme (later Francis I), who was an incorrigible spendthrift.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(t)
Tout est perdu, fors l'honneur Orange
L'année suivante, 1525, François Ier, par aveugle bravoure, livra à Charles-Quint la désastreuse bataille de Pavie, après laquelle il écrivit à sa mère: Tout est perdu, fors l'honneur!
[TABLE DES MOTS] 106: François Ier | Tout est perdu, fors l'honneur. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 32
Note: On the defeat of the French forces in 1525 at the Battle of Pavia, Francis I (1494-1547) wrote in a letter to his mother that de toutes choses ne m'est demeuré que l'honneur et la vie: ‘Nothing is left to me except my honour and my skin’. The more pithy tout est perdu fors l'honneur is a non-historical version of the above.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(u)
Either he does or I must this very morning Orange
Henri III refusa de rentrer à Paris, et convoqua les états généraux à Blois, où le duc de Guise dut se rendre. Le 23 décembre Henri III s'écria: Il faut que je meure ou qu'il meure, et que ce soit ce matin! Quelques instants plus tard, le duc de Guise, prévenu que le roi l'attendait dans son cabinet, s'y rendit et tomba sous les coups des assassins. Henri III murmura en le voyant: Il paraît encore plus grand mort que vivant!
[TABLE DES MOTS] 106: Henri III | Il faut que je meure ou qu'il meure, et que ce soit ce matin. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 36
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(v)
plus grand mort que vivant Orange
  • FW unlocated
Henri III refusa de rentrer à Paris, et convoqua les états généraux à Blois, où le duc de Guise dut se rendre. Le 23 décembre Henri III s'écria: Il faut que je meure ou qu'il meure, et que ce soit ce matin! Quelques instants plus tard, le duc de Guise, prévenu que le roi l'attendait dans son cabinet, s'y rendit et tomba sous les coups des assassins. Henri III murmura en le voyant: Il paraît encore plus grand mort que vivant!
[TABLE DES MOTS] 106: — | Il paraît encore plus grand mort que vivant! E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 36
Note: How great he is! And greater dead than in life!: the sentiment expressed by Henri III (1551-1589) on seeing the corpse of the Duc de Guise, whose murder he had engineered.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(w)
voulez savoir le prix d'un liard Red
Pour Henri IV, il est resté le roi populaire, le bon roi Henri. Il s'arrêtait dans ses promenades pour s'informer du prix des choses: «Je voudrais savoir le prix d'un liard, disait-il, afin de ne point trop demander à ces pauvres gens.»
[TABLE DES MOTS] 106: Henri IV | Je voudrais savoir le prix d'un liard. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 36
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(x)
the 2 bubs of Ireland Orange
Son ministre favori, Sully, l'aida beaucoup en son gouvernement. Il répétait: Labourage et pâturage sont les deux mamelles de la France. Et c'est grâce à lui qu'Henri IV pouvait dire qu'il voulait voir la poule au pot de tous les paysans, chaque dimanche.
[TABLE DES MOTS] 106: Sully | Labourage et pâturage sont les deux mamelles de la France. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 39
Note: These are two breast-shaped hillocks west of Killarney, in County Kerry, called “Paps”, on the tops of which are heaps of stones that jut up like erect nipples.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(y)
Pere Joseph (2) nous avons pris / Brissach Orange
A l'étranger, il s'alliait aux protestants pour abaisser la maison d'Autriche au profit de la France, et quand, le P. Joseph agonisant, Richelieu voulut le faire revenir à lui, il ne trouva rien de mieux que ce cri où sonne le patriotisme de ces deux grands hommes: Père Joseph! Père Joseph! nous avons pris Brisach.
[TABLE DES MOTS] 106: Richelieu | Père Joseph! Père Joseph! nous avons pris Brisach. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 40
Note: This was the happy news imparted by Cardinal Richelieu (1585-1642) to his special agent, Père Joseph, as he lay dying in the Château de Ruel.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(z)
Luxemburg, c'est le tapissier de N.D. Orange
Louis XIV avait fait de Versailles le centre du monde. Les courtisans y affluaient. Un jour Jean Bart tomba sur eux à coups de poing et à coups de pied, afin de montrer au roi comment il avait vaincu les ennemis. Sire, disait-il, voilà comment je m'y suis pris. L'influence française était à l'apogée; on appelait le maréchal de Luxembourg le tapissier de Notre-Dame, tant il y avait envoyé de drapeaux ennemis, et, en 1700, le roi pouvait dire à son petit-fils Philippe d'Anjou, qui allait régner en Espagne: Il n'y a plus de Pyrénées!
[TABLE DES MOTS] 106: Les Parisiens | Luxembourg, c'est le tapissier de Notre-Dame. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 48
Note: The Maréchal de Luxemburg (1628-1695) was given the soubriquet “the tapestry-maker for Notre Dame” following his many victories. It was the custom of the day to drape the cathedral with flags seized from the enemy.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(aa)
Tirez les 1er, MM les Anglais Red
Louis XIV, frappé dans ses plus chères affections, mourut bientôt après, léguant à ses successeurs les traditions de la plus exquise courtoisie, qu'ils devaient encore exagérer jusqu'à l'imprudence. Ainsi, à la bataille de Fontenoy, en 1745, il fallut toute l'habileté du duc de Richelieu et du maréchal de Saxe pour réparer le «tour de faveur» que nous avions donné à l'ennemi, en disant, au début de l'action: Tirez les premiers, messieurs les Anglais!
[TABLE DES MOTS] 106: Le Comte d'Auteroche | Tirez les premiers, messieurs les Anglais. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 48
Note: At the start of the Battle of Fontenoy on 11 May 1745, Lord Charles Hay valourously (and foolishly) exclaimed, Messieurs des gardes français, tirez!—Gentlemen of the French Guard, Fire!—to which the aristocratic Compte d'Auteroches graciously (and even more foolishly) responded—Gentlemen, we are never the first to fire, fire yourselves. This courtesy cost the gallant French the whole of their front line.
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(ab)
[Tomley] Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 51(ac)
apres nous deluge Red
Louis XV était trop jeune pour gouverner lui-même au moment où Louis XIV mourut (1715). Son cousin le duc d'Orléans, qui prit la régence du royaume, vécut dans l'infamie, aidé par son triste précepteur et conseiller Dubois. Ce dernier finissait souvent par dégoûter le Régent lui-même, qui lui disait: Un peu de droiture, je t'en prie! Pendant ce temps, le vieux maréchal de Villeroi disait à Louis XV, en lui montrant la foule: Sire, tout ce peuple est à vous! Il n'en fallait pas tant pour perdre complètement un prince qui avait sous les yeux les pires exemples, qui subissait tous les entraînements et devait se débarrasser plus tard des préoccupations de l'avenir, en disant négligemment: Cela durera bien autant que moi. Après moi, le déluge. Sous un tel règne, c'est à l'armée qu'on trouve les plus beaux traits.
[TABLE DES MOTS] 107: Louis XV | Cela durera bien autant que moi. Après moi le déluge. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 51
Note: The well-known, if pompous, epigram was communicated in a letter by Madame de Pompadour to Louis XV after his defeat at the Battle of Rossbach in November 1757.
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(a)
après demain the coq de village,
Nous avons déjà vu comment s'était engagée la bataille de Fontenoy, en 1745. Louis XV, qui avait amené son fils avec lui, le conduisit sur le champ de bataille, au milieu des morts et des blessés, et lui dit: Apprenez, mon fils, à ne pas jouer avec la vie de vos sujets. Malheureusement il poussait trop loin ses dédains royaux, et, sous prétexte de ne pas faire la paix en marchand, mais en roi, il signa le traité d'Aix-la- Chapelle, en 1748, qui ne nous était d'aucun profit après beaucoup d'efforts. Mais les soldats n'avaient cure de ces grands démêlés. Ils faisaient la guerre en s'amusant. Un jour, Mme Favard, célèbre actrice, qui suivait les troupes, fit afficher sur son théâtre, au camp, cet avis: Demain, relâche à cause de la bataille; après-demain, le «Coq du village».
[TABLE DES MOTS] 107: Mme Favart | Demain, relâche à cause de la bataille. Après-demain, le «Coq du Village». E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 52
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(b)
this cockade'll go round the world Red
Le lendemain, la garde nationale était formée. Elle prenait pour chef La Fayette qui, plaçant le blanc (couleur de la royauté) entre le bleu et le rouge (couleurs de la municipalité), inaugura ainsi la cocarde tricolore, et la confia à ses soldats en disant: Elle fera le tour du monde.
[TABLE DES MOTS] 107: La Fayette | Cette cocarde fera le tour du monde. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 56
Note: That is, the tricolour. It was presented to Louis XVI at the Hôtel-de-Ville by the Marquis de Lafayette, in 1789.
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(c)
all seen, all heard forgotten Green
Dès les 5 et 6 octobre 1789, les révolutionnaires attaquèrent ouvertement la famille royale et saccagèrent Versailles. Lorsque, quelques mois plus tard, on demanda à la reine ce qu'elle savait sur ces journées, elle répondit: J'ai tout vu, tout entendu et tout oublié.
[TABLE DES MOTS] 107: Marie- Antoinette | J'ai tout vu, tout entendu et tout oublié. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 56
Note: The reply of Marie Antoinette (1755-1793), when interrogated by the judges of the Châtelet about the outrages committed in her presence during the removal of the royal family from Verseilles to Paris after the Revolution.
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(d)
Is yesterday not over, Ma Red
Le lendemain du 20 juin, entendant un roulement de tambour, le jeune Dauphin demandait avec frayeur: Maman, est-ce qu'hier n'est pas encore fini? Hélas! les violences allaient redoubler.
[TABLE DES MOTS] 107: Le Dauphin (Louis XVII) | Maman, est-ce qu'hier n'est pas encore fini? E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 59
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(e)
we need no blotting-paper Green
Au siège de Toulon, Bonaparte commençait sa carrière. Le sergent Junot, dit la Tempête, écrivait, un jour, une lettre sous sa dictée. Il l'avait à peine terminée, qu'une bombe anglaise éclate auprès de lui et couvre la lettre de terre: Bon, dit Junot, nous n'avions pas besoin de sable pour sécher l'encre! Cette intrépidité décida de sa fortune.
[TABLE DES MOTS] 107: Junot | Bon! nous n'avions pas besoin de sable pour sécher l'encre. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 59
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(f)
40 centuries have their eyes on you Red
C'est en Egypte qu'il les mena. Bonaparte rencontra l'armée ennemie au pied des pyramides. Il s'adressa alors à ses troupes: Songez que, du haut de ces pyramides, quarante siècles vous contemplent.
[TABLE DES MOTS] 107: Bonaparte | Songez que du haut de ces Pyramides quarante siècles vous contemplent. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 60
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(g)
N'est pas athée qui veut Red
Napoléon abdiqua cette fois définitivement et écrivit au prince régent d'Angleterre : Je viens, comme Thémistocle, m'asseoir au foyer du peuple britannique. Pour toute réponse, on l'enyoya dans l'île Sainte-Hélène, où il fut gardé à vue, privé même de toutes communications avec son fils. Six ans de cette torture suffirent à le tuer. Il demanda les secours de la religion, ayant déclaré un jour: N'est pas athée qui veut.
[TABLE DES MOTS] 107: Napoléon Ier | N'est pas athé qui veut. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 68
Note: While in exile at Saint Helena, Napoleon remarked: One cannot be an atheist merely by desiring it.
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(h)
dance on volcano Green
Le 31 mai 1830, le duc d'Orléans donna une grande fête au Palais- Royal en l'honneur du roi de Naples. Charles X y assistait et disait, souriant: Les vents sont au nord, bon présage pour ma flotte d'Alger; tandis que M. Salvandy, prévoyant la révolution, disait au duc d'Orléans: C'est une vraie fête napolitaine : nous dansons sur un volcan.
[TABLE DES MOTS] 108: M. de Salvandy | Nous dansons sur un volcan. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 72
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(i)
Ch. X only a place in pit Blue
Malgré ses infirmités, Louis XVIII remplit jusqu'au bout les devoirs de sa charge. Le roi peut mourir, disait-il à M. de Villèle, son ministre, il ne doit pas être malade. Après sa mort, Charles X fît son entrée triomphale à Paris, et voulut qu'on laissât la foule approcher de lui. Point de hallebardes, dit-il. C'est lui qui, refusant de faire intervenir l'autorité royale dans une question dramatique, déclara: Au théâtre je n'ai que ma place au parterre.
[TABLE DES MOTS] 107: Charles X | Au théâtre, je n'ai que ma place au parterre. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 72
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(j)
Sire, best of republics Blue
Les ordonnances supprimant la liberté de la presse, les journalistes de l'opposition rédigèrent, le 26 juillet 1830, une protestation. Quand M. Thiers eut fini de l'écrire, comme on ne se pressait pas de la signer: Il faut des noms, s'écria-t-il, il faut des têtes en bas! Et quarante et une signatures furent données sur-le-champ. C'est ainsi qu'on aboutit à la royauté de Louis-Philippe, à qui La Fayette disait: Vous êtes la meilleure des républiques!
[TABLE DES MOTS] 108: La Fayette | Vous êtes la meilleure des Républiques. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 75
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(k)
We 3, they 7 = Red
Pendant ce temps se poursuivait héroïquement la conquête de l'Algérie. Constantine ayant résisté à un premier siège, l'armée bat en retraite. Changarnier, à l'arrière-garde, est un moment enveloppé par les Arabes: Nous sommes trois cents, ils sont six mille, la partie est égale, s'écrie-t-il, et sa vigoureuse défense sauve la retraite.
[TABLE DES MOTS] 108: Le Général Changarnier | Nous sommes trois cents, ils sont six mille: la partie est égale. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 75
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(l)
No, sire, I'm dead Green
Enfin, en 1837, après des efforts inouïs, Constantine est prise. Le colonel Combes vient de recevoir deux coups de feu à la poitrine. L'épée haute, il rend compte au duc de Nemours du progrès des troupes et s'estime heureux d'avoir pu travailler encore pour le roi et la France. «Mais vous êtes donc blessé?» demanda le prince.—Non, Monseigneur, je suis mort! Il expirait quelques heures plus tard.
[TABLE DES MOTS] 108: Le Colonel Combes | Non, Monseigneur, je suis mort. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 75
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(m)
comme Ch. X Red
  • FW unlocated
Et Louis-Philippe, vaincu, quittait la France, en répétant: Comme Charles X!
[TABLE DES MOTS] 108: Louis-Philippe | Comme Charles X. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 76
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(n)
Have you seen Bugeaud's cap
Cependant, la révolution approchait. On songea, pour la combattre, au maréchal Bugeaud, devenu légendaire en Algérie. Dans une surprise, il avait perdu son shako, qu'il appelait sa « casquette ». Les soldats avaient aussitôt adapté à leurs sonneries les mots fameux: As-tu vu la casquette du père Bugeaud?
[TABLE DES MOTS] 108: Les soldats de Bugeaud | As-tu vu la casquette du père Bugeaud? E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 76
Note: As-tu vu la casquette au père Bugeaud as a phrase derives from a song written in honour of Maréchal Bugeaud (1784-1849) who habitually sported a bizarre hat while Governor of Algeria.
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(o)
j'y suis, j'y reste Red
Ainsi fut sauvé l'étendard aux trois couleurs que Mac-Mahon, quelques années plus tard, en Crimée, le 8 septembre 1855, plantait sur la tour Malakoff, en répondant aux ordres qui voulaient l'arracher au danger: J'y suis, j'y reste!
[TABLE DES MOTS] 108: Mac-Mahon | J'y suis, j'y reste. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 76
Note: That is, in English, ‘Here I am, here I remain’. This remark was made by Maréchal Patrice de MacMahon in 1855 when it was inquired of him if he could retain a fortress that he had just captured, the Malakoff near Sebastopol.
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(p)
vive la Pologne (C. Floquet) Red
  • FW unlocated
Après les expéditions de Crimée, d'Italie, de Chine et du Mexique, l'Empire était officiellement, en 1867, à l'apogée de sa gloire, pendant l'exposistion universelle que visitaient à l'envi les souverains d'Europe. C'est à ce moment que M. Floquet, dont le chapeau fut désormais légendaire, s'imposa à la postérité, en apostrophant l'empereur de Russie de ces mots: Vive la Pologne, Monsieur!
[TABLE DES MOTS] 108: M. Floquet | Vive la Pologne, Monsieur! E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 79
Note: According to the story, Charles Floquet was one of a crowd of barristers that cried out Long live Poland! on the occasion of the visit of Czar Alexander II to the Palais de Justice in Paris on 4 June 1867.
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(q)
probable words possibly said Red
Nous croyons, en effet, que pour avoir droit à être cité,—excusez le paradoxe!—il suffit qu'un mot historique soit non pas historiquement vrai, mais historiquement vraisemblable. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 5
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(r)
gleaning words in field Red
Cependant, nous n'avons pu que glaner, dans notre champ national, et nous prévoyons que nos lecteurs regrettereont tel ou tel mot que nous n'avons ni oublié ni méconnu, mais simplement ajourné. Nous avons pensé à ces regrets d'une façon pratique. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 6
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(s)
family words Red
Des pages blanches, à la fin du volume, sont prêtes à recevoir les croquis, ou au moins la mention des mots préférés qui n'ont pu être cités dans les pages précédentes. Il n'est pas de famille qui n'ait quelques souvenirs d'hier ou d'autrefois transmis aux enfants comme un précieux héritage. E. Trogan, Les Mots Historiques du Pays de France (1922) 6
N53 (VI.B.46): 52(t)
eagle & cock Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 53(a)
Spanish
Note: Index title. Underlined in red.
N53 (VI.B.46): 53(b)
seu attenndto, once trenlydos,
Note: Spanish atento: attentive; once: eleven; treinta y dos: two and thirty.
N53 (VI.B.46): 53(c)
lluvia, llover,
Note: Spanish lluvia: rain; llover: to rain.
N53 (VI.B.46): 53(d)
paraguas, Green
Note: Spanish paraguas: an umbrella. Cf. FW 520.15.
N53 (VI.B.46): 53(e)
mayo,
N53 (VI.B.46): 53(f)
hombre, hambre Orange
Note: Spanish hombre: man; hambre: hungry.
N53 (VI.B.46): 53(g)
[??] m'u orunca,
N53 (VI.B.46): 54(a)
buck terp
N53 (VI.B.46): 54(b)
hoof nutty
N53 (VI.B.46): 54(c)
do a mayflower
N53 (VI.B.46): 54(d)
restaged
N53 (VI.B.46): 54(e)
Litt (63.28)
N53 (VI.B.46): 54(f)
4 fathom groom / 40 in bride Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 54(g)
decathlon contest
N53 (VI.B.46): 54(h)
the girles were boys
[Indeed I regard the division of substantives acccording to gender as a temporary fashion … undoubtdly, in prehistoric times, words had as yet no gender.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 31
N53 (VI.B.46): 54(i)
then [because] plural
[A nice observation is the fact that, in German specially, those words that are commonly used in the neutral plural … have changed gender more easily than other words.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 32
N53 (VI.B.46): 54(j)
plural became sing.
[Old plural forms such as ‘dozen’ are used as singular forms in many languages.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 32
N53 (VI.B.46): 54(k)
brother (is) hit (me)
[We are so accustomed to give our words the meaning which our imagination deduces from the circumstances that we … clearly differentiate between ‘I hit my brother’ and ‘I am hit by my brother’. There can be no doubt that, long ago, language made no distinction between active and passive, comparable to the language of a two-year-old child. ‘Brother hit!’ the child cries and because of the circumstances the mother knows what the child means.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 33
N53 (VI.B.46): 54(l)
timeword more / developed than / spaceword
[It is even less evident that the Verb — because of its developed temporal forms — is called ‘timeword’ (Zeitwort) in German. The linguistic development might just as well have taken the opposite course, so that, for instance, direction … would be expressed by means of spatial forms of the verb, analogous to our temporal forms.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 37
N53 (VI.B.46): 55(a)
the kiss O
N53 (VI.B.46): 55(b)
intransitive space Red
[The three spatial dimensions do not necessarily imply movement. Movement is always accompanied by a change in the fourth dimension, time. There is something intransitive about space, something transitive about time.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 39
N53 (VI.B.46): 55(c)
he shall have / not tense enough Red
[We are short of … a future sense of prophecy … We do not have a ‘futurum exactum’, the pre-future … But we do not have the logically-required tense to express a future that is even further away than the future starting point. … Because of our position in time we need at least nine clearly-separate tenses to express temporal relationships; yet we have only six tenses.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 42
N53 (VI.B.46): 55(d)
24 express [sociable] Red
[… the twenty seven Korean expressions of courtesy.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 46
N53 (VI.B.46): 55(e)
may it please majesty Red
Geruhen Majestät, ausgefahren zu werden? [May it please Your Majesty to be transported?] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 46
N53 (VI.B.46): 55(f)
in beginning was / the sentence Not cancelled
[Grammatical study shows that there have always been sentences, even in prehistoric times, and never separate individual words, and that the first cry already expressed a sentence.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 47
N53 (VI.B.46): 55(g)
That (1st word) Red
  • FW unlocated
[The exclamation of surprise or astonishment, which may be connected with our expression ‘there!’ (da!) — what we can interpret as the demonstrative pronoun that (das — …] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 48
N53 (VI.B.46): 55(h)
du & near & like (ness) Red
[In Chinese, the pronoun for the second person coincides with conjunctions for spatial and temporal proximity, as well as with expressions for likeness (resemblance)]. Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 51
N53 (VI.B.46): 55(i)
das heisst Ihr.
[Conversely, in some dialects we may say, when looking at an awesome painting … Da muss ich Sie sagen. (In the region of the Bodense, perhaps under Austrian influence: Das heisst Ihr. [German Das Heisst Ihr: you call it.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 51
N53 (VI.B.46): 55(j)
Imp & vocative 1st
[If we could shed the habit of starting from the infinitive and the nominative, we would understand that the vocative and imperative cases are the oldest forms of the substantive and the verb.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 52
N53 (VI.B.46): 55(k)
du tense of da
[Since we have seen that linguistic communciation between people could not emerge from anything other than an exhortatory exclamation, our notion of ‘thou’ (du) is some kind of subsidiary form of the genus generalissimum, the demonstrative pronoun ‘this’ (da) or ‘that’ (das). Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 53
N53 (VI.B.46): 55(l)
[letter] in past tense Red
[Just as we only perceive the light from a fixed star years after it is sent out, we feel the prick of a needle only when it is already part of the past. Therefore, the present is not a reality — it exists only in our mind or consciousness. A pedant would never say, Lightning strikes, only that it struck, the way the Romans predated the events they mentioned in their letters, because they took the point of view of the addressee.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 68
N53 (VI.B.46): 55(m)
wo ist die Reise Red
  • FW unlocated
[Wind is not a concrete thing: it is a movement. The effort on the part of contemporary natural sciences to reduce every observation to periodical movements eventually collides with the idea that all of our knowledge is subjective, that our language is an airy net of abstractions. We laugh at the child to whom a journey was promised and who, confronted with mountains and lakes and forests far away from home, naively asks, Yes, but where is the journey? [Wo ist die Reise?] We are just as naive when we ask the physicist, Yes, but where is the wind?] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 85
N53 (VI.B.46): 55(n)
when H without / his quality
N53 (VI.B.46): 56(a)
36.68 / Eur 36.80
N53 (VI.B.46): 56(b)
96 Ave. Mozart / 5 rue Broussaais / Av. Gde Armée, / Villaret de Joyeuse 5 / 10 rue Faraday
N53 (VI.B.46): 56(c)
X [Kistulu]
N53 (VI.B.46): 56(d)
60. Ch O'C[?] / 440 Br [??]
N53 (VI.B.46): 56(e)
Ntamplin Red
Note: Possibly from Mauthner. Dublin is intended. [In Middle Greek 'd' was written as 'nt' and 'b' was written as 'mp'.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 56(f)
Bisshopp Red
Note: In text with chess (bishop, rook). Bishop Rock Lighthouse, Scilly Isles. Server boy (mass). Buoy.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(a)
Portuguese Not cancelled
Note: Index title. Underlined in red-orange, not crossed out. This language is primarily associated with Shem in I.7 and II.3. In the glosses to this Index certain orthographical conventions — /mpt/ rather than the current /nt/ — introduced since Joyce's time have not been adopted. [Unit in text with Port. povo: people.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(b)
dor (pain), Green
Note: Portuguese dôr: pain.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(c)
O mar, Orange
Note: Portuguese [o] mar: [the] sea.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(d)
Enjooy / Se, Orange
Note: Portuguese enjoo: qualm, disgust, nausea. With Eng. ‘enjoy’. Se: oneself.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(e)
bem, Green
  • FW unlocated
Note: Portuguese bem: advantage, edge, benefit.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(f)
invencaon, Green
Note: Portuguese invenção: invention. Joyce adapted ‘convocation’ on the basis of this reading. Cf. convocação: convocation.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(g)
manha,
Note: Portuguese manhã: morning.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(h)
outomno, Green
Note: Portuguese outono: autumn.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(i)
navio, popa, Green
Note: Portuguese navio: ship; popa: stern [of ship].
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(j)
— im, Green
Note: Portuguese:
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(k)
[n]this,
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(l)
para (pour) Green
Note: Portuguese para: for (Fr. pour). [In text with Portuguese São: saint.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(m)
no (in) Green
  • FW unlocated
Note: Port. em means ‘in’. [Where this is followed by the masculine article /o/, it becomes no, thus no jardin means ‘in the garden’.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(n)
circumstancias, Green
Note: Portuguese circunstáncia: circumstance.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(o)
sala d'espera, / so ([??])
Note: Portuguese sala de espera: antechamber, waiting room. : sole, alone.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(p)
hospadaria, Green
Note: Portuguese hóspedaria: lodging-house, inn.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(q)
cama,
Note: Portuguese cama: bed, couch.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(r)
mesa redonda, Green
Note: Portuguese mesa redonda: round table, table d'hote.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(s)
it will / be precise to ([baroque]) Green
Note: Preciso is used in Portuguese with the verb to be ser to denote necessity. The above thus means ‘it will be necessary to — ’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(t)
acordar / (waken), Green
Note: Portuguese acordå: to (a)wake. [In text with Eng., according.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(u)
jantar (dinner), Orange
Note: Portuguese o jantar: dinner; jantar: to dine.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(v)
peixies, Orange
Note: Portuguese peixe(s): fish(es).
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(w)
peru (turkey) Orange
Note: Portuguese perú: turkey cock.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(x)
lorange
Note: Portuguese laranja: orange [fruit].
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(y)
tangerina, Green
Note: Portuguese tangerina: tangerine [orange of Tanger].
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(z)
Estrella Green
Note: Portuguese estrella: star.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(aa)
[verlittle],
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(ab)
difficultous, Green
Note: Portuguese difficultoso: difficult.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(ac)
assumpto
Note: Portuguese assumpto: matter, issue, topic.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(ad)
prace, Green
Note: Portuguese praça: market-place, exchange.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(ae)
preto (dark) Green
Note: Portuguese preto: dark.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(af)
padeiro (baker) Green
Note: Portuguese padeiro: baker.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(ag)
alfaiate (tailor) Green
Note: Portuguese alfaiate: tailor.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(ah)
pattern, Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(ai)
precise of a pair of, Orange
Note: This imitates the Portuguese use of precisão and means ‘in need of a pair of — ’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(aj)
cor (colour) Green
Note: Portuguese côr: colour, hue.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(ak)
no espello (in glass) Green
Note: Portuguese no espelho: in the looking glass.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(al)
cor preto Green
  • FW unlocated
Note: Portuguese côr preto: dark colour.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(am)
branco, Green
Note: Portuguese branco: white, blanched.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(an)
amarello, Green
Note: Portuguese amarello: yellow.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(ao)
azul, Green
Note: Portuguese azul: blue.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(ap)
vermehlo, Green
Note: Portuguese vermelho: red, vermillion.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(aq)
suspensao,
Note: Port. suspensão: suspension.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(ar)
[fustao] Green
  • FW unlocated
Note: Fustão is a kind of coarse twilled cotton fabric, fustian.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(as)
tesoura, Orange
Note: Portuguese tesoura: a pair of scissors.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(at)
dedal, dedi, Green
Note: Portuguese dedal: thimble.
N53 (VI.B.46): 57(au)
alfinete, Green
  • FW unlocated
Note: Portuguese alfinete: pin. Joyce seems to have confused this word with ‘alfaiate’ above, as FW 180.12 — alfaiate punxit — would then more sensibly mean ‘pin pricked’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(a)
roupa ~
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(b)
~ branca, Green
  • FW unlocated
Note: Portuguese roupa branca: clean linen.
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(c)
[??] / lessive,
Note: French lessive: detergent.
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(d)
blowing sheet (hank) Green
Note: Portuguese lenço de assoar: pocket handkerchief. [Lenço means Sheet.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(e)
[??]
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(f)
amagoa ([??]) / justilho (stays) Green
Note: Portuguese âmago: heart, pith; justilho: bodice, stays. [In text with Eng., goaded into adjusting/loosening.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(g)
sabaou / (soap) Green
Note: Portuguese sabão: soap.
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(h)
[amadriar]
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(i)
bigote / (moustache), Green
Note: Portuguese bigodes: moustache, whiskers.
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(j)
criado (servant) Green
Note: Portuguese criada: maid, servant.
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(k)
boastarde (gd. even.) Orange
Note: Portuguese boa tarde: good evening.
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(l)
caboodle, Orange
Note: [Eng.] Caboodle, or crowd.
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(m)
garganta (throat) Orange
Note: Portuguese garganta: throat.
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(n)
comer Orange
Note: Portuguese comér: to eat, devour.
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(o)
baroto (cheap) Green
Note: Portuguese barato: cheap, inexpensive.
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(p)
bonito, / chove, pedras,
Note: Portuguese boonito: pretty; chuva: rain; pedra[s]: stone[s].
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(q)
River Jachary, Orange
Note: Jacaré, a cayman (a type of alligator).
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(r)
Iles azures,
Note: The Azores; ilha: island.
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(s)
feiria quarta Green
  • FW unlocated
Note: Portuguese quarta-feira: Wednesday.
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(t)
Dia dos Finados (2. xi) Green
Note: Portuguese Dia dos finados: All Souls Day [November 2.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(u)
relogion (watch) Orange
Note: Portuguese relógio: watch, timepiece.
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(v)
tresdobre, Orange
Note: Portuguese tresdobrar: to treble; tresdobre is used specifically to mean a kind of military evolution.
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(w)
povo (people) / Brasil, back [??] Orange
Note: Portuguese povo: people. Brasíl, or Brazil (formerly a Portugese colony). [Cf. Brasil, the fabled Island of the Blest.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(x)
Dinamarqueza, Orange
Note: Portuguese Dinamarquês: Danish.
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(y)
Lourenço Tulo Green
Note: Portuguese Lourenço: Laurence. [Also, Laurence O'Toole.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 58(z)
monge, Green
Note: Portuguese monje: monk.
N53 (VI.B.46): 59(a)
Greek
Note: Index title. Underlined in green.
N53 (VI.B.46): 59(b)
apaxyomenos, Green
Note: Apaxioumenos is the particle of the verb meaning ‘to disclaim as unworthy’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 59(c)
henoptysie, Green
Note: Hemiopsy is a disease of the eye in which one half of the visual field is masked.
N53 (VI.B.46): 59(d)
euphoria, Green
Note: The Greek-derived word Euphoria most originally denoted ‘fecundity’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 59(e)
diadumenos, Green
Note: Diadoumenos is the participle of the verb meaning ‘to bind on both sides’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 60(a)
S N U G / G U N S Red
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 60(b)
protonotary Red
Note: Protonotary: chief notary or chief clerk or registrar of a court.
N53 (VI.B.46): 60(c)
Redland
N53 (VI.B.46): 60(d)
Tin[?]
N53 (VI.B.46): 60(e)
46 Santé / Gob. 34⁄74
N53 (VI.B.46): 60(f)
logic ([logir])
[right margin, Grammatik und Logik; Sprachen und Logiken] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 1
N53 (VI.B.46): 60(g)
the tree greens [me] Red
[People would be surprised were a scholar to say, The tree greens me, rather than, The tree is green.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 5
N53 (VI.B.46): 60(h)
good - better / am was
[It is typical that the most common adjective — good, better — does not have regular degrees of comparison. Similarly, the most common verb — to be, am, was — has an irregular conjunction.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 12
N53 (VI.B.46): 60(i)
inedible Red
[The contradistinction ‘edible-inedible’ may be even older. Today, these two categories still apply, for instance in the classification of fungi.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 13
N53 (VI.B.46): 60(j)
speaker behind intransitive
[right margin, Intransitive Verben] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 19
N53 (VI.B.46): 60(k)
Esk. liv & dead
[When we realise that most languages do not distinguish gender, that, for instance, the Eskimos segregate things into living and dead objects, we would perforce admire the linguistic imagination of the Eskimos and consider our own sex-driven phantasy merely barbarian.] Fritz Mauthner, Beiträge zu einer Kritik der Sprache. 3 vols (1901-2) III 28
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(a)
White Slave
The White Slave Market Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) title
Note: Index title. Underlined in green.
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(b)
Major (S. Army), Green
The second story, which follows, is from the records of Major Hillyer, Matron of Mackirdy House: A captain of the Salvation Army in Holland wrote to Major Hillyer informing her that a young girl aged sixteen was being sent to a situation in London. Before the girl arrived an officer called on the future mistress, but was treated with scant courtesy, and, the interview being so unsatisfactory, it was thought advisable that the girl should not go to the place. The girl was met at Liverpool Street Station and taken to the midnight quarters of the Salvation Army, instead of to the situation. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 14
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(c)
servation, ~ Green
A young German girl wrote from her home to a Registry Office in London inquiring if she could get a situation as servant. The woman in charge of the office wrote and told her to come to England and she would get a place at once. On the girl's arrival she found that the house was a house of infamy, and straightway went wrong. She was rescued, but too late to save her honour, by two gentlemen whom she happened to hear speaking German at a railway station, and whom she told of her trouble. They went to the Salvation Army Depot at Regent Street and reported the matter. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 15
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(d)
~ the life, ~ Not cancelled
After a great deal of difficulty some officers got the girl away from the bad house into a Home, but she would not stay, “the life” having taken too great a hold of her. This is a case of a quite good girl falling on coming to London. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 15
Note: ‘the life’, prostitution.
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(e)
~ went wrong, Green
A young German girl wrote from her home to a Registry Office in London inquiring if she could get a situation as servant. The woman in charge of the office wrote and told her to come to England and she would get a place at once. On the girl's arrival she found that the house was a house of infamy, and straightway went wrong. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 15
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(f)
tout, Green
It was not long ago that a magistrate dealing with a case of a man touting for patrons for a fearful, low house, said that it seemed almost a worse thing for unhappy women to be driven into hideous secret dens than for them to be situated where they could be watched by the police. We agree with this entirely. It cannot serve the purpose of morality, health, or cleanliness, nor advance the ideals of Christianity one jot, to drive away numbers of diseased, unhappy, deplorable women from positions where society could, as it were, keep a guard over them, to by-ways and slums where they can entice perhaps ignorant and undefended men, rob them, blackmail them, invest them with disease, and let them go forth to taint others with whom they come in contact. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 16
Note: See also: N53 (VI.B.46):061(j). The ‘tout’ was the fine fellow who solicited clients for the whores.
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(g)
procuress, Green
The reason this fearful trade exists and flourishes in the midst and under the very noses of good, proper-living people is, primarily, because of the existence of the despicable creatures known as “pimps” and “bludgers.” Thousands of men known as “bludgers” live upon the tainted earnings of unfortunate women; and there are hundreds aye, thousands of procuresses who make large sums by decoying girls to sin. The law deals very lightly with these three classes of individuals, who keep the trade flourishing so that they themselves may flourish. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 24f
Note: The ‘procuress’ by solicitations and promises diverted young women into prostitution.
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(h)
pimp, Green
The plague of the “pimp” and his co-partner, the procuress, in Egypt is bad enough, in all conscience, but, from a European standpoint, it does not assume the awful seriousness of the aspect of the traffic in the Middle East and the Far East as regards the literal slaughter of white women and girls. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 28
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(i)
bludger, Green
Thousands of men known as “bludgers” live upon the tainted earnings of unfortunate women; and there are hundreds aye, thousands of procuresses who make large sums by decoying girls to sin. The law deals very lightly with these three classes of individuals, who keep the trade flourishing so that they themselves may flourish. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 24f
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(j)
tout, Green
It was not long ago that a magistrate dealing with a case of a man touting for patrons for a fearful, low house, said that it seemed almost a worse thing for unhappy women to be driven into hideous secret dens than for them to be situated where they could be watched by the police. We agree with this entirely. It cannot serve the purpose of morality, health, or cleanliness, nor advance the ideals of Christianity one jot, to drive away numbers of diseased, unhappy, deplorable women from positions where society could, as it were, keep a guard over them, to by-ways and slums where they can entice perhaps ignorant and undefended men, rob them, blackmail them, invest them with disease, and let them go forth to taint others with whom they come in contact. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 16
Note: See also: N53 (VI.B.46):061(f). The ‘tout’ was the fine fellow who solicited clients for the whores.
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(k)
scharlotte runners, Green
[In Egypt, the girls employed ‘runners’, youths, to attract customers. Mr Willis, the co-author, at one time bribed a clerk to led him to a caged batch of eleven very young Greek girls ready for shipment. For his protection, Willis took with him his Colt ‘six-shooter’.] Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 36
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(l)
sixshooter
I fixed a time in the afternoon, and at the appointed hour I pocketed my revolver—as a precautionary measure—filled my pocket with Burma cigars, and, accompanied by the clerk, drove off in a ramshackle trap to one of the suburbs of Cairo. On the journey I explained to my companion the killing power of a Colt six-shooter. This was another precautionary measure, to disabuse his mind of any possible idea of having “a cheap proposition” to face if treachery were in the air. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 36
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(m)
Gage St. Green
In Hong-Kong Gage Street, and other streets running off Gage Street, are full of bad houses. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 56
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(n)
Lyndhurst Terrace, Green
In Lyndhurst Terrace too are houses occupied by American “missuses.” Hundreds of American girls pass through Gage Street and Lyndhurst Terrace during the year, and, if they live, eventually find themselves, when their bloom is gone, and they become addicted to drink and drugs, in the Chinese quarter in Takkn Road, where nearly three hundred brothels exist, each house containing from a dozen to twenty unfortunates of all colours, creeds, and castes. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 56
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(o)
missus Green
The traffic at Hong-Kong and Shanghai is principally in the hands of American “missuses” that is, the big traffic in white girls is in the hands of these women. […] Hundreds of American girls pass through Gage Street and Lyndhurst Terrace during the year, and, if they live, eventually find themselves, when their bloom is gone, and they become addicted to drink and drugs, in the Chinese quarter in Takkn Road, where nearly three hundred brothels exist, each house containing from a dozen to twenty unfortunates of all colours, creeds, and castes. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 56
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(p)
crany (clerk) Green
One of the leading “missuses” of Lyndhurst Terrace actually told me that she draws her supplies from New York and San Prancisco, generally by cable code. […] She has no lover or protector. She speculates in rubber, in tin, and in rice, and it is said that it takes three or four cranys (clerks) to keep her books in order. The saddest feature of this fearful woman's excursions is her return to Hong-Kong to her place of infamy. She nearly always returns alone. The daughters of America are left behind God only knows where, and God only knows their end. And this is what they call triumphant civilisation! Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 57f
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(q)
Scott's road Green
Where the American girls disappear to, once they leave the “Harem,” is a secret surrounded with much mystery, as few if any of these particular women find themselves in the Chinese dens at Scott's Road. Scott's Road is a very notorious quarter containing about three hundred Chinese dens. Each den shelters from ten to fifteen or twenty girls of every nationality. The place is as dangerous as it is loathsome. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 74
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(r)
Malay Street, Green
Every boat that comes to Singapore brings its quota of human freight in the form of these unfortunate, misled girls, nearly all of whom go into Malay Street and are borne out again only to be buried. It is a national disgrace that we as sane men and women cannot look this fearful evil in the face and deal with it without fear and trembling, for the protection of the young, the innocent, and the ignorant. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 103
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(s)
foreigner,
These creatures are almost all foreigners, and many of them have a sort of loud smartness and flashy appearance which might well appeal to ignorant and innocent girls of the poorer classes. The business of these men is to decoy into the public market, for public hire, women who are charming to look at and who are likely to please the senses of men who will pay for them. These women must ply their trade at certain given houses. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 107
Note: Most of the pimps operating in Singapore were foreigners.
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(t)
fallener (W), Green
I wondered how on earth any human being could stay in such a place with such truly contemptuous people for a single moment longer than was absolutely compulsory. This is, of course, an extreme case, and wiser counsels and more Christian wisdom now prevail. “Fallen women” are given a far better chance than they used to be given even ten years ago, and many of the rescue homes are quite charming places. But how are these poor women to know this? Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 111
Note: The authors cite the often shoddy treatment meted out to the women in such institutions as the Magdalene's Home.
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(u)
uplift, Green
[The authors cite the often shoddy treatment meted out to ‘fallen women’ by such institutions as the Magdalene's Home, where the zealous ‘rescue work’ to uplift and restore the whores to respectable living was accompanied with excessive preaching.] Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 110
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(v)
rescue work Green
They will not of course face the question of going into rescue homes and putting themselves into the hands of rescue workers, because they have been told, and in some cases also they know from experience of these places, that they are hard and cruel. The women are looked upon with suspicion and with immense contempt. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 110
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(w)
magdalen, Green
I myself visited a Home once when I first came to this country. I did not know quite what I was going to see, but was invited to inspect the work of some “sisters,” and I was taken into what was called a “Magdalenes' Home.” A number of women with close-cropped hair were at work over wash-tubs in a semi-underground place. They had hideous little caps tied partly over their heads, and stiff straight gowns of a very ugly material. They were, in fact, branded; and the “saintly sisters” went among them with the same sort of air that one would have if compelled to walk among lepers or plague-stricken people. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 110
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(x)
petted, Green
But only a few of the girls are petted, or are kept by the “pimps” for themselves. They are most of them simply slaves; they never handle the money that is due to them from their terrible work. They have no right to make any objection to any man who may be sent to them. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 113
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(y)
sisterhood, Green
If the “pimp” and his woman have an open quarrel, jealousy on the part of the woman sometimes induces that climax, but even then she does not hand him over to the law. What she does is to give her late hero money to quit the country, and she tells him to be gone. He goes, making a pretence of being broken-hearted and drowned in tears, and shortly he returns smiling, with another fair-headed and blue-eyed, golden-slippered recruit to the sisterhood, a person who is perhaps fonder of him than is his first “missus.” Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 113
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(z)
flirtation, Green
On the way out to the East the girls are often made very useful to their masters by being set to decoy some young Britisher who is travelling. The girl is compelled to attract the young man and begin a flirtation. The slave trader so contrives that the guilty pair are caught in a compromising situation, and as what he wants is money the young man who has been trapped is unscrupulously blackmailed. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 116
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(aa)
Britisher, Green
On the way out to the East the girls are often made very useful to their masters by being set to decoy some young Britisher who is travelling. The girl is compelled to attract the young man and begin a flirtation. The slave trader so contrives that the guilty pair are caught in a compromising situation, and as what he wants is money the young man who has been trapped is unscrupulously blackmailed. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 116
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(ab)
respectable Green
So the traders in the East find it a desirable part of a very lucrative trade to pander to these men. They are offered by these rich natives thousands of pounds and jewels if they can procure for them a pretty young white girl. They will have nothing at all to do with the demimonde in the East—the girls they want must be brought especially for them, and they must be respectable. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 117
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(ac)
forget the native tongue, bosom,
But if there is a child the girl's fate is very sad, as she and her offspring are very much despised, and they are often both murdered and put out of the way. Mr. Willis sketched a picture of a beautiful Italian girl who had been brought to Burma from Europe, on order. She was quite beautiful, an Italian who had been sold to a native man. When she had a child she was put into native dress and thrown out into the compound among the servants. The sketch drawn from life is reproduced on the outer wrapper of this book. It is a strange picture of a beautiful white girl with a half-caste child in her arms living in an alien community an outcast and wretched, having almost forgotten her native tongue. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 118
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(ad)
destroyer, Red
My destroyer had been stricken down by the quantity of wine he had consumed, and it was only too late I learned it had been drugged. I opened the window casement and gazed out over the city of wealth and luxury, of sin, poverty, and shame. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 143
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(ae)
decoyer, Red
Nelly contracted a complaint when she was first seduced by her infernal ‘pimp’ decoyer. Soon after her capture she knew she was diseased. The doctors told her so plainly, and she smiled and said: ‘Oh, then it won't be long before I die. Our kind Esther in heaven, through the sweet Jesus, said that the greatest sinners may find salvation if they repent. Oh, I have prayed so long, I know I will be saved.’ Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 170f
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(af)
boxer, coxer, / rising Green
America very properly aspires to become a leader among the great Western Powers in the East. She is now standing as a “good stepmother” to China—a vast territorial area covering nearly one-twelfth of the known surface of the earth and inhabited by a population of anything from four hundred and fifty million to five hundred million souls. America has certainly got half her foot in China, and by many diplomatic acts of statesmanship has impressed the Chinese. Her last great act of “policy” towards China was to reduce the fearful indemnity claimed against China by the allied Powers for the late Boxer rising. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 183f
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(ag)
house with golden stairs Green
The unfortunate child-girl was only one night in New York—the next day she was en route for Shanghai. When she landed at Shanghai she was dumped into the “house with the golden stairs,” but as her sobs and sighs, her tears and her importuning for her mother, her brother, and her little sisters became nauseating to the strong-minded “missus” of the “house with the golden stairs”—who was out for money,—not tears the child-girl disappeared so completely that not a trace of her or her having lived in the fearful Babylonian house now exists. Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 188f
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(ah)
the governor,
I was told the following incident by an attache to one of the Consular offices in the East when he and I were at one of the hotels at Tiffen. He told me what he was pleased to term “a good joke on the Governor” the “Governor” being the American Consul in charge. The good, easy-going Consul had settled in his own mind that the traffic in American women in the East had better be stopped, and for the purpose of making a start at the “stopping business” the Consul sent for a bulky, brazen “missus” who traded heavily in young girls by direct cable to New York and California, Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 190
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(ai)
follow suit, renege, / or go to the pack, Red
“Well,” said the “missus,” with a loud laugh that reverberated throughout the building, “what will you do, Sir Consul—‘follow suit,’ ‘reneague,’ or ‘go to the pack’? It's all one to me. You're ‘done to rags,’ anyhow, if you lay hold on my position.”

The Consul “went to the pack.” He had no power to interfere with this bold American “missus” or to order her off the Eastern premises.

Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 192f
Note: See also N55 (VI.X.5):005(m)
N53 (VI.B.46): 61(aj)
shake eternity / lick creation Red
In your hurry to harry me, Sir Consul, don't forget that the ‘sky pilots,‘ the ‘pulpit-punchers,‘ and ‘Bible-bangers‘ don't own creation; they don't even own America by quite a lot. If you stop my progress out here in this hell-on-earth, where all the plagues of Egypt are bottled together, and may be sampled without the asking—if you stop me, I say, I'll shake eternity to its foundation to get even with you. I am out for business and dollars, Sir Consul. You, sir, are out for morality and hypocrisy. When you were a young man you were a noted ‘lark.‘ Now you are old and grumpy you are a ‘nark.‘ ' Mrs Archibald Mackirdy and W.N. Willis, The White Slave Market (1912) 191f
N53 (VI.B.46): 62(a)
to sleep cease
N53 (VI.B.46): 62(b)
boshiman Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 62(c)
[an opportunity] / oa[t] a[?]
N53 (VI.B.46): 62(d)
[mon - see]
N53 (VI.B.46): 62(e)
[mountain] [?]t [see]
N53 (VI.B.46): 62(f)
blackfoot
Note: The nomadic buffalo-hunting Blackfoot Indians dwelt on the great plains east of the Rockies. They spoke a dialect of the Algonquian language and, when communicating with other tribes, had recourse to a more widely understood language of gestures.
N53 (VI.B.46): 62(g)
beothuck (Newfoundland
Note: The non-extinct Beothuk Indians hunted in the Exploits River area of Newfoundland and spoke a language peculiar to themselves. The term ‘redskin’ was applied most originally to these people, who smeared their bodies and possessions with red ochre.
N53 (VI.B.46): 62(h)
5 nations / Kayuga / Mohawk / oneida / onandaga / seneka N.Y
Note: The Seneca, Cayuga, Onandaga, Oneida and Mohawk tribes all belonged to the Iroquois group. They inhabited the woodlands of Upper New York State, in the area extending from the Genesee River to Lake Champlain. Deganawidah, a Huron Indian, and his desciple Hiawatha, a Mohawk, found the League of the Five Nations in the sixteenth century. This was designed to eliminate inter-tribal warfare and in 1715 was joined by a sixth tribe, the Tuscacora. The confederacy prospered through the fur trade until shortly after the war of 1812, when at last the encroachment of white settlers uprooted and dispersed the Indians.
N53 (VI.B.46): 62(i)
Susquehanna Red
Note: The Susquehannocks were an Iroquois tribe in Central Pennsylvania, south of the Susqquehanna River.
N53 (VI.B.46): 62(j)
seroki
Note: The Cherokee Indians inhabited the country of North Carolina and Tennessee and were among the first of the native North Americans to adapt to the ways of the white settlers. Sequoia, a Cherokee, invented a syllabary for his people in 1821, allowing them to codify their laws. At about this time they were expelled by the whites to Oklahama, a place then felt uninhabitable for Europeans.
N53 (VI.B.46): 62(p)
Kaddo
Note: The Caddo Indians spoke a language related to Iroquois and lived in the region of the Red River in east Texas. They farmed as well as hunted, and lived in villages of several large dwellings called ‘long-houses’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 62(q)
ward in chancery
Note: Ward in chancery refers to a minor in custody of the Court of Chancery. In a sense the native Indians became wards of the Government following the massive settlement of America by Europeans.
N53 (VI.B.46): 63(a)
Russian
Note: Index title. Underlined in red.
N53 (VI.B.46): 63(b)
cholondner, Orange
Note: Russian khalodnay: cold.
N53 (VI.B.46): 63(c)
lyepiad, kazze / (si sa),
N53 (VI.B.46): 63(d)
Slom (bishop) Red
Note: Russian slon: an elephant, a bishop in chess.
N53 (VI.B.46): 63(e)
vott / (voici) Red
Note: Russian vot: here (Fr. voici).
N53 (VI.B.46): 63(f)
prayshyo, Orange
Note: Russian prashchur: ancestor.
N53 (VI.B.46): 63(g)
bosher / to me
N53 (VI.B.46): 63(h)
Vyera Nikolaya / Varana Red
Note: Vjera Nikolaya Varana is a woman's name.
N53 (VI.B.46): 63(i)
gassooudarunya,
Note: Russian gasudárunya: Queen, Empress.
N53 (VI.B.46): 63(j)
yastsar Red
Note: Russian Tsar: Tsar, King.
N53 (VI.B.46): 63(k)
rouble, revizor,
Note: Russian revizóar: an inspector.
N53 (VI.B.46): 63(l)
ledigs & / jointurmen, Red
Note: Cf. German ledig: unmarried.
N53 (VI.B.46): 63(m)
rutene, ukrene,
N53 (VI.B.46): 63(n)
As Ernst to May, Red
Note: German Ernst: Seriousness.
N53 (VI.B.46): 63(o)
Vineshankey Red
Note: German Weinschänke: wine shop.
N53 (VI.B.46): 63(p)
schwemmy Red
Note: German Schwemme: tavern.
N53 (VI.B.46): 64(a)
Mater Mrs Macaulay Red
Note: Mrs Catherine Macaulay was the wife of a London physician. In 1763-1771, she published a History of England. She also founded the Master Misericordiae Hospital in Dublin.
N53 (VI.B.46): 64(b)
[assortment] sosial
N53 (VI.B.46): 64(c)
pepet ö Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 64(d)
(man) ran = seize Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 64(e)
do a get Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 64(f)
day day
N53 (VI.B.46): 64(g)
morpheme Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 64(h)
not to do! Red
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 64(i)
thes
… in the two E. pronouns ‘this’ and ‘that’ the old neuter forms have prevailed (OE. m. thes Otto Jespersen, Language: its Nature, Development and Origin (Jan 1922) 403
N53 (VI.B.46): 64(j)
chien le grand Red
Note: French chien le grand: the great dog.
N53 (VI.B.46): 64(k)
dog it hunting / — let —
N53 (VI.B.46): 64(l)
n(oxe) Red
Another instance of secretion is -en as a plural ending in E. oexn, G. ochsen, etc. Here originally n belonged to the word in all cases and all numbers. Otto Jespersen, Language: its Nature, Development and Origin (Jan 1922) 385
Note: Raphael Slepon has suggested that the typo in the source (oexn for oxen) may have triggered Joyce's “n(oxe)”, thus putting the n before the ox: in text with the phrase, putting the cart before the horse.
N53 (VI.B.46): 64(m)
dog 1 beast Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 64(n)
ox he head Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 64(o)
sula foya
N53 (VI.B.46): 64(p)
mosuzo blacksmith
N53 (VI.B.46): 64(q)
bantur
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(a)
Malay Not cancelled
Note: Index title. Underlined in green, not crossed out.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(b)
Sunda Green
Note: Sunda is a dialect found in certain areas in the Indian archipelago.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(c)
I Borneo Green
  • FW unlocated
Note: The Malays, who are found well scattered as a race, anciently colonised the large island of Borneo.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(d)
isolated, / initial, medial, final
Note: Some of the characters of the Malay alphabet — which derives from an Arabic root — admit of four forms, this depending on the relative position of the character in any word. The positions are either initial, medial, final, or isolated.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(e)
roumah (house) Green
  • FW unlocated
Note: Malay rumah: house.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(f)
Celana / Dalems, Green
Note: Malay chelana dalem: underwear, drawers.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(g)
Ghundur Lightnint Green
Note: Malay guntur: thunder. Also at FW 023.06.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(h)
orang utan (wild man) Green
Note: Malay ôran ûtan: forest dweller, also wild man. [The term was misapplied by Europeans to an anthropoid, hence Ourang-Outang.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(i)
Wayndward I. Green
Note: The Windward Islands are found in the Lesser Antilles in the West Indies.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(j)
Timor (E) Green
Note: Timor, named after the Malay tîmor meaning ‘east’, is an island in the East Indies.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(k)
parang (war) Green
Note: A ‘parang’ is a jungle knife.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(l)
[vint hi] / anngur, Green
Note: Malay anggur: wine.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(m)
Java, Green
Note: In the remoter islands the Malays are found as settlers and not as colonists, as in Java, Timor, and the Moluccas.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(n)
Engrish (I) Green
Note: Malay Inggris: English.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(o)
anghinn ([isle])
Note: Malay angin: wind, weather, air.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(p)
Tanah / Cornall, Green
Note: Malay tanah: land, territory, as in ‘Tânah Mâlayu, the Malayan Peninsula.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(q)
Aprika, Green
Note: The /f/ phone, which is not found in Malay, is commonly replaced by the /p/ phone, [hence ‘APrika’ for ‘Africa’].
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(r)
ghagah / (elep),
Note: Malay gâjah: elephant.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(s)
orange ulton Green
Note: Malay ôran ûtan: forest dweller, also wild man. [The term was misapplied by Europeans to an anthropoid (hence Ourang-Outang) and here by Joyce to Ulster protestants (Ultonia, or Ulster).]
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(t)
[weather] / baghus (good) Green
Note: Malay bâgus: beautiful.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(u)
what the [puking] / time it was, Green
Note: Allowing for the /f/-/p/ substitution, this unit blends ‘fu[c]king’, with Malay puki: cunt.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(v)
tuan (sir) Green
Note: Malay tuan: master, sir.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(w)
Burni Green
Note: Malay Brunai: Borneo. See unit N53 (VI.B.46):066(i) below.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(x)
putih (white) Green
Note: Malay pûteh: white.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(y)
etam (black) / serong, pazang (pair)
Note: Malay hîtam — black. The sârong is the traditional body cloth made of silk or cotton.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(z)
wangh (Lsd) Green
Note: Malay wang: cash, money.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(aa)
surat (letter) / pos / tilpon, venta ([inn])
Note: Malay sûrat: letter, epistle; pos: post; tilpon: telephone.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(ab)
rooma makin (hotel) Green
Note: Malay rûmah makan: food-place, restautant.
N53 (VI.B.46): 65(ac)
susu (milk) Green
Note: Malay susu: milk, udders.
N53 (VI.B.46): 66(a)
Javanese ([Change this]) Green
  • FW unlocated
Note: In the remoter islands the Malays are found as settlers and not as colonists, as in Java, Timor, and the Moluccas.
N53 (VI.B.46): 66(b)
Japa, konyag, saos, nasi / ghorong,
Note: Malay kunyaah: to chew, ruminate; saos: sauce; nasi goreng: a fried rice dish.
N53 (VI.B.46): 66(c)
biribiri, Green
Note: Malay biribiri: a lamb dish.
N53 (VI.B.46): 66(d)
botol
Note: Malay botol: bottle.
N53 (VI.B.46): 66(e)
gongos, (waiter) Green
Note: Malay jongos: a waiter.
N53 (VI.B.46): 66(f)
slamet,
Note: Malay gunong: mountain. There is a Gunong Slamet in Java.
N53 (VI.B.46): 66(g)
Gunnong, (Mt), Green
Note: Malay gunong: mountain. There is a Gunong Slamet in Java.
N53 (VI.B.46): 66(h)
fireaskiff,
N53 (VI.B.46): 66(i)
the woolman from Burni Green
Note: The popular song, The Wild Man from Borneo. Malay Brunai: Borneo.
N53 (VI.B.46): 66(j)
thanks giveme, Green
Note: Malay terima-kasih: thanks; kasih: give me.
N53 (VI.B.46): 66(k)
gambanman, Green
Note: Malay jâmban: a floating bath-house.
N53 (VI.B.46): 66(l)
yiah Green
Note: Malay ya or iya: yeah, yes.
N53 (VI.B.46): 66(m)
tida,
Note: Malay tîdak: no, not.
N53 (VI.B.46): 66(n)
me & me trulock Green
Note: Me and my true love. The Malay sense escapes me.
N53 (VI.B.46): 66(o)
in [statue] of Erin
N53 (VI.B.46): 66(p)
tub in wicker caning
N53 (VI.B.46): 66(q)
Max Eschig / 46 Rue / Lab. 6664 / 49 [??]
Note: Max Eschig was a publisher based in Paris in the 1930s.
N53 (VI.B.46): 66(r)
scoreboard
N53 (VI.B.46): 66(s)
actor in country / with letter
N53 (VI.B.46): 67(a)
Ruthenian
Note: Index title. Underlined in black. Ukranian (Ruthenian) forms with Russian and White Russian the East Slavonic group of languages, all of which derive from Old Russian — the language of the non-ecclesiastical documents of Kiev Rus prior to its destruction by the Tatars in 1240. It differs from Russian in a number of points of morphology and phonology, and in vocabulary following the introduction of Polish loan-words in the 1569-1772 period.
N53 (VI.B.46): 67(b)
lyiss (wood) / luhy (meadow) Green
Note: Ruthenian lyis: forest; luhy: meadows.
N53 (VI.B.46): 67(c)
rutene, Green
Note: ‘Ruteni’ was the medieval Latin name for the inhabitants of Russia, which was later borrowed into other languages (e.g. German Ruthene, French Ruthène).
N53 (VI.B.46): 67(d)
poroch, Green
Note: Ruthenian porokh: dust, powder.
N53 (VI.B.46): 67(e)
lyudsky wischod, Green
Note: Ruthenian lyudskyi vischod: origin of man.
N53 (VI.B.46): 67(f)
misto, mist, Green
Note: Ruthenian misto: town, city; mist: a bridge.
N53 (VI.B.46): 67(g)
selo, Green
Note: Ruthenian selo: village; selomoe: my village.
N53 (VI.B.46): 67(h)
tak, nyi, Green
Note: Ruthenian tak: [affirmative] so; nyi: no.
N53 (VI.B.46): 67(i)
jisty, pythy, rosolun, Green
Note: Ruthenian jisty: to eat; pyty: to drink.
N53 (VI.B.46): 67(j)
wody, Green
Note: Ruthenian vody: waters.
N53 (VI.B.46): 67(k)
ras, tryrasy, Green
Note: Ruthenian raz: once; try razy three times.
N53 (VI.B.46): 67(l)
howorodies Green
Note: Ruthenian hovoryty: to speak.
N53 (VI.B.46): 67(m)
stooleazy, Green
Note: Ruthenian stolitsya: metropolis.
N53 (VI.B.46): 67(n)
obras Not cancelled
Note: Ruthenian obraz: an icon.
N53 (VI.B.46): 67(o)
switchskes / (light)
Note: Ruthenian svichky: candles, lights.
N53 (VI.B.46): 67(p)
nitshnyk, Green
Note: Ruthenian nichnyk: night watchman; nyzhnyk: a jack in cards. [In FW Nijni Novgorod — Gorkii — seems to refer.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 67(q)
notylytyl / (farfalla) Green
Note: Ruthenian motyl: butterfly (It. farfalla).
N53 (VI.B.46): 67(r)
krow (blood) Green
  • FW unlocated
Note: Ruthenian krov: blood. Cf. Polish krowa: a cow. [Unit at FW 347.05 derives from N53 (VI.B.46):070(b) below.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 68(a)
spectators at windows
N53 (VI.B.46): 68(b)
faio il cimadori
N53 (VI.B.46): 68(c)
sax milime moor
N53 (VI.B.46): 68(d)
in 4 [tableaux] Blue
N53 (VI.B.46): 68(e)
[Trir] 16.68
N53 (VI.B.46): 68(f)
guldensilver Blue
N53 (VI.B.46): 68(g)
army on stomach Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 68(h)
Shemsi-Shausi
N53 (VI.B.46): 68(i)
coalhaven Blue
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 68(j)
helt 09.7.8 / 55 Va[?] / heft 67.48
N53 (VI.B.46): 68(k)
the tree that kills
N53 (VI.B.46): 68(l)
F.O. Jnr 16.40
N53 (VI.B.46): 68(m)
topical tip Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 68(n)
unguardsmanlike Red
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(a)
Polish Not cancelled
Note: Index title. Underlined in orange, not crossed out.
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(b)
dantsigirl, Green
Note: Polish dantsigirl: dancing girl.
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(c)
Lubliners, Orange
Note: A play on ‘Dubliners’. Lublin is a city in east Poland.
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(d)
Siedlitz, Green
  • FW unlocated
Note: [FW 272.l3 (II.2:3.4) was entered too early to derive from this notebook.] Siedlce is a Polish town. [Here with Seidlitz powder (an aperient).]
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(e)
wilna, minsk, Orange
Note: Wilno is a town in Lithuania, and Minsk an important city in Belorussia (occupied by the Poles in 1919-1920). [The former is in text with 'willynilly'.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(f)
Polendum Green
Note: Polish: Poland.
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(g)
przsy, Green
Note: Polish przy: adjacent, nearby.
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(h)
papierossy, Orange
Note: Polish papieros: cigarette.
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(i)
gladny (hungry),
Note: Polish glodny: hungry.
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(j)
mleky w Orange
Note: Polish mleko: milk.
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(k)
yaya (eggs) Green
Note: Polish jaje (jajko): egg (eggs). [In text with phrase, As sure as eggs are eggs.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(l)
kuropatra (partridge) Orange
Note: Polish kuropatwa: partridge.
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(m)
napiwek (tip) Green
Note: Polish napiwek: tip, gratuity.
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(n)
prsyzt,
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(o)
pratschka (lavendiere) Orange
Note: Polish praczka: washerwoman (Fr. lavandière).
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(p)
pul ½, ponitschook (hank) / (bas),
Note: Polish po[blank]: one half; ponizej: under, beneath (Fr. bas).
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(q)
Gatsi (drawers) P. Orange
Note: Polish gacie [plural dgatki]: stays, drawers. [In text with name Ghazi Power (an Irish journalist).]
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(r)
kobiett (w), lodow (eis)
Note: Polish kobieta: a woman; lodow: ice (Gm. eis).
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(s)
pissma (journals) Green
Note: Polish pisma: a journal, periodical.
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(t)
Torty
Note: Polish tort: a tart or pie.
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(u)
bulki (breads) Green
Note: Polish bulki: loaves.
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(v)
tytony (tobacco) Red
Note: Polish tyton: tobacco.
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(w)
orel (eagle) Green
Note: Polish orze[blank]: an eagle (or[blank]e: eaglet). [In text with Perse O'Reilly and line ‘The wren, the wren, the king of all birds’.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(x)
Polnisch, Pistola, / Grenade, Bagonne,
Note: Polish pistolet: pistol; granat: grenade; bagnet: bayonet.
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(y)
krzersse, Orange
Note: Polish krzesa: to strike fire, to light.
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(z)
popyul (ashes) Orange
Note: Polish popio[blank]: ashes.
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(aa)
Dym (smoke) Orange
Note: Polish dym: smoke. [In text with 'doomsday'.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(ab)
szp, Green
Note: Polish:
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(ac)
[rp] Orange
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(ad)
rosing gardinal, Orange
Note: Russian General.
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(ae)
mohn, Mak,
Note: Polish mak: a poppy.
N53 (VI.B.46): 69(af)
skop (sheep) Orange
Note: Polish skop: a wether (sheep). [In text with ‘scapegoat’.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(a)
kura (hen)
Note: Polish kura: hen.
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(b)
as the krow / flies (cow), Orange
Note: As the crow flies. Polish krowa: cow. [Cf. VI.B.067(r) above [krow (blood) [Ruthenian krov: blood].]
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(c)
Pschl, pszcz- / trz / Czw. stsh, schpl-
Note: Polish pchla: flea [cf. FW 415.14]; pszczola: bee [cf. FW 415.26]; trzy: three; czworo: four; szesc: six.
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(d)
drogi (dear) Green
Note: Polish drogi: dear. In text with English, druggist (German Drogist).
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(e)
pan, Orange
Note: Polish pan: sir, mister.
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(f)
pryarkyssen,
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(g)
ubranje (suit) Orange
Note: Polish ubranie: suit (of clothes). [In text with Danish beromtst: most famous.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(h)
zhony (wife) Green
Note: Polish zona: wife; zony: wives.
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(i)
treewool,
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(j)
pulbuty (½boot) Orange
Note: Polish pøl: half; but(y): boot(s).
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(k)
szewc (cordonnier) Red
Note: Polish swewc: shoemaker, cobbler (Fr. cordonnier).
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(l)
ki Red
  • FW unlocated
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(m)
ogrowdnik, / (gardener) Green
Note: Polish ogrodnik: gardener. [In text with O'Growney, who helped to form the Gaelic League and whose body was brought back to Ireland from abroad for burial.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(n)
chory (sick) Red
Note: Polish chory: sick.
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(o)
bul (mal) twarsh (face)
Note: Polish ból: pain, ache (Fr. mal); twarz: face.
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(p)
vlossy (hair) Red
Note: Polish vlosy: hair.
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(q)
brwi (brow) / pot (sweat) moves (speaks) / Pop- Cornette, Monsher,
Note: Polish brwi: brow; pot: sweat; Pop: an orthodox priest; kornet: coif, hood.
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(r)
Shona, padadnie, feelfeebels, / fohneight [of]
Note: Polish paradnie: splendidly; feldfebel: sergeant-major.
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(s)
sczlantka! Orange
Note: Polish szklanka: drinking glass. [Here with Irish Sláinte!: Cheers!]
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(t)
[treplid] podushka,
Note: Polish poduszka: pillow [cf. Cz. poduska: pillow, at FW 333.28].
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(u)
herbata (tea) Green
Note: Polish herbata: tea.
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(v)
komnandos!
Note: Commandoes, with Pol. stem form komn-.
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(w)
bron (gun) Orange
Note: Polish brón: arms (weaponry).
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(x)
presentings,
Note: Polish prezentowác brón: to present arms.
N53 (VI.B.46): 70(y)
nuhlan, Orange
Note: Uhlan, a light-cavalryman; a Prussian lancer (Polish ulan, German uhlan).
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(a)
Bulgar Not cancelled
Note: Index title. Underlined in red, not crossed out. Bulgarian forms with Serbo-Croatian and Slovene the Southern group of the Slavonic languages. It derives ultimately from Old Slavonic, believed to have been the first literary language of the Slavs. Bulgarian differentiated itself as a language mostly in the Middle Bulgarian period; since that time, extensive orthographical reforms have simplified its innate complexity and replaced its archaic historic system of spelling with a more truly phonetic one. Several logically redundant (junk) characters were likewise abolished from its alphabet.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(b)
kilolitre, miriameter Red
Note: Myria- : with the meaning 'ten-thousand', in names of weights and measures of the metric system. Kilo- (one-thousand).
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(c)
blagodaro, Green
Note: Bulgarian blagodarya: thanks.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(d)
sbogom (ciao) Green
Note: Bulgarian sbógom: goodbye, ciao [lit., ‘with God’].
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(e)
¼ from 1,
Note: This is the Bulgarian system of indicating the time of day.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(f)
napred (avant) Green
Note: Bulgarian napred: before (Fr. avant).
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(g)
igra (game) Red
Note: Bulgarian igra: a game. [In text with ‘a nasty, low, diagreeable game’.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(h)
mangoat, Green
Note: Bulgarian element remains obscure.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(i)
yessik (language) Green
Note: Bulgarian ezyk: language, tongue.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(j)
plodowe (fruit)
Note: Bulgarian plod: fruit.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(k)
dubrin den, Green
Note: Bulgarian dobry den: good day.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(l)
lukowzi (onion)
Note: Bulgarian luk: onion.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(m)
Ballygarry Green
Note: A mock-Irish town-name formed from the word Bulgarian.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(n)
stotnaki, lewa, / utro (morning)
Note: Bulgarian útra: morning.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(o)
As said (I) / colporal Fenix, Green
Note: Bulgarian az: I; feniks: phoenix. [Note the echo of Latin O felix culpa; also, the corporal is the linen square on which the chalice is placed at the Eucharist.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(p)
nastilo (ink) Red
Note: Bulgarian mastilo: ink. [In context, with nasty and low.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(q)
Paritschmo (Lsd) Green
Note: Bulgarian pari: cash, money.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(r)
dumata (word)
Note: Bulgarian dumata: the word.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(s)
pet (5) Green
Note: Bulgarian pet: five.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(t)
brassnaar (barber) Red
Note: Bulgarian brusnár: barber.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(u)
trizse me (I tremble) Green
Note: Bulgarian tresene: trembling.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(v)
utschiatschi Green
Note: Cf. Russian ushi otchii: father's ears.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(w)
lekar (Dr), Red
Note: Bulgarian lekár: doctor.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(x)
rashen (rye) Green
  • FW unlocated
Note: Bulgarian razh: rye.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(y)
Messger, Green
Note: The Bulgarian component is obscure.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(z)
drob (liver) Green
Note: Bulgarian drob: liver (organ).
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(aa)
whishnytka, rakkia,
Note: Suggests ‘whiskey’ and ‘rakia’ [Russian brandy].
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(ab)
led (ice) Green
Note: Bulgarian led: ice.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(ac)
absent & wehrmuth Green
Note: German wermut: absinthe.
N53 (VI.B.46): 71(ad)
Borris[,] shtewdo (surprise)
N53 (VI.B.46): 72(a)
sopprused, Green
Note: Suggests ‘surprised’. Bulgarian suprúg: husband. Term suggests ‘married’.
N53 (VI.B.46): 72(b)
twani,
N53 (VI.B.46): 72(c)
spry (stop) Red
Note: Bulgarian spri: stop.
N53 (VI.B.46): 72(d)
wraimy, Green
Note: Bulgarian vréme: time. [In text with ‘rainy weather’.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 72(e)
walidasht,
Note: Bulgarian vali: it is raining.
N53 (VI.B.46): 72(f)
Awghost, Green
Note: Bulgarian Ávgust: August [month].
N53 (VI.B.46): 72(g)
godinat (yr) Green
Note: Bulgarian gudina: year.
N53 (VI.B.46): 72(h)
shookatnavratatta Not cancelled
Note: Bulgarian shumat na natta: the noise of the struggle.
N53 (VI.B.46): 72(i)
momstchance (waiter) Green
Note: Bulgarian momché: a boy.
N53 (VI.B.46): 72(j)
topkats (balls) Green
Note: Bulgarian topka: ball, dance.
N53 (VI.B.46): 72(k)
rog (horn) / sckulka ([??]) chaibuva (schön
Note: Bulgarian rog: horn; choobav: beautiful (German schön).
N53 (VI.B.46): 72(l)
studenly, Green
Note: Bulgarian studén: cold. [Suggests ‘suddenly’.]
N53 (VI.B.46): 72(m)
proleta (spring) Green
Note: Bulgarian Próletta: (the) Spring.
N53 (VI.B.46): 72(n)
maikar (mother), Green
Note: Bulgarian máika: mother.
N53 (VI.B.46): 72(o)
terrsia / (tailor) Green
Note: Bulgarian terzia: tailor.
N53 (VI.B.46): 72(p)
slatar (goldsmith) Green
Note: Bulgarian zlatár: goldsmith.
N53 (VI.B.46): 73(a)
Shelta Not cancelled
Shelta R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Shelta, 130
Note: Index title. Underlined in green, not crossed out. cf. FW 117.17, 421.21, 542.14. At FW 117.13 with Irish focal, word.
N53 (VI.B.46): 73(b)
Hisperica Famina, 〃 Irish
In a document, or rather a group of documents, called Hisperica Famina: R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Hisperic, 78
N53 (VI.B.46): 73(c)
cad of 9 tongues / philip 9 tongues cut out / evernew tongue
The skeleton of the story is to the effect that the apostle Philip's tongue was cut out nine times by the heathen, and nine times restored, on which account his name in Heaven is ‘the Ever-New Tongue’. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Hisperic, 74
N53 (VI.B.46): 73(d)
Haeli, habia felebe fae / niteia temnibissi salis sal / p75,
Haeli, habia felebe fae / niteia temnibissi salis sal — ‘Hear this tale ye sons of men, I have been sent by God to converse with you’. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Hisperic, 74
N53 (VI.B.46): 73(e)
ampla pectoralem suscitet / vernia cauernam
The ordo uerborum shews a certain balance: the verb generally stands as a pivot in the middle of the sentence, and the subject with its adjective, the object with its adjective, range themselves about it, as in the first sentence: Ampla pectoralem suscitet vernia cauernam R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Hisperic, 82
N53 (VI.B.46): 73(f)
jape,
Unfortunately for himself, and as it turned out, for the world, he gave his book the jocular name The Epitomes of Publius Virgilius Maro: it is as though the perpetrator of an early Victorian jape called The Comic English Grammar […] R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Hisperic, 84
N53 (VI.B.46): 73(g)
galbungus, vocative of I,
In the passage most frequently quoted, he shows us Galbungus and another colleague, Terrentianus, disputing day and night for a fortnight on the question whether the pronoun ego can have a vocative case. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Hisperic, 84
N53 (VI.B.46): 73(h)
bigerro sermoni clefabo
Maro's alleged connection with Toulouse seems to have inferred by a misunderstanding of his words Bigerro sermone clefabo R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Hisperic, 86
N53 (VI.B.46): 73(i)
practions
all the evil actions of their King and other vicious practions (sic) of their Monarchs and great personages both male and female that it should not be known to any but themselves and their successors being sworn Antiquaries as aforesaid. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) 88
N53 (VI.B.46): 73(j)
Maro,
Kuno Mayer has examined philologically the names of Maro's fictitious companions: and he concludes that they have a strong Celtic element, if they are not actually Irish. Zimmer identifies Maro with an enigmatic Irish writer. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Hisperic, 86
N53 (VI.B.46): 73(k)
Satan 1st being to utter / God's name, Red
The writer is telling us an interesting bit of ecclesiastical folklore, referred to by other ancient authorities, to the effect that the first being to utter the name of God was Satan: […] R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Hisperic, 69
N53 (VI.B.46): 74(a)
Delb nathrach, corp aeou / seim, / tuc leis diabul sin / droich-reim / litri trias ro chan, / ni as liach, / lae, vau, lae ocus lath
Delb nathrach, corp aeou séim, tuc leis diabul sin droich-reim: litri trias ro chan, ni as liach, lae, vau, lae ocus lath R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Hisperic, 69
Note: A serpent's shape, a body of thin air, Took the Devil with him on his evil way: By these letters he chanted, not in piety: He, Vav, He, and Yogh.
N53 (VI.B.46): 74(b)
lawsuit over suitlaw
It fell out that the two sages went to law in the matter of the right to possession of the robe of office of another, by name Adna, who had shortly before solved the riddle of existence. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Ogham, 12
N53 (VI.B.46): 74(c)
dark tongues Red
And as they respectively pleaded their case they spoke ‘in a dark tongue’ so that the chieftains standing by were unable to understand them. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Ogham, 12
Note: Ogham was incomprehensible to the king. As a consequence, he dismissed the case.
N53 (VI.B.46): 74(d)
katharma (leper) / blotches after bespelling
Perhaps we may look in this direction to explain the remarkable phenomenon of ‘blotches on the face’ and similar disfigurements, appearing after an offender had been cursed, bespelled, or satirized by a druid. […] One blighted with such a curse became in the eyes of his fellow a moral leper, a katharma to be shunned as though he were infected with physical disease. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Ogham, 13
N53 (VI.B.46): 74(e)
Voteporius (x)
Towards the end of the tombstone of this ruler was discovered […] The stone bears two inscriptions: one in Latin, VOTEPORIGIS DEMETORVM PROTICTORIS, giving the king's name in its Brythonic form; and the other in Ogham letters […] VOTECORIGAS. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Ogham, 15
Note: Old Goidelic is the base language underlying Ogham inscriptions. The Old Goidelic suffix -as, indicating the genitive case in names, appears in the epitaph of Voteporix, or Voteporius, king of the Demetae, that is graven on his headstone in both Latin and Ogham letters. Voteporix is mentioned as contemporary in the sixth-century history, De excidio Britanniae liber querulus.
N53 (VI.B.46): 74(f)
 (of) [Fim/es, / decenee]
N53 (VI.B.46): 75(a)
deaf & dumb ogham Green
Evidently this is a convenient device for secret communication. I have some knowledge of the common ‘deaf-and-dumb’ manual alphabet, but I am without skill or practice in its use; and it would be impossible for me ex improviso to follow a rapid conversation between two expert deaf-mutes. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Ogham, 19
N53 (VI.B.46): 75(b)
ogma (sunface) ~ Green
‘Ogham’, says the treatise on the subject which we find in The Book of Ballymote, ‘was put together by Ogma Sun-face, son of Bres, son of Elada.‘ This conducts us into august company. Whatever the author of the treatise may have supposed, there is no shadow of a doubt that Ogma was originally a god. He was one of the Tuatha De Danann, the numerous pagan gods of the Goidelic people, whose complicated theogonia, euhemerized into a bald string of genealogies, is made into an ‘invasion’ of Ireland in the history of the country concocted and taught in the native schools. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Ogham, 29
N53 (VI.B.46): 75(c)
~ Ogmade l. Green
So the word Ogham became a name, not for the Proto-Goidelic cultivated by the druids, but for the secret alphabet which first began to be written down, just when it, and the language, and, indeed, the druids themselves, were passing off the stage. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Ogham, 30
Note: Ogham is essentially transliterative. For each letter of the alphabet a certain mark was dedicated, represented by small cuts made on a fixed axis or line. This representation could be communicated by means of the hands or recorded on a suitable surface, by making scratches on a rock, say, or notches on a piece of wood. A study of the surviving inscriptions shows the base language to have been an ancient form of Goidelic — though it had by this time become obsolete.
N53 (VI.B.46): 75(d)
I am (31) all things Red
What, then, is this song of Amorgen? It is a hymn, setting forth a pantheistic conception of a Universe where Godhead is everywhere and omnipotent. […] the Christian writers were […] unwilling to let it go; and to avoid all risk of the charge of disseminating paganism, they forced it into the incongruous association where we now find it. God speaketh: and this is what He saith:

I am wind in the sea,
Wave of the billow am I,
I am sound of the sea:
I am an ox of seven fights,
[…]

R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Ogham, 31
Note: The Druidic philosophy was, it seems, pantheistic and Pythagorean.
N53 (VI.B.46): 75(e)
message-stick Red
The story has become worn down to an unintelligible fragment, but it displays to us a practice of nicking messages upon message-sticks, which could be interpreted by the illuminati. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Cryptology, 40
N53 (VI.B.46): 75(f)
mac ogham Green
Two forms of divination by means of Ogham are also described in the course of the tract, called respectively Mac-ogam and Bas-ogam. Mac-ogam (‘Son Ogham’). R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Cryptology, 40
N53 (VI.B.46): 75(g)
pas ogham
Bas-ogam (‘Palm-of-hand Ogham’) is laconically and ungrammatically described in Latin, thus: i.e. manus aliam percutit lignorum. This probably means that a number of pieces of wood, variously marked, were thrown together, and one of them was picked out at random: the answer to the question propounded being given by the mark on the selected piece. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Cryptology, 40
N53 (VI.B.46): 75(h)
leg ogham Green
  • FW unlocated
Cryptocheironomy is only slightly touched upon: but particulars are given of two of the means by which the Ogham gestures were performed. We are told of Cos-ogam and Sron-ogam: Cos-ogam (‘Leg Ogham’), in which the gesticulator uses the ridge of his shin-bone as the Ogham stem-line, and forms the letters with his fingers on the two sides; R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Cryptology, 40
N53 (VI.B.46): 75(i)
nose —
Sron-ogam (‘Nose Ogham’), in which he uses the ridge of his nose in the same way. It is evident that the first of these could be used conveniently by a person seated or squatting, the second by a person standing. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Cryptology, 40
N53 (VI.B.46): 75(j)
en ogham Red
  • FW unlocated
Én-ogam (‘Bird Ogham’), as Bittern, Lark, Falcon, etc. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Cryptology, 42
N53 (VI.B.46): 75(k)
bird — / fort / colour — Green
Dinn-ogam (‘Fortress Ogham’), a similar alphabetical list of famous fortresses.
Én-ogam (‘Bird Ogham’), as Bittern, Lark, Falcon, etc.
Dath-ogam (‘’), as Blue, Lake, Flaxen, etc. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Cryptology, 42
N53 (VI.B.46): 75(l)
act = cat Red
Of Anagrams the simplest example is (15) Ogam uird (‘Order Ogham’), in which the letters of a name are written in the alphabetical order of the Ogham alphabet — as when the name Bran is written bnra, or Labraid, bldraai. This is a device described by the grammarian Maro, of whom we shall hear in the following chapter […] R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Cryptology, 46
N53 (VI.B.46): 76(a)
glesselgi (track of hunt)
Gleselgi, a word that seems to mean ‘the track of the hunt’, is another Maronian device. It consists in separating and interlacing the syllables of two names: thus Fethnat and Segnat may be written fethsegnatnat. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Cryptology, 46
N53 (VI.B.46): 76(b)
alphagammaalphamu
Two forms may be mentioned here which will hardly fit under the other heads. The first of these is (31) Ogam romesc Bres (‘The Ogham which bewildered Bres’). This consists in writing the name of the letter for the letter, as though one should write Alpha-gamma-alpha-mu, etc. for ‘Agamemnon’. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Cryptology, 46-7
N53 (VI.B.46): 76(c)
ogham that bothered / Bres
The first of these is (31) Ogam romesc Bres (‘The Ogham which bewildered Bres’). This consists in writing the name of the letter for the letter, as though one should write Alpha-gamma-alpha-mu, etc. for ‘Agamemnon’. The name of this cypher is explained by a story to the effect that a message thus concealed was given to the ancient hero called Bres as he was going into battle, and he lost the battle because he was distracted by trying to read it! R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Cryptology, 46-7
N53 (VI.B.46): 76(d)
head in bush / under bush Green
Cend a muine (‘Head in a bush’) and Cend fo muine (‘Head under a bush’) are variations of a reverse form, in which, if a syllable in a word is identical with the name of any letter, the letter is written for the syllable: thus ruis is the name of the letter R, so MAEL-R may be written for Mael-Ruis. In ‘head in bush’ the suppressed syllable is the first of the word, in ‘head under bush’ the last. R.A. Stewart MacAlister, The Secret Languages of Ireland (Jan 1937) Cryptology, 47
N53 (VI.B.46): 76(e)
str shirt of 2 strokes / ogham Green
II. The following are the varieties which come under Confu