FINNEGANS WAKE NOTEBOOKS

N01 (VI.B.10): Polyphemous Nice, Paris

Facsimile edition: James Joyce Archive vol. 31, ed. David Hayman.
Print edition: Finnegans Wake Notebooks at Buffalo (Turnhout: Brepols, 2001), ed., V. Deane, D. Ferrer & G. Lernout
Manuscript: Buffalo VI.B.10, late October 1922-beginning February 1923. Notebook details
N01 (VI.B.10): front cover recto(a)
BLOC / de / 200 PAGES / pour la / Sténographie
Note: Printed title of notebook.
N01 (VI.B.10): front cover verso(a)
 
Note: BLANK page
N01 (VI.B.10): 1(a)
282 l 7 ft I dare him / and I doubledare him
Note: Putative correction to 1922 edition of Ulysses page 282, line 7 from foot: italicise these phrases.
N01 (VI.B.10): 1(b)
284 l 8 freely freckled
Note: Putative correction to 1922 edition of Ulysses page 284, line 8: for “freely freckled” read “freelyfreckled”
N01 (VI.B.10): 1(c)
l 9 ruddyfaced, ruddyfaced
Note: Putative correction to 1922 edition of Ulysses page 284, line 9: delete comma after “ruddyfaced”
N01 (VI.B.10): 1(d)
285 l 5 Michelangelo, Michelangelo
Note: Putative correction to 1922 edition of Ulyssespage 285 line 5: for “Michelange'o” (broken letter) read “Michelangelo” and delete comma
N01 (VI.B.10): 1(e)
286 l 5 Jude's V,
Note: Putative correction to 1922 edition of Ulysses page 286, line 5: add comma after “Jude's”
N01 (VI.B.10): 1(f)
288 l 7 says
Note: Putative correction to 1922 edition of Ulysses page 288 line 7: for “say” read “says”
N01 (VI.B.10): 1(g)
Polyphemous is Ul's shadow
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:092(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 1(h)
clipper ship Blue
“DEAD HORSE” […] I am afraid that the sailormen of the Western Ocean packets do not remember the old ceremonial of the clipper ship. They are five and a half days between ports and never work “dead horse.” Daily Mail (23 October 1922) 8/5
N01 (VI.B.10): 1(i)
dead horse
“DEAD HORSE” […] I wonder whether, when in that United States liner, they recently committed the body of John Barleycorn to the deep, they observed any of the ancient ritual of the dead horse! Daily Mail (23 October 1922) 8/5
Note: See also: N44 (VI.B.34):138(d) and Sheet iii-54(m) (source of FW 521.12).
N01 (VI.B.10): 1(j)
crimps
“DEAD HORSE” […] They used to sign on, those old-time shell-backs, at the shipping master's office the day before sailing, and each claimed an advance of one month's pay. It was given them, not in cash, but in the form of an advance note, payable some days after the ship sailed. The shopkeepers and crimps of the shore cashed them at heavy discount, and—the last night ashore was a merry one. Not so the next morning. Running down channel, heavy-eyed and heavy-headed, the next port three or four months away, they went about their business gloomily, knowing that their pay for the first month was already gone — that for a month they would be working “dead horse.” […] F.R. Daily Mail (23 October 1922) 8/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:092(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 1(k)
[Una]
“DEAD HORSE” […] I wonder whether, when in that United States liner, they recently committed the body of John Barleycorn to the deep, they observed any of the ancient ritual of the dead horse! Daily Mail (23 October 1922) ?8/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:092(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 1(l)
Every W in I shd down tools
[Article about a Dublin protest meeting of the mothers and wives of the civil war prisoners] Mrs. Despard proposed the resolution. She said that they would bring anything before them which they could not vouch for. She saw the mark of the branding-iron on the forearm of one of the prisoners. They were there to prevent the infamy of these things. To this end they should form themselves into a Prisoners' Defence Association. Every women should join it, and she strongly advised militant action. If that failed every woman in Ireland should “down tools”. The truth was that the war would cease only when both sides laid down their arms. Irish Times (7 October 1922) 8/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:092(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 1(m)
ladies foursome tournament / golf Blue
[Golf] As a result of the fourth and fifth rounds of the Ladies Foursomes Tournament at Ranelagh […] Irish Times (20 October 1922) 3/5
Note: The word ‘golf’ is not crossed through.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:092(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 1(n)
face fungus
[Letter entitled “Beaveritis”] One need neither howl nor shout nor in any way offend the feelings of those who flaunt face-fungus in the form of either a “Walrus” or a “Beaver” Irish Times (20 October 1922) 6/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:092(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 1(o)
~ Royal beaver (baffi e barba)
[Letter entitled “Beaveritis”] […] a “Royal Beaver” is a man afflicted with a full outfit of face-fittings — to wit, beard and moustache Irish Times (20 October 1922) 6/6
Note: Italian: baffi e barba, moustache and beard.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:092(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 1(p)
walrus Blue
[Letter entitled “Beaveritis”] One need neither howl nor shout nor in any way offend the feelings of those who flaunt face-fungus in the form of either a “Walrus” or a “Beaver” Irish Times (20 October 1922) 6/6
N01 (VI.B.10): 1(q)
King Beaver redwhiskered / policeman on a / green bicycle
[Letter entitled “Beaveritis”] — while a “King Beaver” is a red-whiskered policeman riding a green bicycle. Irish Times (20 October 1922) 6/6
Note: See Letters I, 8 November and and Letters III, 25 November, 1922. The letter was a reader's response to an article in the Irish Times of 17 October 1922 entitled Beaveritis which attacked the current brief vogue for the game of Beaver. This was played by two people using a scoring system borrowed from tennis. The player scored who first cried ‘Beaver’ as, and if, a bearded person appeared. Several other references to the term appear in the IT around this period. See OED ‘Beaver’ sb, 4, in which all citations that give the game as current are dated 1922. [This same year also saw the publication of John Kettlewell's Beaver (London: Werner Laurie)—a study of the subject—and Aldous Huxley's Antic Hay (see Chapter 4 of the latter for opportunistic musings on the subject) followed in 1923.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:092(n)
N01 (VI.B.10): 2(a)
Buttle
[ROLL OF HONOUR / (1914-1918) / IN MEMORIAM] Buttle - In proud and loving memory of Albert Edward Buttle, Lieutenant, Royal Irish Rifles, who died in France, October 2nd, 1918, of wounds received in action Irish Times (9 October 1922) 1/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:093(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 2(b)
franking machine
[Stamps of the Future] The “Philatelic Magazine” received yesterday, was in a wrapper franked by a three-halfpenny stamp impressed in red by an automatic postal franking machine. Irish Times (21 October 1922) 5/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:093(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 2(c)
son turned out badly Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 2(d)
look at it over / there
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:093(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 2(e)
Ir cricket
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:093(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 2(f)
Lambert, Gwynn
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:093(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 2(g)
horses
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:093(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 2(h)
Widger, Red
[Obituary] The death occurred yesterday of Mr. Thomas Widger, Duagh, Waterford, who was well known in Irish racing and hunting circles. Irish Times (27 October 1922) 5/6
Note: Tom's brother Joe was a more famous jockey, having won the Grand National in 1895 riding ‘Wild Man from Borneo’.
N01 (VI.B.10): 2(i)
Beasley
Note: Harry Beasley (1852-1939) was a well-known Irish jockey. He rode the winner in the Grand National in 1891 riding ‘Come Away’. He was the last surviving member of the famous quartet of “Beasley brothers” (Tommy, John, Willie and Harry) whose deeds as amateur riders, more especially in the steeplechasing field, are writ large in the pages of Turf history in Ireland, England and France.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:093(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 3(a)
storm debated
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:093(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 3(b)
introduce (penis) / object
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:093(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 3(c)
bell on table / (L.W.)
Note: Possibly Lillian Wallace, wife of the book illustrator Richard Wallace. They were friends of Joyce in Paris. Ellmann writes (p.516) that Joyce, on visiting the Wallaces at their small country house at Chatillon and overhearing Lillian speaking with a young painter, in which she repeated the word ‘yes’ many times, in different tones of voice, got the idea for the opening and closing words of his ‘Penelope’ episode.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:093(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 3(d)
biography begin / in middle / “at 28 …”
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:094(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 3(e)
W thinks she is frigged in sleep / tells Priest. He at altar next / morning thinks he has been / polluted. Catechism class He / explains boy's revery. He / meets girl. She dreams / “The glance”
Note: Cf the ‘glance’ motif in Wagner's Tristan, so called because it first appears prominently at Isolde's words ‘er sah mir in die Augen’ near the beginning of Act One. See also N11 (VI.B.5):007(i).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:094(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 4(a)
story all improbable / lies
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:094(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 4(b)
Jenner vaccin
Jenner had to wait many years before vaccination was accepted. Lister's early efforts to get recognition for anæsthetic surgery had a sorry welcome. Arthur E.J. Legge, “Mental Healing”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 257
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:095(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 4(c)
Lyster cocaine
Jenner had to wait many years before vaccination was accepted. Lister's early efforts to get recognition for anæsthetic surgery had a sorry welcome. Arthur E.J. Legge, “Mental Healing”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 257
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:095(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 4(d)
functional disease / organic —
The distinction between functional and organic disease is not easy. Dr W.H. Rivers gives a useful definition, in saying that funcional disease has no known structural or chemical basis, while organic disease is that for which such a basis has been discovered. Arthur E.J. Legge, “Mental Healing”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 263
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:095(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 4(e)
Maitrise de Soi-même / E. Coué (Nancy)
La Maîtrise de Soi-même. Par Émile Coué. Chez l'Auteur, Nancy, 1921. Arthur E.J. Legge, “Mental Healing”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 252
Note: a reference to Émile Coué, Maitrise de soi-même par l'autosuggestion consciente (Nancy: l'auteur, 1921). Also mentioned (much later) in a letter of 17 October 1935
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:095(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 4(f)
Papers on Psycho Analysis / Ernest Jones / (Bailliere: 1913)
Papers on Psycho-Analysis. By Ernest Jones, M.D. Baillière, 1913. Arthur E.J. Legge, “Mental Healing”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 252
Note: a reference to Ernest Jones, Papers on Psycho-Analysis, rev. and enlarged ed. (London: Bailliere, November 1918)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:095(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 5(a)
Guinness (oars) Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 5(b)
a meuse in the thorn
[Reynard the Fox] He crossed the covert, he crawled the bank / To a meuse in the thorns, and there he sank Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 265
Note: Meuse: a gap or opening in a fence or hedge through which game, especially hares, habitually pass.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:095(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 5(c)
casts along shore (fox) Blue
Some years ago a long run with a well-known West Country pack ended quite unaccountably upon a strip of sandy beach on the Dorset coast. The fox had vanished […] exhaustive casts upon the shore failed to recover the line Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 267
Note: Cast [of hounds]: to be spread out in different directions in search of a lost scent.
N01 (VI.B.10): 5(d)
saves his brush Red
[the fox] saves his brush, but it is not likely that […] he acts with deliberate intent Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 268
N01 (VI.B.10): 5(e)
play ‘possum Red
the stratagems common to the whole race [of foxes] […] are merely the promptings of instinct, of which the most notable example is the trick of ‘playing possum.’ Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 268
N01 (VI.B.10): 5(f)
the worry Not cancelled
A comparatively fresh fox had been headed into the very mouths of the pack, and rolled over. Somehow during the worry he got dragged into a deep runnel Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 268
Note: Worry [of hounds]: the action of gripping and shaking an animal or quarry so as to kill or injure it.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:095(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 5(g)
turning down Red
In Devonshire where ‘turning down’ is unknown, we will have a wild, hardy sort of animal that will literally run all day Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 269
Note: To turn down [of game]: to put in a place to stock it.
N01 (VI.B.10): 5(h)
trailing of vixens
The trailing of vixens is doubtless responsible for the theory that the fox is polygamous Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 270
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:095(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 5(i)
dogfox Blue
It is hard to understand why dog-foxes are so often seen about earths which contain cubs Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 270
N01 (VI.B.10): 5(j)
red mother Red
  • FW unlocated
Particularly when studying cubs […] is one liable to encounter disappointment […] For, should the red mother's suspicion once be aroused, all is over Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 270
Note: Possibly moved to N05 (VI.B.2):051(e), source of FW 031.25.
N01 (VI.B.10): 5(k)
ran him Red
in early summer greyhounds can seldom be induced to attack a she-wolf. They will run her readily, but never hurt her when overtaken. Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 271
N01 (VI.B.10): 5(l)
ladypack Blue
A late snowfall having prevented hunting, we had taken the lady-pack out for road exercise Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 271
Note: See also N15 (VI.D.2):051(b).
N01 (VI.B.10): 5(m)
the ‘whip’
[a fox] was little more than a gunshot astern of us when the chance crack of a whip scared it off, whereupon it broke over the wayside fence and disappeared. Nothing would satisfy [the groom] but that the whip and I should accompany him to where he had last seen the fox, and there, sure enough, were the unmistakable tracks leading away across the snow. Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 271-2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:095(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 5(n)
rekennelling
It occurred when I was hunting beagles in Scotland. A late snowfall having prevented hunting, we had taken the lady-pack out for road exercise, and were just rekenneling them when the groom, a thoroughly reliable fellow, rode up in a high state of excitement. Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 271
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:095(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 5(o)
fox & weasel eat moles
a fox's fatal passion for moles—shared with no other creature that I know of, except the weasel—has provided one of the surest and easiest ways of effecting his destruction. Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 272
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:096(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 6(a)
to wind hounds ~
When hunted, [the fox] cares little about being able to see or hear his pursuers as long as he can wind them. Thus he is never content unless well to leeward of the hounds; […] It is for this reason, of course, that he habitually runs down wind Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 273
Note: To wind: in hunting, to scent or detect by the wind.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:096(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 6(b)
~ runs down wind Red
When hunted, [the fox] cares little about being able to see or hear his pursuers as long as he can wind them. Thus he is never content unless well to leeward of the hounds; […] It is for this reason, of course, that he habitually runs down wind Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 273
N01 (VI.B.10): 6(c)
coombe
[Reynard the Fox] One May morning about sunrise […] I was watching for badgers in a West Dorsetshirew coombe Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 273-4
Note: Coombe: a deep hollow or vale, esp. one on the flank of a hill.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:096(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 6(d)
batch
[Reynard the Fox] […] Flanking the steep sides of the batch to right and left of me stretched extensive gorse-breaks Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 273-4
Note: batch: the vale of a stream.
N01 (VI.B.10): 6(e)
mosshykes
[Reynard the Fox] […] while dividing the breaks from the larch coverts ran a ribbon of silver-grey marsh land, flecked with […] bright emerald excrescences […] suspiciously like moss-hags. […] For some time I watched the peculiar gyrations of a snipe, which since the first streak of dawn had been rising and falling in its own peculiar way, drumming incessantly all the while. […] Along a faint sheep-path which skirted the morass came a beautiful dog-fox […] Full fed, and therefore at peace with all things, he was pointing for his own kennel, somewhere in one of the breaks. Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 273-4
Note: moss-hag: a pit or hole from which peat has been dug.
N01 (VI.B.10): 6(f)
drumming of snipe
[Reynard the Fox] […] For some time I watched the peculiar gyrations of a snipe, which since the first streak of dawn had been rising and falling in its own peculiar way, drumming incessantly all the while. […] Along a faint sheep-path which skirted the morass came a beautiful dog-fox […] Full fed, and therefore at peace with all things, he was pointing for his own kennel, somewhere in one of the breaks. Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 273-4
Note: To drum: (of snipe) to make a hollow reverberating sound by the quivering of the tail feathers.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:096(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 6(g)
morass
[Reynard the Fox] […] Along a faint sheep-path which skirted the morass came a beautiful dog-fox Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 273-4
N01 (VI.B.10): 6(h)
pointing for his kennel Red
Note: To point: (of a hound) to indicate the presence or position of (game) by standing rigidly looking towards it.
[Reynard the Fox] […] Full fed, and therefore at peace with all things, he was pointing for his own kennel, somewhere in one of the breaks. Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 273-4
N01 (VI.B.10): 6(i)
2 guns (2 men) Blue
On a certain day [a well-known Devonshire squire] was rabbiting in one of his own woods with a couple of companions—quite an informal party, just the two guns and a dog Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 274-5
Note: See also: N01 (VI.B.10):036(h) and N03 (VI.B.3):120(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 6(j)
blackberry growth ~ Red
At the moment his spaniel was speaking freely in some blackberry growth […] when […] he saw a fox sitting on a stump not fifty yards ahead of him Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 274-5
N01 (VI.B.10): 6(k)
~ dog was speaking Red
At the moment his spaniel was speaking freely in some blackberry growth […] when […] he saw a fox sitting on a stump not fifty yards ahead of him Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 274-5
Note: See also: N01 (VI.B.10):047(j). To speak: (of a hound) to give tongue, to bay.
N01 (VI.B.10): 6(l)
old deaf fox ~ Red
For a startled instant […] its intense yellow eyes looked full into his; then it shot across the ride and into the brushwood with one streaklike bound […]He was deaf,’ said my friend laconically. ‘Old foxes often lose their hearing as old dogs do.’ Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 274-5
Note: Moved to N01 (VI.B.10):006(n)
N01 (VI.B.10): 6(m)
~ the ride ~
For a startled instant […] its intense yellow eyes looked full into his; then it shot across the ride and into the brushwood with one streaklike bound […] ‘He was deaf,’ said my friend laconically. ‘Old foxes often lose their hearing as old dogsdo.’ Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 274-5
N01 (VI.B.10): 6(n)
~ old deaf fox Red
For a startled instant […] its intense yellow eyes looked full into his; then it shot across the ride and into the brushwood with one streaklike bound […]He was deaf,’ said my friend laconically. ‘Old foxes often lose their hearing as old dogs do.’ Douglas Gordon, “Reynard the Fox”, Quarterly Review (October 1922) 274-5
Note: Moved from N01 (VI.B.10):006(l).
N01 (VI.B.10): 7(a)
Harry Coverdale's Courtship Not cancelled
Note: According to Herbert Gorman, this was one of four books owned by John Stanilaus Joyce: “His father's library,if the few volumes can be so dignified, consisted of Pelham, or the Adventures of a Gentleman, by Bulwer-Lytton …; Harry Coverdale's Courtship, by Smedley; Jonah Barrington's Recollections of His Own Times, and The House by the Churchyard, a story about old Chapelizod, by Le Fanu.” Harry Coverdale's Courtship, and all that came of it, by Francis Edward Smedley, was published in London in 1855 by Virtue, Hall and Virtue. See also N12 (VI.B.14):056(j)and N26 (VI.B.18):152(d).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:096(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 7(b)
strike camp
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:096(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 7(c)
the stultitiae we do in / wine condone for those / worse done in cold blood
Note: Latin stultitiae: follies.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:096(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 8(a)
wealth of his / dramatis personarum / ([purest] J.J. Blue
  • FW unlocated
N01 (VI.B.10): 8(b)
sturgeon / king's trophy Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 8(c)
ground bait
Note: Bait laid on riverbed to lure fish.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:096(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 8(d)
hempseed (bhang)
Note: Bhang: hemp that is smoked or chewed: a psychotropic drug.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:096(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 8(e)
sick fish belly up Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 8(f)
One laughs in / streams, in / cascades with / unbuttoned / belly
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:097(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 9(a)
Maldoror — Ossian / De Quincey —
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:097(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 9(b)
in a manner which / I must admit / seems extraordinary
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:097(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 9(c)
Dublin churches
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:097(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 9(d)
make reader believe / it is N.D The / ‘Seine’
Note: N.D.: Notre Dame.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:097(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 9(e)
fox has broken / at covert side
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:097(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 9(f)
imposture book through / the ages, revered more / & more Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 10(a)
p 414 LB & taxi
Note: See page 414 of Ulysses (Paris, 1922), page 414, last line, where Bloom recalls incident from earlier in the day involving a cab.
N01 (VI.B.10): 10(b)
live on the smell Red
Note: Compare Dubliners (1914 edition), ‘Ivy Day in the Committee Room’, p. 156: “Entertaining!” says he. “He'd live on the smell of an oil-rag.”
N01 (VI.B.10): 10(c)
— Kells Ul
Note: In right column same line as ‘Father Prout’ (N01 (VI.B.10):010(d)). Both the Book of Kells and Ulysses are “Irish” versions of classics.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:098(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 10(d)
Father Prout / (Andrew)
Ah, what would not one give to have made one of a group about the chair of him who created the Rev. Andrew Prout, the lone incumbent of Watergrasshill, in the delectable county of Cork; Michael Monahan, Nova Hibernia (1914) [FATHER PROUT] 261f
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:098(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 10(e)
Fraserians / right arm caught in / left hand behind
That is also a good bit of description, showing the free touch of a contemporary, which pictures for us the “short, spare man, stooping as he went, with the right arm clasped in the left hand behind him; a sharp face—a mocking lip, and an ecclesiastical garb of slovenly appearance. Such was the old Fraserian,” adds the writer, “who would laugh outright at times, quite unconscious of bystanders, as he slouched toward Temple Bar.” Michael Monahan, Nova Hibernia (1914) [FATHER PROUT] 259
Note: The gentleman described is “Father Prout.” Fraserian: name applied to contributors to Fraser's Magazine..
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:098(b), VI.C.05:098(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 10(f)
L Brett (Younghusband) / 32 Rendezvous Street / Folkstone
Note: See 6 August, 1921. It is possible Mr Younghusband is the hosier referred to. From 1887 until 1934 the shop at 32 Rendezvous Street, Folkstone, went under the name Brett (first J., later L.A.). It started as a tailor and cutter and later became hosier and outfitter.

Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:098(d), VI.C.05:098(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 10(g)
mere de Dieu / — — Cambronne
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:098(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 11(a)
Phelan
[Deaths] PHELAN—October 29, 1922, at a Private Hospital, Dublin, Mary, relict of the late Thomas Phelan Irish Times (31 October 1922) 1/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:098(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 11(b)
raffia allover pattern
[NEWSPAPER HOLDER.] The handle of the bag can be covered with ribbon or raffia twisted round and round, while the front of the bag should be decorated with raffia in an “allover” pattern of flowers. Irish Times (30 October 1922) 2/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:098(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 11(c)
Brown Betty ~ Red
[BROWN BETTY.] Butter a deep pie-dish, and place a layer of finely chopped apples on the bottom. Cover with a layer of fine bread crumbs, sprinkle with sugar, and spice and small bits of broken-up butter. Then add another layer of apple, and cover as before, and so on till the dish is full. Irish Times (30 October 1922) 2/5
N01 (VI.B.10): 11(d)
~ apples & breadcrumbs in layers
[BROWN BETTY.] Butter a deep pie-dish, and place a layer of finely chopped apples on the bottom. Cover with a layer of fine bread crumbs, sprinkle with sugar, and spice and small bits of broken-up butter. Then add another layer of apple, and cover as before, and so on till the dish is full. Irish Times (30 October 1922) 2/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:098(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 11(e)
windfalls (apples) Red
Note: Probably first moved to: N25 (VI.B.15):165(a).
There has been a wonderful crop of apples this year, so large that great numbers of them have been pushed off the branches by their fellows, as well as those that have fallen off in the late storms. “Windfalls,” when gathered fresh, may be used in making tarts or puddings, and the very small ones boiled down for jelly. Irish Times (30 October 1922) 2/5
N01 (VI.B.10): 11(f)
till it jellies
“Windfalls,” when gathered fresh, may be used in making tarts or puddings, and the very small ones boiled down for jelly […] to each pint of fluid allow a pound of sugar, and boil till it jellies. Irish Times (30 October 1922) 2/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:099(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 11(g)
Greek uniates Red
Note: Uniate: a member of that part of the Greek church which, while retaining its own liturgy, acknowledges the supremacy of the Pope.
N01 (VI.B.10): 11(h)
X tropic beast & man Egypt / India / = brothers / beast superior?
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:099(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 12(a)
hearing his name / called very / sagaciously he / turned Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 12(b)
after honourable sleep Green
N01 (VI.B.10): 12(c)
— a draught of obvious / water / — Blue
N01 (VI.B.10): 12(d)
hermocopidae ~
The late M. Paul Stapfer […] suffered, like other good men, from the maleficent influence of that extraordinary popular delusion by which France put herself on a level with Athens in the Hermocopidae mania, and England in the Popish Plot. He was a gentleman too. George Saintsbury, “Dullness” in The Criterion, I.1 (Oct 1922) 1-2
Note: Hermocopidae: mutilators of Hermae [statues of the god Hermes used as boundary marks, mile-stones, sign posts, etc.].
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:099(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 12(e)
it was a gent
The late M. Paul Stapfer […] suffered, like other good men, from the maleficent influence of that extraordinary popular delusion by which France put herself on a level with Athens in the Hermocopidae mania, and England in the Popish Plot. He was a gentleman too. George Saintsbury, “Dullness” in The Criterion, I.1 (Oct 1922) 1-2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:099(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 12(f)
hermeneutics
the discipline of interpretation, especially of Scripture. George Saintsbury, “Dullness” in The Criterion, I.1 (Oct 1922) 1-2: Note: Hermeneutics

Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:099(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 12(g)
cachexies / —
Note: Cachexies: a depraved condition of the body, in which nutrition is everywhere deficient.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:099(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 12(h)
pink an opponent / —
In spite of Moore's pacific character, there is no doubt that he was always ready, upon due occasion, to call out and even pink an adversary on the field of honor. Michael Monahan, Nova Hibernia (1914) [THOMAS MOORE] 106
Note: To pink: to pierce (in fencing).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:099(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 13(a)
condign satisfaction / — Red
However, Moore was hot for a deadly reprisal, and, by the hand of his trusty, though eccentric, friend, Hume, he dispatched to Jeffrey a fiery cartel, demanding a plenary apology, or that condign satisfaction which one gentleman is bound to accord another, etc. Michael Monahan, Nova Hibernia (1914) [THOMAS MOORE] 108
Note: condign: worthily deserved, merited; as in ‘condign punishment’.
N01 (VI.B.10): 13(b)
blue? methylated / spirit / —
METHYLATED SPIRIT DRINKERS When two Irishmen were charged at Thames Police Court, London, yesterday, with having been found in a drunken condition on methylated spirits, Mr. J.A.R. Cairns remarked, “It is an extraordinary thing that nearly all the methylated spirit drinkers I get here are Irishmen. If you go on drinking this stuff you will become insane.” Irish Times (10 October 1922) 6/8
Note: See also N05 (VI.B.2):114(k)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:099(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 13(c)
Le Toler
LE TOLER—In loving memory of Isabella Florence Le Toler, who died 1st November, 1920. Irish Times (1 November 1922) 1/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:099(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 13(d)
Loftus Cliffe
STATUTORY NOTICE TO CREDITORS. In the Goods of Anthony Loftus Cliffe, late of Bellevue, Macmine, in the County of Wexford, Esquire. J.P., D.L. Deceased. Irish Times (1 November 1922) 1/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:099(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 13(e)
Fr Bern. Vaughan granted / privilege of portable altar Brown
As a mark of special favour in 1916 Father Vaughan received a letter from Pope Benedict XV., congratulating him upon his jubilee in the priesthood and granting him the privilege of a portable alter. Irish Times (1 November 1922) 5/3
N01 (VI.B.10): 13(f)
Albi Connolly thinking / of giving M.[S.R]. in / custody Red
Note: Albrecht Connolly was a fellow student of Joyce at Belvedere and served him as a model for Heron in A Portrait.
N01 (VI.B.10): 13(g)
bathos (Eol)
Yet it is in a degree true to the sentiment or, rather, bathos of that queer Georgian period. The French Revolution had been followed by an aftermath of hysteria which was fearfully prolonged. Michael Monahan, Nova Hibernia (1914) [THOMAS MOORE] 43
Note: Cancelled as part of previous cross-out.
N01 (VI.B.10): 14(a)
T. Moore [writes] for 5 ears
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:100(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 14(b)
bulbul — Red
It is not easy to offer extracts from “Lalla Rookh,” for the reason that too much of it tempts quotation. I may ask your indulgence while I mark a few passages where the thrush and the bulbul sing one note, and that the note of beauty and rapture which men have agreed to call poetry. Michael Monahan, Nova Hibernia (1914) [THOMAS MOORE] 83
Note: See also: N01 (VI.B.10):035(n). A bulbul is an oriental nightingale. Thomas Moore is referred to as the Irish bulbul (cf. OED entry for “bulbul”).
N01 (VI.B.10): 14(c)
Aliaga Kelly
FEIS CEOIL COMMITTEE. The Feis Ceoil Assocation has elected the following Executive Committee by ballot for 1922-1923: […] Miss Eithne Aliaga Kelly, Edward Martyn, […] The Music Sub-Committee and the Ladies' Committee has been re-elected, and Mr. Ambrose Aliaga Kelly elected Hon. Treasurer in place of Mr. W. P. Geoghegan, who has resigned the position as he is now residing in England. Irish Times (31 October 1922) 3/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:100(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 14(d)
Lassam
[Deaths] Lassam—October 21, 1922 […] Emily Lassam, for over 57 years the faithful servant and friend of the late William Hemingway Mills, Esq., and family. Irish Times (31 October 1922) 1/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:100(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 14(e)
won its dancing / spurs
A Dancing Week. World Championship to be held in London. London's reputation as a Home of the Arts is growing rapidly, says a Correspondent: A signal compliment is being paid by the selection of the Queen's Hall for the holding of the World's Dancing Championship at Christmas. Hitherto these have been held in Paris — except in 1915, when Milan was the place appointed — but M. de Rhynal, the originator of the Dansant, composer of the Camel Walk, and organizer of all the big Paris dancing events for the past 12 years, thinks London has won its dancing spurs. Irish Times (31 October 1922) 3/3
Note: See also N03 (VI.B.3):108(e).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:100(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 14(f)
buggareaus / (seeds)
“Trees in Ireland.” “Sir,—I have read with unusual interest Dr. Gogarty's account of the blessings, direct and indirect, that would flow from a programme of planting the Irish railway embankments and other barren places with assorted fruit trees of the most productive types. […] The painful truth appears to be that before Ireland can be afforested in the manner suggested by Dr. Gogarty it will have to be de-middlemanned. Otherwise, if the big winds of liberty did not uproot the infant Bramley seedlings and immature bugarreaus in their adolescence, the sacred privileges of a vested interest would confine their mature utility exclusively to the provision of golf-club heads and imitation blackthorn walking-sticks. Let Dr. Gogarty plant the embankments of our State-owned railways with weeping elders and sad cypress, and none will say him nay.—Yours, etc., “Woodsman.”

Irish Times (31 October 1922) 3/5
Note: See also N01 (VI.B.10):017(f) below.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:100(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 14(g)
Val. Vousden / —
[Performance of “Arrah-na-Pogue,” in Queen's Theatre] The O'Grady was played by Valentine Vousden, who always succeeds in giving his characters a sense of reality. Irish Times (31 October 1922) 6/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:100(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 14(h)
Several Greeks wrote / Medea
Alas! young dramatists never tempt us with new versions of Hamlet's or Othello's story, yet Athenian audiences were asked to applaud ever afresh Medea's or Antigone's. T. Sturge Moore, “The Story of Tristram and Isolt in Modern Poetry” in The Criterion, I.1 (Oct 1922) 34
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:100(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 14(i)
Ital. Hamlet / —
Alas! young dramatists never tempt us with new versions of Hamlet's or Othello's story, yet Athenian audiences were asked to applaud ever afresh Medea's or Antigone's. T. Sturge Moore, “The Story of Tristram and Isolt in Modern Poetry” in The Criterion, I.1 (Oct 1922) 34
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:100(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 15(a)
Tristan — Binyon / Tennyson / Wagner / Michael Field / Swinburne / Arnold / Debussy
Let us, then, praise Mr. Binyon and Michael Field that after Tennyson, after Matthew Arnold, after Swinburne, and the European outburst of Wagner's success, they did not shrink from treating the legend of Tristan and Isolt. T. Sturge Moore, “The Story of Tristram and Isolt in Modern Poetry” in The Criterion, I.1 (Oct 1922) 34
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:100(i), VI.C.05:101(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 15(b)
Gordon Bottomley
Mr. Gordon Bottomley has recently used the earlier lives of Shakespeare's characters T. Sturge Moore, “The Story of Tristram and Isolt in Modern Poetry” in The Criterion, I.1 (Oct 1922) 34n1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:101(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 15(c)
write it in love / —
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:101(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 15(d)
O la musique / Avec les soldiques / —
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:101(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 15(e)
Isolde of Britt — Pen / — — white hands — Calypso
[Matthew Arnold] let himself be seduced by the yet more pathetic though less necessary figure of Tristram's wife, Isolt of Brittany […] and he uses her as symbol of his reflection upon this tragic tale […] Only with the last line of the third part […] is this reflection brought completely into the light. When “Isolt of the Snow-white Hand,” having told her children the story of Merlin and Vivian, explains it with the words — / “For she was passing weary of his love.” T. Sturge Moore, “The Story of Tristram and Isolt in Modern Poetry” in The Criterion, I.1 (Oct 1922) 39
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:101(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 15(f)
rebuttal Red
People who read Maupassant in the current translations usually think of him as a man who had a perverted talent for writing indecent stories and whose own personal immoralities brought upon him a judgment in the shape of paresis and an untimely death. The latter part of this view is probably well founded, though the physiologist might have something to say in the way of rebuttal or, at least, qualification. The matter of heredity would have to be taken into account; it being clear that a man is often punished in his venial sins for the graver transgressions of an ancestor who had dodged the reckoning in his own person. Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 78 [Guy de Maupassant]
N01 (VI.B.10): 15(g)
preserving persevering Red
Few English writers have satisfied the demands of the artistic conscience as rigorously as did Maupassant. In the preface to Pierre et Jean, already cited, he says: “After so many masters of nature so varied, of genius so manifold, what remains to do, which has not been done, what remains to say, which has not been said? Who can boast, among us, of having written a page, a phrase, which is not already, almost the same, to be found elsewhere?” Now the man who seeks only to amuse his public, continues Maupassant, by means already known and familiar, writes with confidence, his work being intended for the ignorant and idle crowd. But—and here is a truth, oh ye professors of literature!—those upon whom weigh all the past cycles of literature, those whom nothing satisfies, whom everything disgusts, because they dream better, to whom everything seems already deflowered, whose work gives them always the impression of a labor useless and common—they arrive at length to judge the literary art as a thing unseizable and mysterious, which even the greatest masters have scarcely unveiled. What remains then, he asks, for us who are simply conscientious and persevering workers? Why, we can maintain our struggle against invincible discouragement only by continuous effort par la continuité de l'effort. Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 80 [Guy de Maupassant]
Note: Possibly a misreading questioned by Joyce when being read to.
N01 (VI.B.10): 16(a)
2d because
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:101(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 16(b)
Buffoon Buffon
Yet, if as Buffon implied, beauty of style lies in the number, coherence, and justness of relations between the perceptions evoked […] then it is evident that beauties of detail which lack organic relation to the whole […] must, like cut or wired flowers doomed to sterility, ill compare with blooms on thriving plants. T. Sturge Moore, “The Story of Tristram and Isolt in Modern Poetry” in The Criterion, I.1 (Oct 1922) 49
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:101(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 16(c)
to ever happy Frauds
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:101(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 16(d)
S. Giovanni Boccaccio
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:101(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 16(e)
Exiled Irish Employm / Bureau / 4 Lr Abbey Street
[CURRENT TOPICS] The Exiled Irish Employement Bureau, 4 Lower Abbey Street, Dublin, stands for a very good and useful national service The Leader (4 November 1922) 295/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:101(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 16(f)
What harm wants / but demands it!
[PESSIMISM] Everyone wants to be better off and to have an easier time of it than before. And what harm wants, but demands it. The Leader (4 November 1922) 303/1
Note: ‘CURRENT TOPICS’: each issue opens with this — a series of editorial comments on topical themes.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:102(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 16(g)
Ann Doyle (An Dail) Red
[AS OTHERS SEE US]Anne Doyle” has been goin' strong here for the past month or so. The Leader (4 November 1922) 305/1
Note: See also: N20 (VI.B.13):031(i). ‘AS OTHERS SEE US’, an occasional column, taking the form of facetious letters on the state of Ireland from ‘John Bull (Junior)’ to a friend.
N01 (VI.B.10): 16(h)
'pon my Sam,
[AS OTHERS SEE US] 'Pon my Sam, it's like the good old times to be readin' election speeches. The Leader (4 November 1922) 306/1
Note: ‘AS OTHERS SEE US’, an occasional column, taking the form of facetious letters on the state of Ireland from ‘John Bull (Junior)’ to a friend.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:102(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 16(i)
search me, Red
[AS OTHERS SEE US] Of course, we've got a strike goin' on one of the railways. What they're strikin' about—well, search me, but I expect it don't matter a row of pills. The Leader (4 November 1922) 305/1
Note: ‘AS OTHERS SEE US’, an occasional column, taking the form of facetious letters on the state of Ireland from ‘John Bull (Junior)’ to a friend.
N01 (VI.B.10): 16(j)
get the hump
[AS OTHERS SEE US] Talkin' of civic sense, this city has pretty well gone to the dogs. What with lively Irregulars paintin' notices on the dead walls, all parties stickin' up placards on posts and pillars, rubbish, skins, papers scattered all over the town, a cove like yours very truly with some order and decency fair gets the hump. The Leader (4 November 1922) 306/1
Note: ‘AS OTHERS SEE US’, an occasional column, taking the form of facetious letters on the state of Ireland from ‘John Bull (Junior)’ to a friend.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:102(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 16(k)
old Top, Black
[AS OTHERS SEE US] Cheerio now, old Top. The Leader (4 November 1922) 306/2
Note: See also: SA (VI.A):0721(w).‘AS OTHERS SEE US’, an occasional column, taking the form of facetious letters on the state of Ireland from ‘John Bull (Junior)’ to a friend.
N01 (VI.B.10): 17(a)
get out button by / twisting
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:102(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 17(b)
velvet strand / Portmarnock
DUBLIN. Tragedy of the sea. — A verdict of “Found drowned” was returned by a Coroner's jury, at an inquest held last night in Baldoyle, on the body of an unknown woman, found on the Velvet Strand, Portmarnock, on Wednesday. Irish Times (27 October 1922) 7/3
Note: The Velvet Strand is a two-mile stretch of sandy strand in Portmarnock, Dublin.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:102(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 17(c)
Bassett
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:102(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 17(d)
covered with revolver
Schooner Seized in German Port. Adventure ends on Warship. While the motor schooner Bertha, bound from Hamburg to Sweden, was lying in Cuxhaven awaiting the tide she was suddenly stormed by pirates, says The Times Hamburg Correspondent. The pirates, four in number, appeared alongside in a boat, scrambled on board, shot down the captain, drove the crew into the hold, and made themselves master of the ship./ Having locked the captain in his cabin, they dragged out one of the crew from the hold, and, covering him with a revolver, order him to navigate them to Denmark. Irish Times (27 October 1922) 5/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:102(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 17(e)
orchestral end of / book —
N01 (VI.B.10): 17(f)
Hills of Eire
Instead of being (in the Midlands) one of the ugliest and most ill-kempt countries in Europe, Ireland would be transformed in a decade. The climate would change, and with it the character of the people. Road-sides that grow wasteful ash and useless elder would be trim and productive with the apple, pear and plum. Monotony could be varied by the poplar and sorb-apple tree. The hills of Eire would be fair once more. […] Those who live in Ireland will be less subject to brain-storms and emotional extremes. They will live placider in milder air, and from their literature and oratory there will be a dying down of wind.

OLIVER ST. JOHN GOGARTY
Ely place, Dublin, October 28th, 1922.

Irish Times (30 October 1922) 7/3
Note: See also N01 (VI.B.10):014(f) above. To throw some light on Buck Mulligan's (Gogarty's) real character the full letter can be viewed here
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:102(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 17(g)
his ‘gun’ (revolver) Red
Note: Not in final text: the second use replaced by ‘kayoed’ (N26 (VI.B.18):028(l), FW 85.04) at draft 5+.
N01 (VI.B.10): 17(h)
Cato (9 tails) — Caton[e]
FLOGGING MACHINE FOUND.—Police found a rudely-constructed flogging machine and a cat-o'-nine tails in a house in Scotch Row, Ballymacarrett, Belfast, yesterday morning. Irish Times (28 October 1922) 5/3
Note: It. Catone: Cato.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:102(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 17(i)
The Prices turn plates down / for dessert
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:103(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 17(j)
Touchez ma main (H C)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:103(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 18(a)
leave him to cool (P)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:103(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 18(b)
evil courses Red
A few years ago I wrote an essay on the downfall of Oscar Wilde, inspired as it was by the publication of his “De Profundis.” The few American critics who did me the honor to notice my article referred to above, took exception to the fact that I had accepted Wilde's repentance as sincere, and they were at somewhat scandalous pains to point out his relapse into his old evil courses an accusation which, at the time, I believed to rest only upon such idle gossip as the poet's disgrace and conviction would naturally give rise to.

The charitable view held by these critics, and I believe still held by too many people, was that the man's name should be blotted from memory and his literary legacy annulled since, after his public punishment and professed penitence, he had again fallen into the ways of sin.

They, and many with them, seem to have forgotten the precept of Him who said that even the just man shall fall not seven times but seventy times seven!

Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 260 [A Note on Oscar Wilde]
N01 (VI.B.10): 18(c)
S Thomas Didymus
But it seems the doubtful public that had previously cried “Crucify him!” wanted to be very sure ere they would believe in the penitence of this great sinner; like Thomas surnamed Didymus, they would put their fingers in his wounds and their hands in his side to verify for themselves that his heart was really and truly broken—aye, and they would even taste his tears to make sure if these were salt! Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 261f [A Note on Oscar Wilde]
Note: Saint Thomas, the Apostle, was called Didymus (the twin).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:103(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 18(d)
taken to (t)ask (W)
Still another word, which perhaps it is even more needful to say. I have been taken to task by a certain critic for printing so much about Oscar Wilde. In this person's view the offence of Wilde was so great and his fall of such unmitigated horror and disgrace that it were better to leave his name to the charity of oblivion. Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 263 [A Note on Oscar Wilde]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:103(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 18(e)
the lady (p 7) / the brazen whore (p 20)
His quarrel with Luigi Pulci (“son of the Pulci beheaded for incest with his daughter”) is of a like temper, Benvenuto being now in his early twenties. The trouble arose over “the lady Pantasilea who bore me that false and burdensome love”; but yet Benvenuto disliked that Luigi should partake of her favors. This he told him in a manner that makes one think of the fire and cunning of Iago—and in truth Cellini often reminds one of that honest person, showing how well Shakespeare knew his Italian. Here was the way of it.

“As soon as the brazen-faced whore (just a page before she had been ‘the lady Pantasilea’!) set eyes on the fine youth, she had her designs on him. Seeing this, as soon as our supper was over, I called Luigi aside and told him that for the sake of the kindness he owned I had done him, he must never seek the company of that prostitute. His reply was, ‘Alas, my friend Benvenuto, do you take me, then, for a madman?’ … ‘Not for a madman but for a young man,’ I answered; ‘and I swear to you I have no thought of her at all, but I should be very sorry if through her you broke your neck.’ Whereupon he swore and called to God to witness that [307] if ever he spoke to her, he might break his neck upon the spot.”

Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 307 [Cellini]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:103(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 18(f)
to avenge brother!
Cecchino, a younger brother of our Benvenuto, had been wounded to death by a guardsman after he had himself killed one of the latter's comrades. The guardsman had plainly acted in self-defence, and the quarrel was one which the fiery Cecchino had brought on himself. Nevertheless, the filial Benvenuto pined to avenge his brother and became so gloomy from brooding over this thought of blood that Pope Clement (for whom he was doing some artistic work at the time and who perhaps feared that it might suffer) rebuked him, saying: “Oh, Benvenuto, I did not know you were demented. Haven't you learnt before now that for death there is no remedy? You are doing your best to follow your brother.” Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 309 [Cellini]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:103(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 18(g)
arquebusier
How Cellini cured himself of this indisposition and “got his man” (as we are now saying) is thus told and I wonder if there is anything more dramatically effective in the pages of Dumas. “Better to me than courting a sweetheart,” he says with savage joy, “was watching that arquebusier who had killed my brother.” But one evening he resolved once and for all to be done with the trouble. I here gladly give him the word. Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 309 [Cellini]
Note: arquebusier: a soldier armed with an arquebus, an early type of portable gun.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:103(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 18(h)
forehandedness
A later and more daring piece of homicide (which was to have more serious consequences for our spirited friend), was the killing of Messer Pompeo, a Milanese and a sort of trade rival of Cellini. Believing his own life to be threatened, the latter with admirable forehandedness attacked Pompeo in the midst of a band of friends. “But with a little keen-edged dagger (he was perhaps laudably partial to the national weapon) “I forced their ranks and had my hands upon his breast so quickly and with such coolness that not one of them could hinder me. I was aiming at his face, but in his terror he turned his head, so that I plunged the poniard in just below the ear. It only needed two strokes, for at the second he fell dead, which had not been at all my intention. But as the saying is, ‘There is no bargaining about blows.’” Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 311 [Cellini]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:103(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 18(i)
to yerk him under / the ribs
We cannot leave the excellent Benvenuto Cellini at a more fitting or happier point than this, where he has completed his imperishable masterpiece and is at reasonable peace with all the world. He had indeed, just previous to the casting of the Perseus, met with his enemy and rival Bandinello in a desolate region near Florence, and first thought to “yerk him here under the ribs,” like Iago on a somewhat like occasion. Bandinello, in truth, expected no less and became pale as death, shaking from head to foot. His fear was vain: the admirable Benvenuto's spirit had declined, and he contented him self with thanking God who by His own strength had kept him from such a deed of violence! Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 315 [Cellini]
Note: Shakespeare, Othello i. ii. 5: Nine, or ten times I had thought t'haue yerk'd him here vnder the Ribbes.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:103(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 19(a)
I came into the world Brown
At twelve years, her brother says, she was grave in thought and appearance, borne down with anxiety, haunted by melancholy presentiments. And here is one of the tenderest pages of the memoir, written when the sense of her loss was still poignantly fresh with Renan: “I came into the world in February, 1823. The advent of a little brother was a great comfort to my sister. She attached herself to me with all the ardor of a shy and tender nature, endued with an immense longing to love something. […] Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 341-2 [Henriette Renan]
N01 (VI.B.10): 19(b)
pretend to be dead
“{…] I remember yet the petty tyrannies I practiced on her and against which she never revolted. When she was going out in full dress to attend gatherings of girls of her own age, I would cling to her gown and beseech her to remain. Then she would turn back, take off her holiday attire and stay with me. One day, in jest, she threatened she would die if I were not a good child, and pretended to be dead, in fact, sitting in an armchair. The horror caused me by the feigned immobility of my dear sister is perhaps the strongest impression ever made upon me, whom fate did not permit to witness her last sigh. […] Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 341-2 [Henriette Renan]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:104(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 19(c)
Allmers = Renan
[the entire story, as recapped by Monahan] Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 338-351 [Henriette Renan]
Note: Joyce notes the parallel between Alfred Allmers, the deluded protagonist of Ibsen's Eyolf (1894), who lives with his wife and half-sister, that suffer for his ideals, and Renan, who also lived with his wife and sister, Henriette. Cf. also VI.A.0301 (‘Exiles’ II): ‘Henriette (cf Trist-Renan)’, and David Hayman, The Wake in Transit, 181n.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:104(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 19(d)
play a tune on piano Red
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] Things are quiet in Dublin—if you'd call it quiet not to be shot. […] I didn't think what a mope I was till last week, when I was moving the piano into the sitting-room to the fire for the winter. I remembered I hadn't sat down to it to play a tune since the fighting started in June! The Leader (28 October 1922) 277/2
Note: See also: N01 (VI.B.10):038(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 19(e)
clip — haircut Green
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] [referring to ‘Mickey's’ views on prices]: he went into a new barber's (Mickey I'm saying), and he had to pay 1⁄6 for the clip The Leader (28 October 1922) 277/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 19(f)
Micky, I'm saying Red
  • FW unlocated
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] [referring to ‘Mickey's’ views on prices]: he went into a new barber's (Mickey I'm saying), and he had to pay 1⁄6 for the clip The Leader (28 October 1922) 277/2
Note: See N05 (VI.B.2):104(i) for another version of this unit.
N01 (VI.B.10): 19(g)
draw a girl on me / (get a servant) ~
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] Mrs. Mac came on me the other day, and at the range, and if she didn't laugh, but 'tis no laughing matter for me, I can tell you. All the same, I'd rather do it than draw a girl on me. The Leader (28 October 1922) 278/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:104(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 19(h)
~ no laughing matter
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] Mrs. Mac came on me the other day, and I at the range, and if she didn't laugh, but 'tis no laughing matter for me, I can tell you. All the same, I'd rather do it than draw a girl on me. The Leader (28 October 1922) 278/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:104(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 19(i)
the Bush in Bloom (Music
‘SHALL THE HARP, THEN, BE SILENT?’ [Review of “Irish Jigs, Reels and Hornpipes,” arranged by Carl Hardebeck]: The following are the names of some tunes:— “The Bush in Bloom,” […] The Leader (28 October 1922) 279/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:104(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 19(j)
reversioners
Note: Reversion: the return of an estate to the donor or the heirs, upon expiry of the grant.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:104(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 19(k)
Agnew Jerry Perry
Note: Jeremiah Perry, a Dublin solicitor and ale-house companion of John Joyce. See also N03 (VI.B.3):050(d).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:104(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 20(a)
particularly / (practically) W
The little house stands with its shoulder to the street and is neighbored by some rather imposing villa residences. It has one fairly large window looking on a small grass-plot in front, and two tiny windows which light the low sleeping-room upstairs—for there is an “upstairs” although the cottage is practically of only one story. Over the large window is an effigy of a raven, which looks as if it might have been dashed off by a handy boy. There is, besides, an inscription stating that the house was occupied by Edgar Allan Poe from 1845 to l849; also, that it is now the property of E.J. Chauvet, D.D.S., Fordham, N.Y. Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 321 [At Poe's Cottage]
Note: Possibly a misreading questioned by Joyce when being read to.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:104(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 20(b)
names cut on trees
Before the cottage is a blasted cherry tree, half of which has been cut down, leaving a blackened trunk upon which the penknives of relic-hunters have wrought additional havoc. It stands not an unworthy symbol of the man whose eyes often rested on it in its greenness and vigor. Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 322f [At Poe's Cottage]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:104(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 20(c)
thicker (thither) Red
  • FW unlocated
Across the street a pleasant park, named after the Poet, has been set out. Thither it is proposed to move the historic cottage when a settlement shall have been made with the present owner. Knowing the mind of Chauvet, D.D.S., I should recommend the committee having the negotiation in charge, to come to terms with that gentleman as soon as practicable. They will not better the bargain by waiting. Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 322f [At Poe's Cottage]
Note: Possibly a misreading questioned by Joyce when being read to.
N01 (VI.B.10): 20(d)
integument Red
In what bodiless region dost thou now sojourn, O Carolus Agnus, with thy slim shy soul answering to what was erst its earthly integument? Art thou,—if daring conjecture may follow thee beyond the warm precincts of the cheerful day,—somewhere in the vast stellar interspaces (for the “downright Bible heaven” were not for thee)—wandering forlorn with Her who companioned thy earth journey? Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 233 [To the Shade of Lamb]
Note: Integument: that with which anything is covered, enclosed, or clothed; spec. the natural covering or investment of the body, or of some part or organ, of an animal or plant; a skin, shell, husk, rind.
N01 (VI.B.10): 20(e)
Carolus Agnus / = Dei Dillon Green
  • FW unlocated
In what bodiless region dost thou now sojourn, O Carolus Agnus, with thy slim shy soul answering to what was erst its earthly integument? Art thou,—if daring conjecture may follow thee beyond the warm precincts of the cheerful day,—somewhere in the vast stellar interspaces (for the “downright Bible heaven” were not for thee)—wandering forlorn with Her who companioned thy earth journey? Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 233 [To the Shade of Lamb]
Note: Carolus Agnus, Latin for Charles Lamb. ‘Carolus’ not crossed through.
N01 (VI.B.10): 20(f)
ruptures (raptures) Green
Or wouldst thou, O Elia, be again a child at Christ's, glad to lay thy sick head on a pillow, with the image of maternal tenderness bending over thee […]? Well I believe it, for thou hadst never a mind for joys beyond thy ken. The factitious raptures of spiritists were not for thee, nor wert thou ever seduced from the steady contemplation of thy ideal of happiness here below, by a distorted vision of the New Jerusalem. Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 235 [To the Shade of Lamb]
Note: Possibly a misreading questioned by Joyce when being read to.
N01 (VI.B.10): 20(g)
as a matter / of fact Red
Note: Left margin. See also: N12 (VI.B.14):193(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 20(h)
philogy / & hapiograph
Note: Haplography: the inadvertent writing of a letter, word or phrase once when correctly it should be written twice, as in philo(lo)gy for philology.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:104(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 20(i)
Bodley Bodley / dittograph
Note: The erroneous repetition of a letter, chord or phrase; see ‘Counterparts’, where Farrington writes ‘Bernard Bernard“ instead of ‘Bernard Bodley’.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:105(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 20(j)
candeler (calende)
Note: A chandler is a candlemaker.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:105(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 20(k)
oldster ~ Blue
  • FW unlocated
Turning over a rubbishly lot of old pamphlets in a second-hand bookstall on Fourteenth Street, New York, lately (a thing I am apter to be doing at five o' the afternoon than any other) I made a find that literally took my breath away. Nothing less than a miracle happened to me at that moment in the grimey old book shop, under the dealer's careless yet observant eye. From an oldster of some forty odd I became in a flash a boy of eleven, and stood there tingling and trembling at sight of what had been my earliest introduction to Romance. Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 87 [Knights of the Road]
Note: Possibly copied to SA (VI.A):0982(ap) for FW 393.31. FW 533.17 derives from N36 (VI.B.29):202(d).
N01 (VI.B.10): 20(l)
~ Hickey 2nd hand books
Turning over a rubbishly lot of old pamphlets in a second-hand bookstall on Fourteenth Street, New York, lately (a thing I am apter to be doing at five o' the afternoon than any other) I made a find that literally took my breath away. Nothing less than a miracle happened to me at that moment in the grimey old book shop, under the dealer's careless yet observant eye. From an oldster of some forty odd I became in a flash a boy of eleven, and stood there tingling and trembling at sight of what had been my earliest introduction to Romance.

What was the marvel? Only a parcel of dusty, shelf-worn paper novels, long out of print, so far as I know, and certainly never looked on by these eyes of mine since the gates of boyhood closed behind me.

Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 87
Note: Mentioned in The Dead. A Michael Hickey, Esq., Bookseller, operated out of 8 Bachelor's Walk in 1903.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:105(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 21(a)
Claude Duval / 16 String Jack / Tom King
Thirty years vanished at sight of the tall paper books, their very form and pressure conveying instant affirmation, even without the bold testimony of the titles in staring black and the quaintly symbolic design of interwoven masks and handcuffs on the cover. These insignia of the [87] Road and the Police waking in my heart an exquisite thrill of boyhood (through them I first felt the power of Art), would alone have certified to me the Adventures of Claude Duval, with the accompanying and more or less related histories of Dick Turpin, Tom King, and Sixteen-String Jack. The sight of Aladdin's Lamp or the Slaves of the Ring could not have moved me more—nay, not so much, for Hounslow Heath laid a stronger toil upon my young fancy than any scene of Arabian enchantment: I was, and ever have remained, a child of the Occident. Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 87-88 [Knights of the Road]
Note: Claude Duval (1643-70) was a notorious highwayman born in Normandy but operated in England. He was eventually captured and executed. ‘Sixteen-string Jack’ was the nom-de-guerre of John Rann, Esq., highwayman, hanged in 1774. His nickname derives from his fashionable dress, which included a bunch of sixteen strings at the knees of his breeches. Tom King acted as a partner to the notorious Dick Turpin.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:105(d), VI.C.05:105(e), VI.C.05:105(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 21(b)
furetive —
Of Life and Literature I knew nothing when I brought a boy's mind to these books—the dearer, too, that they were forbidden and had to be tasted with fear and precaution, sometimes by a furtive candle in my little room; or, as Tom Pinch sought to master the violin at Pecksniff's, under the bed clothes; or with desperate hardihood, betwixt the covers of a school book, in full family circle about the evening lamp. Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 88 [Knights of the Road]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:105(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 21(c)
chapbooks
I have just said that I knew nothing of Life and Literature when these picturesque old chapbooks, with their deadly designs of prison and gibbet, fell into my young hands. Truly I may add that Life and Literature, in such small measure as I have since come to know them, have stamped upon my mind no impressions more vivid and enduring. Taking up one book from the lot, I hold it in hands that tremble a little, wishing and yet fearing to turn the page and read. Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 89 [Knights of the Road]
Note: Chap-books: popular nineteenth-century pamphlets hawked by itinerant booksellers known as chapmen.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:105(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 21(d)
Tyburn tree Red
The spell will not be there, I say to myself, and the Boy I once knew alone has rights in this province—no trespassing, sir! I am still debating the question (as nice a one as you shall propose to yourself), always gazing at the quaint old novel with its pictured legends, appropriate foliage of Tyburn Tree, but not turning a leaf, when an eager shrill young voice seems to speak to me from its pages out of the Past. […] Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 89 [Knights of the Road]
Note: Tyburn tree: the gallows; named after Tyburn, the place of public execution for Middlesex until 1783, situated at the junction of Oxford Street, Bayswater Road, and Edgewood Road, north west of London.
N01 (VI.B.10): 21(e)
f(l)eet as the wind / Dick Turpin / L—York 150 mls
I liked to tell about Dick Turpin, too, with his Bonny Black Bess (O Romance, show me such an other pair as these!). Say, there wasn't her match in England for beauty and speed. Black every inch of her and fleet as the wind. When the coachies caught sight of her, they just hollered, “O Lord! It's Dick Turpin and his Bonny Black Bess,” and told everybody they'd better fork over quiet and peaceful. But, say, did you ever hear of anything like that ride to York—one hundred and fifty miles, without stopping once, to save her master and then dropped dead as he cleared hisself from the stirrups. There was a picture in my book showing the gallant steed stretched lifeless in the road, with Dick Turpin bending sorrowful-like over her. Oh, my Bonny Black Bess! (I have lived to see many a famous picture by some of the world's great artists, but none that pierced my heart with such sorrow as that old wood-cut in the story of Dick Turpin.) Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 92-93 [Knights of the Road]
Note: Richard Turpin (1706-39), short-lived highwayman, hanged at York (not Tyburn). The actual distance from London to York is over 200 miles.
N01 (VI.B.10): 21(f)
Jack Sheppard / Jonathan Wild
After Claude Duval and Dick Turpin, I guess Jack Sheppard was my favorite hero. But he didn't come in those long novels with the handcuffs strung around the cover. His was a smaller book with a colored picture on the outside showing Jonathan Wilde in a red coat and a cocked hat and a ferocious sneer, looking through the bars of a cell at Jack Sheppard. Oh, how I hated that Jonathan Wilde, and how I loved Blueskin for cutting his throat, though he didn't make a perfect job of it! Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 93 [Knights of the Road]
Note: Jack Sheppard (1702-24), romanticised highwayman hanged at Tyburn; the subject of ballads and ballads and a tract by Defoe. Jonathan Wild († 1725), the head of a gang of thieves, was hanged at Tyburn. He ran a business in London restoring property stolen by his aides. See also N32 (VI.B.23):125(h), the source for FW 540.27f.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:105(l), VI.C.05:105(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 21(g)
Jack Ketch
Note: Jack Ketch († 1686), public executioner.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:106(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 21(h)
Finchley Common
That night at home I take down my Macaulay (a choice that maturity enforces on me) and read under the head of “State of England in 1685”:

“Whatever might be the way in which a journey was performed, the travellers, unless they were numerous and well-armed, ran considerable risk of being stabbed and plundered. The mounted highwayman, a marauder known to our generation only from books, was to be found on every main road. The waste tracts which lay on the great routes near London were especially haunted by plunderers of this class. Hounslow Heath, on the Great Western Road, and Finchley Common, on the Great Northern Road, were perhaps the most celebrated of these spots.”

Michael Monahan, Adventures in Life and Letters (1912) 95 [Knights of the Road]
Note: Finchley Common, Middlesex, England: notorious haunt of highwaymen.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:106(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 21(i)
William the Conk Blue
[Review of “The Nine O'Clock Revue” at the Little] Who can resist Beatrice Lillie? I can't. Hear her sing her ancestry in “William the Conk!” with moustache and bowler hat. Sunday Express (29 October 1922) 9/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 21(j)
parlour golf
[Passing Pageant / A Few Remarks About the Chief Topics of the Day] Indoor Golf Vogue. There promises to be a craze for indoor golf schools. […] Sunday Express (29 October 1922) 10/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:106(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 21(k)
a tope
[Passing Pageant / A Few Remarks About the Chief Topics of the Day] Sunday Express (29 October 1922) 10/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:106(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 21(l)
how young are you
[NUTS AND WINE / Gossip for the After Dinner Hour] Home Thrusts. First Actress: “Do you know, darling, this is my birthday, darling?” Second Actress: “Really, darling! And how young are you today, darling?” Sunday Express (29 October 1922) 11/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:106(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 22(a)
Knut
[NUTS AND WINE / Gossip for the After Dinner Hour] Hints to Knuts. A contemporary remarks that brown boots should not be worn with evening dress. It should also be borne in mind that it is not considered the thing to walk down Bond-street with one's trousers tied at the knees. Sunday Express (29 October 1922) 11/3
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 22(b)
hold a wood (bowls)
[Photo caption] [Above:] Bowls again the Sport of Sea-Captains! [Below:] Sir William Don, K.B.E., left, who is captaining the international bowling team, now sailing to South Africa aboard the Union Castle s.s. Briton, shows Captain Sir Benjamin Chave, commander of the ship, how to hold a “wood” for the ancient game of sea captains. Sunday Express (29 October 1922) 13/3
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 22(c)
Eczema & rashers
[advt] Eczema and Rashes / Irritation maddening, but cured completely by Germoline. Sunday Express (29 October 1922) 14/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:106(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 22(d)
martyr to indigestion Brown
[Author, Journalist — & / Martyr to Indigestion] Writing from St. Michael's House, Southhampton, Ernest Lawton, the well-known author and journalist, says:— “For many years I was a martyr to indigestion and could get no relief […] when a friend induced me to try Bisurated Magnesia, which, I am pleased to say, effected a complete and permanent cure. Sunday Express (29 October 1922) 15/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 22(e)
contracted a / stubborn cough Brown
[Advertisement for Parmint] Ends stubborn coughs in a hurry. Sunday Express (29 October 1922) 15/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 22(f)
Aplin & Chaplin
[The Shadow Show / Rehashing Old Films] One up for Charlie.— A very interesting decision in the American Law Courts is the injunction which has been granted Charlie Chaplin to restrain Charles Amador from showing films under the name of Charlie Aplin, and imitating in costume and conduct the more famous Charlie. Sunday Express (29 October 1922) 15/2-3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:106(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 22(g)
Hustler soap
[advt] Hustler Soap / John Knight Ltd. London E.16. If it's washable, wash it with Hustler. Sunday Express (29 October 1922) 16/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:106(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 22(h)
Sylvia Silence, the girl / detective Red
[Advertisement for The Schoolgirls' Weekly] No. 2 Just Out […] includes all these tip-top stories:— Eldorado Nell / A thrilling tale of life in the Far West / Sylvia Silence / the girl detective Sunday Express (29 October 1922) 17/4
Note: See also N20 (VI.B.13):009(k).
N01 (VI.B.10): 22(i)
People in the Story Red
[Less Than the Dust By Henry St. John Cooper] People in the Story [above a list of characters] Sunday Express (29 October 1922) 18/1
Note: See also N22 (VI.B.17):005(n), the source of FW 48.16f.
N01 (VI.B.10): 23(a)
disaffection / unredressed
Once at least in every generation the question, “What is to be done with Ireland?” rises again to perplex the councils and trouble the conscience of the British nation. It has now risen more formidable than ever, and with the further aggravation, that it was unexpected. Irish disaffection, assuredly, is a familiar fact; and there have always been those among us who liked to explain it by a special taint of infirmity in the Irish character. But Liberal Englishmen had always attributed it to the multitude of unredressed wrongs. England had for ages, from motives of different degrees of unworthiness, made her yoke heavy upon Ireland. J. S. Mill, England and Ireland, (1869) 3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:106(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 23(b)
Whiteboy & Rockite
Let any Englishman put himself in the position of an Irish peasant, and ask himself whether, if the case were his own, the landed property of the country would have any sacredness to his feelings. Even the Whiteboy and the Rockite, in their outrages against the landlord, fought for, not against, the sacredness of what was property in their eyes; for it is not the right of the rent-receiver, but the right of the cultivator, with which the idea of property is connected in the Irish popular mind. J. S. Mill, England and Ireland, (1869) 3
Note: Irish agrarian terrorist organisations.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:106(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 23(c)
cottonball Red
  • FW unlocated
Note: Cottonball: ersatz.
N01 (VI.B.10): 23(d)
respite
What Hoche would have done for the Irish peasant, or its equivalent, has still to be done; and any government which will not do it does not fulfill the rational and moral conditions of a government. […] Perhaps even such small measures as that of securing to tenants a moderate compensation, in money or by [21] length of lease, for improvements actually made, and abolishing the unjust privilege of distraining for rent, might have appeased or postponed disaffection, and given to great-landlordism a fresh term of existence. But such reforms as these, granted at the last moment, would hardly give a week's respite from active disaffection. J. S. Mill, England and Ireland, (1869) 21-22 [Mill is imagining what would have happened if the French general Hoche in 1797 had managed to land in Ireland, driven the English out, and would have made Irish farmers equal to French farmers, instead of them continuing to be subject to English landlords, to be sent away from the land at six months' notice and having to pay more rent for every improvement they make themselves]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:106(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 23(e)
J.J. & Warren Hastings
Note: Warren Hastings (1732-1818), first governor-general of India. He was impeached for brutality and corruption, but was found not guilty despite compelling evidence of the cruelty of his administration.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:106(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 23(f)
Gibraltar
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:106(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 23(g)
cat eating (Rgrhtgkrght)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:107(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 23(h)
9 pages more = 18 (W)
[18 pages remain of this pamphlet, which ends on page 44] J. S. Mill, England and Ireland, (1869) 26
Note: Joyce was possibly being read to by a woman who counted leaves as pages.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:107(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 23(i)
This representation does not / accord with my experience
The prophets who, judging, I presume, from themselves, always augur the worst of the moral sentiments of their countrymen, are always asseverating that, whether right or wrong, the British people would rather devastate Ireland from end to end and root out its inhabitants, than consent to its separation from England. If we believe them, the people of England are a kind of bloodhounds, always ready to break loose and perpetrate Jamaica horrors, unless they, and their like, are there to temper and restrain British brutality. This representation does not accord with my experience. J. S. Mill, England and Ireland, (1869) 26
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:107(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 23(j)
by hearing a thing twice / reader begins to think / it may be true
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:107(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 23(k)
rootles Blue
Note: rootle: to root or grub up.
N01 (VI.B.10): 23(l)
instilled into him across / his grandmother's knee Brown
N01 (VI.B.10): 24(a)
carry fire & sword
The time is come when the democracy of one country will join hands with the democracy of another, rather than back their own ruling authorities in putting it down. I shall not believe, until I see it proved, that the English and Scotch people are capable of the folly and wickedness of carrying fire and sword over Ireland in order that their rulers may govern Ireland contrary to the will of the Irish people. J. S. Mill, England and Ireland, (1869) 27
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:107(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 24(b)
re(ci)procate
Too much bitter feeling still remains between England and the United States, more than eighty years after separation; and Ireland has suffered from England, for many centuries, evils compared with which the greatest grievances of the Americans were, in all but their principle, insignificant. The persevering reciprocation of insults between English and American newspapers and public speakers has, before now, brought those two countries to the verge of a war; would there not be even more of this between countries still nearer neighbours, on the morrow of an unfriendly separation? J. S. Mill, England and Ireland, (1869) 28
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:107(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 24(c)
born(e) / —
In the perpetual state of irritated feeling thus kept up, trifles would become causes of quarrel. Disputes more or less serious, even collisions, would be for ever liable to occur. Ireland, therefore, besides having to defend herself against all other enemies, internal and external, without English help, would feel obliged to keep herself always armed and in readiness to fight England. An Irishman must have a very lofty idea of the resources of his country who thinks that this load upon the Irish taxpayer would be easily borne. A war-tax assessed upon the soil, for want of other taxable material, would be no small set-off against what the peasant would gain even by the entire cessation of rent. J. S. Mill, England and Ireland, (1869) 28
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:107(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 24(d)
succeed (secede) / —
The burthen of the necessity of being always prepared for war, was no unimportant part of the motive which made the Northern States of America prefer a war at once to allowing the South to secede from the Union.
[England and Ireland 30] Ireland would succeed in establishing a regular and orderly government J. S. Mill, England and Ireland, (1869) 28-9
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:107(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 24(e)
prejuice
But Ireland is marked out for union with England, if only by this, that nothing important can take place in the one without making its effects felt in the other. If the British Parliament could sufficiently shake off its prejudices to use the veto on Irish legislation rightly, it could shake them off sufficiently to legislate for Ireland rightly, or to allow the Irish, as it already allows the Scotch members, to transact the business of their own country mainly by themselves. J. S. Mill, England and Ireland, (1869) 34
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:107(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 24(f)
single will (W = aux) / above them both / —
The difficulty of keeping two countries together without uniting them, begins with constitutional liberty. Countries very dissimilar in character, and even with some internal freedom, may be governed as England and Scotland were by the Stuarts, so long as the people have only certain limited rights, and the government of the two countries practically resides in a single will above them both. J. S. Mill, England and Ireland, (1869) 34-5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:107(j), VI.C.05:108(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 24(g)
just (W = gerade) that / severing (W = severe)
Those landlords who are the least useful in Ireland, and on the worst terms with their tenantry, would probably accept this opportunity of severing altogether their connexion with the Irish soil. Whetherthis [sic] was the case, or not, every farm not farmed by the proprietor would become the permanent holding of the existing tenant, who would pay either to the landlord or to the State the fixed rent which had been decided upon; or less, if the income which it was thought just that the landlord should receive were more than the tenant could reasonably be required to pay. J. S. Mill, England and Ireland, (1869) 38
Note: German Gerade: just, as in the adverbial sense, ‘he has just left.’
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:108(b), VI.C.05:108(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 24(h)
cottier
All prognostics of failure drawn from the state of things preceding the famine are simply futile. The farmer, previous to the famine, was not proprietor of his bit of land; he was a cottier, at a nominal rent, puffed up by competition to a height far above what could, even under the most favourable circumstances, be paid, and the effect of which was that whether he gained much or little, beyond the daily potatoes of which his family could not be deprived, all was swept off for arrears of rent. Alone of all working people, the Irish cottier neither gained anything by industry and frugality, nor lost anything by idleness and reckless multiplication. J. S. Mill, England and Ireland, (1869) 40
Note: An historical term used in 19C Ireland for a peasant who rents land under the cottier tenure system. This was defined by an Act of Parliament of 1860 as tenancy of a cottage and not more than half an acre of land, at a rent not exceeding £5 a year.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:108(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 25(a)
intermit / preter —
If a debtor acknowledges only sixpence when he owes a pound, he should be allowed to pay that sixpence; but let us not for a moment intermit the demand, that the remaining balance be paid up before the otherwise inevitable hour of bankruptcy arrives. J. S. Mill, England and Ireland, (1869) 42
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:108(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 25(b)
Mr Johnjack
[Roll of honour] Cooke—In loving memory of Lance-Corporal John (Jack) Cooke, Canadian Infantry, killed in action, in France November 6th, 1917. Irish Times (6 November 1922) 1/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:108(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 25(c)
Mary Selina Red
[Deaths] Blake—On the evening of October 28, 1922, at Ballycogoran, Killaloe, Mary Selina, second daughter and only surviving child of the late Walter Blake Irish Times (6 November 1922) 1/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 25(d)
Scotch wincey
[Brown Thomas Special Offers] SCOTCH WINCEY —1,000 yds. White Scotch Wincey, beautiful soft quality, made from very finest yarns, guaranteed not to shrink or change colour in wash. Irish Times (6 November 1922) 3/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:108(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 25(e)
golf — mashie — caddy — / putt — putting green
[Golf for Beginners] Some years ago when I consulted Charles Wilkinson, a local professional, and one of the best teachers in the country, regarding a temporary breakdown in my wooden club play, he set about remedying the defect by giving me a hard hour's work with the mashie. […] for I believe, as a result of many years of experience, of close observation, and of a deal of quiet consideration, that the whole game of golf can be built upon the foundation of the short putt Irish Times (6 November 1922) 4/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:108(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 25(f)
sleap
[BIRTHS] SLEAP—November 3, 1922, at 162 Cranbrook gd. Hford, Essex, Violet, wife of J. Weldon Sleap, of a son. Irish Times (7 November 1922) 1/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:108(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 25(g)
Sigismund Moss
[DEATHS] MOSS—November 5, 1922, Harriette Isabella Moss, daughter of the late Sigesmunde S. Moss, of Kilternan Lodge, Co. Dublin Irish Times (7 November 1922) 1/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:108(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 25(h)
following in the footlight / footsteps Green
[Theatres & Cinemas] THIS WEEK'S PROGRAMMES: Lennox Robinson's “The Round Table” at the Abbey] Following in the footlight footsteps of the author's “Lost Leader” and other plays, it will be produced in London next year Irish Times (6 November 1922) 5/2
Note: ‘footsteps’ not crossed through.
N01 (VI.B.10): 25(i)
Oddfellows Hall Red
[MANY OUTRAGES IN DUBLIN. / ROBBERIES AMBUSHES AND FIRES. / A FORMIDABLE LIST.] National troops, in the course of a raid on the premises formerly known as the Oddfellows Hall, Upper Abbey Street, yesterday, arrested fourteen young men, who were found in one of the rooms which was let last week as a social club. Irish Times (6 November 1922) 8/6
N01 (VI.B.10): 25(j)
vested the character
[Amusements in Dublin] Miss Constance Willis showed herself alive to the dramatic requirements of her part, […] She vested the character with an individuality which was very effective. Irish Times (7 November 1922) 3/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:108(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 26(a)
 
Note: BLANK page
N01 (VI.B.10): 27(a)
 
Note: BLANK page
N01 (VI.B.10): 28(a)
hold a sworn / inquiry Red
[Film censorship] Alderman Lawlor said that he was prepared with any member of the Corporation, to have a full sworn inquiry. He would move that a full sworn inquiry be held, instead of submitting the matter to a committee of the whole house. Irish Times (7 November 1922) 3/6
N01 (VI.B.10): 28(b)
murine experts (rats)
[War on Rats] This week is “rat-week” in England […] The murine experts have concluded that during this precise week the rat may be caught Irish Times (7 November 1922) 4/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:109(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 28(c)
red squill & / barium carbonate / ratsbane
[War on Rats] The Board of Agriculture recommends a paste of red squill and barium carbonate. Irish Times (7 November 1922) 4/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:109(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 28(d)
lift over head of / deep-field
[War on Rats] The Board of Agriculture recommends a paste of red squill and barium carbonate. […] By lifting [the rat] over the head of deep-field with an ash-plant one may hope to do the trick Irish Times (7 November 1922) 4/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:109(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 28(e)
Rotunda rink Red
The Rotunda Rink: The destruction of the building known as the Rotunda Rink […] draws our mind back to the days when it first came into being. Irish Times (7 November 1922) 4/6
N01 (VI.B.10): 28(f)
The Sons' Rest / (Cunniam) Red
Note: Capt. Thos Cunniam owned a pub in Upper George's Street. Kingstown. A drunken but successful vulgarian himself, he was a friend of John S. Joyce. See also: SA (VI.A):0021(bs), SA (VI.A):1001(g) and N08 (VI.B.6):107(p).
N01 (VI.B.10): 28(g)
a bouken of stoutz Black
  • FW unlocated
[Payment in stout] Reilly said to Reynolds, who was employed by him, go home and get your gun; put a cartridge in it; shoot the crows that are eating my oats, and for every crow you shoot you will get a bottle of stout. Irish Times (6 November 1922) 10/2

Page: N01 (VI.B.10) 29

[stub of missing page]

 
N01 (VI.B.10): 29(a)
the worse for drink Red
[CURRENT TOPICS] [on ‘the drink evil’]: I am informed that publicans have gone so far as to hold all-night dances on or near their premises, and the poor fellows […] make their way home as best they can in the small hours of the morning much the worse of drink; 319/2: a sergeant […] sent one of his constables to one village, for three Sundays running, with instructions that he should see that the licensing laws were observed. On each Sunday of the three the constable arrived back at the barrack the worse of drink! The Leader (11 November 1922) 319/1
Note: ‘CURRENT TOPICS’: each issue opens with this — a series of editorial comments on topical themes.
N01 (VI.B.10): 29(b)
true facts Blue
[CURRENT TOPICS] [rejecting Major Douglas' economic theories] We still knock up against our old friend, “the true facts” […] A fact is a fact, and that is enough, and “true fact” is an absurd term. The Leader (11 November 1922) 318/1
Note: ‘CURRENT TOPICS’: each issue opens with this — a series of editorial comments on topical themes.
N01 (VI.B.10): 29(c)
1 street town Red
[CURRENT TOPICS] There is much reason why villages in Ireland are called sraid, for many of them consist to a great extent of one street. We would not insult the thriving and historic town of Ardee by referring to it as a village, but of all towns we ever saw in Ireland, it is a one-street town. The Leader (11 November 1922) 319/2-320/1
Note: ‘CURRENT TOPICS’: each issue opens with this — a series of editorial comments on topical themes.
N01 (VI.B.10): 29(d)
indeed I may say Red
[CURRENT TOPICS] Fr. Tomkins, S.J., rightly contended that no films should be shown in any Dublin picture-house that had not passed a censorship—indeed he might have said that no picture should appear in any picture-house in the country except under such conditions. The Leader (11 November 1922) 322/2
Note: ‘CURRENT TOPICS’: each issue opens with this — a series of editorial comments on topical themes.
N01 (VI.B.10): 29(e)
sweeping assertion
[A CANDID CRITIC ON THE GOVERNMENT] The statements made by President Cosgrave and Mr. O'Higgins certainly seem a good deal too sweeping. The Leader (11 November 1922) 325/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:109(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 29(f)
a wintry [mineral]
[A CANDID CRITIC ON THE GOVERNMENT] A certain muddling on the part of the Provisional Government has helped to make many Irish-Irelanders adopt a wintry attitude towards those who sit in high places. The Leader (11 November 1922) 325/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:109(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 29(g)
MM the govt Red
[A CANDID CRITIC ON THE GOVERNMENT] I have done something over the years towards making it possible for Messrs. the Provisional Government Ministry to occupy their present exalted positions. The Leader (11 November 1922) 325/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 29(h)
Irish tinge Red
[A CANDID CRITIC ON THE GOVERNMENT] a good deal of the work performed at home has been handed to un-Irish and anti-Irish firms, whilst firms with any tinge of Irish-Ireland management have been ignored The Leader (11 November 1922) 325/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 29(i)
God guard his generous / soul ~ Brown
[A CANDID CRITIC ON THE GOVERNMENT] Many young men who had done good work in the past wished to settle down after the Truce or after the signing of the Treaty […] Michael Collins (God guard his generous soul) assisted some of these men The Leader (11 November 1922) 325/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 29(j)
~ Mick Collins
[A CANDID CRITIC ON THE GOVERNMENT] Many young men who had done good work in the past wished to settle down after the Truce or after the signing of the Treaty […] Michael Collins (God guard his generous soul) assisted some of these men The Leader (11 November 1922) 325/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:109(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 29(k)
How are ye all? Red
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] How are ye all? […] We're all well ourselves, thank God! The Leader (11 November 1922) 326/2
Note: See also N06 (VI.B.11):020(o).
N01 (VI.B.10): 29(l)
he is giving (dying) ~ Red
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] How are ye all? […] We're all well ourselves, thank God! even father […] except that he stays in bed a day now and then, you wouldn't notice he was giving. Bridgy keeps a drop with him in the tea and 'tis the life of him. The Leader (11 November 1922) 326/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 29(m)
~ 'tis the life of him Brown
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] How are ye all? […] We're all well ourselves, thank God! even father […] except that he stays in bed a day now and then, you wouldn't notice he was giving. Bridgy keeps a drop with him in the tea and 'tis the life of him. The Leader (11 November 1922) 326/2
Note: In proto only
N01 (VI.B.10): 29(n)
without my teeth
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] I wasn't in town within a month, but I must go in soon, for I'm without my teeth The Leader (11 November 1922) 326/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:109(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 29(o)
Like that only — ~ Red
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] Like that, only the way the trains are, I'd be tempted to go up to ye and not be tinkering with them in town for teeth. What harm, but I down to three pigs and them same near fat! They'll be running all right for trains when I'll have my hands full again, I'll bet you. The Leader (11 November 1922) 326/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 29(p)
~ & I down to 3 pigs ~ Brown
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] Like that, only the way the trains are, I'd be tempted to go up to ye and not be tinkering with them in town for teeth. What harm, but I down to three pigs and them same near fat! They'll be running all right for trains when I'll have my hands full again, I'll bet you. The Leader (11 November 1922) 326/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 30(a)
~ I bet ye Red
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] Like that, only the way the trains are, I'd be tempted to go up to ye and not be tinkering with them in town for teeth. What harm, but I down to three pigs and them same near fat! They'll be running all right for trains when I'll have my hands full again, I'll bet you. The Leader (11 November 1922) 326/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 30(b)
is there any chance I / could feed you, I would Red
  • FW unlocated
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] Like that, is there any chance I could send you up a handful of potatoes, I wonder? The Leader (11 November 1922) 327/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 30(c)
You heard — or did you?
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] You heard — or did you — Mary Rose of the bog was married. The Leader (11 November 1922) 327/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:109(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 30(d)
How did they manage / it, says you Red
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] You heard — or did you — Mary Rose of the bog was married. He's a general or something […] How did they manage it, says you. The Leader (11 November 1922) 327/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 30(e)
— the same fight Brown
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] the lads say she wanted to know from the son-in-law would they fire three shots over the wedding the same as they do over a funeral? The Leader (11 November 1922) 327/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 30(f)
Father Tom was chatting / to her
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] Father Tom was chatting to her, and he asked her how long was Joanie, her sister buried. The Leader (11 November 1922) 327/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:109(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 30(g)
She died the year the / sugar was scarce Brown
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] “What year was it the sugar was scarce?” says Kitty, “because that was the year she died. The Leader (11 November 1922) 327/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 30(h)
ahide
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] “What year was it the sugar was scarce?” says Kitty, “because that was the year she died. 'Tis why I remember it. She had a half-stone of it ahide in the clock. The Leader (11 November 1922) 327/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:109(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 30(i)
'tis why I remember it Brown
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] “What year was it the sugar was scarce?” says Kitty, “because that was the year she died. 'Tis why I remember it. She had a half-stone of it ahide in the clock. The Leader (11 November 1922) 327/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 30(j)
surcingles Blue
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] One story borrows another. Mrs Joe was out last Sunday, and if you heard her about the military weddings! The officers “with their surcingles!” that kill her. The Leader (11 November 1922) 327/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 30(k)
the way the world is Black
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] “He was thinking of giving a stained-glass window [to the local church], but I told him not, or if he did, not to put his name on it, for fear people would think we had money; the way the world is, aweenoch, you wouldn't be safe. The Leader (11 November 1922) 327/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 30(l)
'twould perish the Danes Red
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] Did you get anything for the winter? 'Twould perish the Danes here for the past week The Leader (11 November 1922) 327/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 30(m)
'tis short now till Red
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] Like that, I suppose 'tis short now till we'll have women labourers in the Government as well as the men The Leader (11 November 1922) 327/2-328/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 30(n)
mant(o)ymaking
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] Like that, I suppose 'tis short now till we'll have women labourers in the Government as well as the men, and when we will, maybe we'll have to belong to the Amalgamated Housekeepers Society or something, or we won't be let do our own mantymaking. The Leader (11 November 1922) 327/2-328/1
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 30(o)
I'm ashamed of the / bit of butter Red
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] P.S. I'm ashamed of the little bit of butter, but the post wouldn't take any more and there's no use sending it by train. The Leader (11 November 1922) 328/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 31(a)
on a new register
The new register. To the editor of the Irish Times. As an Englishman resident in Ireland for a great many years I have hitherto enjoyed the privilege of a Parliamentary and municipal vote; but it appears that I am now about to be penalised on account of my nationality. Recently I received a form from the registration officer of my district, which in due course I returned filled in. Question 2 asked “nationality of occupier and domicile.” This I filled in as “British,” stating the number of years during which I have been resident. A few days ago I received the enclosed circular letter, from which you will observe that I am to be disfranchised unless I sign as accepting citizenship of the Free State. Irish Times (11 November 1922) 8/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:109(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 31(b)
phonoscope
[THE HUMAN VOICE. / ANALYSING THE SOUNDS.] There is also a phonoscope, invented by M. Lioret, of Paris, for the son of the King of Spain, in which the speaker can see what letter he has spoken. Irish Times (10 November 1922) 2/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:109(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 31(c)
Frau Schmidt geogr books
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:110(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 31(d)
Hobson's choice Red
“Books Of The Week.” … According to the view here put forward, the troops had not had sufficient rest to admit of further marching, and it was necessary to fight a determined action in order to put a definite check to the power of the enemy to pursue. Admittedly this course endangered the safety of the whole Second Army Corps; but it was Hobson's choice and the event was favourable.” Irish Times (10 November 1922) 3/2
Note: Hobson's-choice: That or none: that is, there is no alternative. [Popularly derived from the name of a Cambridge livery stable keeper, whose rule was that each customer must take the horse next the door, or have no horse at all.] cf. 1717. CIBBER, Non-juror i. Can any woman think herself happy that's obliged to marry only with a Hobson's Choice?
N01 (VI.B.10): 31(e)
1753 Barry Yelverton / (lord Avonmore) in / Trinity
[College Historical Society in Trinity College] In 1753, Barry Yelverton, afterwards Lord Avonmore, started a debating society, called the College Historical Club, but of its proceedings no record remains. Irish Times (8 November 1922) 4/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:110(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 31(f)
Senior Sophister
[College Historical Society in Trinity College] in 1747, Edmund Burke, who was in his Senior Sophister year, started within the College a Society for history and debating. Irish Times (8 November 1922) 4/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:110(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 31(g)
jump the rails
[FULL STEAM AHEAD / A DUBLIN RAILWAY OUTRAGE] Indeed railwaymen of experience are surprised that it did not jump the rails long before it came to the North Wall Irish Times (8 November 1922) 5/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:110(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 31(h)
took the points
[FULL STEAM AHEAD / A DUBLIN RAILWAY OUTRAGE] the flying locomotive took the points with scarcely a jolt. Irish Times (8 November 1922) 5/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:110(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 31(i)
‘road’ made for ‘entry’
[FULL STEAM AHEAD / A DUBLIN RAILWAY OUTRAGE] Across the crowded shunting yards and tangle of tracks on the level ground near the docks it tore with undiminished speed. The “road” was “made” for entry to the London and North-Western Railway station, and the flying locomotive took the points with scarcely a jolt. Irish Times (8 November 1922) 5/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:110(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 31(j)
imperfectly / warmblooded Blue
[THE WILD THINGS IN WINTER. By JAMES DIXON] When winter comes wild creatures are rarely caught unprepared. The methods they employ in the course of their preparations are most interesting. These methods differ according as the creature is perfectly warm-blooded, imperfectly warm-blooded, or cold-blooded. […] All mammals are descended from cold-blooded reptiles. The hedgehog, dormouse and bat are examples of creatures which have only, up to the present, reached an imperfectly warm-blooded state. Their body temperature tends to approximate to that of the surrounding atmosphere. Daily Mail (15 November 1922) 8/4
N01 (VI.B.10): 32(a)
[so] it is so sorry / in Trieste Blue
N01 (VI.B.10): 32(b)
Phoebe, dearest Red
Note: Phoebe Dearest, Tell O Tell Me: ([Claxon] Bellamy; [J. L.] Hatton). See also UG 18:1294 and FW 583.19. Noted in Song in the Works of James Joyce; the lyrics are given in Gifford's Ulysses Annotated]
N01 (VI.B.10): 32(c)
That photo (J.R. JJ. SB CB) / was a prophecy
Note: See Faber edition of Letters III, illustration facing p.17; plate 7 after p.96 in the Viking edition. The photograph, taken in Shakespeare and Company about 1921, shows (from left to right) John Rodker, Joyce, Sylvia Beach and Cuprian Beach.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:110(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 32(d)
economy of movement ~
N01 (VI.B.10): 32(e)
~ priest on altar
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:110(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 32(f)
ambrose (amber)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:110(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 32(g)
Italian with perforated / clothing
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:110(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 32(h)
[S.e] / [4.c]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:111(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 33(a)
lunch gathering / — edition / |alunch editiona| Blue
Note: The appended words are scripted in black ink.
N01 (VI.B.10): 33(b)
bombard with / starshells & electric sparklers
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:111(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 33(c)
my son John / (David Power)
Note: See also N03 (VI.B.3):057(b): David Power / John Power / Maumy —
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:111(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 33(d)
Alice Murray ([ldy] Isabelle)
Note: Alice was a daughter of Joyce's aunt Josephine. Isabella Murray was a daughter of John ‘Red’ Murray, Joyce's maternal uncle.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:111(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 33(e)
shipping mogul Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 33(f)
Lucalizod Blue
Note: Chapelizod and Lucan, in Dublin.
N01 (VI.B.10): 33(g)
pump room (spa) Red
[TAKING THE WATERS. By F. SINCLAIR PARK.] There is no place where the process of camouflage can be seen to greater advantage than in the pump-room during the season at a fashionable spa. Daily Mail (17 November 1922) 8/4
N01 (VI.B.10): 33(h)
outpassed beasts grow / small
[WHEN DEER HAD TUSKS. By LESLIE G. MAINLAND] A tiny tusked deer has just been born in the London Zoological Gardens—the heir to an ancestral blunder committed several millions of years ago. […] The fellow who had got knobs over his eyes was quite a success […] But the deer who trusted to the old-fashioned tusks were having an increasingly rough time. […] Still they developed a defensive policy of their own— those that were left. They grew smaller and took to hiding in the generous undergrowth of the primeval forests. Daily Mail (17 November 1922) 8/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:111(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 33(i)
Shop T p (trade price line) ~
[GRADING THE SHOPPER. By A FIRST SALESWOMAN.] Every person entering a large drapery store is mentally “graded” by the shopgirl serving her according to the manner in which she makes her purchases. […] It is the type of shopper we study, and we classify these types under headings which are universally used by shop assistants throughout the country. […] Different goods are known as “lines” by shoppers. Shoppers in turn are known as “lines” by the assistants. Daily Mail (17 November 1922) 8/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:111(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 33(j)
~ sale in articles, match / pattern line, ~
[GRADING THE SHOPPER. By A FIRST SALESWOMAN.]There is the “pattern line” —the woman who seems to devote her life to collecting patterns and appears never to make a purchase. The “match pattern line” is the woman who demonstrates what size pattern she wants so carefully that it is obvious she wants a free patch for a worn-out suit or costume of that material. Daily Mail (17 November 1922) 8/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:111(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 33(k)
~ sidedoor line
[GRADING THE SHOPPER. By A FIRST SALESWOMAN.] A “side-door line” is a woman who constantly arrives just as the shop is about to close for the night. She keeps assistants working when their day's work should have ended. By the time she has made her choice the large doors have been closed on her and she has to be escorted out of a side-door. Daily Mail (17 November 1922) 8/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:111(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 33(l)
[friends of boss]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:111(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 34(a)
Introduction 700pp
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:111(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 34(b)
stage superstition / no title with ‘golden’ / not say tag / Macbeth bad / not whistle / not quote Hamlet / no peacock's feathers
[ACTORS LESS SUPERSTITIOUS / By Gordon Street] Not very long ago a musical piece with the word “golden” in its title was put on. No one seemed to mind, and the thing was far from the failure that the superstitious ones of the stage would have held it invariably must be. Many of the young people on the stage are too material to pay even any half-serious attention to old superstitions […] If, for instance, actors and actresses want to whistle in their dressing rooms why shouldn't they whistle? How can such whistling possibly bring “bad luck” to the play? […] And then there is the idea that on no account should anyone speak the “tag” of the play — the last few words — before the end of the first performance. […] and I very much doubt if it would strike terror nowadays into the hearts of her companions if an actress came into the theatre with peacock's feathers or if someone thoughtlessly quoted from “Hamlet” in a dressing-room. Daily Mail (18 November 1922) 6/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:112(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 34(c)
Shee
[DEATHS] SHEE—November 5, at her residence, Clonlahy, Annie M. Shee, widow of J. Shee, Bannoxtown, Co. Tipperary. Irish Times (17 November 1922) 1/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:112(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 34(d)
Crinion
[BIRTHS] CRINION—October 31, 1922, at The Bungalow, Barristown, Navan, to the wife of Timothy C. Crinion, Solicitor, a daughter. Irish Times (17 November 1922) 1/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:112(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 34(e)
Colthurst Red
[DEATHS] COLTHURST—November 10, 1922, at Scilly, Kinsale, Ludlow Tonson Colthurst Irish Times (17 November 1922) 1/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 34(f)
dear delightful firelit hours Red
The dear delightful firelit hours can be doubly appreciated if one is the possessor of a becoming negligée. Irish Times (17 November 1922) 2/4
N01 (VI.B.10): 34(g)
shortest of culottes
Since our sense of order is satisfied by having things to match, there is a nightdress, a petticoat, and the shortest of culottes, embroidered with white heather […] Irish Times (17 November 1922) 2/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:112(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 34(h)
woolback satin
The dear delightful firelit hours can be doubly appreciated if one is the possessor of a becoming negligée. In wool-back satin or velveteen this garment need not be inordinately expensive Irish Times (17 November 1922) 2/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:112(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 34(i)
sickabed Blue
Short negligées, for those who are sick-a-bed and inclined to be luxurious, can be fashioned of scraps of georgette and lace Irish Times (17 November 1922) 2/4
N01 (VI.B.10): 34(j)
100.000 edible snails used / yearly in London to glaze / pastry & thicken / mock turtle soup
[Review of Animal Curiosities by W.S. Berridge] One comes, for example, upon such items as the fact that a hundred thousand edible snails are used annually in London restaurants, mostly for glazing pastry and thickening mock turtle soup Irish Times (17 November 1922) 4/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:112(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 34(k)
toucan bird smaller than / own beak Red
[Review of Animal Curiosities by W.S. Berridge] One comes, for example, upon such items as the fact that […] the word “toucan” is a South American name, meaning “the bird that is smaller than his own beak.” Irish Times (17 November 1922) 4/6
N01 (VI.B.10): 35(a)
Padichah
Note: Padichah: Persian title, applied to the Shah; in Europe applied to the Sultan of Turkey; in India to the Great Mogul; and (before 1948) by natives to the Soverign of Great Britain as Emperor of India.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:112(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 35(b)
Mlle Lorly has shaken / cocktails for diplomats / of every country in Eur Brown
[M. Teager of the Palace Hotel has hired Mdlle. Lorly, a barmaid at the Victoria Hotel] I realised that diplomats of every nation would appreciate Mdlle. Lorly here. She has mixed cocktails for practically every League of Nations session, and knows the favourite drink of practically every diplomat in Europe. Irish Times (20 November 1922) 4/6
N01 (VI.B.10): 35(c)
flying [sau] Red
  • FW unlocated
N01 (VI.B.10): 35(d)
eggshaped fuselage
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:113(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 35(e)
Wm Dakin Waterhouse Red
[DEATHS] WATERHOUSE—November 12, 1922, at Kingscote, Westcott, Surrey, William Dakin, Surgeon-Colonel (retired) Irish Times (17 November 1922) 1/1
Note: Only ‘Waterhouse’ is crossed through.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:113(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 35(f)
bacon ~ Red
  • FW unlocated
LIPTON'S Prices Save You Money: […] Imported Bacon […] BACK or STREAKY, sliced 1⁄6 […] BELLIES, Pale, Mild cure 1⁄2 Irish Times (16 November 1922) 3/7
Note: prototext 615.31 derives from N05 (VI.B.2):104(j).
N01 (VI.B.10): 35(g)
~ bellies mild cure 1⁄2 ~ Red
LIPTON'S Prices Save You Money: […] Imported Bacon […] BACK or STREAKY, sliced 1⁄6 […] BELLIES, Pale, Mild cure 1⁄2 Irish Times (16 November 1922) 3/7
N01 (VI.B.10): 35(h)
~ back & streaky, sliced 1⁄6 Red
LIPTON'S Prices Save You Money: […] Imported Bacon […] BACK or STREAKY, sliced 1⁄6 […] BELLIES, Pale, Mild cure 1⁄2 Irish Times (16 November 1922) 3/7
N01 (VI.B.10): 35(i)
Flanders poppy
In Dublin, of course, there was no public ceremonial, but an astonishing number of Flanders poppies were worn. Irish Times (13 November 1922) 6/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:113(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 35(j)
railchair
Near Millstreet, County Cork, 2,000 rail chairs were removed. Irish Times (13 November 1922) 6/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:113(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 35(k)
schoolgirl complexion Red
If only women realised that it is just as important to keep the air fresh indoors during the cold months as well as during the heat, then we should see fewer rough skins and chapped lips. There is nothing like impure air for causing that nice “schoolgirl” complexion to fade. Irish Times (13 November 1922) 3/5
Note: See also: SA (VI.A):0681(q)
N01 (VI.B.10): 35(l)
Irish Order of Rechabites
The Order of Rechabites is the first English society which has taken steps to legalise its existence under the Irish Free State. At a meeting in the Rechabite Hall, 4 Cavendish row, Dublin, it was decided to form an Irish Order of Rechabites. Irish Times (11 November 1922) 5/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:113(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 35(m)
Ulema (Pers. parl) Red
The Ulema, the Council of holy men that directs the religious and educational activities of the Persian people, has demanded legislation to prohibit the sale of liquor and to close all places of public amusement Irish Times (11 November 1922) 6/5
N01 (VI.B.10): 35(n)
bulbul Blue
  • FW unlocated
Yet the Persia of popular fancy—of bulbuls and pomegranates and roses and buds of Spring—is all the Persia that we know on earth and all we need to know. Irish Times (11 November 1922) 6/5
Note: See also: N01 (VI.B.10):014(b).
N01 (VI.B.10): 36(a)
private divorce bill / promoted in Lords / for domiciled Irishmen
No law court in this country—or in any country —has any power, where the husband is a domiciled Irishman, to dissolve a marriage […] Accordingly, up to the present, the only method by which an Irishman could break the vinculum matrimonii was by obtaining a private Act of Parliament for the purpose […] A divorce bill is always originated in the Lords Irish Times (11 November 1922) 7/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:113(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 36(b)
Rashi letters / (Sephardim)
Among the medley of races that have taken root here [in Smyrna], mention should be made of the colony of Sephardim or Spanish Jews […] their books are printed in a quaint script, called the Rashi types, somewhat different to the ordinary Hebrew letters. Irish Times (11 November 1922) 9/7
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:113(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 36(c)
Ital speaks E / puts his cool — etc
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:113(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 36(d)
Cotelette (Colette)
Note: French cotelette: chop.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:113(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 36(e)
‘doze’ impossible in verse
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:113(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 36(f)
[C] — may swing Red
Note: In text in sense of ‘hang’ (criminal).
N01 (VI.B.10): 36(g)
drug addict Red
Note: See also: N01 (VI.B.10):093(n)
N01 (VI.B.10): 36(h)
gunman Blue
Note: See also: N01 (VI.B.10):006(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 36(i)
K(nock) O(out)
Prunier […] beat Balzac by a knockout in the eleventh round. Irish Times (10 November 1922) 8/3
Note: See also: N01 (VI.B.10):096(h)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:113(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 36(j)
soft coal (gems) Red
Note: "Soft" coal designates inferior coal.
N01 (VI.B.10): 36(k)
10 copies [o]f / = 10 pockets [o]f |a(autor / ait)a|
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:114(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 37(a)
polishman (D M P) Red
Note: The Dublin Metropolitan Police was created in 1836 on the lines of the London Metropolitan Police. It was distinct from its national counterpart, the Royal Irish Constabulary, being unarmed. In 1922 the RIC was disbanded and replaced by the Royal Ulster Constabulary in the North and the Gárda Síochána in the South. In 1925 the D.M.P. was absorbed by the Gárda.
N01 (VI.B.10): 37(b)
LB putting up bed / piecemeal (cf Odyss)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:114(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 37(c)
inquisitive
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:114(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 37(d)
objectionable ass Red
Note: Cf. Margaret Piper Chalmers, Wild Wings: A Romance of Youth, 1921, p.239: “He fell asleep again and presently re-awoke in a kind of shivering panic. What if Carlotta would not marry Philip after all? What if it was too late already? What if his grandson turned out to be a second Herbert Lathrop, an unobjectionable, possibly even an objectionable ass. Perspiration beaded on the millionaire's brow.” Also, Beatrice May Butt, An Episode on a Desert Island, 1901, p.78: “‘He,’ exclaimed Don fiercely, ‘is an objectionable ass. But, whatever he may be — and she says he's only silly — he has behaved to her in a beastly way. ...”
N01 (VI.B.10): 37(e)
Stories monologue / 1 pers to 1 / 1 — — 2 / 2 〃 〃 1 / 2 — — 2 / polylogue (broadcasting)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:114(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 37(f)
Tserontis - Importante!
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:114(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 37(g)
nosepaper Red
Note: A replacement for a handkerchief or nose cloth (see N01 (VI.B.10):037(h) below).
N01 (VI.B.10): 37(h)
rumpcloth
Note: A replacement for toilet paper (see N01 (VI.B.10):037(g) above).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:114(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 38(a)
Mrs Mervyn Brown / plays [(not)] piano Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 38(b)
mi raccomando, gazzela / figlia
Note: Italian: Mi raccomando!, please! I entreat!
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:114(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 38(c)
Ninni, Nanni (A F)
Note: Anne Flynn (1845-95): aunt of Joyce's mother; see also N03 (VI.B.3):017(c).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:115(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 38(d)
150 yr old grey crow †
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:115(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 38(e)
facial hair / cue wizard
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:115(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 38(f)
hunting pinkheaded duck / from eleph. back
Note: There was once a species, the pink-head duck (Rhodonessa caryophyllacea), but she went the way of the Dodo c. 1940.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:115(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 38(g)
Tuscraroora Deep 5½ m. ~
The Pacific Ocean, unlike the Atlantic, is also remarkable in possessing narrow troughs of immense depth. Off the east coast of Japan lies the Tuscaroora Deep. Its greatest depth is 5¼ miles, and below its western slope originates many of the greatest of Japanese earthquakes. Daily Mail (21 November 1922) 8/4 [WHERE EARTHQUAKES COME FROM.]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:115(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 38(h)
~ Challenger Deep 6 ~
The Pacific Ocean, unlike the Atlantic, is also remarkable in possessing narrow troughs of immense depth. […] The deepest of all, off the island of Guam, is the Challenger Deep, which sinks nearly six miles below the sea level. Daily Mail (21 November 1922) 8/4 [WHERE EARTHQUAKES COME FROM.]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:115(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 38(i)
~ Richards — ~
The Pacific Ocean, unlike the Atlantic, is also remarkable in possessing narrow troughs of immense depth. The coasts of Chile and Peru are bordered by a series of these troughs—the Krummel Deep (4[1/4] miles) off Arequipa, the Bartholomew Deep (4 miles) off Arica, the Richards Deep (4[3/4] miles) off Copiapo, and the Haeckel Deep (3[1/2] miles) off Valparaiso, and Santiago. Daily Mail (21 November 1922) 8/4 [WHERE EARTHQUAKES COME FROM]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:115(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 38(j)
~ Bartholomew ~ Red
The Pacific Ocean, unlike the Atlantic, is also remarkable in possessing narrow troughs of immense depth. The coasts of Chile and Peru are bordered by a series of these troughs—the Krummel Deep (4[1/4] miles) off Arequipa, the Bartholomew Deep (4 miles) off Arica, the Richards Deep (4[3/4] miles) off Copiapo, and the Haeckel Deep (3[1/2] miles) off Valparaiso, and Santiago. Daily Mail (21 November 1922) 8/4 [WHERE EARTHQUAKES COME FROM]
N01 (VI.B.10): 38(k)
~ Krummel
The Pacific Ocean, unlike the Atlantic, is also remarkable in possessing narrow troughs of immense depth. The coasts of Chile and Peru are bordered by a series of these troughs—the Krummel Deep (4[1/4] miles) off Arequipa, the Bartholomew Deep (4 miles) off Arica, the Richards Deep (4[3/4] miles) off Copiapo, and the Haeckel Deep (3[1/2] miles) off Valparaiso, and Santiago. Daily Mail (21 November 1922) 8/4 [WHERE EARTHQUAKES COME FROM]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:115(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 39(a)
hounds find / scent is breasthigh Red
[MISSING THE HUNT. By “SILVER BUTTON.”] Even more bitter perhaps are the reflections of the man who goes home early because there seem to be no more foxes; he thinks scent is poor and the hounds will do no more. He has not been gone five minutes when hounds find scent (that most curious and incomprehensible phenomenon) improves, is, in fact, breast-high. Now comes the hour for the faithful who have stayed. Hounds run at steeplechase pace over one of the best bits of vale land in the country. Daily Mail (21 November 1922) 8/4
Note: The words ‘hounds find’ are not crossed through.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:115(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 39(b)
vale land
[MISSING THE HUNT. By “SILVER BUTTON.”] Even more bitter perhaps are the reflections of the man who goes home early because there seem to be no more foxes; he thinks scent is poor and the hounds will do no more. He has not been gone five minutes when hounds find scent (that most curious and incomprehensible phenomenon) improves, is, in fact, breast-high. Now comes the hour for the faithful who have stayed. Hounds run at steeplechase pace over one of the best bits of vale land in the country. Daily Mail (21 November 1922) 8/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:115(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 39(c)
which overcoat does he / prefer? (the robber)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:115(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 39(d)
which [own] no common / jurisdiction nor hold / any intercourse
The natural world and the spiritual world, the world which is immediately subject to causation and the world which is immediately subject to God are, on this view, each of them real, and each of them the objects of real knowledge. But the laws of the natural world are revealed to us by the discoveries of science; while the laws of the spiritual world are revealed to us through the authority of spiritual institutions, inspired witnesses, or divinely guided institutions. And the two regions of knowledge lie side by side, contiguous but not connected, like empires of different race and language, which own no common jurisdiction nor hold any intercourse with each other, except along a disputed and wavering frontier where no superior power exists to settle their quarrels or determine their respective limits. A. J. Balfour, The Foundation of Belief, (unknown review of this 1895 book) [original source] p.186
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:116(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 39(e)
— — far from being / the least important
The manner in which attention and interest are thus unduly directed towards the operations, vital and social, which are under our direct control, rather than those which we are unable to modify, or can only modify by a very indirect and circuitous procedure, may be illustrated by countless examples. Take one from physiology. Of all the complex causes which co-operate for the healthy nourishment of the body, no doubt the conscious choice of the most wholesome rather than the less wholesome forms of ordinary food is far from being the least important. A. J. Balfour, The Foundation of Belief, (unknown review of this 1895 book) [original source] p.204
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:116(b), VI.C.05:116(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 39(f)
To begin with Red
These immediate beliefs belong to man as an individual. They involve no commerce between mind and mind. They might equally exist, and would equally be necessary, if each man stood face to face with material Nature in friendless isolation. But they neither provide, nor by any merely logical extension can be made to provide, the apparatus of beliefs which we find actually connected with the higher scientific social and spiritual life of the race. These also are, without doubt, the product of antecedent causes — causes many in number and most diverse in character. They presuppose, to begin with, the beliefs of perception, memory, and expectation in their elementary shape; and they also imply the existence of an organism fitted for their hospitable reception by ages of ancestral preparation. A. J. Balfour, The Foundation of Belief, (unknown review of this 1895 book) [original source] p.193
N01 (VI.B.10): 39(g)
Are they? Blue
But are these results rational? Do they follow, I mean, on reason quâ reason; or are they, like a schoolboy's tears over a proposition of Euclid, consequences of reasoning, but not conclusions from it? A. J. Balfour, The Foundation of Belief, (unknown review of this 1895 book) [original source] p.208
N01 (VI.B.10): 39(h)
We shall see. Blue
In order to answer this question it may be worth while to consider it in the light of an example which I have already used in another connection and under a different aspect. A. J. Balfour, The Foundation of Belief, (unknown review of this 1895 book) [original source] p.208
N01 (VI.B.10): 39(i)
these data, did we / possess them, are too complex Red
Nor is the comparative pettiness of the rôle thus played by reasoning in human affairs a matter for regret. Not merely because we are ignorant of the data required for the solution, even of very simple problems in organic and social life, are we called on to acquiesce in an arrangement which, to be sure, we have no power to disturb; nor yet because these data, did we possess them, are too complex to be dealt with by any rational calculus we possess or are ever likely to acquire; but because, in addition to these difficulties, reasoning is a force most apt to divide and disintegrate; and though division and disintegration may often be the necessary preliminaries of social development, still more necessary are the forces which bind and stiffen, without which there would be no society to develop. A. J. Balfour, The Foundation of Belief, (unknown review of this 1895 book) [original source] p.229
N01 (VI.B.10): 39(j)
Fargue at Reval's funeral
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:116(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 39(k)
hunger strike (Irish-Uncle W) Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 40(a)
[h] Balfour cum Livingstone / plus John Sebastian Bach / Super Marie Antoinette
Note: Arthur James, First Earl of Balfour (1848-1930). British Conservative Secretary for Ireland. Known for his policies as ‘Bloody’ Balfour. David Livingstone, explorer and medical doctor. Marie Antoinette, Queen of France.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:116(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 40(b)
arsefuttered her / —
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:116(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 40(c)
Borsch interrupted goes / on with sentence
Note: Joyce began to employ the services of the American ophthalmologist Dr Louis Borsch at his practice in the rue de la Paix in the Summer of 1922.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:116(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 40(d)
Ulysses rex in partibus / goes away to [test]
Note: Latin in partibus (infidelium): a term used to describe a bishop consecrated to a see dominated by infidels or heretics.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:116(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 40(e)
Tomba Mausoleo
Note: Italian tomba: tomb; mausoleo: mausoleum.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:117(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 40(f)
‘dorgs’ — meat drink & washing Brown
N01 (VI.B.10): 40(g)
Harvey du Cros
[In Memoriam] Du Cros—In devoted and ever-loving memory of Harvey du Cros, Esq., J.P., Founder of the Pneumatic Tyre Industry, who died at his residence, Inniscorrig, Dalkey, Co. Dublin, December 21st, 1918. Irish Times (21 December 1922) 1/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:117(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 40(h)
cycles of hist. W. Tone Childers
Note: Wolfe Tone died on 19 November 1798. Erskine Childers was captured on 10 November, tried on 17 November and executed on 24 November 1922. Joyce presumably read of this curious connection in some newspaper.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:117(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 41(a)
Sir Tom McCabe / (Irish riposte) Red
  • FW unlocated
N01 (VI.B.10): 41(b)
Stuck up with spit
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:117(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 41(c)
horse ‘savage’ a jockey
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:117(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 41(d)
bring whip into play
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:117(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 41(e)
smoke that & spend a ½ / hour in Havana Red
Note: “Havana” repeated at N06 (VI.B.11):143(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 41(f)
I saw a slinker slinking
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:117(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 41(g)
masher Red
Note: Masher (slang): a foppish lady-killer.
N01 (VI.B.10): 41(h)
why O, why — ~ Green
Note: See also: N14 (VI.B.7):037(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 41(i)
~ Readers, am I / right ~ Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 41(j)
Kate Coetus |acoitusa|
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:117(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 41(k)
I consulted Mrs B — (LB)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:117(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 41(l)
cinegraphist
[The Life of Eskimos at the Cinema] Du moins, l'extraordinaire roman de Nanouk ne doit-il rien à l'ingéniosité des cinégraphistes et des metteurs en scènes. [At all events, the extraordinary romance of Nanouk owes nothing to the ingenuity of cinegraphists and directors.] L'Illustration (4 November 1922) 444/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:117(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 42(a)
leitmotivs no 0 décor idéal
l'Opéra, nous dit-il, nous demandons, en moyenne, huit minutes pour un changement de décor entre le baisser et le lever du rideau. […] Mais, hormis les cas assez rares où on veut représenter la mer ou le désert, la supériorité du fond panoramique ne para#[C3]#[AE]t pas absolue.
[In opera, he tells us, we require on average eight minutes for the scenery to change between the lowering and raising of the curtain. […] But, beyond the fairly rare situations where we want to represent the sea or the desert, the importance of the panoramic backdrop does not seem absolute.] L'Illustration (11 November 1922) 462/3-463/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:117(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 42(b)
Proust — max text — min action / cine [min text - max action]
[Marcel Proust (obituary)] Dans ce vaste roman où s'incorpore l'histoire d'une famille et où il y a aussi peu d'action que possible [In this vast novel, embodying the history of a family, and where there is as little action as possible] L'Illustration (25 November 1922) 514/2
Note: Reverse on second line indicated by large ‘X’. Marcel Proust died on 18 Nov 1922.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:117(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 42(c)
Easter Island (Cyclopean statues / 60 ft high, stonetools, sunk Chile)
[Easter Island. / Wiped Out by the Earthquake.] the sensational news is also telegraphed that Easter Island, the mystery island of the Pacific, with its ancient gigantic statues and wonderful sculptured rocks, has completely disappeared. […] Easter Island, which belongs to Chile, lies some 2,300 miles west of the province of Atacoma […] “Some of the statues are over 30 feet in height […] Evening Telegraph (17 November 1922) 2/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:118(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 42(d)
blood will suffer blood to / die hungry; but blood / will not suffer blood / to be spilt
[about the execution by the Free State government of four men for possession of revolvers]: It was because these men were found under these circumstances, and with such intent, that it was necessary to execute them this morning. It is the old story: “Blood will suffer blood to die hungry; but blood will not suffer blood to be spilt.” Irish Times (18 November 1922) 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:118(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 42(e)
m (chrysanthe(Mum)
[Chrysanthemums] These Goliath —mums,” as the trade hideously calls them Irish Times (18 November 1922) 6/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:118(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 42(f)
not insult a priest by / asking him to take oath Red
[report of sitting by commission appointed by Dublin Corporation to investigate the treatment of prisoners] Rev. Kieran O'Farrelly, Mount Argus, came forward to give evidence, and the chairman said they would not insult him by asking him to take an oath. Irish Times (18 November 1922) 5/3
N01 (VI.B.10): 42(g)
oil shares cheerful
OIL SHARES CHEERFUL Irish Times (18 November 1922) 10/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:118(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 42(h)
crosscut & felling saw
[Advertisement] Disston's Cross Cut & Felling Saws. Irish Times (18 November 1922) 1/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:118(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 43(a)
frisky shorty (tramp) Red
  • FW unlocated
[Literary Vagabonds] He [the author W.H. Davies] varied the monopoly of tramping by stealing free rides on freight trains with kindred knights of the road known as “Boston Slim” and “Frisky Shorty.” Irish Times (18 November 1922) 9/6
Note: Enters the text (FW 039.18) via N06 (VI.B.11):113(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 43(b)
garden shoes (a garden in / themselves Red
[Elbow Grease] I found myself whistling the first act of “The Mikado”, […] Taking over the boot-cleaning department was my happiest idea. Surrounded by a few pairs of my own, a couple of the wife's, my son's garden shoes (so-called because they are a garden in themselves) […] I soon finished the rest of the Savoy opera. Irish Times (18 November 1922) 9/4
N01 (VI.B.10): 43(c)
fleet of motorcars Red
[Article about Lord Northcliffe]: His only recreations were motoring and golfing. At Sutton Place, that beautiful Tudor house, a few miles from Guildford, he built an exceedingly modern and vastly scientific 9-hole course, where he used to invite friends and his staff to play with him, and he owned a wonderful fleet of motor cars. At one time he owned at least a dozen, and was certainly one of the pioneers of mechanical transport, as he was of flying. Irish Times (18 November 1922) 9/2
Note: See also N12 (VI.B.14):160(a) and N19 (VI.B.19):009(b).
N01 (VI.B.10): 43(d)
it is hardly too / much to say Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 43(e)
W reads, skips 2 pages / [??] Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 43(f)
at a loose end Red
[Mr. G.B. Shaw on the elections]: Lord Birkenhead has not ceased to proclaim his adherence to the Conservative Party, though he is at the moment in the category of a brilliant statement at a loose end. Irish Times (18 November 1922) 7/4
N01 (VI.B.10): 43(g)
whores [&] civilians
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:118(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 43(h)
keep it down, get it off (Lestr)
Note: Lestrygonians.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:118(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 43(i)
smoke roseleaves (Naus)
Note: A brand of cigarettes, cf. ref. in the Evening Standard of 23 January 1923, 4/4: [A Londoner's Diary / The Rose Leaf Cigarette] Cigarettes with rose-leaf ends (not fresh, of course) can be bought from at least one firm, though I fear that the cynics believe them to be saleable because when you smoke them no trace is visible of any lip cosmetic. Naus: Nausicaa.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:118(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 44(a)
WBY likes mice / rabbits, hares, (rodents)
Note: William Butler Yeats.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:119(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 44(b)
Morris who kissed / the cow was a strong / farmer. ~
Note: Strong farmer (Hiberno-English): prosperous farmer.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:119(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 44(c)
~ WBY is all / in 1st poem ‘Sad / lady, cease’
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:119(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 44(d)
sororicide, matricide / fratricide, no word / for figlicide (cf Abraham / & Cenci)
The presentation of Shelley's tragedy “The Cenci,” is one of the events of the London theatre season Irish Times (14 November 1922) 4/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:119(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 44(e)
WBY — letter “my wife / travels with a certain / friar” Red
  • FW unlocated
N01 (VI.B.10): 44(f)
moroccan bound
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:119(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 44(g)
Secretary to Board of / Green Cloth
Dead in his office chair. Mr. Gerald MacGill, for some years Assistant Secretary at the Board of Green Cloth, Buckingham Palace, was found dead in his office chair yesterday morning. The Palace doctor had been treating him recently for heart trouble. Irish Times (23 November 1922) 5/3
Note: Board of Green Cloth: in England, part of the Royal Household, which controlled expenditure and had certain legal powers within the verge (a 12-mile radius of the Palace). It took its name from the green-covered table at which it used to meet.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:119(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 44(h)
turbinated bones
Note: Turbinated: resembling a spinning-top in shape; (anatomically) applied to the scroll-like spongy bones of the nasal foss in the higher vertebrates.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:119(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 45(a)
weevily winecorks Black
[WHAT THE WINE CORK TELLS.] With very old wines of whatever kind always take care that there is no weevil in the corks, as once this insect gains access to the cork owing to its “tunneling” tactics it will not be very long before the wine leaks out. Daily Mail (23 November 1922) 8/5
N01 (VI.B.10): 45(b)
cellarbook
[WHAT THE WINE CORK TELLS.] Wine coming from a well-kept cellar should show no sign of weevily corks. Daily Mail (23 November 1922) 8/5
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 45(c)
chateau-bottled Black
[WHAT THE WINE CORK TELLS.]: With a château-bottled claret there is the […] brand of the château, as all château-bottled wines are marked with this. Daily Mail (23 November 1922) 8/5
N01 (VI.B.10): 45(d)
fouled the screw
Note: Presumably ‘corkscrew’, suggested by preceding units.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:119(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 45(e)
clinging vine—girl / who lets chaps pay. / contrary = go Dutch
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:120(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 45(f)
had Ul. stayed at / home??? (demobbed)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:120(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 45(g)
Mater smells incest
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:120(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 45(h)
D.P must be screwed up / or loosened for art / purposes
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:120(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 45(i)
Ul's crew = Sancho Panza / = LB½
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:120(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 46(a)
AE & WB
Note: AE and W. B. Yeats.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:120(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 46(b)
Goneril & Regan
Note: Regan and Goneril are two villains in Shakespeare's King Lear.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:120(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 46(c)
Odyss = 12 predom passions Red
Note: The twelve predominant passions possibly refer to the six concupiscible and six irascible passions identified in the scholastic tradition. In III q.3540, Thomas Aquinas discusses these six basic passions of the concupiscible: love and hate; desire and aversion; pleasure and pain; and six basic passions of the irascible: hope and despair; fear and daring (or boldness); anger divided into anger directed towards good ends (ie, righteous anger) and anger directed towards evil or corrupt ends.
N01 (VI.B.10): 46(d)
low blackguardism Red
Note: See also SA (VI.A):0742(aa)
N01 (VI.B.10): 46(e)
not answer the door
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:120(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 46(f)
pull m—y behind door / wh. toss H off cart |asawdusta|, haggle / Stop singing! Leave the room! / rubber cunt, Sst! / Show him album clap! / tell story — ‘my husband’ / purge him, shitcan [talk], dung / ask leave 3 t for go WC / tempt H / H write to BB / rod in pickles / after-inspection / mixed grill
Note: ‘m—’ is short for ‘mickey.’ (penis).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:121(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 47(a)
FJCS sending of proof / no guarantee etc
Note: FJCS = F.J.C. Skeffington. Joyce and he printed their essays privately in 1901, because they were rejected by St Stephen's magazine. FJCS became FJCSS (Sheehy-Skeffington) in 1903. He was shot dead during the Easter Rising, in which he did not participate.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:122(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 47(b)
commitments
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:122(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 47(c)
to ‘lace’ a horse
Note: lace: to beat, or thrash.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:122(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 47(d)
policewoman Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 47(e)
niggers toting goods / up & down gangplank
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:122(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 47(f)
Indiana — holy hornimy / heat, hives ~
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:122(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 47(g)
~ & highbones Red
  • FW unlocated
N01 (VI.B.10): 47(h)
pumpkin pie (Thank Day)
Note: Thanksgiving Day.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:122(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 47(i)
Youth wanted Red
Wanted, a smart Youth for Office in leading City Firm. Reply in own handwriting, stating age, where educated, and salary require, D 378, this office. / Wanted, smart Youth. Apprentice to Gents' Outfitting and Clothing. Apply by letter, D 379, this office. Irish Times (21 November 1922) 1/6
N01 (VI.B.10): 47(j)
rifles were speaking Red
Rifles and machine guns. Immediately afterwards ambulances were got out, and he assisted some people there. An armoured car came along from the opposite direction, and while rifles were speaking a machine-gun was also speaking, and, he understood, people far distant from the crowd suffered casualties. Irish Times (21 November 1922) 5/4
Note: See also: N01 (VI.B.10):006(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 47(k)
Winter turned leaves of / book of nature Red
Nature's Book [title of an article on nature conservation] Irish Times (21 November 1922) 4/5
N01 (VI.B.10): 47(l)
Dispute amical H & W, H for / truth, W for peace
Note: H (husband), W (wife).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:122(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 48(a)
armitise Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 48(b)
minutiae Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 48(c)
in page 2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:122(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 48(d)
both sides / all sections
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:122(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 48(e)
reliquary (relique)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:123(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 48(f)
Eve in trousers
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:123(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 48(g)
bought a paper to / see had he really / committed suicide (W) Red
[WIFE'S STORY IN NULLITY SUIT] Further evidence was given in the petition for the nullity of marriage on the ground of the wife's refusal of marital relations presented by Mr. Samuel Herbert Hudston, aged 66, managing director of a Nottingham firm of wire-rope manufacturers, against his wife, Mrs. Lucy Ethel Hudston, who was formerly Mrs. Newbigging, of the Park Hotel, Preston […] Mrs. Hudston said that he [Mr. Hudston] followed her to Windermere in October and repeated his proposal of marriage. […] She persisted in her refusal to marry him. […] Turning to her he said “My body will be found on the line at Sheffield to-night, and my death will be at your door.” […] Mr. Hastings—Did you think he was going to commit suicide when he left you at Windermere?—Yes I really did. Did you make inquiries the next day?—Yes, I bought a paper to see if he had. (Laughter.) Daily Mail (25 November 1922) 12/3-4
Note: A photograph of Mrs. Hudston appeared in the Daily Mail of 25 Nov 1922.
N01 (VI.B.10): 48(h)
Move up, Mick, Make / room for Dick Red
[Iron Rule in Ireland […] / by “Dubliner.”] Mulcahy has now placed himself definitely on the danger line, and nothing is more significant of this than the doggerel: Move up Mick / Make room for Dick. Translated into plain English this means: We have killed Michael Collins, we are after you now, General Richard Mulcahy. Illustrated Sunday Herald (26 November 1922) 11/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 48(i)
LB in talith
Note: Talith: a shawl worn by Jews at prayer.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:123(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 49(a)
the kissing candlesticks / —
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:123(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 49(b)
7 mile boots Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 49(c)
“Lucia has an exquisite / handwriting” (leisure)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:123(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 49(d)
lend us yr [bluebag] / (Ir. neighbour) / —
Note: Bluebag: a bag for holding detergents.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:123(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 49(e)
the ‘boys’ (I.R.A.) Red
[Report of an ambush on the border between Meath and Kildare] The day ended disastrously for the “boys,” they told us, and then, as if they were merely unimportant details— “22 prisoners captured, and one of our chaps killed.” Irish Times (2 December 1922) 7/8
N01 (VI.B.10): 49(f)
La lasci! (don't be / talking!) / —
Note: Italian la lasci: leave it.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:123(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 49(g)
parabellum (rev) Red
Troops from Monasterevan and Portarlington […] discovered a ‘dump,’ making the following captures: […] 1 Parabellum revolver Irish Times (28 November 1922) 7/6
N01 (VI.B.10): 49(h)
Peter the Painter Red
The attacking party were all armed with Service rifles, and some of them carried “Peter the Painters” and Smith and Wesson revolvers. Irish Times (2 December 1922) 7/8 [Report of the same ambush on the border between Meath and Kildare]
N01 (VI.B.10): 49(i)
dressing station
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:123(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 49(j)
stationary engine [driver]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:123(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 50(a)
they have as much / word now or I / don't know what / (servants) / (W)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:123(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 50(b)
donkeyman
Note: donkeyman: a man in charge of a donkey-engine, a small (stationary) steam-engine, usually for subsidiary operations on a ship, as feeding the boilers, etc.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:124(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 50(c)
After the mollygnats / & the bloomburst
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:124(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 50(d)
How do you do, you / damned sneakylooking / soaper you think / you're not going to / fork out?
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:124(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 50(e)
How do you do, Mr X! / you haven't got me / yet, I know what / you're after nor / you won't. I hope / you're quite / well
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:124(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 51(a)
He was explaining about / Schumann / but I know he likes / me (Pen)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:124(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 51(b)
that's the funniest / little hat, you know, / I turned it down last / night and this morning / it turned itself all / up again on me / (W / S. Brigid)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:125(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 51(c)
Saint Foy
Note: Saint Foy: Saint Faith, venerated in the middle ages.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:125(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 51(d)
God he's got worse / instead of better if / I'm a bad judge
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:125(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 52(a)
emplacement
Note: emplacement: a platform for canon.
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 52(b)
drag her anchor
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:125(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 52(c)
caveman style (Cyc) Darkred
  • FW unlocated
Note: See also: N01 (VI.B.10):078(i) for FW 60.14, and SA (VI.A):0641(bd) for FW at 037.01-02.
N01 (VI.B.10): 52(d)
this baby
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:125(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 52(e)
‘Poison Ivy’ (Cycl) Green
  • FW unlocated
Note: See also N03 (VI.B.3):107(b) and N18 (VI.B.8):017(b).
N01 (VI.B.10): 52(f)
vitamine Red
Note: Vitamins were ooriginally known as vitamines, on the mis-supposition that they were animes.
N01 (VI.B.10): 52(g)
syllabub: warm milk / milked into 2 pints / of port & sherry, clotted / cream, cinnamon / comfits Red
[GRANDFATHER'S SYLLABUB. By AN OLD MAID] “When I was a girl,” she began,”we would have no more thought of omitting syllabub from the Christma festivities than of going without plum pudding and turkey. “When we saw grandfather measure out a pint from the sherry that always stood in a decanter on the sideboard,” she went on, “we always knew what was going to happen. Then he used to fetch up a bottle of port and pour out a pint of that also. Both lots of wine went into a big old china bowl and were sweetened with sugar to father's liking. “Then he and I went across the yard to the netters. Father carried the bowl and I took the milking-stool under my arm. Father would pet one of the quietest of the cows and feed it with apples while I milked her into the bowl. […] “After waiting about 20 minutes,” continued mother, “we used to pile up the bowl with clotted cream. From time to time, as father heaped it up, we would put in a little powdered cinnamon. “On the top we grated nutmeg and stuck in some sweetmeats. Grandma liked nonpareil comfits, she bought them at Norwich when she went up to do the Christmas shopping. Daily Mail (29 November 1922) 8/5
N01 (VI.B.10): 52(h)
lounge lizards Red
Note: Lounge-lizard: a parasite operating in fashionable society, usually hoping to dupe a wealthy woman.
N01 (VI.B.10): 52(i)
beauty parlour Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 53(a)
where do you get / that stuff?
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:125(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 53(b)
My pleasure, ~ Red
  • FW unlocated
N01 (VI.B.10): 53(c)
~ buddy Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 53(d)
the rick was thatched
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:126(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 53(e)
Carmun fair ~
Note: Carman Fair was a famous ancient Irish festival, and the subject of an eleventh-century poem, the Óenach Carmain.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:126(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 53(f)
~ aonach
Note: Irish aonach: fair.
N01 (VI.B.10): 53(g)
more than I can say Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 53(h)
plainlands Green
N01 (VI.B.10): 53(i)
Muircearteach of the / Leather Coats Green
Note: Muirchertach (of the Leather Cloaks): tenth-century Irish chieftain who opposed the Danes.
N01 (VI.B.10): 53(j)
Brian marches round I — / his left hand to the sea / — (LB) Darkred
Note: Brian Boru made a general tour of Ireland after he had subjugated the various kings of Ireland.
N01 (VI.B.10): 53(k)
Mrs Evadne Bell Red
Note: See also: N09 (VI.B.1):158(g).
N01 (VI.B.10): 54(a)
Elsie Oram Red
Note: Eilis Oram was the name of a notorious liar (a folklore character).
N01 (VI.B.10): 54(b)
a chesterfield
Note: A variety of overcoat; also, a type of sofa.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:126(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 54(c)
you can hatch / by yourself
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:126(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 54(d)
brother in Trinity / Coll = abortion in a / glass case
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:126(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 54(e)
Llewelyn Marriage Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 54(f)
Mac Murrough Kavanagh Darkred
Note: Art Mac Murrogh Kavanagh (1357-1417), king of Leinster.
N01 (VI.B.10): 54(g)
bellclear Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 54(h)
Funny poor dear ~ Red
[LONG-SKIRT MENACE. By DOROTHY RICHARDSON.] The reintroduction of the long skirt will be [an] aesthetic and a physiological tragedy. […] It is said to be modest. It is, in effect the extreme of immodest false modesty. Those funny poor dears, the ankle-gazers, who shriek out against current immodesties […] will remain themselves whatever the fashion. Daily Mail (30 November 1922) 8/5
N01 (VI.B.10): 54(i)
~ anklegazer Red
[LONG-SKIRT MENACE. By DOROTHY RICHARDSON.] The reintroduction of the long skirt will be [an] aesthetic and a physiological tragedy. […] It is said to be modest. It is, in effect the extreme of immodest false modesty. Those funny poor dears, the ankle-gazers, who shriek out against current immodesties […] will remain themselves whatever the fashion. Daily Mail (30 November 1922) 8/5
N01 (VI.B.10): 55(a)
persimmon ~
N01 (VI.B.10): 55(b)
~ mango ~
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:126(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 55(c)
~ grapefruit Green
N01 (VI.B.10): 55(d)
Venus pencil
Note: ‘Venus Pencil’, a brand of pencil common enough in the twenties.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:126(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 55(e)
fowl don't eat in dark / electric roost more eggs
[DARKNESS THAT KILLS. By LESLIE G. MAINLAND] Why do your eggs now cost you 4d apiece or more? Because, among other reasons, fowls do not feed after darkness. They get enough food during daylight to stay alive, but they have not much superfluous energy left for manufacturing eggs. Electric light in a fowl-house has, by test, resulted in a 30 per cent increase in the egg output. Daily Mail (1 December 1922) 8/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:126(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 55(f)
what have we there? (Pen)
Note: Penelope.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:126(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 55(g)
baulk line
Note: As drawn on a billiards table.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:126(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 55(h)
close cannon
Note: As in the game of billiards.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:126(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 55(i)
hugging the cushion
Note: As in the game of billiards.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:127(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 55(j)
“particular” = fog Red
Note: London particular, or London ivy: a thick yellow or black fog, the product of certain atmospheric conditions and carbon: Cf. Belfort's Magazine, Sep., 29. But the crowning masterpiece of the climate is a London fog, locally known as a London particular. ?DE 221113-9/3
N01 (VI.B.10): 55(k)
take his medicine silently Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 55(l)
Marriage Notice minus Hubby / “The Couple”
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:127(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 55(m)
h doublell Black
  • FW unlocated
Note: See also: N01 (VI.B.10):056(e). H(e)ll.
N01 (VI.B.10): 56(a)
S Luke — painter & dentist / S Apollonia
Note: Luke is the patron saint of artists. The female Saint Apollonia, whose emblem is a forceps gripping a molar, is invoked against toothache.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:127(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 56(b)
Gilchrist
[In Memoriam] Gilchrist—Fifth Anniversary. In fond and loving memory of William Alfred, eldest son of James and Margaret Gilchrist, who was accidentally killed on 5th November 1917. Irish Times (6 November 1922) 1/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:127(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 56(c)
de Sales La Terriere
[Births] De Sales La Terriere. Nov 21 1922 at Kiltinan Castle, Co. Tipperary, the wife of F.J.B. De Sales La Terriere, M.F.H., of a son. Irish Times (27 November 1922) 1/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:127(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 56(d)
assafoetida / —
Note: Assafoetida, a strongly smelling gum used in cooking and as an antispasmodic.
N01 (VI.B.10): 56(e)
aitch double⁄ell Black
  • FW unlocated
Note: H L L (Hell). See also: N01 (VI.B.10):055(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 56(f)
Frank Cinnamond
[Roll of Honour / (1914-1918))./In Memoriam.] Cinnamond—In loving memory of Frank Cinnamond, Lieutenant, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who died while a prisoner of war in Gaudenz, Prussia, November 13th, 1918. Mourned by parents, brothers and sisters. Irish Times (15 November 1922) 1/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:127(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 56(g)
Peebles (Sligo)
[Births] Peebles—November 12, 1922, at the Sligo Independent and West and Ireland Telegraph Office, Ratcliffe st., Sligo, to Mr. and Mrs. Peebles, a daughter. Irish Times (15 November 1922) 1/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:127(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 56(h)
Croskerry ~
[Salmon Pool, / Island Bridge.] This beautifully circumstanced residence, on the Bank of the River Liffey, with valuable Salmon Fishery attached, will be sold by auction, on Tuesday, 5th December, at 110 Grafton street […] Frederick Croskerry and Son, Solicitors, Lr. Ormond quay. James H. North and Co., Auctioneers, 110 Grafton street. Irish Times (15 November 1922) 1/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:127(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 56(i)
~ beautifully circumstanced / residence
[Salmon Pool, / Island Bridge.] This beautifully circumstanced residence, on the Bank of the River Liffey, with valuable Salmon Fishery attached will be sold by auction, on Tuesday, 5th December, at 110 Grafton street. Irish Times (15 November 1922) 1/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:127(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 56(j)
dying man shouts / for mother
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:128(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 56(k)
Vereker Red
[In Memoriam.] Vereker—In ever-present memory of beloved Lelia, who passed away on Friday, November 21st, 1919. Irish Times (23 November 1922) 1/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 56(l)
Verschoyle Red
  • FW unlocated
Note: Cf. Ulysses 1496-7. Verschoyle (like Vereker, a name of Dutch origin) is, like Vereker, found in Thom's Directory for 1923 in the ‘Nobility, Gentry, Merchants, and Traders’ section.
N01 (VI.B.10): 57(a)
Jedburgh justice / (shoot, then try) Red
Note: Jedburgh [Scottish town] justice: hanging first, then trying.
Note: See also: SA (VI.A):0983(cd)
N01 (VI.B.10): 57(b)
You're the first that / came here from / Kilcock
Note: Kilcock is a village in County Kildare.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:128(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 57(c)
found himself looking / into barrel of revolver Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 57(d)
Now is the winter —
Note: Opening words of Shakespeare's Richard III.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:128(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 57(e)
I'd like to emphasise that
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:128(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 57(f)
it depends, under God
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:128(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 57(g)
w wardmaster
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:128(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 57(h)
Mr Nelson Cromwell
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:128(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 58(a)
Capt. Norman Algeo ~
[Roll of Honour / (1914-1918) / In Memoriam.] Algeo—In proud and ever-loving memory of Captain Norman Algeo, Leinster Regiment, who died of wounds at 55th Casualty Clearing Station, on November 30th, 1917, aged 23 years. Irish Times (30 November 1922) 1/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:128(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 58(b)
~ Casualty Clearing Station
[Roll of Honour / (1914-1918) / In Memoriam.] Algeo—In proud and ever-loving memory of Captain Norman Algeo, Leinster Regiment, who died of wounds at 55th Casualty Clearing Station, on November 30th, 1917, aged 23 years. Irish Times (30 November 1922) 1/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:128(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 58(c)
dispersal sale (herd)
[Kilfrush Herd. / Dispersal Sale at Ballsbridge.] One of the leading herds of pedigree cattle, Shorthorn and Aberdeen Angus, of the South of Ireland, came under the hammer yesterday in the Sale Paddock of the Royal Dublin Society, at Ballsbridge, when Messrs. Gaze and Jessop […] disposed of the herd of Mr. F.J.B. Gubbins, Kilfrush House, Knocklong. Irish Times (30 November 1922) 3/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:128(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 58(d)
bought a donkey for / ½ a crown
Donkey For Half A Crown.—John Glynn, Galway, was sent to prison for a month for buying a donkey for half a crown from a schoolboy who had found the animal wandering. R.J. Hughes, a local shopkeeper, was also sentenced to a month's imprisonment for receiving stolen tobacco from four boys whose ages ranged from eight to ten. The tobacco had been stolen from a trawler bound for Connemara. Irish Times (30 November 1922) 7/8
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:128(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 58(e)
by runner to Luxor / (mail) Blue
[Egyptian Treasure. / Remarkable Find at Thebes. / Some Wonders of Early Art.] The Cairo Correspondent of The Times yesterday telegraphed a long message, dated from the Valley of the Kings (by runner to Luxor [on the river Nile]), in which it is stated:—This afternoon Lord Carnarvon and Mr. Howard Carter revealed to a large company what promises to be the most sensational Egyptological discovery of the century. Irish Times (30 November 1922) 7/3
N01 (VI.B.10): 58(f)
Knocklong
[Kilfrush Herd. / Dispersal Sale at Ballsbridge.] One of the leading herds of pedigree cattle, Shorthorn and Aberdeen Angus, of the South of Ireland, came under the hammer yesterday in the Sale Paddock of the Royal Dublin Society, at Ballsbridge, when Messrs. Gaze and Jessop […] disposed of the herd of Mr. F.J.B. Gubbins, Kilfrush House, Knocklong [a village in Co. Limerick]. Irish Times (30 November 1922) 3/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:129(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 58(g)
Knockmedown
Note: Knockmealdown, a mountain range between Co. Tipperary and Co. Waterford.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:129(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 58(h)
Is that your last cup / of tea? / Last for today. Is the / gallows ready
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:129(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 59(a)
The two lazers Darkred
Note: Lazer, or lazar: leper.
N01 (VI.B.10): 59(b)
topless (W)
Note: W: woman.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:129(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 59(c)
unfrocked Red
  • FW unlocated
Note: See also: SA (VI.A):0742(ab), where this unit was possibly transferred.
N01 (VI.B.10): 59(d)
“She shall make music”
Note: Line from the nursery rhyme, Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:129(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 59(e)
alighted disgustedly Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 59(f)
bail estreated
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:129(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 59(g)
Smith Minor
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:129(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 59(h)
merger
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:129(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 59(i)
a get-together evg Black
Note: Get-together evening [colloquial]: a (usually informal) meeting or assembly.
N01 (VI.B.10): 60(a)
he hurriedly threw on / a pair of trousers Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 60(b)
Within a few minutes
When Lilian found that Felix's bedroom stood next to her bathroom her anxieties were renewed. Felix laughed again, and rang, for the door between the bathroom and the bedroom was locked. In a few minutes a dark and stoutish chambermaid entered with a pleasant, indulgent comprehending gravity and unlocked the door.” Arnold Bennett, Lilian, (1922) ?169 [136]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:129(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 60(c)
W: you not? It is law
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:129(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 60(d)
Write story about Riviera ~
Lilian looked out. There were the shady gardens of the hotel, the white promenade with strolling visitors in pale costumes, the calm ultramarine Mediterranean, the bandstand far to the right emitting inaudible music, the yellow casino, beyond the casino the jetty with its group of white yachts, and, distant on either side, noble and jagged mountains, some of them snow-capped. Incredible! Arnold Bennett, Lilian, (1922) 171 [137f]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:129(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 60(e)
‘Snow, hail’ sentences / without “I” (Cycl)
She heard Felix moving within the room, and turned her head.

“Darling, what are you doing?”

“Ringing for your coffee.”

“What time is it?”

“Haven't the least.”

“But your watch?”

“Haven't got it on.”

“But you're all dressed.”

“Haven't put my things in my pockets.”

Arnold Bennett, Lilian, (1922) 171 [137f]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:129(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 60(f)
her face positively / burning
His gentle manner was inexpressibly soothing. It was so soothing that just as he was leaving she kept him back with a gesture.

“Doctor, before you go, I wish you would do something for me.” And she sat down, her face positively burning, and shed tears.

Arnold Bennett, Lilian, (1922) 240 [197]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:130(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 60(g)
ten |athirty thirstya| Red
The next morning when Lilian entered his room the nurse was not there.

“I've sent her off”, Felix explained. “I much prefer to have you with me than any nurse on earth.” He was dressed before ten-thirty. “Now put your things on”, said he.

Arnold Bennett, Lilian, (1922) 240 [197]
Note: The alteration (addition of ‘s’) is made in ink.
N01 (VI.B.10): 60(h)
you may pick overhanging / fruit but it belongs to / tree owner, party / hedge dies, special / pleading, if trap / for ground vermin ~
[GARDENING LAW. By AN EXPERT] the law being that you may cut overhanging trees but the branches belong to the owner of the tree. […] Suppose you cut a party hedge and it dies in consequence, or that you dig so as to interfere with the foundations of a party wall which is thereby damaged. The person responsible for the damage would have to make it good, and no special pleading that the fault was the gardener's would be to any avail. Again supposing I am the owner of extensive grounds and lay a trap therein for the purpose of catching ground vermin. If a tramp trespasses on my ground and gets hurt, say, by his foot being caught in the trap, and the latter is within 25 yards of the road or highway, an action would lie against me. But if the trap was more than 25 yards away from the road I should not be liable. Daily Mail (6 December 1922) 6/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:130(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 61(a)
~ naps tramp within / 25 yds from main road / setter liable
[GARDENING LAW. By AN EXPERT] Again supposing I am the owner of extensive grounds and lay a trap therein for the purpose of catching ground vermin. If a tramp trespasses on my ground and gets hurt, say, by his foot being caught in the trap, and the latter is within 25 yards of the road or highway, an action would lie against me. But if the trap was more than 25 yards away from the road I should not be liable. Daily Mail (6 December 1922) 6/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:130(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 61(b)
companies' call-up
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:130(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 61(c)
reclose
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:130(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 61(d)
polygraph
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:130(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 61(e)
hypogeum
Note: An underground chamber or vault.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:130(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 61(f)
he ‘spat out’ = spoke
[THE SECRETS OF SONG. By DAME NELLIE MELBA] Nine out of every ten persons enjoy a song far more if the words are clearly enunciated so that they can readily understand them. […] This depends on clear enunciation, by which I mean that words must not be swallowed, but I do not mean that they must be “mouthed” or forcibly “spat out” to use a vulgar but expressive phrase. Daily Mail (6 December 1922) 6/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:131(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 61(g)
accent stronger in singing
[THE SECRETS OF SONG. By DAME NELLIE MELBA] Any brand of accent, whether Lancashire, Glasgow, Australian, or what you will, becomes more marked in singing than in speech through the sustaining of the vowels. Daily Mail (6 December 1922) 6/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:131(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 61(h)
fight ‘framed’ Red
The “sensation” of the day is the charge that the Carpenter-Siki fight was “faked.” Irish Times (6 December 1922) 5/1
Note: See also: N01 (VI.B.10):115(d).
N01 (VI.B.10): 61(i)
Perrott
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:131(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 61(j)
false setting of starmap / discover new star Red
[No New Star / Fruitless Search by Astronomers / “The Mystery of the Heavens”]: The new star of the first magnitude that was reported to have been discovered by M. Zwierel, a Rumanian astronomer, at Fatticeni on December 1 has not been seen by any other astronomer. […] Dr. A.C. Crommelin says […] “Zwierel must apparently have made his mistake in setting his star-map, and in his confusion re-discovered some well-known star.” Daily Mail (16 December 1922) 13/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 61(k)
several degrees lower / than a snake ~ Red
[Ilford murder trial, quoting statement made by Bywaters] The reason I fought with Thompson was because he never acted like a man to his wife. He always seemed several degrees lower than a snake. Daily Mail (8 December 1922) 6/3
N01 (VI.B.10): 62(a)
~ he acted like a man
[Ilford murder trial, quoting statement made by Bywaters] The reason I fought with Thompson was because he never acted like a man to his wife. He always seemed several degrees lower than a snake. Daily Mail (8 December 1922) 6/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:131(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 62(b)
at 41 (T's house)
[Ilford murder trial] Immediately I receive a second letter I destroy the first, and when I get the third I destroy the second. Now the only one I have is the “Dear Edie” one, written to 41. Mr. Inskip here explained that No. 41 was the number of the house in Kensington-gardens where Mrs. Thompson lived. Daily Mail (7 December 1922) 12/3-4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:131(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 62(c)
dormy f)
[Advertisement] The New Dormie Ball is specially made with high-tension winding for plus and scratch players. Ask for the BLUE LETTERING DORMIE—The Perfect Ball—2/6. Daily Mail (8 December 1922) 8/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:131(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 62(d)
stymie / niblick (golf)
GOLF LANGUAGE. Golf, though it came to England from Scotland, is not of Scottish origin […] golf derives from the Dutch word kolf, meaning “club.” […] The niblick, for the benefit of non-golfers, is a short, stiff club used for playing out of bunkers. Originally it was “knibloch,” an old Scottish term for a chunk of wood, but go still farther back and you get the Dutch word knobbelachtig, which means, I think, a knot of wood. “Stymie” is one of the few golfing expressions which appear to be truly Scottish. “Stymie” is, or was, used in Scotland to mean an obstruction to the eyesight. Daily Mail (8 December 1922) 8/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:131(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 62(e)
buttercup cat
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:131(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 62(f)
dying cat brings in other
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:131(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 62(g)
joy of ladies in theatre at cat in bag
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:131(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 62(h)
grey cat lucky (France)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:131(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 62(i)
mistigri
Note: French mistigri: pussycat.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:131(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 62(j)
Rennix ~
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:131(n)
N01 (VI.B.10): 62(k)
~ Mannix ~ Red
Note: These uncommon names—Rennix, Mannix (Co. Cork: derives from the Irish manach [Italian monaco], a monk) and Ormsby—are all found in Ireland.
N01 (VI.B.10): 62(l)
~ Manoco / Ormsby
Note: These uncommon names—Rennix, Mannix (Co. Cork: derives from the Irish manach [Italian monaco], a monk) and Ormsby—are all found in Ireland.
N01 (VI.B.10): 62(m)
Posting & livery yard
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:132(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 63(a)
scourge of Littlehampton Red
[Mystery of Littlehampton's Scourge.] [Article about three-year mystery of writer of libellous and obscene messages — letters and postcards — which led to the wrongful conviction of a Mrs Gooding of Littlehampton] Yet so cunningly had the trap been set by the unknown scourge of Littlehampton that […] she had failed in an appeal to the Court of Criminal Appeal. Daily Sketch (7 December 1922) 2/2-4
N01 (VI.B.10): 63(b)
why wives cling to brutes ~
[letter from ‘Mrs. R.H.’] Dear Sir — I should like to reply to the article in to-day's Daily Sketch, “Why Wives Cling to Brutes Daily Sketch (7 December 1922) 4/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:132(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 63(c)
~ H a bigger brute than ever
[letter from ‘Mrs. R.H.’] Dear Sir — I should like to reply to the article in to-day's Daily Sketch, “Why Wives Cling to Brutes” […] [‘Mrs R.H.’ describes her own husband's brutish behaviour.] Daily Sketch (7 December 1922) 4/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:132(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 63(d)
Festus Joya, Recess Red
Note: See also N06 (VI.B.11):049(f). When working on I.4:1A.0, Joyce used VI.B.11 and VI.B.10 together. He entered the unit “Festy King” from N06 (VI.B.11):049, striking it through in red. Presumably he cancelled N01 (VI.B.10):063(d) at the same time, conflating the present unit with the VI.B.11 transfer.
N01 (VI.B.10): 63(e)
DWD
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:132(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 63(f)
to blaze on it (shoot)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:132(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 63(g)
do for children
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:132(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 63(h)
S. Heart feast of the / Universal Church / rite [cf] double of 1st class / 23 June
Note: The Feast of the Sacred Heart of Jesus falls each year on the Friday after the second Sunday after Pentecost (in 1922 this fell on 23 June). In the Roman Rite it is ranked as ‘Double of the First Class’.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:132(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 63(i)
1⁄7 - feast of Precious Blood
Note: Feast of Precious Blood falls on 1 July.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:132(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 64(a)
a nice prickly back / brush with long / handle — joy of joys / sheer joy
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:133(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 64(b)
dress shelly & scaly / details
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:132(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 64(c)
where is Mr Redapple?
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:132(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 64(d)
no of 1st P C to arrest hood or / cribcrack. new moon bad / never rob knife or / 1 armed man
[THIEVES' SUPERSTITIONS. By CHRISTOPHER BECK.] Certain times and seasons are unpopular with Bill Sykes […] Numbers count for much with the crib-cracking fraternity. Each man has his lucky or unlucky numbers. A man who has been arrested or convicted never forgets the number of the policeman who arrested him, and considers this number to be his “hoodoo.” […] Not only must you never steal a knife, but also you must never rob a one-armed man. To do so means all kinds of ill-luck. Daily Mail (11 December 1922) 8/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:132(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 64(e)
(I) can't say / don't know (Cycl)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:132(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 64(f)
to stump (make speeches) acc
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:133(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 64(g)
which words were / taken up
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:134(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 65(a)
hatefilled women Red
[‘Zara the Cruel’ by Joan Conquest, described as “This splendid serial of Romance and Passion in the East”] [The heroine, Helen Raynor is escaping from Zara and hears “the shrill cries of many hate-filled women”] Daily Sketch (9 December 1922) 7/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 65(b)
Kloochee (longhandled puff)
[photo caption] THE “KIOUCHEE.”— To the long list of novelties in the way of women's toilet requisites has to be added the “Kiouchee.” This is a long-handled puff which adds extra ease in completing the toilet. Daily Sketch (9 December 1922) 8/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:134(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 65(c)
Shufflebotham
[Whose Child?] Dr. Ellen Mary Shufflebotham sued her husband, Dr. Frank Shufflebotham, in the Divorce Court yesterday Daily Sketch (9 December 1922) 15/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:134(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 65(d)
bailiff specially detailed Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 65(e)
grimmest lifedrama of history
[All for Two […] by A Woman] One woman and a man [i.e. Bywaters]. No, not a man, but a boy, called on to play a man's part in this grimmest of grim dramas. Daily Sketch (9 December 1922) 2/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:134(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 65(f)
sleeve dog
[photo captions] “SLEEVE” DOG SHOW. […] The dogs are miniatures and of the Pekinese breed and must be under [illeg] lb in weight, which enables them to be carried on the sleeve with care. Daily Sketch (9 December 1922) 8-9
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:134(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 65(g)
Siki, Georges will fight
Note: See also N09 (VI.B.1):008(h), N09 (VI.B.1):061(g) and N21 (VI.B.20):008(a).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:134(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 65(h)
party rates (train)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:134(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 65(i)
Michael Arlen ‘Piracy’
Note: a reference to Michael Arlen, “Piracy”: a romantic chronicle of these days (London: W. Collins and Sons, October 1922)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:134(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 65(j)
a quiet stamp Red
[Free State Stamp] It is officially announced that the new issue of the 2d. postage stamp for the Irish Free State will be on sale […] as from to-day […] If we were looking for a word to indicate a first impression, “quiet” would suit very well. The stamp is a quiet stamp, in which the harmony of the design and the ornamentation of Celtic scrolls and headed outline are well balanced. Irish Times (6 December 1922) 4/6
Note: [From First Stamps of the Irish Free State, 6th December 1922] With the creation of the Irish Free State on December 6, 1922, the stamps of the Provisional Government were replaced by new stamps of the Free State. Once again, the current British stamps were used until the first Irish definitive stamps could be produced (see next page). The 2d. and 3d. stamps were issued on January 6, 1923, the 4d. on January 16, 1923, and all the other values were issued on December 6, 1922. The 2½d. to 1 shilling values can only come from one printing, by Alex Thom and Co. Ltd in December 1922/January 1923, whilst the ½d., 1d., 1½d. and 2d. values were also produced by Harrison and Sons, Ltd, in England in coil form. The “Seahorse” higher value stamps provide a more complicated area for the philatelist to study. Because the Free State did not produce stamps of its own designs for values of 2 shillings and sixpence to ten shillings until 1937, the overprinted versions remained in use until then, being subject to the variations in type of the basic British stamps (eg, the “re-engraved” designs of the 1935 issue), and to wear of the overprinting type.
The first truly Irish stamp went on sale on 6 December 1922, the 2d. Map of Ireland. It was chosen following a design competition organized by the Provisional Government. J. Ingram submitted the winning entry. The other design of these early issues included “The Sword of Light”, “The Arms of the Four Provinces of Ireland”, and the “Cross of Cong” … The dies for these stamps were engraved at the Royal Mint in London and a specially watermarked paper was made with an overall pattern of monogram “SE” [Saorstat Éireann] that was used for all Irish stamps until the introduction of the new Irish Constitution in 1937, after which the monogram in the watermark was changed to “e” (Éire). After 1971, all Irish stamps have been printed on non-watermarked paper An original Irish 2d. stamp was issued earlier in 1922 by the Irish Republicans during the Civil War: “During the Civil War the I R A prepared three denominations of postage stamps for their own postal service, a 1d. brown, a 2d. green, and a 6d. blue. They appear to have been produced in July 1922, but all except a small quantity (about 250 of each value) were destroyed when the National Army captured Cork in August. These stamps are known with perforation 11 on wove paper; imperforate on wove paper (probably proofs), and the 6d. is known with perforation 11 on laid paper. All versions are rather valuable … [Effects of the Partition of Ireland on the postal service (1920-1922)]
N01 (VI.B.10): 65(k)
Master Seven
[King Pantomime] “Childish nonsense,” sneer the grown-ups when questioned upon the subject. Why, then, does it require four of these self-same grown-ups to escort one small boy of seven to see “Aladdin”? Not because Master Seven needs such a bodyguard to look after him, but to see if Lazy Aladdin is as lucky as ever, if he discovers the same gorgeous jewels that he did last time (the forget how many years ago), if the Genie is as green and weird and awe-inspiring and the dark-haired Princess as beautiful. Irish Times (7 December 1922) 2/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:134(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 65(l)
threat to kill & murder Red
GARDENER SENT TO PRISON. Yesterday at the County Commission, before Mr. Justice Pim and a jury, a middle-aged man named William Blackmore was charged with having on October 5 maliciously addressed a letter to Mr. Thomas Archer, Airfield House, Donnybrook, threatening to kill and murder him. The prisoner pleaded not guilty, and was not professionally represented. Irish Times (7 December 1922) 3/3
N01 (VI.B.10): 66(a)
darlingest lover of mine
[ILFORD MURDER TRIAL] On the Sunday or Monday before the crime, Mrs. Thompson wrote to Bywaters. The letter was undated and began:— Darlingest lover of mine thank you a thousand times for Friday Daily Mail (7 December 1922) 13/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:134(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 66(b)
the heavens as / they were Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 66(c)
whilst waiting for / chop he dropped dead Blue
N01 (VI.B.10): 66(d)
sidesmen (church)
Note: OED: One of the persons elected as assistants to the churchwardens of a parish.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:134(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 66(e)
ketch (ship)
Note: ketch: a strongly built two-masted vessel, formerly much used as a bomb-vessel. See also SD1 (VI.A):032(e).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:134(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 66(f)
josshouse Darkred
  • FW unlocated
Note: joss-house: a Chinese temple or building for idol worship.
N01 (VI.B.10): 66(g)
curling (sport)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:135(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 66(h)
in good time Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 66(i)
McAlmon can see Lilian / Gish in Rome [(Lucia)]
Note: Lilian Gish, the American film star visited Rome in December 1922 with a film company of her own. Robert McAlmon spent the winter of 1922 in Italy.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:135(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 67(a)
love — Lilian
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:135(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 67(b)
V. M. Llonar / 106 r. de la Tour / (Passy 2406
Note: Victor Llona, contributor to Our Exagmination.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:135(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 67(c)
She ought to have her / hands blessed by / the pope (Pen)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:135(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 67(d)
useful fish
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:135(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 67(e)
toyland
Woman and her Home. / Toyland: Unlimited Choice for Everyone. Irish Times (9 December 1922) 5/2
Note: Pre-Christmas article on toys for children.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:135(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 67(f)
imagination ~ Red
[Four “Reprisal” Executions. / Labour's Strong Protest in the Dail.] Mr. Gavan Duffy (County Dublin) said that little remained to be said about the horrible deed of that morning. […] Imagination was staggered by the idea that any group of man calling themselves an Executive authority could be drivcen so far from the ordinary course of human understanding, human appreciation of things, as to sanction such an act as this. Irish Times (9 December 1922) 5/2
Note: The execution by the Government was of four ‘Irregulars’, after the fight for the Four Courts.
N01 (VI.B.10): 67(g)
~ indignation ~ Red
[Four “Reprisal” Executions. / Labour's Strong Protest in the Dail.] Mr. Gavan Duffy (County Dublin) said that little remained to be said about the horrible deed of that morning. […] Imagination was staggered by the idea that any group of man calling themselves an Executive authority could be driven so far from the ordinary course of human understanding, human appreciation of things, as to sanction such an act as this. Irish Times (9 December 1922) 5/2
Note: The execution by the Government was of four ‘Irregulars’, after the fight for the Four Courts.
N01 (VI.B.10): 67(h)
~ was staggered Red
[Four “Reprisal” Executions. / Labour's Strong Protest in the Dail.] Mr. Gavan Duffy (County Dublin) said that little remained to be said about the horrible deed of that morning. […] Imagination was staggered by the idea that any group of man calling themselves an Executive authority could be drivcen so far from the ordinary course of human understanding, human appreciation of things, as to sanction such an act as this. Irish Times (9 December 1922) 5/2
Note: The execution by the Government was of four ‘Irregulars’, after the fight for the Four Courts.
N01 (VI.B.10): 67(i)
to plug (shoot) Red
[Four “Reprisal” Executions. / Labour's Strong Protest in the Dail.] Mr. Shannon (Labour) […] The I.R.A. would argue that they had to “plug” a good many more deputies in order to prevent the national troops from firing on them. Irish Times (9 December 1922) 5/3
N01 (VI.B.10): 67(j)
stuffing
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:135(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 68(a)
prisons leak
[NO DIFFERENCE LEGALITY EXECUTIONS] Mr. Blythe said that it must be fairly well known, and fairly obvious, that they had this connection — they were part of one body with the men who committed the crime, and were part of the irregular army. There was no question of their disapproval of the policy that had been pursued by the irregulars; they had necessarily been in constant communication with the irregulars outside.

They knew that all prisons leaked, and that information got in and out. They knew that policies had been drawn up inside the prison, and communications and advice had been sent out of prison by the irregulars.

Irish Times (9 December 1922) 5/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:135(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 68(b)
‘loco’(motive) men
[Public Notices] A MASS MEETING OF LOCOMOTIVE MEN. ABOVE MEETING WILL BE HOLD ON TO-MORROW (SUNDAY) Irish Times (9 December 1922) 5/8
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:135(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 68(c)
sea slight ~ Red
[WEATHER FORECAST.] Cloud will vary in amount […] sea slight. Irish Times (9 December 1922) 6/4
N01 (VI.B.10): 68(d)
~ cloud will vary
[WEATHER FORECAST.] Cloud will vary in amount […] sea slight. Irish Times (9 December 1922) 6/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:135(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 68(e)
a matter of 15 yards Red
[INQUEST ON SHOT DEPUTY. “WILFUL MURDER” BLOW AT POPULAR GOVERNMENT; “A NATIONAL LOSS” SOLDIER'S STORY OF THE PURSUIT] A British lorry just then passed by witness's own car, and he thought that an attack had been made on it. The two civilians turned down Arran street, and witness was too late to turn his car after them. Consequently, he jumped out and, drawing his revolver, called on them to halt.

The civilians took no notice, but continued running. Witness fired one round from his revolver. Simultaneously, the smaller of the two civilians turned into a side street on the left of Arran street. The taller man went down the next street to the left — a matter of fifteen yards. Witness saw that further pursuit was useless, “and left it at that”.

Irish Times (9 December 1922) 7/4
N01 (VI.B.10): 68(f)
in the arms of / a policeman Red
  • FW unlocated
N01 (VI.B.10): 68(g)
a few strong remarks Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 68(h)
spits fat Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 68(i)
exchange amusing jest
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:136(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 68(j)
lean lanky kelt (salmon) ~
[SALMON No. 23. By W. SELLAR HAY] Last winter officials of the Scottish Fishing Board netted the lower reaches of the Spey, and to the dorsal fins of 75 salmon, which were afterwards released, were affixed numbered alluminium discs. […] Salmon No. 23 proved to be a pilgrim and a stranger. Less than three months after being caught it turned up in the Banffshire Deveron, a lean and lanky kelt. Daily Mail (14 December 1922) 8/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:136(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 69(a)
~ speckled lax / heavy with roe Red
[SALMON No. 23. By W. SELLAR HAY] Now the mystery about Salmon No. 23 is this. Weighed and numbered in the Spey at about three miles from the estuary, it was a female fish of about 8lb., heavy with roe, which had obviously entered the river with the intention of spawning. Why, then, so late in the season, did it turn again downstream, recross the bar, swim 40 miles along the coast, and then push laboriously up the Deveron for 40 weary miles? Daily Mail (14 December 1922) 8/5
N01 (VI.B.10): 69(b)
tweeny (betweenmaid) Red
Duke's Daughter Could Not be a “Tweeny Daily Sketch (13 December 1922) 3/3
N01 (VI.B.10): 69(c)
surprisingly nice day Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 69(d)
batter the bolster
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:136(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 69(e)
Nutting felt eyeache
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:136(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 69(f)
deceitful jade
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:136(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 69(g)
wipe street with him ~ Red
[DOCTOR'S DENIAL. / WAR TIME AFFAIR. / LETTERS / BLACKMAIL ALLEGATION] Mrs. Oliver Briggs, wife of Dr. Briggs, detailed an interview on August 20, 1919 she had with Mr. Fry. He asked if she was aware that Briggs and Mrs. Fry had been living together as man and wife at Teddington, Middlesex, for three and a half years. She said it was untrue. He then demanded money or he would take proceedings against the Major [i.e. Dr. Briggs]. When she declined to give him any, he declared, she said, that he would “wipe the streets” with Major Briggs. Daily Mail (8 December 1922) 10/4
N01 (VI.B.10): 69(h)
~ my darling one
[DOCTOR'S DENIAL. / WAR TIME AFFAIR. / LETTERS / BLACKMAIL ALLEGATION] Mr. Clifford Mortimor (for the husband) further cross-examining Dr. Briggs: What did you call Mrs. Fry?—Lottie. Ever call her your “darling” or “dearest darling”? Daily Mail (8 December 1922) 10/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:136(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 69(i)
|ahisa| voice was wasted / on ‘I was shy’
[ARTISTS IN SONG. / OPERATIC AND BALLAD CONCERT.]: “In Cellar Cool” too, brought out the fine depth of Mr. Griffin's voice—a voice somewhat wasted on “I was Shy” and “Father O'Flynn.” Irish Times (11 December 1922) 4/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:136(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 69(j)
complementary [twin]ship
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:136(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 70(a)
Saul Bros / screened coal / Grand Canal Quay
[COALS.] Saul Bros., / COAL IMPORTERS / Special Screened House Coal […] / Depôt: GRAND CANAL QUAY Irish Times (12 December 1922) 1/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:136(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 70(b)
stock branding
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:136(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 70(c)
Lucia cooking reads Brown
N01 (VI.B.10): 70(d)
estopped
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:136(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 70(e)
in the goods of
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:136(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 70(f)
sandshift
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:137(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 70(g)
congrats!
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:137(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 70(h)
dickens a curl has gone Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 70(i)
streamline bullet
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:137(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 70(j)
jaywalker Green
Note: Jaywalker: a careless pedestrian.
N01 (VI.B.10): 70(k)
flivverboob (roadhog)
Note: New York slang 1922: Flivverboob, a reckless driver. A flivver was a cheap motor car.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:137(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 70(l)
her boy Red
Note: See also N01 (VI.B.10):076(g).
N01 (VI.B.10): 71(a)
had for the asking
[PETITION FOR REPRIEVE OF BYWATERS IS READY TO-DAY] Large bills with the words, “Bywaters' reprieve, sign here,” will draw attention to the petition and can be had for the asking. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:137(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 71(b)
Bywaters … a waitress
[PETITION FOR REPRIEVE OF BYWATERS IS READY TO-DAY […] WHAT THEY THINK] A waitress: Bywaters had more love for Mrs. Thompson than sense; she instigated him to the crime, she is older than he and ought to have a greater sense of responsibility. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:137(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 71(c)
an omnibus driver
[PETITION FOR REPRIEVE OF BYWATERS IS READY TO-DAY […] WHAT THEY THINK] An omnibus driver: I heartily support the petition; Bywaters ought not to die. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:137(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 71(d)
a rlway porter Red
  • FW unlocated
[PETITION FOR REPRIEVE OF BYWATERS IS READY TO-DAY […] WHAT THEY THINK] A railway porter: Bywaters has been under this woman's influence ever since he was a boy. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 3
N01 (VI.B.10): 71(e)
a dustman named Churches / in the employ — of / ‘We have been discussing the case / All the fellows — Red
[PETITION FOR REPRIEVE OF BYWATERS IS READY TO-DAY […] WHAT THEY THINK] A dustman named Churches, in the employ of the City Corporation, said:— “We have been discussing the case at our wharf, and most of the fellows will sign the petition; in fact, I believe we shall all sign it. Bywaters is only a young fellow, and ought to be let off the death sentence. The woman dominated him and led him astray.” Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 3
Note: See also N20 (VI.B.13):009(f).
N01 (VI.B.10): 71(f)
An actress ‘Then he has been / so wonderful’ Red
[PETITION FOR REPRIEVE OF BYWATERS IS READY TO-DAY […] WHAT THEY THINK] Miss Sheila Courtenay, who is appearing in “The Cat and the Canary” at the Shaftsbury Theatre, put the same view: “I do sincerely hope,” she said, “that Bywaters will not be hanged. He is very young, and was egged on by a woman older than himself to do what he did. And then he has been so wonderful in his behaviour at the Old Bailey.” Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 3
Note: See also N20 (VI.B.13):009(e).
N01 (VI.B.10): 71(g)
Three soldiers were walking / in Fleet Street. One gave an opinion in which all / concurred. It was the woman / He proved himself a man / afterwards Red
[PETITION FOR REPRIEVE OF BYWATERS IS READY TO-DAY […] WHAT THEY THINK] Three soldiers were walking together in Fleet-street; one gave an opinion in which all concurred. It was the woman who was to blame. Bywaters played a bad part in the crime, but he was coerced. He proved himself a man afterwards. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 3
Note: See also N20 (VI.B.13):009(d).
N01 (VI.B.10): 71(h)
a sailor on embankment / was encouraged to speak / by his fiancée & said / I think he was more / to blame but I think / there was someone else in it. Red
[PETITION FOR REPRIEVE OF BYWATERS IS READY TO-DAY […] WHAT THEY THINK] A sailor, on the Embankment, was encouraged to speak by his fiancée, and said: I think the woman was more to blame than Bywaters, but I think there was someone else in it. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 3
N01 (VI.B.10): 71(i)
a barmaid — it wd be / a shame Red
[PETITION FOR REPRIEVE OF BYWATERS IS READY TO-DAY […] WHAT THEY THINK] A barmaid in the West. End: It would be a shame if Bywaters died. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 3
Note: See also N20 (VI.B.13):009(h).
N01 (VI.B.10): 71(j)
a taxicab driver ~ Red
[PETITION FOR REPRIEVE OF BYWATERS IS READY TO-DAY […] WHAT THEY THINK] A taxicab driver: Bywaters is a silly young fellow, but he ought not to pay the full penalty. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 3
Note: See also N20 (VI.B.13):009(g).
N01 (VI.B.10): 71(k)
~ ought not pay ~ Red
[PETITION FOR REPRIEVE OF BYWATERS IS READY TO-DAY […] WHAT THEY THINK] A taxicab driver: Bywaters is a silly young fellow, but he ought not to pay the full penalty. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 3
N01 (VI.B.10): 72(a)
~ full penalty Red
[PETITION FOR REPRIEVE OF BYWATERS IS READY TO-DAY […] WHAT THEY THINK] A taxicab driver: Bywaters is a silly young fellow, but he ought not to pay the full penalty. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 3
N01 (VI.B.10): 72(b)
A chef I do not believe / in the capital punishment
[PETITION FOR REPRIEVE OF BYWATERS IS READY TO-DAY […] WHAT THEY THINK] A Chef: I do not believe in the capital sentence, and I certainly do not think that this boy deserves it. He seemed to be entirely under the influence of the woman. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:137(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 72(c)
a sh
[PETITION FOR REPRIEVE OF BYWATERS IS READY TO-DAY […] WHAT THEY THINK] A shop assistant: My heart goes out to the young fellow who has proved himself such a man in standing by his sweetheart at all costs. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:137(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 72(d)
a commercial traveller ~ Not cancelled
[PETITION FOR REPRIEVE OF BYWATERS IS READY TO-DAY […] WHAT THEY THINK] A commercial traveller: I have discussed the case with many people, and in every instance the view has been expressed that Bywaters should escape the gallows. Should Mrs. Thompson be reprieved, Bywaters should most certainly be similarly treated. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:137(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 72(e)
~ escape the gallows
[PETITION FOR REPRIEVE OF BYWATERS IS READY TO-DAY […] WHAT THEY THINK] A commercial traveller: I have discussed the case with many people, and in every instance the view has been expressed that Bywaters should escape the gallows. Should Mrs. Thompson be reprieved, Bywaters should most certainly be similarly treated. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:137(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 72(f)
a sharp girl
[DOCTOR, WIFE, AND SERVANT / Husband Says He Never Drank With Girl: / Charges Denied in Witness Box] Giving evidence on his own behalf in the Divorce Court yesterday, Dr. Frank Shufflebotham denied the allegations of his wife, Mrs Ellen Mary Shufflebotham, in regard to Amy Tempest, a former servant. […] [Dr Shufflebotham] held many important offices in the district where he lived at Newcastle-under-Lyme and finding Amy Tempest a sharp girl, he made her his secretary. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 3/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:137(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 72(g)
my improved looks Red
[RENEWED HOPE / Bywaters to See Father of / Mrs Thompson] Mrs Bywaters declared […] “His first thought was of me. He noticed my improved looks, and when I told him the Daily Sketch had taken his reprieve petition in hand he coloured with delight. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 3/3
N01 (VI.B.10): 72(h)
a straphanger said
Note: Not in index source. This appears to be a later insert, written in a darker, softer pencil, and added to give ambiguous point to the following entry. Strap-hanging was a mode of self-support used on public transport, as on the tube in London.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:138(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 72(i)
brace up ~ Red
[My Married Life / The Amazing Diaries of a Man and Woman Who Happened to be Husband and Wife / Edited by Olive Wadsley, the Famous Novelist] I met old Charles the other evening […] “Well, I'm coming back […] so brace up and prepare for me. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 7/3
N01 (VI.B.10): 72(j)
~ I met Charles
[My Married Life / The Amazing Diaries of a Man and Woman Who Happened to be Husband and Wife / Edited by Olive Wadsley, the Famous Novelist] I met old Charles the other evening […] “Well, I'm coming back […] so brace up and prepare for me. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 7/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:137(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 72(k)
that woman ought to / be strangled Red
[My Married Life]: Heavens, that woman ought to be strangled — I mean Diana's mother. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 7/3
N01 (VI.B.10): 72(l)
a salesman in a / wellknown stores
[PETITION FOR REPRIEVE OF BYWATERS IS READY TO-DAY / WHAT THEY THINK] A commissionaire at a well-known store: I can assure you that among the hundreds of girls employed here, sympathy is strongly felt for Bywaters, and every one will be glad to sign the Daily Sketch petition. Daily Sketch (14 December 1922) 3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:138(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 72(m)
oddments in maids' / costumes
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:138(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 72(n)
Sweeping reductions
Note: A common phrase; see e.g. Popular Science Monthly, December 1921, p.118 [advertisment]: Diamonds at Pre-War Prices […] Free 1922 Basch De Luxe Diamond Book — Write See the sweeping reductions in this New Basch Book. Rare bargains also in watches, jewelery, silverware, etc. Trials how to judge a diamond. A postcard or letter brings it free — write now.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:138(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 73(a)
ostrich = sparrow / — camel
Note: The word ‘ostrich’ derives from the Latin avis struthio, ostrich bird. Struthio, through its Greek form, derives from the word meaning a bird, and this in turn is identical in root to the Gothic sparwa, whence the modern word ‘sparrow’. In Classical Greek the ostrich was called ‘struthiocamel’, which in its English form was so used by Massinger.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:138(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 73(b)
pistoleers Brown
N01 (VI.B.10): 73(c)
by the + of Christ
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:138(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 73(d)
lamp of maintenance (Toc H) Red
Note: From the Times of 15 Dec 1922 9/4: “It has been said of “Toc H” that it is one of the few good things that have come out of the war. […] and to-day delegations […] will meet at the Guildhall to celebrate the eighth birthday of this wonderful fellowship. The Prince of Wales, who is patron of “Toc H,” will attend the festival, and the event of the evening will be the lighting by his Royal Highness of the lamps of maintenance which are to be presented to delegates from fifty branches. The lamp of maintenance is a replica of the old Christian catacomb lamp, except that the handle has been designed in the form of a cross to represent part of the arms of Ypres. It is a symbol of the recognized establishment of a branch of “Toc H” and will be displayed burning on ceremonial occasions.”
Note: See also EB 14 Vol. 22, p.264: ‘Toc H’: Each branch has Lamp of Maintenance […] relighted in rededication to the task […] [of] building “a New Jerusalem.”
N01 (VI.B.10): 73(e)
tights, trunks, / springside boots
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:138(h), VI.C.05:138(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 73(f)
cellarflap (East end / dance)
Note: The ‘cellar-flap’ (slang): a dance performed within a very small compass.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:138(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 73(g)
overhaul (collarred)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:138(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 73(h)
He simply had no / time for girls. He used / to say his sisters / were good enough for him Brown
[MY BOY'S LIFE: BY HIS MOTHER] It was only last year that we knew of his friendship with Mrs. Thompson, and, as far as I know, she was the first woman outside his family circle he ever cared for. In his young days he simply had no time for girls. He used to say that his sisters were good enough for him, and that there was no girl in Manor Park to equal them. Daily Sketch (15 December 1922) 13/3
N01 (VI.B.10): 74(a)
red blood in his veins Red
[HYPNOTISED AND UNLUCKY / An Understandable Crime: Boy Reduced to Mental Slavery by a Masterful Woman / By W. L. George.] […] let any man who reads this ask himself what he is capable of for a woman dear to him, if he were to see her separated from him by another. If he has red blood in his veins he will honestly reply that he does not know. Daily Sketch (15 December 1922) 13/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 74(b)
The boy curser Red
[BOY OF 15 CURSES MAGISTRATE] “If you take no notice of my appeal, then I hope God's curse will be upon you and your family for the rest of your days.” This was a passage from a strange letter written by a boy of 15, John Albert Smith, who pleaded guilty at Willesden Children's Court on Saturday to the theft of £35 worth of goods. Sunday Express (17 December 1922) 3/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 74(c)
Bywaters wrote prize / essay on Kindness / to Animals Brown
[MY BOY'S LIFE: BY HIS MOTHER] His school reports always bore high marks, and he won quite a number of prizes and certificates, especially for essay-writing. One essay I shall always remember. The subject was “Kindness to Dumb Animals,” and it gained for him the first prize in his class. Daily Sketch (15 December 1922) 13/3
N01 (VI.B.10): 74(d)
Miss Leahy shampoos / with Amami
[advert.] Miss Leahy / Shampoos with / Amami / (AH MAH ME) Daily Sketch (16 December 1922) 13/4
Note: Margaret Leahy was the winner of a Daily Sketch competition, judged by Norma Talmadge, to find a new starlet; see also N01 (VI.B.10):078(j).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:138(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 74(e)
ship fouled buttress of / bridge Red
When the King's Ferry railway bridge was raised […] the Norwegian steamer Gyp […] knocked down an iron banded brick buttress Irish Times (18 December 1922) 5/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 74(f)
that's the beauty / of it
“But you can't sacrifice yourself to an abstract principle,” said Tanny.

That's just what you can do. And that's the beauty of it. Who represents the principle doesn't matter. Christ is the principle of love,” said Jim.

D. H. Lawrence, Aaron's Rod, (1922) 82
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:139(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 74(g)
nothing to touch it Red
Note: See also: N20 (VI.B.13):216(c), the source of FW 441.14.
N01 (VI.B.10): 74(h)
druid Christianity / S Patrick
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:139(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 75(a)
granite setts (market) Red
The voice made Lilly peer between the people. And sitting on the granite setts, being hauled up by a burly policeman, he saw our acquaintance Aaron, very pale in the face and a little dishevelled. D. H. Lawrence, Aaron's Rod, (1922) 92
N01 (VI.B.10): 75(b)
freezia
Lilly was properly troubled. Yet he did not quite know what to do. It was early afternoon, and the sun was shining into the room. There were daffodils and anemones in a jar, and freezias and violets. Down below in the market were two stalls of golden and blue flowers, gay. D. H. Lawrence, Aaron's Rod, (1922) 101
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:139(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 75(c)
crowd work (stage)
“Oh, I hated Chelsea — I loathed Chelsea — Chelsea was purgatory to me. I had a corporal called Wallace — he was a fine chap—oh, he was a fine chap—six foot two-and about twenty-four years old. He was my stand-back. Oh, I hated Chelsea, and parades, and drills. You know, when it's drill, and you're giving orders, you forget what order you've just given — in front of the Palace there the crowd don't notice — but it's awful for you. And you know you daren't look round to see what the men are doing. But Wallace was splendid. He was just behind me, and I'd hear him, quite quiet you know, “It's right wheel, sir.” Always perfect, always perfect-yes-well. . . . D. H. Lawrence, Aaron's Rod, (1922) [possibly] 122f
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:139(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 75(d)
Grand Banks — breed fogs
Note: Grand Banks: noted fishing ground south east of Newfoundland.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:139(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 75(e)
picked up Lizard lights
Note: The Lizard, a peninsula in Kerrier district, Cornwall, England: the southernmost part of Great Britain.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:139(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 75(f)
dead slow
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:139(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 75(g)
blast echoed by wall of berg
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:139(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 75(h)
traffic lanes
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:139(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 75(i)
tailor's tab Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 75(j)
ramp
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:139(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 75(k)
Chief White Elk Darkred
  • FW unlocated
[RED INDIAN LEADER'S VISIT TO BUCKINGHAM PALACE] Dr Teewanna, the Chief White Elk, leader of the Red Indian tribes of British Columbia, hopes to lay before the King special claims for improved facilities for education among his tribesmen. Irish Times (21 December 1922) 6/6
Note: See also N05 (VI.B.2):170(l) and N19 (VI.B.19):080(f).
N01 (VI.B.10): 75(l)
poor man's duck
FOR THE COOK / POOR MAN'S DUCK / Bone half a shoulder of mutton and lay it open Irish Times (18 December 1922) 3/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:139(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 75(m)
fall in!
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:139(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 75(n)
— says you Red
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] If everyone was like me, says you! The Leader (16 December 1922) 452/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 75(o)
Aililiu
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] Tim Healy to be what he is is what most people will be talking about. “Aililiu!” says Mrs. Mac — “whatever chance of peace we had before!” The Leader (16 December 1922) 452/1
Note: Aililiú: an exclamation of surprise or sorrow (quoted in Ó Muirithe, A Dictionary of Anglo-Irish). Irish aililiú: Alleluia; Good gracious!
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 75(p)
the mother, you'd pity her Brown
[OUR LADIES' LETTER] you were asking me did I know the “Fear Mor.” […] I do sure and wasn't there a wedding present to him in a window in Grafton Street during the week—a lovely Dun Eimer rug. […] There was a lady looking at the rug the day Mickey and myself were in and a little boy with her, with a Fainne, and if we didn't have the chat with him! Like another thing, the mother you'd pity her, looking on and listening and as proud as if she was the Queen, and that she couldn't understand a word of what we were saying, herself, the angishore! The Leader (16 December 1922) 452/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 76(a)
old skin
[AS OTHERS SEE US] Well, that's enough politics, old skin. The Leader (16 December 1922) 457/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:139(n)
N01 (VI.B.10): 76(b)
goak ~ Red
Fancy a country with a sense of humour same as Ireland's supposed to have, puttin' its Parliament bang among the fossils and the stuffed owls! “Humour,” my giddy aunt, they don't know what it means. Still it's a jolly good goak! The Leader (16 December 1922) 457/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 76(c)
~ my giddy aunt
Fancy a country with a sense of humour same as Ireland's supposed to have, puttin' its Parliament bang among the fossils and the stuffed owls! “Humour,” my giddy aunt, they don't know what it means. Still it's a jolly good goak! The Leader (16 December 1922) 457/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:140(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 76(d)
too perfectly priceless / for words
[AS OTHERS SEE US] The “Sourstout's” got busy all right since its birthday, but say, old top, have you heard where they've fixed up? In the Museum. Ain't it too perfectly priceless for words? The Leader (16 December 1922) 457/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:140(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 76(e)
O yes thee had been
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:140(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 76(f)
found time for God
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:140(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 76(g)
man of her choice Red
Note: See also N01 (VI.B.10):070(l).
N01 (VI.B.10): 76(h)
pull out damper
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:140(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 76(i)
possessed of some means Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 76(j)
Jane Barlow the Younger
The highly popular Irish annual, “The Lady of the House,” […] Jane Barlow the Younger contributes a delightful Irish story, “A Change of Heart” Irish Times (23 December 1922) 6/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:140(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 76(k)
oyster cut / (turkey)
[HOW TO CARVE YOUR TURKEY. By CHARLIE BROWN. / FOR 44 YEARS CARVER AT “SIMPSON'S”]: If the bird is later to be served cold, the wing bones, the “parson's nose” (the tail), and the oyster cut should, if possible, be left intact. Daily Mail (21 December 1922) 6/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:140(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 76(l)
jokey old man Brown
in some respects the testator was keener than other men; he was very shrewd and very difficult to get the better of in a bargain. He was what was called in the North “a jokey old man.” Mr Overend […] referred to the terms of the certificate of the death of the testator, in which the cause of death was stated as cerebreal [sic] haemorrhage (four years) and senile decay. Irish Times (15 December 1922) 10/4 [Heading in article on dispute over will of William Boyd]
N01 (VI.B.10): 76(m)
Pierrepoint (boia) / invented strap ~
[EXECUTIONER'S DEATH] Henry Albert Pierrepoint, for 11 years chief public executioner of England […] died yesterday morning at his home […] [F]ollowing the hanging of a one-armed man in 1908 he invented a strap that has since been used for the pinioning of one-armed persons condemned to capitol punishment. Daily Mail (15 December 1922) 7/2
Note: Italian: boia, hangman.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:140(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 77(a)
~ for 1 armed men
[EXECUTIONER'S DEATH] Henry Albert Pierrepoint, for 11 years chief public executioner of England […] died yesterday morning at his home […] [F]ollowing the hanging of a one-armed man in 1908 he invented a strap that has since been used for the pinioning of one-armed persons condemned to capitol punishment. Daily Mail (15 December 1922) 7/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 77(b)
vocational schools
[Strain in School. Dr. Greeg and the study of fatigue.] I […] He was not a great believer in what was known as vocational schools, aiming at teaching their work in later life. Irish Times (19 December 1922) 5/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:140(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 77(c)
operatives (factory)
[Strain in School. Dr. Greeg and the study of fatigue.] In a great business world, it was one of the commonest things to get tired, and what they had to study wa to prevent people from getting tired as quickly as they generally did. Very careful examinations have been made of the subject of fatigue in regard to operatives in factories such as the number of motions needed in the making of a pin or a steel nib. Irish Times (19 December 1922) 5/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:140(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 77(d)
it's windy or smthg
“Ah, well! A breath of fresh air, by myself. I felt forced to feel—I feel if I go back home now, I shall be FORCED—forced to love—or care—or something.” D. H. Lawrence, Aaron's Rod, (1922) [possibly] 77
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:140(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 77(e)
Lord, I'm tired yawning
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:141(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 77(f)
I have enough of this day
“When you've had enough, you go away and you don't care what you do,” he said, epigrammatic.

She paused a moment.

“Enough of what?”,/p> she said. D. H. Lawrence, Aaron's Rod, (1922) [possibly] 132

Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:141(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 77(g)
everything went off very badly
However, the food was good enough, and sufficient, and the waiter and the maid-servant cheerful and bustling. Everything felt happy-go-lucky and informal, there was no particular atmosphere. Nobody put on any airs, because nobody in the Nardini took any notice if they did. The little ducal dog yapped, the ducal son shouted, the waiter dropped half a dozen spoons, the old women knitted during the waits, and all went off so badly that it was quite pleasant. Yes, Aaron preferred it to Bertolini's, which was trying to be efficient and correct: though not making any strenuous effort. Still, Bertolini's was much more up to the scratch, there was the tension of proper standards. Whereas here at Nardini's, nothing mattered very much. D. H. Lawrence, Aaron's Rod, (1922) [possibly] 223
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:141(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 77(h)
She's like a bluerag
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:141(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 77(i)
Nature sends me to / do so (piss) W Blue
N01 (VI.B.10): 77(j)
no better ma'am / (Un Chas)
“Aaron Sisson! Oh, but how amusing! What a nice name!”

No better than yours, is it?”

“Mine! Franz Dekker! Oh, much more amusing, I think,” said Francis archly.

D. H. Lawrence, Aaron's Rod, (1922) 225
Note: Uncle Charles uses this quaint form of expression in A Portrait.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:141(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 78(a)
chestnut burr
Well now, and what next? Having in some curious manner tumbled from the tree of modern knowledge, and cracked and rolled out from the shell of the preconceived idea of himself like some dark, night-lustrous chestnut from the green ostensibility of the burr, he lay as it were exposed but invisible on the floor, knowing, but making no conceptions: knowing, but having no idea. Now that he was finally unmasked and exposed, the accepted idea of himself cracked and rolled aside like a broken chestnut-burr, the mask split and shattered, he was at last quiet and free. He had dreaded exposure: and behold, we cannot be exposed, for we are invisible. We cannot be exposed to the looks of others, for our very being is night-lustrous and unseeable. Like the Invisible Man, we are only revealed through our clothes and our masks. D. H. Lawrence, Aaron's Rod, (1922) 175
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:141(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 78(b)
beef olives
There was evidently much bitter feeling as a result of Sir William's philanthropy. Apparently even the honey of lavish charity had turned to gall in the Italian mouth: at least the official mouth. Which gall had been spat back at the charitable, much to his pain. It is in truth a difficult world, particularly when you have another race to deal with. After which came the beef-olives. D. H. Lawrence, Aaron's Rod, (1922) 166
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:141(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 78(c)
Gainsborough suits ~
[photo caption] Flowing Train of a Young Baronet's Bride […] Right: some of Miss Caton's little attendants. The Boys wore blue velvet Gainsborough suits and the girls were in long silver frocks with Charles I lace caps. Daily Sketch (21 December 1922) 1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:141(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 78(d)
~ Chas I lace caps
[photo caption] Flowing Train of a Young Baronet's Bride […] Right: some of Miss Caton's little attendants. The Boys wore blue velvet Gainsborough suits and the girls were in long silver frocks with Charles I lace caps. Daily Sketch (21 December 1922) 1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:141(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 78(e)
out-of-works Red
[STINK-BOMB PLOT NIPPED IN THE BUD] Organised coercion of the public by the “Red” corrupters of the unemployed was nipped in the bud by a police discovery yesterday […] an S.O.S. was spread [by the plotters] among the out-of-works asking for men with a knowledge of chemistry. Daily Sketch (21 December 1922) 2/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 78(f)
Child to father — Aren't / we a pair of young / rascals
[What Did Your Child Say? / To-day's Best Bright Saying / One Guinea Awarded] Norman, aged five, was to sleep with his father, on account of the unexpected visit of friends. He was still awake when his father turned in. “Oh! Daddy,” he exclaimed, “you haven't said your prayers.” Father excused himself on the grounds that he was too tired, whereupon Norman, sidling up to him, whispered: “Aren't we a pair of young rascals; I haven't said mine either.” Mr. A.J. Brain, 168 Greenvale-road, Eltham. Daily Sketch (21 December 1922) 4/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:141(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 78(g)
Joycey (DB) Red
  • FW unlocated
[Echoes of the Town and Round About] Many of my friends are going to the Côte d'Azur by sea […] Vi Loraine (Mrs Edward Joicey) is making this journey next week. Daily Sketch (21 December 1922) 6/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 78(h)
tugs at heartstrings .
[Jackie Coogan Comes To London] [JC in The Kid] The tiny impish boy, with […] his deep, wide eyes with their wistfulness that tugs at the heartstrings Daily Sketch (21 December 1922) 6/1
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 78(i)
Jackie Coogan believes / in caveman attitude to W Red
[Jackie Coogan Comes To London] Child-like, Jackie has some quaint ambitions. […] he wants to be a camera-man and to marry Mary Pickford. He believes in the cave-man attitude to women. Daily Sketch (21 December 1922) 6/1
Note: Jackie Coogan, child star (b. 1914). He played the title role in the film Oliver Twist, shown in London at the end of 1922 and publicised by the usual gossipacious newspaper articles. See also: N01 (VI.B.10):052(c), and SA (VI.A):0641(bd) for FW at 037.01-02.
N01 (VI.B.10): 78(j)
wheelboards
[photo caption] By means of wheelboards all Belfast knows that the Margaret Leahy film is showing. Daily Sketch (21 December 1922) 8/1
Note: The wheelboards in question were a sort of sandwich board on wheels; see also N01 (VI.B.10):074(d).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:141(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 78(k)
engine throttle
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:141(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 79(a)
dress
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:142(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 79(b)
rippling points
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:142(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 79(c)
jet cabochon
Note: Jet cabochon: brightly polished jet, used in jewelry or for making buttons.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:142(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 79(d)
petal sleeves Brown
N01 (VI.B.10): 79(e)
pelargonium-pink
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:142(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 79(f)
overdress of net / darned with gold Brown
N01 (VI.B.10): 79(g)
side train
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:142(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 79(h)
pouffed skirt
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:142(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 79(i)
petunia satin
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:142(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 79(j)
golf
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:142(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 79(k)
greens heavy
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:142(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 79(l)
complaint book
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:142(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 79(m)
bush-harrowed
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:142(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 79(n)
worm cast
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:142(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 79(o)
asparagus decumbens
Note: Decumbent: trailing along the ground.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:142(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 79(p)
Salvia splendens
Note: Salvia splendens, a scarlet-coloured herbaceous plant.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:142(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 79(q)
golden one Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 79(r)
the rushy hollow Blue
N01 (VI.B.10): 79(s)
(THE END)
Note: This unit appears to have been added later in a softer, darker pencil.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:142(o)
N01 (VI.B.10): 80(a)
skijk / skikjoring / (sheering) / pulled by horse on ice
[An Irish Ski[…]] There was an abundance of skating, tobaggoning, luging, and skioring [the rest of the article is missing] Irish Times (27 January 1923) 9/2
Note: See also N09 (VI.B.1):035(g). Skikjoring: a popular winter sport in the twenties, trailing on skis behind a horse, which goes at the speed of a runaway.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:143(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 80(b)
giant cards
Theatre Royal. A different class of performance is that of Amac, who, with the assistance of Mll. Velma, presents the three-card trick with giant cards. The failure of members of the audience to “find the lady” and her magic disappearance on the stage is a source of much amusement. Irish Times (19 January 1923) 9/7
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:143(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 80(c)
mirth provoking
[Pantomime and Variety. / “Robinson Crusoe” at the Queen's] All the comedy parts were very well taken by sprightly comedians, Barrett McDonnell, as Will Atkins, a bold buccaneer, being quite a fearsome villain, and Stanley Granby and Frank Grant, in the respective parts of the skipper and mate of the “Saucy Sall”y, very strong both in song and patter. The Billy Crusoe of Jim Johnson was also mirth-provoking, and even more laughable was the Mrs. Crusoe of Gus Walker, a typical pantomime dame. Irish Times (19 January 1923) 9/7
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:143(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 80(d)
farmers' shoots
Rough Shooting. […] Hares and rabbit will both do a great deal of damage to young spring corn if allowed to increase at an enormous rate, as must happen if they are not shot regularly and extensively. Farmers' shoots can be arranged with this object in view, and this is a means of ensuring good relations between landlord and tenants. Irish Times (19 January 1923) 6/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:143(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 80(e)
rough —ing ~
Rough Shooting. Moreover, ground game provide a variation from shooting at winged game continuously. Where, again, there is a risk through the great increase of ground game of damaging crops, which is a very serious matter in an agricultural district, it is very necessary to keep the numbers down by periodically arranged shoots. Irish Times (19 January 1923) 6/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:143(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 80(f)
mixed bag Red
Rough Shooting. […] There are some estates where the ground is not suited to the preservation of game in the strict sense, or where no large bags can be made, which lend themselves to mixed or rough shooting. There are also cases where game such as pheasants or partridges are scarce, and where rabbits and hares are the only means of securing a good mixed bag. This sort of shooting is not to be despised, for it offers very good sport. Often on an estate where there are plenty of pheasants there cannot always be flushed, and it is then that a good show of rabbit makes up for the deficiency. Irish Times (19 January 1923) 6/6
N01 (VI.B.10): 80(g)
to flush pheasants
Rough Shooting. […] This sort of shooting is not to be despised, for it offers very good sport. Often on an estate where there are plenty of pheasants there cannot always be flushed, and it is then that a good show of rabbit makes up for the deficiency. Irish Times (19 January 1923) 6/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:143(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 80(h)
ground game
Rough Shooting. […] Moreover, ground game provide a variation from shooting at winged game continuously. Where, again, there is a risk through the great increase of ground game of damaging crops, which is a very serious matter in an agricultural district, it is very necessary to keep the numbers down by periodically arranged shoots. Irish Times (19 January 1923) 6/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:143(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 80(i)
Tar's baggy slacks
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:143(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 80(j)
incest made crime 1908
Note: Legislation prohibiting incest was first enacted in England in 1908; theretofore it was not a crime under the common law but was punishable historically in the ecclesiastical courts.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:143(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 80(k)
331 days gestation
Note: Three hundred and thirty days: the period of gestation of the alpaca and the horse.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:143(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 80(l)
Bullwinkle Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 80(m)
Da[g]antie[r]e
Note: Possibly Maurice Darantiere, printer of Ulysses.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:143(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 81(a)
hip(s) name wap(s)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:143(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 81(b)
p. 11 slaver
Note: See Ulysses (Paris, 1922), page 11, line 22.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:144(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 81(c)
an accident occur is going / to commence
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:144(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 81(d)
We were too happy I knew / smthg wd happen (W)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:144(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 81(e)
it is not done (made)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:144(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 81(f)
house in darkness
Aaron half-opened his eyes, and writhed feverishly, as if his limbs could not be in the right place. Lilly mended the fire, and sat down to write. Then he got up and went downstairs to unfasten the street door, so that the doctor could walk up. The business people had gone from their various holes, all the lower part of the tall house was in darkness. D. H. Lawrence, Aaron's Rod, (1922) 107
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:144(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 81(g)
bailiwick Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 81(h)
rubber of hat under chin
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:144(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 81(i)
pawky
Note: Pawky: tricky, artful, sly, cunning, shrewd; esp. dryly humorous.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:144(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 81(j)
flummery Red
  • FW unlocated
Note: Flummery: a kind of food made by coagulation of wheatmeal or oatmeal; mere compliment; nonsense, humbug, empty trifling. See also: N01 (VI.B.10):096(k) and N03 (VI.B.3):037(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 81(k)
[poshiness]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:144(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 81(l)
logotypes neologism
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:144(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 81(m)
heard from him Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 82(a)
Master curriers ~
[DUBLIN LEATHER TRADE.] Only about sixty curriers found employment in Dublin in 1864 […] Mr. Roche, a master currier and tanner […] said:— “I remember when you could not get a house in Back lane (which is entirely occupied by tanners and curriers) Irish Times (23 December 1922) 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:144(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 82(b)
~ Back lane / —
[DUBLIN LEATHER TRADE.] Only about sixty curriers found employment in Dublin in 1864 […] Mr. Roche, a master currier and tanner […] said:— “I remember when you could not get a house in Back lane (which is entirely occupied by tanners and curriers) Irish Times (23 December 1922) 7/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 82(c)
14⁄xii halcyon / 28⁄xii (Kingfisher) days
[SOME CHRISTMAS TRADITIONS / […] / The “Halcyon” Days. / (By F.P.C.)] The “halcyon days,” […] were anciently the seven days preceeding and the seven days following December 21st […] Popular belief has it that by reason of the brooding of the “halcyon bird,” as the kingfisher is called, at this period the sea becomes calmy Irish Times (23 December 1922) 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:144(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 82(d)
a stolen kiss
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:145(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 82(e)
J Caesar, greatness his tragedy / — Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 82(f)
rescued from 7 ft of water Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 82(g)
Yes, she gasped / (simper)
Note: Cf. William Le Queux's Mademoiselle of Monte Carlo (1921) Ch. 5: “Is that Shapley Manor?” she asked. “I have a telegram for Mrs. Bond. Handed in at Nice at two twenty-five, received here at four twenty- eight. ‘To Bond, Shapley Manor, near Guild-ford. Yvonne shot by some unknown person while with Hugh. In grave danger.--S.’ That is the message. Have you got it please?”
Mrs. Bond held her breath.
“Yes,” she gasped. “Anything else?”
”No, madam,” replied the telephone operator at the Guildford Post Office. “Nothing else. I will forward the duplicate by post.”
And she switched off.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:145(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 82(h)
ages & ages
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:145(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 82(i)
incinerating chamber
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:145(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 82(j)
pale blue pall
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:145(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 82(k)
Bengali (Hades)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:145(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 82(l)
axed (dismissed) C.S Red
Note: See also N14 (VI.B.7):220(c).
N01 (VI.B.10): 83(a)
ring down
Note: To ring down: to direct the raising or lowering of a theatre curtain by way of ringing a bell.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:145(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 83(b)
spike (casual ward) ~
The real gipsy still lights a wood fire within his blanket tent and huddles up by the embers in the blinding fumes. Very few vagrants sleep out during the winter months. They resort to the “spike” or casual ward when they have not enough coppers to pay for a “doss” in the common lodging house. Daily Mail (28 December 1922) 6/5 [GIPSIES IN WINTER.]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:145(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 83(c)
~ Romanichel ~
But the Romanichal, the true-bred gipsy, scorns the “mumpers” or road-folk who seek cover at night under a house-roof. Daily Mail (28 December 1922) 6/5 [GIPSIES IN WINTER.]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:145(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 83(d)
mumper roadfolk who shelter Red
But the Romanichal, the true-bred gipsy, scorns the “mumpers” or road-folk who seek cover at night under a house-roof. Daily Mail (28 December 1922) 6/5 [GIPSIES IN WINTER.]
N01 (VI.B.10): 83(e)
hedgecreeper .
[GIPSIES IN WINTER.] The real gipsy is clean in his habits, and has a contempt for the unwashed “hedge-creeper” or “mumper.” Daily Mail (28 December 1922) 6/5
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 83(f)
gorgios (Gentiles) Red
[GIPSIES IN WINTER.] At the time of the first Movable Dwellings Bill the gipsies of the true caste complained that the “giorgios” or “Gentiles” persisted in classing all kinds of tramps and beggars of the high road as “gipsies.” Daily Mail (28 December 1922) 6/5
N01 (VI.B.10): 83(g)
tan (tent) ~ Red
[GIPSIES IN WINTER.] It is part of his racial pride that makes the Romanichal reluctant to abandon the tawny tent in winter for a house. I have heard an old gipsy say that when lying convalescent in a hospital he “was terribly afeared that the ceiling might come down on him.” He was glad to get back to “the old tan” (tent) and put kosht (wood) on the yog (fire) and “feel comfortable-like again.” Daily Mail (28 December 1922) 6/5
N01 (VI.B.10): 83(h)
~ kosht (wood) ~
[GIPSIES IN WINTER.] It is part of his racial pride that makes the Romanichal reluctant to abandon the tawny tent in winter for a house. I have heard an old gipsy say that when lying convalescent in a hospital he “was terribly afeared that the ceiling might come down on him.” He was glad to get back to “the old tan” (tent) and put kosht (wood) on the yog (fire) and “feel comfortable-like again.” Daily Mail (28 December 1922) 6/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:145(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 83(i)
~ yog (fire)
[GIPSIES IN WINTER.] It is part of his racial pride that makes the Romanichal reluctant to abandon the tawny tent in winter for a house. I have heard an old gipsy say that when lying convalescent in a hospital he “was terribly afeared that the ceiling might come down on him.” He was glad to get back to “the old tan” (tent) and put kosht (wood) on the yog (fire) and “feel comfortable-like again.” Daily Mail (28 December 1922) 6/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:145(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 83(j)
W's money - in stockings, / hank, hat, bag, pettipocket, / corsage -VI.C.05.145(n)
[HER MONEY. By BERYL SAGE.] “Where can I safely carry money?” is a problem which women have vainly endeavoured to solve. For the most part they place faith in the handbag, though every day yields a harvest of bags garnered by professional thieves. […] There are the hair, the crown of the hat, the shoes and gloves. […] The ancient method of tying up money in the corner of a handkerchief still has its adherents, though where to carry the handkerchief constitutes a problem in itself. The equally old expedient of a pocket in the petticoat has also its defenders, though this device is not at all safe. […] The corsage is one of the most ancient receptacles for ready cash and small articles of jewellery […] But all these devices aim only at safeguarding money. Convenience is not considered. Yet convenience is a factor of the problem. If the handbag, with its manifest disadvantages, is taboo where shall a woman carry her money? Daily Mail (28 December 1922) 6/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:145(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 83(k)
sealion (eared seal)
[SEA LION ASHORE] A 12 years-old boy and a sea lion, or eared seal, were the principal actors on the beach at Heacham, near Hunstanton, Norfolk, during the week-end. Daily Mail (27 December 1922) 5/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:145(o)
N01 (VI.B.10): 83(l)
terrier contains seal
[SEA LION ASHORE] […] The boy, Robert Collaby, was exercising his horse, accompanied by a terrier. He was riding close to the water's edge when a large sea lion came ashore. The animal bared its teeth and growled, causing the pony to shy. The terrier tried to “contain” the sea lion while Collaby galloped to fetch his gun, but when he got back the sea lion had vanished. Daily Mail (27 December 1922) 5/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:146(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 83(m)
give him the raspberry Red
Note: To be given the raspberry [slang]: to be dismissed, brushed aside.
N01 (VI.B.10): 83(n)
brassard (armlet)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:146(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 83(o)
convert a try (rugby)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:146(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 84(a)
Chinese oath (blow out / lighted match
[COCAINE TRAFFIC IN WEST END. / […] / NOVEL FORM OF OATH. / LIGHTED MATCH BLOWN OUT BEFORE EVIDENCE.] Fong was […] called. He said that he belonged to the “Chinese” religion. The Magistrate.—What oath is binding on him? […] The interpreter said a match should be lighted and blown out, and this form of oath was administered. Evening Standard (13 November 1922) 6/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:146(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 84(b)
ironing fat
[BEAUTY'S TORTURE CHAMBER […] / By Leonie Duprez] One of London's most noted beauties has a “human repair shop” all her own […] The most extraordinary of all is a machine that irons and dissolves fat […] Daily Sketch (23 December 1922) 13/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:146(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 84(c)
reducing cream
[BEAUTY'S TORTURE CHAMBER […] / By Leonie Duprez] One of London's most noted beauties has a “human repair shop” all her own […] then she lies on the hard couch while her masseuse pummels her and rubs her with a reducing cream. Daily Sketch (23 December 1922) 13/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:146(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 84(d)
elect. light boxbath
[BEAUTY'S TORTURE CHAMBER […] / By Leonie Duprez] One of London's most noted beauties has a “human repair shop” all her own […] The most extraordinary of all is a machine that irons and dissolves fat […] When she has stood as much as possible of the ironing business she steps into the electric light box bath […] then she lies on the hard couch while her masseuse pummels her and rubs her with a reducing cream. Daily Sketch (23 December 1922) 13/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:146(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 84(e)
4 lengths of sherry
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:146(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 84(f)
retch off Red
“Yes, perhaps. But no. What I can't stand is chords, you know: harmonies. A number of sounds all sounding together. It just makes me ill. It makes me feel so sick.”

“What — do you want discords? — dissonances?”

“No”,they are nearly as bad. No, it's just when any number of musical notes, different notes, come together, harmonies or discords. Even a single chord struck on the piano. It makes me feel sick. I just feel as if I should retch. Isn't it strange? Of course, I don't tell Manfredi. It would be too cruel to him. It would cut his life in two.

D. H. Lawrence, Aaron's Rod, (1922) possibly 239
N01 (VI.B.10): 84(g)
luggage stool ~
Argyle shoved the last chair — it was a luggage stool — through the window. D. H. Lawrence, Aaron's Rod, (1922) 250
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:146(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 84(h)
cheep (chicks) Red
He stretched his blue eyes so that the whites showed all round, and grinned a wide, gnome-like grin.

“You made that start long ago, my dear fellow. Don't play the ingenue with me, you know it won't work. Say when, my man, say when!”

“Yes, when,” said Del Torre. “When did I make that start, then?”

“At some unmentionably young age. Chickens such as you soon learn to cheep.

“Chickens such as I soon learn to cheap,” repeated Del Torre, pleased with the verbal play. “What is cheap, please? What is TO CHEAP?”

“Cheep! Cheep!” squeaked Argyle, making a face at the little Italian, who was perched on one strap of the luggage-stool.

D. H. Lawrence, Aaron's Rod, (1922) 250f
N01 (VI.B.10): 84(i)
answered very similarly Blue
She must be loved and adored, and above all, obeyed, particularly in her sex desire. There she must not be thwarted, or she becomes a devil. And if she is obeyed, she becomes a misunderstood woman with nerves, looking round for the next man whom she can bring under. So it is.”

“Well,” said Lilly. “And then what?”

“Nay,” interrupted Aaron. “But do you think it's true what he says? Have you found it like that? You're married. Has your experience been different, or the same?”

“What was yours?” asked Lilly.

“Mine was the same. Mine was the same, if ever it was,” said Aaron.

“And mine was extremely similar,” said Argyle with a grimace.

D. H. Lawrence, Aaron's Rod, (1922) 275
N01 (VI.B.10): 84(j)
persimmon (cacci)
The second wine was a gold-coloured Moselle, very soft and rich and beautiful. She drank this with pleasure, as one who understands. And for dessert there was a dish of cacchi—that orange-coloured, pulpy Japanese fruit—persimmons. Aaron had never eaten these before. Soft, almost slimy, of a wonderful colour, and of a flavour that had sunk from harsh astringency down to that first decay-sweetness which is all autumn-rich. The Marchese loved them, and scooped them out with his spoon. But she ate none. D. H. Lawrence, Aaron's Rod, (1922) 263
Note: Diospyros kaki, or Japanese persimmon: included in most accounts of persimmon.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:146(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 84(k)
men is [grown / evll] (W)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:146(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 85(a)
I wish I cd get rid of / them —
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:146(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 85(b)
gallipots
Note: gallipot: a small earthen glazed pot, esp. one used by apothecaries for ointments; jocularly, an apothecary.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:147(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 85(c)
pep
Note: pep (pepper), vigour.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:147(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 85(d)
repartee Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 85(e)
unscrew stub / a refill threaded
Note: This is from a Colgate advertisement, similar to one featured on the last page (p.130) of the January 1921 issue of Popular Science: Colgate “Handy Grip” - patented 1917 - Shaving Stick / “Just What I Want” / No matter where you live or where you travel, it will be easy to get Colgate's “Handy Grip” and “Refill” Shaving Stick. Even in the little out of the way town, the general storekeeper will be ready to supply your demand for a “Handy Grip”. / Interested in mechanics, you will appreciate this ingenious device. The base of the soap itself is threaded. It thus screws into the metal “Handy Grip”. When the soap finally wears down you unscrew the stub, and screw in a “Refill” — like putting a new electric bulb in a socket.
The ad appeared variously, e.g. in the Strand Magazine issue of March 1922.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:147(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 85(f)
hip-bath (semicupio) Brown
The Italian Minister, another of our colleagues, was supposed to be a confirmed bachelor and not very meticulous in his personal habits. Great excitement was created, therefore, when he once returned from leave in a cab, on the top of which figured a shining new hip-bath, whilst inside sat a lady, young and of high degree, whom he had married during his visit home. Lady Susan Townley, Indiscretions, (1922) 35
Note: Latin semicupium — a bath in which only one's legs and hips are covered, a hip bath. See also N03 (VI.B.3):080(b).
N01 (VI.B.10): 85(g)
my belly no belong sick
“Oh! Chang San,” I ejaculated, shocked at his intruding upon my guests with this allusion to a stomach trouble, apparently contracted since lunchtime, when he had seemed quite well. “Go to bed at once. I'll send daifoo to you,” and I gently pushed him towards the door.

But he held his ground. “My belly no belong sick,” he insisted. “Wall belly all wrong inside!” And he pointed to the electric bell, which I then realized was out of order and wanted re-charging!.

Lady Susan Townley, Indiscretions, (1922) 85
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:147(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 85(h)
Distinguished & aged Wu, what / is yr honourable age / I have wasted 50 yr ~
The ceremonial form of Chinese conversation always amused me. It abounded in flowery compliments and quaint self-depreciatory remarks, as shown by the following questions and answers which invariably passed between us, through the intermediary, of course, of the interpreter:

I: Distinguished and aged Wu, what is your honourable age?

He: Alas, honourable lady, I have wasted fifty years!

Lady Susan Townley, Indiscretions, (1922) 103
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:147(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 86(a)
~ how many worthy young gentlemen / sons have you. / My fate is beggarly. 1 poor / bug ~
The ceremonial form of Chinese conversation always amused me. […]

I: How many worthy young gentleman sons have you?

He: My Fate is beggarly; I have but one little bug.

Lady Susan Townley, Indiscretions, (1922) 103
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:147(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 86(b)
~ How is yr Excellency favoured / wife / The foolish one of the family / is well Not cancelled
The ceremonial form of Chinese conversation always amused me. […]

I: How is Your Excellency's favoured wife?

He: Thank you, madam! The foolish one of the family is well.

Lady Susan Townley, Indiscretions, (1922) 103
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:147(k), VI.C.05:148(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 86(c)
the scene shuts
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:148(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 86(d)
lectionary (church / book)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:148(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 86(e)
discussing Boer war / S D said he had / read Motley's Rise of / Dutch Republic / (had read title)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:148(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 86(f)
Thos Shelton / tachyography
Note: Thomas Shelton was the inventor of the term “tachygraphy” in the title of a book published 1637-8: Tachygraphy. The most exact and compendious method of Shorthand Swift Writing.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:148(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 87(a)
shorthand of Pepys
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:148(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 87(b)
sat on a tuffet
Note: Nursery rhyme: Little Miss Muffet / Sat on a tuffet [footstool, or hassock], / Eating her curds and whey; / There came a big spider, / Who sat down beside her / And frightened Miss Muffet away.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:148(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 87(c)
the cock thrustened
Note: Herod and the Cock (An English Christmas Carol): There was a star in David's land, / So bright it did appear / Into King Herod's chamber, / And brightly it shined there.
King Herod soon espied it, / And told the king on high / A princely babe was born that night / No king could e'er destroy.
“If this be true”, King Herod said, / “As thou hast told to me, / This roasted cock that lies in the dish / Shall crow full fences three.”
The cock soon thrustened and feathered well / By the work of God's own hand, / And he did crow full fences three / In the dish where he did stand.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:148(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 87(d)
spelch (wood)
He felt at once for his flute. But his trampled, torn coat had no flute in its pocket. He pushed and struggled, caught sight of a section, and picked it up. But it was split right down, two silver stops were torn out, and a long thin spelch of wood was curiously torn off. He looked at it, and his heart stood still. No need to look for the rest. D. H. Lawrence, Aaron's Rod, (1922) 296
Note: spelch (Scottish): a splinter, a chip of wood.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:148(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 87(e)
[representation of line]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:148(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 87(f)
I'd like to see his / moustache on fire (Pen)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:149(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 87(g)
it doesn't follow —
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:149(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 87(h)
caterpillar in pupal state
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:149(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 87(i)
surcoat
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:149(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 87(j)
one rater (yacht)
Note: rater: term used in combination with various numbers to denote the tonnage of yachts.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:149(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 88(a)
act drop
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:149(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 88(b)
O laus! Red
  • FW unlocated
Note: See also: N04 (VI.B.25):160(m) and N08 (VI.B.6):071(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 88(c)
who died following pneumonia
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:149(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 88(d)
sew up swabs (surgery)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:149(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 88(e)
in his true colours Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 88(f)
age before honesty / (LW)
Note: Possibly Lillian Wallace, who is credited with suggesting the last word of Ulysses.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:149(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 88(g)
slither of glass
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:149(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 88(h)
stampage (mint)
[THE HUMBLE PENNY. By A BANKER] The Royal Mint announced last week that as there were too many copper coins in circulation, those of the “uncrowned Queen Victoria” stampage were to be withdrawn. Daily Mail (2 January 1923) 6/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:149(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 88(i)
Silent Death / (tramp steamer) Red
Note: Tramp: a cargo vessel, esp. a steamship, which does not trade regularly between fixed ports, but takes cargoes wherever obtainable and for any port. The expression “silent death” was used of vessels that forged ahead regardless of the safety of others.
N01 (VI.B.10): 88(j)
soldier's wind
Note: Soldier's wind: a wind that blows so that the ships could lie either way, so as to run out or into the harbour.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:149(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 89(a)
flint, chert, obsidian / (stone age) ~
[OLDEST IN THE WORLD. By AN ANTIQUARY] The oldest manufactured articles in the world are probably some chipped stones found on the Kentish Weald. […] Knives, axes, hammers, scrapers, spearheads, arrowheads, even awls for piercing skin and roughly notched saws for cutting bone were made of flint or chert or obsidian—any stone that would chip to a cutting edge hard enough to stand wear. Daily Mail (2 January 1923) 6/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:150(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 89(b)
~ eoliths of Kentish weald ~ Red
[OLDEST IN THE WORLD. By AN ANTIQUARY] The oldest manufactured articles in the world are probably some chipped stones found on the Kentish Weald. […] Knives, axes, hammers, scrapers, spearheads, arrowheads, even awls for piercing skin and roughly notched saws for cutting bone were made of flint or chert or obsidian—any stone that would chip to a cutting edge hard enough to stand wear. […] But it is a curious and significant thing that these eoliths all “come to the hand,” as a workman would say. When one is held in the hand so that it fits most comfortably to the grasp of palm and fingers, the chipped edge will be found in the right place for striking a blow with the maximum effect, and this is hardly likely to be accidental. Daily Mail (2 January 1923) 6/5
N01 (VI.B.10): 89(c)
~ tools come to the hand / (fit)
[OLDEST IN THE WORLD. By AN ANTIQUARY] The oldest manufactured articles in the world are probably some chipped stones found on the Kentish Weald. […] Knives, axes, hammers, scrapers, spearheads, arrowheads, even awls for piercing skin and roughly notched saws for cutting bone were made of flint or chert or obsidian—any stone that would chip to a cutting edge hard enough to stand wear. […] But it is a curious and significant thing that these eoliths all “come to the hand,” as a workman would say. When one is held in the hand so that it fits most comfortably to the grasp of palm and fingers, the chipped edge will be found in the right place for striking a blow with the maximum effect, and this is hardly likely to be accidental. Daily Mail (2 January 1923) 6/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:150(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 89(d)
birdangels
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:150(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 89(e)
doeskin
What Paris is Wearing […] Brown doeskin belts are clouté with steel and wonderfully self-fringed. Daily Mail (2 January 1923) 11/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:150(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 89(f)
dash tears away
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:150(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 89(g)
as at present arranged
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:150(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 89(h)
hip toters (drink NY)
Note: Hip flask toters [U S A: prohibition]: those who carried on their person a flask of whisky.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:150(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 89(i)
deponent saith not
[Resignation of Trinity's Chief Steward] Carey [aka Skin-the-Goat] was in Kilmainham for his own safety […] his chief amusement was playing handball—who were his fellow-players, if any, deponent saith not. Irish Times (30 December 1922) 9/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:150(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 89(j)
gives furiously to think
[Resignation of Trinity's Chief Steward] It gave the interviewer furiously to think when he learned that Constable Marshall was on duty in Green street […] at the time of the '67 Rising. Irish Times (30 December 1922) 9/2
Note: See also N01 (VI.B.10):110(l).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:150(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 89(k)
rub shoulders with Red
[Resignation of Trinity's Chief Steward] We have kept Mr. Marshall's acquaintance with Royalty to the last. He rubbed shoulders (literally) with them on various occasions. Irish Times (30 December 1922) 9/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 90(a)
wigeon ~
[BIRD LIFE IN DUBLIN BAY. / PART II.—THE DUCKS.] The air sparkles above the Merrion sands […] Well within sight of the moving train sit a great company of wigeon [duck] Irish Times (30 December 1922) 9/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:150(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 90(b)
~ mallard (wild duck) ~ Darkred
[BIRD LIFE IN DUBLIN BAY. / PART II.—THE DUCKS.] Of ducks that breed in Ireland, the wild duck or mallard is by far the most numerous Irish Times (30 December 1922) 9/5
N01 (VI.B.10): 90(c)
~ paddlings of —
[BIRD LIFE IN DUBLIN BAY. / PART II.—THE DUCKS.] Sometimes “paddlings” of duck can be seen far out in the bay […] The scoters seldom come in near the shore […] The scaup is another typical sea duck […] The male goldeneye is easy to distinguish from the white patch on his cheek […] Occasionally a rarer bird like the velvet scoter or smew will appear […] and once or twice even that dweller in the far North, the eider d[u]ck has paid us a fleeting visit Irish Times (30 December 1922) 9/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:150(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 90(d)
~ scoter, scaup, smew, ~
[BIRD LIFE IN DUBLIN BAY. / PART II.—THE DUCKS.] Sometimes “paddlings” of duck can be seen far out in the bay […] The scoters seldom come in near the shore […] The scaup is another typical sea duck […] The male goldeneye is easy to distinguish from the white patch on his cheek […] Occasionally a rarer bird like the velvet scoter or [the] smew will appear […] and once or twice even that dweller in the far North, the eider d[u]ck has paid us a fleeting visit Irish Times (30 December 1922) 9/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:150(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 90(e)
~ goldeneye, eider duck
[BIRD LIFE IN DUBLIN BAY. / PART II.—THE DUCKS.] Sometimes “paddlings” of duck can be seen far out in the bay […] The scoters seldom come in near the shore […] The scaup is another typical sea duck […] The male goldeneye is easy to distinguish from the white patch on his cheek […] Occasionally a rarer bird like the velvet scoter or smew will appear […] and once or twice even that dweller in the far North, the eider d[u]ck has paid us a fleeting visit Irish Times (30 December 1922) 9/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:150(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 90(f)
Fr King to put a fowl / in every man's pot Brown
[RUSSIAN ART AND CULTURE] Just as the French King's ambition was to place a fowl in every man's pot, so does Lenin hope to place an electric lamp on every man's table. Irish Times (30 December 1922) 9/6
N01 (VI.B.10): 90(g)
plus fours (shoes) Blue
Note: Plus-fours: a distinctive style of long, wide knickerbockers, or a suit having such knickerbockers, originally much worn by golfers and associated with outdoor pursuits. The expression derives from the extra four inches added to the length of ordinary knickerbockers. Not shoes.
N01 (VI.B.10): 90(h)
sprigged waistcoat Brown
Note: Sprigged: decorated with designs resembling sprigs (twigs).
N01 (VI.B.10): 90(i)
wanted none other
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:150(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 90(j)
cup tie
Note: Cup-tie: a match or contest between the victors in previous contests played for a trophy (cup).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:151(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 90(k)
goals in plenty
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:151(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 90(l)
title (Middle Age INRI)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:151(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 90(m)
title (J.L. Sullivan)
Note: John L. Sullivan (1858-1918), professional pugilist. Some dispute his World Heavyweight Championship, seeing him as U.S. champion only.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:151(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 91(a)
a bat flitters Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 91(b)
fly for his life Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 91(c)
cauliflower (= brains / of a cabbage)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:151(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 91(d)
train des maris
Note: French train des maris: train for husbands.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:151(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 91(e)
behaved in a gentlemanly manner Blue
N01 (VI.B.10): 91(f)
rest her shins .
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 91(g)
botulism (coma) Green
  • FW unlocated
Botulism / Suspected Cause of Man's Death. Daily Mail (3 January 1923) 5/4
Note: See also: N12 (VI.B.14):014(l) for FW 170.30.
N01 (VI.B.10): 91(h)
switchroom (telephone) .
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 91(i)
galleyknife
N01 (VI.B.10): 91(j)
I deserve shooting
Note: That is, to be shot.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:151(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 91(k)
gashed
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:151(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 92(a)
little stranger Brown
My mother was sitting by the fire, but poorly in health, and very low in spirits, looking at it through her tears, and desponding heavily about herself and the fatherless little stranger [newborn child], who was already welcomed by some grosses of prophetic pins in a drawer upstairs, to a world not at all excited on the subject of his arrival. Charles Dickens, David Copperfield (ed. unknown) Chapter 1
N01 (VI.B.10): 92(b)
Eurasian
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 92(c)
shingles ~ Red
Note: Herpes is the name given to a group of virus diseases, divided into ‘herpes simplex’ and ‘herpes zoster’; the latter causes shingles.
N01 (VI.B.10): 92(d)
~ herpes coster
Note: Herpes is the name given to a group of virus diseases, divided into ‘herpes simplex’ and ‘herpes zoster’; the latter causes shingles.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:151(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 92(e)
losses
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:151(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 92(f)
on duty : Robert / replenishes his briar .
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 92(g)
deranged
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:151(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 92(h)
kick his reflection (soul) / — — shadow / — — form (bed)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:151(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 92(i)
LB meets self
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:152(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 92(j)
can't kill 1 pig / coram others
[Killed Pig in Sight of Another.] At Folkestone Police Court to-day, a slaughterman, Alfred Duke, and two assistants, Robt. Allen and Henry Winder, were summoned under a by-law for killing one animal in the sight of another. / The animals were pigs, and the defense was that one pig ran into the slaughterhouse while the other pig was being slaughtered. / The Bench fined each defendant 6s.8d. Evening Standard (2 January 1923) 10/2
Note: Latin coram: among.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:152(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 93(a)
funeral took place (obit)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:152(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 93(b)
papersqueeze Red
  • FW unlocated
N01 (VI.B.10): 93(c)
4th wall (stage) Red
  • FW unlocated
Note: Not found in King Lear at Hordle, but it might be inspired by the graphic stage design preceding each act of the play.
N01 (VI.B.10): 93(d)
caddis (in mane)
56.—ANTHONY WOODS

On my seventh birthday

I stood on the Bridge to watch Farmer South's teams go by:

Beautiful horses, well-fed and coal-black,

With their brass harness shining in the sun

And coloured caddis [decorations] in their manes and tails.

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 71
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:152(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 93(e)
wankling ~
57.—DAVID COULSON

When I was learning my trade at the pig-killing

Not one cottage in Fletton but had two or three ready,

And the killers worked all Feast-week without ever stopping.

Pigs was pigs in them days;

None of your wankling creatures that slip sideways through the fence,

But good forty-stoners, fit for a king.

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 72
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:152(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 93(f)
~ pigs on the cratches
57.—DAVID COULSON

How it brings back the smell of fresh pork and the loud cries of dying pigs.

I remember, when I was only that high,

Seeing them scraped and pale on the cratches

All clean and white and beautiful,

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 72
Note: Cratch: a movable rack for feeding beasts out of doors.
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 93(g)
flummuxed Red
[59.—HARRY HEMSLEY]

We were completely flummuxed:

Both of us looking as soft as Silly Sam,

Not even knowing how to work a bank account:

Hundreds of pounds we've lost in three months,

To make matters worse he left a will

Making all to mother for her lifetime.

That was a bitter blow!

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 75
Note: flummoxed: bewildered, confused.
N01 (VI.B.10): 93(h)
spliced (sposà) Red

Susan: It's your job: you know it is.

Henry: It's a housekeeper's job.

Susan: Are you going to torment me all night, you great brute?

Henry: You see, my dear, all these little things ought to be settled before a couple gets spliced, but they never think about them then—at least the fellow doesn't—and after that, it's too late. What about the fire, now?

Bernard Gilbert, King Lear at Hordle, (1922) 145 (from Gone For Good, Susan trying to regain entrance in the house she left after a marital crisis three weeks earlier, husband Henry trying to make a bargain out of it)
Note: It. sposà: married.
N01 (VI.B.10): 93(i)
buy on agistment
[61.—JOHN OVERTON]

We didn't really need a best bedroom;

I told Maud so, and wish I'd held out;

It's all very well,

But I'm beginning to look the wrong way round.

Instead of buying bullocks I've had to take some of

Mr Todd's on agistment,

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 78-79
Note: Agistment: such profit as is made upon the pasturing of another's cattle, extended to any rate or charge levied upon the owner or occupier of pasture lands.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:152(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 93(j)
streamside
[A COUNTRYMAN'S DIARY] On the Marsh / January 4.— The streamside pollard, the eel-fisher's hut […] are seen in the water as in a looking-glass this morning. Daily Mail (3 January 1923) 6/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:152(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 93(k)
buttery hatch Red
[WAYSIDE WINES. By A. BONNETT LAIRD.] Friends have travelled far to taste, with me, the nut-brown Audit, which flows from the buttery-hatch of Trinity, as precious as the learning that blossoms in her stately courts. Daily Mail (5 January 1923) 6/5
Note: ‘hatch’ is not crossed through.
N01 (VI.B.10): 93(l)
rhubarb cider Red
[WAYSIDE WINES. By A. BONNETT LAIRD.] Who can distill good drink—and strong at that—from rhubarb […] I do not mean rhubarb cider, for I have found a place for that. Daily Mail (5 January 1923) 6/5
N01 (VI.B.10): 93(m)
cowslip wine .
[WAYSIDE WINES. By A. BONNETT LAIRD.] Current wine! Who has home-made current wine to sell? Who knows the pleasant soft brew that ancient cottagers used to make from cowslip flowers? Daily Mail (5 January 1923) 6/5
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 93(n)
drug addicts Brown
  • FW unlocated
Note: See also: N01 (VI.B.10):036(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 94(a)
Sara Fhailer, Staleen / Co Meath
[Under “DEATHS”] FHAILER-January 1, 1923, at Staleen, Co. Meath, Sarah Elisabeth Fhailer Irish Times (3 January 1923) 1/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:152(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 94(b)
a bertha of lace .
Round the shoulder line a bertha of lace would disguise any ugly signs of “bonyness,” and would suit almost any young fresh-complexioned girl. Irish Times (3 January 1923) 2/5
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 94(c)
de mortuis nil nisi bonum / nothing but bones in dead
[concerning “quaint and curious” examination answers] Most of us would be inclined to award full marks to this young rationalist, and not less to that other budding materialist who translated de mortuis nil nisi bonum” as, “There's nothing but bones in the dead.” Irish Times (3 January 1923) 4/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:152(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 94(d)
forget me-not / — us-not (pl) Brown
[about “quaint and curious” examination answers] What should be said of the child who gave, as the plural of “forget-me-not,” “forget-us-not?” […] One young genius, mindful, perhaps, of a certain type of newspaper editorial, declared that “letters in sloping print are hysterics.” […] Wisdom is not always absent, as witness the boy who described teaching as a “sedimentary profession,” Irish Times (3 January 1923) 4/5
N01 (VI.B.10): 94(e)
letters slope — hysterics
[about “quaint and curious” examination answers] One young genius, mindful, perhaps, of a certain type of newspaper editorial, declared that “letters in sloping print are hysterics.” Irish Times (3 January 1923) 4/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:152(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 94(f)
sedimentary profession
[about “quaint and curious” examination answers] Wisdom is not always absent, as witness the boy who described teaching as a “sedimentary profession,” Irish Times (3 January 1923) 4/5
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 94(g)
flittermouse
[letter to the editor] I have several times had experience of the fact that it is the finer and sharper ear that fails, and the inferior ear (for common sounds) that catches the “short, shrill shriek” of the passing flittermouse [bat]. Irish Times (3 January 1923) 6/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:152(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 94(h)
Leisler's bat
[letter to the editor] […] The largest of our Irish bats —known as Leisler's bat—possesses a peculiarly strong voice Irish Times (3 January 1923) 6/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:152(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 94(i)
7 sorts in I
[letter to the editor] […] There are, however, so many different kinds of bats (even in Ireland we have seven), with voices of different degrees of strength Irish Times (3 January 1923) 6/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:153(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 94(j)
Daubenton
[letter to the editor] […] There are other kinds of bats—Daubenton's, for example—which usually seem to fly quite silently Irish Times (3 January 1923) 6/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:153(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 94(k)
lifelong friend
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 94(l)
moneyback principle
[advertis3ment for Alka Saltrates] Complete satisfaction is guaranteed or money back immediately and without question. Irish Times (3 January 1923) 7/7
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 95(a)
to haze (to rag)
Note: Hazing: a coarse form of initiation (U.S. freshmen)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:153(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 95(b)
wild as wild Red
[64.—WIDOW HEMSLEY]

Those Keys are a bankrupt crew,

Drinking, card-playing, and wild as wild;

If Harry gets into their hands he'll be lost—

Poor misguided boy—

He should trust to his mother.

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 83
N01 (VI.B.10): 95(c)
chunter
[66.—INSPECTOR DANIELS]

Things aren't what they were in Fletton;

Atkin and Moller Holmes and Makins are upsetting everything;

They're not respectful and always ready to chunter,

So that I shall have to serve a summons on Mr Coote :

I daren't send my fool of a constable;

I'll take it round myself to-night and explain.

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 92
Note: Chunter: to grumble.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:153(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 95(d)
fauce ~
[70.—SAMUEL WADDY]

Everybody knows Challands is over fauce,

But he was such a big ugly chap that nobody stood up to him:

Fancy him being a pulk!

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 95-96
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:153(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 95(e)
pulk
[70.—SAMUEL WADDY]

Everybody knows Challands is over fauce,

But he was such a big ugly chap that nobody stood up to him:

Fancy him being a pulk!

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 95-96
Note: OED gives three distinct senses for “pulk”. Without the source or context it is unclear which applies to this entry. 1. A small pond. 2. An obsolete dialect term for a chest of drawers. 3. A regiment of Cossacks.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:153(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 95(f)
7 card nap ~
[73.—WALLACE RUSTON]

Many a pleasant hour have I spent in their low-roofed parlours,

Playing dominoes or darts or seven-card nap.

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 99
Note: Nap: a card game (players dealt 5 cards).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:153(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 95(g)
carry another drop Red
[73.—WALLACE RUSTON]

Many a pleasant hour have I spent in their low-roofed parlours,

Playing dominoes or darts or seven-card nap.

When you think you couldn't carry another drop

A walk in the fresh air brings you round again.

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 99
N01 (VI.B.10): 95(h)
whizzling
[73a.—WALLACE RUSTON (cont.)]

It's been a freezing hard all day

With gusts of rain and hail,

And now the snow is whizzling down,

The window's turning pale;

Old Mother Goose has shook her gown :

The wind roars down the chimney.

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 100
Note: Whizzling: whistling.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:153(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 95(i)
drive me scranny
[78.—ABEL SNEATH]

It's all very well for Martha to talk about the cash in hand:

What's cash if you can't turn it into stock?

Besides which when I'd paid everybody and took this shop there was precious little left.

Hides will drive me scranny before he's done;

He's turning everything upside down and goes on like a madman;

You can overdo this craze for machinery, I say,

And some day he'll come a cropper;

I may not live to see it, but others will.

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 107
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:153(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 95(j)
drilled peas
[79.—CURTIS FULLERTON]

You wouldn't think there was a War on,

Or the Government was clamouring for us farmers to save the country,

When for walking across my new-drilled peas

And finding pheasants as thick as crows

And losing my temper and shooting one

I was fined five pounds at Quarter-Sessions.

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 109
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 95(k)
he wanted to speak (W)
[80.—VIOLET CHALLANDS]

I'm off now to take a lesson in driving our new car;

The man that's brought it from Bly is stopping a few days,

And he's quite nice when he washes his hands.

(I shall go shopping in Bly every day!)

P'raps we shall meet Lord Fitz;

I know he wants to speak.

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 109
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 95(l)
the strangler (pigs) / disease
[83.—BETTY WILLIAMSON]

I can cure headaches and other pains like she could,

Although it tires you out,

The power running from your fingers.

Any fool can charm warts

Or put a spell on boys to make 'em fall in love,

And farmers come for something to keep swine-fever or strangles away;

But the real business is letting folk think you can do whatever you want.

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 114
Note: Strangles is a disease usually associated with horses (but cf. OED: 1601 Holland Pliny xxvi. xv. II. 268 Sideritis hath a peculiar vertue for to cure swine of their squinsies or strangles).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:153(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 95(m)
splints (horses)
[84.—JEFF SHARPLES]

There used to be worse lives than a carrier's

When you'd plenty of passengers and parcels to Bly market;

So long as your horses didn't begin to cough or start splints

Or get stones in their feet or fall down and break their knees

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 114
Note: Splint is the name given to a form of tumour found on the legs of horses.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:153(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 95(n)
I lay Red
[85.—BLIND JOHNNY]

“Do try an orange, Mester,

They're good and cheap to-day;

I've selled no end this morning;

You'll find 'em nice, I lay.”

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 116
Note: ‘I lay’, meaning ‘I wager’.
N01 (VI.B.10): 95(o)
chitting potatoes
[87.—BANNISTER HIDES, JUNIOR]

I always did enjoy the Feast,

And now I'm eighteen and do a man's work Dad can't expect to keep me in:

I'm meeting Vi Challands at six;

She says we live like pigs 'coz we have meals in the kitchen with the servants,

But it's the handiest place.

She's stuck-up since she went to Eastbourne

And reckons we ought to use the Manor properly

Instead of chitting potatoes in the best rooms,

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 120-121
Note: OED: Sprouting, germination; spec. the process of allowing potatoes, etc., to sprout.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:153(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 96(a)
cocoanut shies
[87.—BANNISTER HIDES, JUNIOR]

I do love the Feast with its lights and three or four lots of music going in your ear

And all the folks from as far as Hordle with their families and dogs;

And the Circus and Pictures and cocoanut-shies and steam-roundabouts and peep-shows and boxing-booths and sweet-stalls;

Serving men and wagoners in their best clothes

And girls that tickle you with feathers and squirt water down your neck.

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 120-121
Note: Coconut shy: a fairground stall where, for some prize, one tries to dislodge standing coconuts with some harmless missile.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:169(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 96(b)
clunch (sly)
[88.—LENA AMBROSE]

I shall go crazy if this keeps on!

The last fortnight I've hardly had a wink of sleep;

He keeps letting out a bit at a time,

A word or two, and then a snore;

But I've pieced it all together

Except for the names—

He never mentions names—

And though I say “Yes” and “What” and nudge the pillow

He's just as clunch as when he's awake.

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 122-123
Note: clunch: lumpy, thickset, chunky.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:169(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 96(c)
to rantan (D's wife)
[89.—JACK KEY]

I've licked all the gipsies that come nigh Fletton

And should have smashed that bastard Waddy

If he hadn't sprung a dirty trick on me before I was rightly ready,

Jumping and dodging about like a monkey;

I'll monkey him!

What call had he to interfere when we was going to ran-tan Herbert Dobney's wife?

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 123
Note: Ran-tan: to make a din by banging pans and pots and singing raucously outside the door of the house of a wife-beater.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:153(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 96(d)
as recently as yesterday Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 96(e)
serving hatch
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:153(n)
N01 (VI.B.10): 96(f)
jigsaw puzzle Red
Note: The earliest OED example dates from 1909.
N01 (VI.B.10): 96(g)
it's this way Blue
N01 (VI.B.10): 96(h)
Kayoes (knocks out)
Note: See also: N01 (VI.B.10):036(i)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:153(o)
N01 (VI.B.10): 96(i)
Barabbas (I)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:153(p)
N01 (VI.B.10): 96(j)
thatchpegs ~

The only one I'm doubtful about is Emmanuel, who was always queer;

Instead of scaring crows for Mr Challands's father he used to measure the sun with thatch-pegs stuck in the ground,

And nearly died of bronchitis being out at night counting stars:

Who wants to know how many stars there be?

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 134
Note: Thatch-peg: a sharpened stick used to hold down straw in thatching.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:154(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 96(k)
~ flummery ~ Brown
  • FW unlocated
[96.—MARIA CREASEY]

Bess is barmaid at Doncaster, Susan's doing well in a shell-factory, Mary's a nurse, and Jane's a cook in Bly:

She will try to help me at the Feast,

But I can't do with any one fussing in my kitchen:

I made frummety before she was thought of.

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 134-135
Note: See also N03 (VI.B.3):037(c) and N01 (VI.B.10):081(j). Flummery: a kind of food made by coagulation of wheatmeal or oatmeal; mere compliment; nonsense, humbug, empty trifling.
N01 (VI.B.10): 96(l)
work double tide
[96.—MARIA CREASEY]

All my bairns are here for the Feast

Excepting Walter, who can't get, being in the Civil Service

And working double-tides, account of the War.

Bernard Gilbert, Old England, (1921) 134-135
Note: To ‘work double tides’ means to work assiduously.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:154(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 96(m)
W changes when new / note strike her
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:154(c)

Page: N01 (VI.B.10) 97

[stubs of 2 missing pages at this point]

 
N01 (VI.B.10): 97(a)
She is a washout Red
  • FW unlocated
Note: See also: N08 (VI.B.6):033(f). Jorn Barger points out that two pages (96b and 96c) are missing at this point in the notebook.
N01 (VI.B.10): 97(b)
The world has / been unkind Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 97(c)
a ‘scrap’ (fight)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:154(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 97(d)
he had become a / raging fiend
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:154(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 97(e)
luggerman
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:154(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 97(f)
detrain
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:154(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 97(g)
entrain
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:154(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 97(h)
cement
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:154(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 97(i)
electric / cantilever system
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:154(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 97(j)
‘in the picture’
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:154(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 97(k)
gored petticoat
[How to Dress / Value of a Colour Scheme] One vastly important point about clothes is underclothes. A beautiful slim gown is going to be an utter failure if it is forced to appear over a bunchy camisole or a gored petticoat […] in the country wear your tweeds and woolly jumpers and brogues, or when, on the other hand, you are going to stay with smart town friends, collect all your very “gladdest” garments. Irish Times (6 January 1923) 3/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:154(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 97(l)
gladdest garments Red
[How to Dress / Value of a Colour Scheme] One vastly important point about clothes is underclothes. A beautiful slim gown is going to be an utter failure if it is forced to appear over a bunchy camisole or a gored petticoat […] in the country wear your tweeds and woolly jumpers and brogues, or when, on the other hand, you are going to stay with smart town friends, collect all your very “gladdest” garments. Irish Times (6 January 1923) 3/6
N01 (VI.B.10): 97(m)
Sheila Harnett Red
[County Kerry. / Death Sentence. / Several People Arrested.] Peter O'Connell, Acres, Annascaul, who was tried by a Military Court at Tralee last November on a charge of taking part in an attack on National troops near Farmer's Bridge, Tralee, and being in possession of gelignite and a revolver without authority, was convicted and sentenced to death. Notification has now been received at General Headquarters, Tralee, that the confirming authorities confirm the findings of the Court, but have not fixed the date of execution […] Ethel and Sheila Harnett, Ralina Ryan, Hannah Lyons, national teacher, Hannah O'Connell, Nora Healy, and Miss Randall, as well as two men named Connor, two named Callaghan, one named M'Carthy, and an unknown man have been brought to Tralee from Kenmare, and lodged in the country jail. Irish Times (6 January 1923) 5/6
N01 (VI.B.10): 98(a)
Hatton Gardens / (diamond merchants)
[London Letter. / […] / A Big Diamond.] Diamond merchants of Hatton Garden are depressed because nobody seems to want to buy a diamond weighing 44 carats, which has been named the Princess Mary Diamond. It has been put up to public auction, but had to be withdrawn at £11,200. Irish Times (6 January 1923) 8/8
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:154(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 98(b)
trolling rod ~
[After Pike on Corrib. / By L.H.] We took one stout trolling rod and a couple of large silver spoons, with wicked-looking eyes, and red on one side and wire traces. The latter are necessary for pike, as they have a habit of snapping gut traces with their teeth. Irish Times (6 January 1923) 9/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:155(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 98(c)
~ wire traces / gut —
[After Pike on Corrib. / By L.H.] We took one stout trolling rod and a couple of large silver spoons, with wicked looking eyes, and red on one side and wire traces. The latter are necessary for pike, as they have a habit of snapping gut traces with their teeth. Irish Times (6 January 1923) 9/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:155(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 98(d)
cist
[Concerning Cromlechs. / (By Vencedor.)] One will also find in the grounds of the Zoological Gardens a cist, or diminutive cromlech, which was discovered some time ago near Chapelizod, and within which was found a human skeleton. Irish Times (6 January 1923) 9/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:155(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 98(e)
forecaddies ~
[Gold Champions Long Ago. / […] / (By Wanderer.)] If the ball landed in decent country the forecaddie had to face towards the players and stroke his breast downward with his right hand. If the ball fell into a whin or bunker, the mishap was telegraphed by a downward stroke of the fist held out from the body. Irish Times (6 January 1923) 9/8
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:155(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 98(f)
~ whin
[Gold Champions Long Ago. / […] / (By Wanderer.)] If the ball landed in decent country the forecaddie had to face towards the players and stroke his breast downward with his right hand. If the ball fell into a whin or bunker, the mishap was telegraphed by a downward stroke of the fist held out from the body. Irish Times (6 January 1923) 9/8
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:155(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 98(g)
serve her horse
Note: This unit is ringed by a large, almost empty circle.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:155(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 99(a)
matchwood
Note: Match-wood: splintered wood.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:155(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 99(b)
uncoupled
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:155(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 99(c)
broad gauge
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:155(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 99(d)
maintenance allowance
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:155(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 99(e)
gave him soup
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:155(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 99(f)
with greatest generosity
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:155(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 99(g)
bankhigh
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:155(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 99(h)
choke pear
Note: choke-pear, a term applied to a pear suitable for making perry, or pear cider, but not for eating.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:155(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 99(i)
S Dunstan
Note: Three churches in London are named after this saint.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:156(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 99(j)
S Swithin ([Lunnon])
Note: St. Swithin's Church, now demolished, named after the ninth-century bishop of Winchester, stood on Cannon Street, London.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:156(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 99(k)
S Bostolph (Boston)
Note: Three London churches are named after the seventh-century abbot Saint Botolph.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:156(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 99(l)
S Mildred
Note: St. Mildred's Church, named after the seventh-century abbess, was built by Wren in Victoria Street, London. It was all but destroyed by bombing in 1941.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:156(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 99(m)
S Alphege
Note: St. Alphege's Church, on the south side of London Wall, was demolished in 1919, though the old porch survives as a chapel. Alphege (tenth-century) was bishop of Winchester, then archbishop of Canterbury.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:156(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 99(n)
S Ethelburga / S. Erconwald
Note: St. Ethelburga was a seventh-century abbess of Barking in Essex, and sister of Saint Erconwald, bishop of the East Saxons. Her church, on the north side of Saint Helen's Place, is one of the oldest in London.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:156(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 99(o)
S Bride (Fleet St Bridewell)
Note: St Bride's Church, Fleet Street, was named after the sixth-century Irish Saint Briget. Nearby are Bride Lane and Bridewell Lane. The name Bridewell came from a well near the Fleet (New Bridge Street), dedicated to St Bride, and was attached to a house built by Henry VIII. The Bridewell was a palace presented by Edward VI to the City authorities and afterwards used as a prison.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:156(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 99(q)
clutch
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:156(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 99(r)
topgear
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:156(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 100(a)
pointers (stars show polestar)
[PHOTOGRAPHING SHOOTING STARS. By Dr. W. J. S. LOCKYER. / Director of the Norman Lockyer Observatory] The Pole Star can easily be found as it is situated due north and lies on the prolongation of a line joining the two bright stars known as “the pointers,” in the constellation of the Great Bear or Plough. Daily Mail (10 January 1923) 6/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:156(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 100(b)
yaffle
Note: Local name for the green woodpecker.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:156(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 100(c)
haggis & whisky tot
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:156(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 100(d)
cockieleekie soup Red
  • FW unlocated
Recipes. COCK-A-LEEKIE Irish Times (15 January 1923) 2/5
Note: See also: SA (VI.A):0541(k), likely source for 210.08
N01 (VI.B.10): 100(e)
nothing under her hat / but hair & solid ivory Brown
N01 (VI.B.10): 100(f)
itemised
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:156(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 100(g)
slink lamb / crimmer — ~
[CRIMMER LAMB. / TRADE DESCRIPTION PUZZLE. / WEST END FIRM'S DEFENSE] At previous hearings it was alleged that a coat sold at £7 7s as grey crimmer lamb was made from “slink” lamb, an inferior fur which was died grey to imitate crimmer. […] It was also stated that the name of “crimmer lamb” belongs to what is known in natural history as “Crimean lamb,” and that “crimmer” is really a German spelling of Crimea. Daily Mail (11 January 1923) 5/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:156(n), VI.C.05:157(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 100(h)
~ (unborn
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:156(n)
N01 (VI.B.10): 100(i)
doughboy (USA soldier) Brown
Note: Doughboy: soldier (American slang).
N01 (VI.B.10): 100(j)
“steady”
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 100(k)
tombstone competition
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:157(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 100(l)
downed
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:157(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 100(m)
mass spirit
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:157(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 100(n)
Xmas pardon Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 101(a)
vestpocket / typewriter Red
[Miniature Typewriter / Weighs 1oz and Goes into the Waistcoat Pocket.] A curiosity in the shape of a typewriter weighing one ounce, produced from the waistcoat pocket (says the “Daily Chronicle” New York Correspondent) was shown at a meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Evening Standard (9 January 1923) 8/3
N01 (VI.B.10): 101(b)
intractables
[GERMAN INTRACTABLES. / ANOTHER ANTI-FRENCH / OUTBREAK.] News has reached Berlin, says Reuter, of an anti-French demonstration by National Socialists on New Year's Day at Ingolstadt, one of the three places which recently had to pay heavy fines for the maltreatment of British and French officers. Irish Times (8 January 1923) 5/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:157(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 101(c)
Me Nenagh - ugliest town / in I
[A JOURNEY TO THE SOUTH. ARMY RESTORING ORDER. COMMUNICATIONS AND TRADE] Nenagh, ugliest of Irish towns, was busy on my arrival in a disheveled kind of way, and was peaceful enough. An efficient and courteous patrol were halting motor cars and occasionally searching them—a procedure which is still necessary on main roads—to hamper the movements of men who are “on the run”. Irish Times (8 January 1923) 5/5
Note: Nenagh is a market town in Co. Tipperary.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:157(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 101(d)
barbecue - feast / whole roasting Brown
N01 (VI.B.10): 101(e)
remnants
[ODDS AND ENDS. / WHAT CAN BE DONE WITH REMNANTS.] When the winter sales are on many chances arise of securing choice pieces of brocade, velvet, crêpe de chine, or marocain, and it cannot be counted a useless piece of extravagance to invest in a good many of these small remnants. Irish Times (8 January 1923) 3/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:157(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 101(f)
brother Gaels
GAELIC ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION AND PEACE. The resolution of the Cork County Board was:—“That, while not forgetting that the Gaelic Athletic Association is a non-political Association, the Cork County Board is unanimously of opinion that a move should be made by the Gaelic Athletic Association to secure peace and friendship among brother Gaels, and with this object in view we ask the Central Council to summon a national convention as soon as possible to discuss the best ways and means to secure peace.” Irish Times (8 January 1923) 7/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:157(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 101(g)
breakdown gang
[RAILWAY OUTRAGE. / ENGINE DERAILED AT KILLESTER. / PASSENGER TRAIN WRECKED. / SEVEN PEOPLE INJURED.] […] The Howth train was seriously damaged. In addition to the [harm] wrought to the engine, the sides were [virtually] ripped out of three passenger coaches, [some] cushions were torn, the window glasses broken, and the woodwork splintered. The [lines] were strewn with wreckage, and [confusion] reigned.
Soon a break-down gang [arrived] from Dublin and began to clear the [line.] The passengers were transferred to other [trains] and taken to their destinations, and thus [traffic] was maintained throughout the day. [Some] of the injured passengers, however, [walked] to Clontarf and drove thence into [Dublin.] By evening the line was cleared, and [trains] could run as usual. The wrecked one, [in] the meantime, had been towed to Amiens [street], and sent thence to the Dundalk [work] to be repaired. Irish Times (13 January 1923) 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:157(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 101(h)
the shiny
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:157(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 101(i)
holy bones! Blue
N01 (VI.B.10): 101(j)
dead head (who doesn't pay in / theatre)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:157(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 101(k)
traycloth
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:157(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 101(l)
runners for sideboard
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:157(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 102(a)
deep water loading berth
[Sligo Railway Outrage.] In the meanwhile a third gang of wreckers […] took the first engine out and hitched the other six on to it, sending the whole lot careering wildly down a branch line which runs from the station to the deep-water berth at the harbour, about a mile and a half away. Irish Times (12 January 1923) 5/7
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:157(n)
N01 (VI.B.10): 102(b)
pinebelt
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:157(o)
N01 (VI.B.10): 102(c)
woman with bedroom eyes Brown
[SPECIAL LAW REPORTS. / WIFE ON ROOF GARDEN. WATCHING HUSBAND AND OTHER WOMAN. / “BEDROOM EYES” / DIVORCE DIVISION. Mr. Justice Horridge] Mrs. Dorothy Emily Crawford, who gave her address as Lake Como, Italy, was granted a decree nisi for the dissolution of her marriage with Oswald Sholto Crawford. […] Her husband got a position in China and she joined him in Tsientsin. While there she found him writing a letter. On seeing her he crumpled it up and threw it in the wastepaper-basket. She recovered it and found it began “Dear Betty” and made an appointment for that day. The Betty referred to was a Mrs. Elisabeth Fiske Leitch. She was a woman who started on the fringe of society and was gradually ostracised. Mr. Pigeon: What name was she known by? — “The Lady with the bedroom eyes.” Daily Mail (12 January 1923) 12/3
N01 (VI.B.10): 102(d)
hop it Red
[MYSTERY HOUSE DISCLOSURES. / TOKENS OF MALTBY'S FORMER PROSPERITY. / HIS LATTER PLIGHT. / A FINAL LETTER] Further facts came to light yesterday in connection with the double tragedy at the house of mystery, 24 Park-road, Regent's Park, London, N.W., where the dead body of Mrs. Alice Hilda Middleton, who had been missing since August 15 last, was found, and where Cecil Arthur Maltby, the tailor who lived alone on the premises, shot himself dead when the police forcibly entered the building on Wednesday afternoon. […] Maltby left the following letter addressed to a prominent Freemason, says the Star: 24, Park-road My dear Brother,—I am in very great trouble. My dear little girl, Mrs. Middleton, committed suicide here on August 24. […] I have put the dear little soul in the bath, and am now going to hop it and join her. Daily Mail (12 January 1923) 9/7-10/1
Note: See also: N01 (VI.B.10):104(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 102(e)
toot sweet (tout de suite) Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 102(f)
a snappy comeback Red
Note: See also N21 (VI.B.20):075(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 102(g)
buzzer (fire alarm) Red
[THE DUBLIN FIRE TRAGEDY] Patrick Barry, station officer at Buckingham street Fire Station, said he received an alarm from the “buzzer” at the corner of Gardiner street at 8.40 p.m. Irish Times (9 January 1923) 3/4
N01 (VI.B.10): 102(h)
posted at Lloyd's as / missing Blue
[Toll of the Sea] In the year 1922 twenty-one ships have been posted at Lloyds as “missing”—and a ship “missing” at Lloyd's seldom reappears. Irish Times (9 January 1923) 4/5
Note: See also N09 (VI.B.1):009(b).
N01 (VI.B.10): 102(i)
light keeper (faro)
[GALLANT RESCUE. / DIVED FROM KINGSTOWN LIGHTHOUSE] At yesterday's meeting of the Dublin Corporation, the Chairman, Alderman Byrne, presented the bronze medal and certificate of the Royal Humane Society to John O'Brien, principal light-keeper at the East Pier Lighthouse, Kingstown, for having, on the 1st October last, rescued Assistant Light-Keeper Healy from drowning at Kingstown Harbour. Irish Times (9 January 1923) 7/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:158(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 102(j)
Goodbye, here's [from / (madre]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:158(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 102(k)
joybook
[Advertisement]: Don't be put off with any picture book / Insist on / The Joy Book / The Ideal Picture Story Book for Little Children / Over 200 pages of Happy Stories / Coloured Pictures / Rhymes and Jingles / A Picture on Every Page. / Obtainable at all booksellers etc., or by post (5/9) from the publishers E. Hulton & Co., 47 Shoe Lane, London EC4. Evening Standard (30 December 1922) ?3/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:158(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 102(l)
joyboy
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:158(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 102(m)
keenest prices
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:158(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 103(a)
get it while it's fresh Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 103(b)
tunnel shored with / bedboards Red
[PRISON TUNNEL / IRISH REBELS' ATTEMPT TO ESCAPE] A bold attempt by Republican prisoners to escape from Galway Gaol is reported. […] The tunnel had been constructed with considerable skill and it had been shored with bed boards and other materials from the cells. Daily Mail (13 January 1923) 7/5
N01 (VI.B.10): 103(c)
timing (tennis)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:158(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 103(d)
charlock
[A COUNTRYMAN'S DIARY] Thriving Weeds. January 12.— The quantity of healthy young seedlings and charlock in the fields and gardens bears evidence of the mild winter season. Daily Mail (13 January 1923) 6/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:158(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 103(e)
cueball objectball
Note: Cue ball and object ball, s in the game of billiards.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:158(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 103(f)
folks Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 103(g)
diapers Red
  • FW unlocated
Note: See also N08 (VI.B.6):062(k).
N01 (VI.B.10): 103(h)
rubber drawers
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:158(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 103(i)
pluck live turkeys
[Dublin and the Provinces […] / Northern Ireland] Plucking Live Turkeys.—Fine of £5 was imposed upon Mary Ann M'Kee, Ann street, Belfast, yesterday, who was summoned as owner for permitting birds to be cruelly illtreated […] Captain M'Cartney, Secretary of the Ulster Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, said […] he looked through a window and saw men and boys plucking fowls. Two of the men were plucking turkeys that were alive and struggling vigorously. Irish Times (10 January 1923) 3/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:158(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 103(j)
catch points / kept the rails
[Mail Train Derailed Near Border. / Passengers Removed.] Mountpleasant, a small station on the Great Northern Railway, four miles north of Dundalk, and almost on the Armagh border, was the scene on Tuesday night of another train outrage. The 6.30 p.m. train from Dublin to Belfast was stopped by a red light, the passengers were ordered out, and the train was sent back at full speed. Fortunately it was stopped by the catch points some distance from the station. The engine and most of the coaches kept the rails, but the dining car, a first-class coach, and another coach toppled over on to the embankment. Irish Times (10 January 1923) 5/7
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:158(k), VI.C.05:158(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 103(k)
guard chain
[DUBLIN AND THE PROVINCES. / CITY STREET PERILS […] Before the Recorder, at Green street Court, Dublin, yesterday, Richard Alpin, 19 Ballybough road, claimed under the Workmen's Compensation Act for personal injuries sustained on the North Circular road while employed by the Dublin United Tramways Company. The applicant said that, while working on May 11 as a labourer on the train line on the North Circular road, a motor car, which was driven inside the guard chain, knocked him down. Irish Times (11 January 1923) 3/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:158(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 103(l)
char from firebox
[“ Heath Robinson” Engine. / Train Run on Waste.] What is declared by experts to be a revolutionary invention in railway transport has been made in Johannesburg by Mr. C. Lawson, superintendent mechanical engineer of the South African Railways. This is the construction and running of a self-contained electrically-propelled train. The train has no need of either central power station, live rails or overhead wires. Its power is generated by means of the “char” or ash from locomotiver fire-boxes, which is at present thrown on the waste-heap. Irish Times (11 January 1923) 4/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:158(n)
N01 (VI.B.10): 103(m)
on a teetotal stomach ~ Brown
[BARRICADED HOUSE INQUEST] In Maltby's room witness found three other letters. The first one was not dated […] The letter ran:— Pat, I hear you calling me. I have been trying to brace up courage all day. I will really do it. I will try and do it the same way you did it. Cheerio, darling, I shall soon be with you.—Cecil (Moppy). It wants some doing on a teetotal stomach. Daily Mail (10 January 1923) 6/4
N01 (VI.B.10): 104(a)
~ the dear little lady seemed / funny Red
[BARRICADED HOUSE INQUEST] The coroner read to the jury a portion of a letter which was found in Maltby's handwriting addressed to a Mr. Robinson:— The dear little lady (Mrs. Middleton), who had been living with me since January, committed suicide on August 24. She shot herself through the top of the head. It seemed unnatural, but I went to make an early cup of tea, and when I came to the room she seemed funny and said she was trying to shoot herself. Daily Mail (10 January 1923) 6/4
Note: See also VI.B.102(d): the inquest found that Maltby had murdered Mrs. Middleton.
N01 (VI.B.10): 104(b)
W keeps hair
[MYSTERY OF A WOMAN'S HAIR. / IN A PHAROAH'S TOMB. / ROMANCE OF HIS QUEEN] Among the many strange discoveries in Tut-ankh Amen's tomb at Luxor, none, perhaps, has caused more discussion than the alabaster box containing human hair of a grey colour—the hair of some woman placed in that tomb more than 3,000 years ago. […] Daily Mail (16 January 1923) ?7/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:159(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 104(c)
Frank Jones / Brummagem English
Note: a reference to Frank Jones, B.A. “Brummagem” English. (Walsall: W. Powis, 1918)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:159(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 104(d)
Erin rebels
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:159(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 104(e)
liquid limed Red
Note: Some executed criminals were buried in liquid lime.
N01 (VI.B.10): 104(f)
the village soak Red
Note: Soak: lush, or drunkard.
N01 (VI.B.10): 104(g)
aspidistra
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:159(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 104(h)
smalls (small towns CW[S])
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:159(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 104(i)
did himself well
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:159(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 104(j)
callboard
Note: callboard: theatrical notice-board.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:159(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 105(a)
whirling spray
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:159(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 105(b)
jock straps
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:159(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 105(c)
abdominal belt
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:159(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 105(d)
escalators
[Escalators at the Bank.] The Underground have placed a £29,650 contract for three escalators to be installed at Bank Station on the Central London Railway. Evening Standard (29 January 1923) 8/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:159(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 105(e)
toreador (not Sp)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:159(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 105(f)
(steeple)'chasing
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:159(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 105(g)
given the once over
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:159(n)
N01 (VI.B.10): 105(h)
pipe my eye (cry) Red
Note: To pipe one's eye: to weep.
N01 (VI.B.10): 105(i)
kang (wide seat wooden back)
Note: kang: a type of bed, heated from underneath.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:160(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 105(j)
stormcrested wave
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:160(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 105(k)
galling
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:160(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 105(l)
memorise Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 105(m)
synthetic sugar Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 105(n)
moonlight polarised
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:160(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 105(o)
stockman
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:160(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 105(p)
cattle dipped .
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 106(a)
a final bullet to remove / all doubts
[Adventure with a Tiger.] Another bullet was fired into the tiger to remove all doubts. Evening Standard (13 January 1923) 2/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:160(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 106(b)
bore of sporting rifles
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:160(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 106(c)
a woman to be avoided
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:160(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 106(d)
reigned in his heart
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:160(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 106(e)
I will give £10 to anyone / who will put her in canal Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 106(f)
ladder which leads to fame
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:160(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 106(g)
‘crowd’ parts (stage) / ‘set’ — 〃
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:160(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 106(h)
by all that's wonderful
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:160(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 106(i)
I was face to face with —
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:160(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 107(a)
W tears postcard for / shoe
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:161(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 107(b)
airyway
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:161(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 107(c)
bonehead
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:161(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 107(d)
2 reel film
Note: Reel as applied to film meant a fixed length, normally one thousand feet at 35mm. gauge. A complete film was called a two-reeler.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:161(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 107(e)
filmgoer
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:161(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 107(f)
screenstruck
Note: See also SD1 (VI.A):035(j).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:161(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 107(g)
thrills administered by / big husky football men
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:161(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 107(h)
coloured friends
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:161(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 107(i)
sit round hot air register Blue
Note: Word ‘air’ entered at later draft (II.4:2.2)
N01 (VI.B.10): 108(a)
Juke & Kellikek / family bred / 250 criminals Blue
Note: A notorious case of inherited feeblemindedness. In 1913 Henry Herbert Goddard wrote a controversial book, The Kallikak Family: A Study in the Hereditary of Feeblemindedness, about the subject.
N01 (VI.B.10): 108(b)
cattiness
Note: Cattiness (pre-1920s the term was cattishness): spitefulness.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:161(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 108(c)
chincilla
[Actress/s £500 Fur Coat.] Bernard John Crewe, aged 28, described as an assistant secretary, was charged at Marlborough-street to-day with stealing on November 27 last, from rooms at a West-end hotel, a grey chinchilla fur cloak and a flame-coloured Indian silk shawl, together valued at £500, belonging to Miss Blanche Tomlin, the actress, of Mount-street, W. Evening Standard (4 January 1923) 10/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:161(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 108(d)
audiometer photos sound
[A Lure For Boys Of All Ages. / Model Engineering At The Horticultural Hall. / Miniature Marvels. / Machine That Finds Noise—And Photographs It.] But perhaps the most fascinating thing of all to those who are able to appreciate its importance, is the audiometer which Professor Low shows at work on the stand of the Institute of Patentees. With this instrument extraordinary things are being done. By means of the photographs that it takes of the oscillations produced in the air by sounds it is possible to estimate the degree of noise and set up a standard that is useful in many ways. When there is absolute silence the film inside registers a straight line; and a noise by a pronounced jagged line. Evening Standard (5 January 1923) 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:161(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 108(e)
atmospheric jamming
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:161(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 108(f)
nude silk Not cancelled
Note: Nude in the sense of flesh-coloured, esp. in describing stockings.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:161(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 108(g)
it woollies one Red
Note: Pun on “it worries one”.
N01 (VI.B.10): 108(h)
bottle drunk
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:161(n)
N01 (VI.B.10): 108(i)
tiltyard & keep Red
Note: ‘& keep’ not crossed through. A tiltyard is a yard or enclosed space for tilts and tournaments; a (permanent) tilting-ground.
N01 (VI.B.10): 108(j)
reims (hide ropes)
Note: (South Africa) Reim: a strip of oxhide, stripped of hair and made pliable, used for twisting into rope.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:162(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 108(k)
leghorn Red
Note: In context, a ‘leghorn’ is a hat or bonnet made from a kind of wheat straw, cut green and bleached, and imported from Leghorn, in Tuscany.
N01 (VI.B.10): 109(a)
trunk boots in first
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:162(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 109(b)
rather rag .
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 109(c)
breathtaking beauty Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 109(d)
johnny cake
Note: Johnny-cake: a wheatmeal cake, usually fried in a pan.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:162(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 109(e)
Dame Alice Barbara Esmond Red
Note: Possibly refers to Alice Esmonde, wife of Sir Thomas Henry Grattan Esmonde, M.P. and Papal Chemberlain, a great-grandson of Grattan. She died in 1922.
N01 (VI.B.10): 109(f)
the going was good
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:162(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 109(g)
barking deer
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:162(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 109(h)
bargeload
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:162(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 109(i)
skeleton rails warped
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:162(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 109(j)
burn loveletters (W)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:162(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 109(k)
water mocassin (snake)
Note: Water moccasin: a venomous rattlesnake found near water in Southern U.S.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:162(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 109(l)
troll for pike
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:162(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 109(m)
got hook foul
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:162(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 110(a)
burglarproof vault lock
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:162(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 110(b)
tarboosh
Note: Tarboosh: a cap or cloth of felt (almost always red) with a tassel (usually of blue silk) attached at the top, worn by Mohammedans by itself or as part of the turban; the fez is the Turkish form.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:162(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 110(c)
tailing (3 sleighs) Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 110(d)
merger Brown
  • FW unlocated
N01 (VI.B.10): 110(e)
stardom Brown
N01 (VI.B.10): 110(f)
elderflower water / cucumber milk
[AIDS TO BEAUTY. / “OLD WOMEN'S LOTIONS.”] Her youthful complexion she attributes to simple food, fresh air, and lanoline. This last, melted down and blended with an equal quantity of almond oil, keeps wrinkles at bay, and makes the skin silken smooth. After washing, a little of the cream is massaged or patted very gently into the skin, allowed to remain on for ten minutes or so, and then wiped off with a soft towel. Such “old women's” lotions as elder flower-water and “cucumber milk” are, in grandma's opinion, far more beneficial to the complexion than modern cosmetics, and, if her white-skinned, gentle face is the result of their use, we would do well to renounce our paint-pots and powders and become old-fashioned and beautiful. Irish Times (16 January 1923) 2/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:163(a), VI.C.05:163(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 110(g)
galley droppings (ship)
‘The Stranger’: It seemed to the little crowd on the wharf that she was never going to move again. There she lay, immense, motionless on the grey crinkled water, a loop of smoke above her, an immense flock of gulls screaming and diving after the galley droppings at the stern. Katherine Mansfield, The Garden Party (1922) 230
Note: This is the first of a number of elements deriving ultimately from the work of Katherine Mansfield, who died at Fontainbleau on 9 January 1923, some weeks before this material was entered. Joyce's (derivatory) source has not been located, but is probably some article on the life of the writer.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:163(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 110(h)
dent of felt hat
‘The Stranger’: “Yes, Mr. Hammond,” said Jean, and she ran her finger down the dent of his felt hat. Katherine Mansfield, The Garden Party (1922) 234
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:163(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 110(i)
they were a price
‘Bank Holiday’: “Aren't they dear!” She stares at the tiny pointed fruits as if she were afraid of them. The Australian soldier laughs. “Here, go on, there's not more than a mouthful.” But he doesn't want her to eat them, either. He likes to watch her little frightened face, and her puzzled eyes lifted to his: “Aren't they a price!’ Katherine Mansfield, The Garden Party (1922) 251-2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:163(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 110(j)
culvert
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:163(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 110(k)
spanner
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:163(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 110(l)
began furiously / to think Brown
  • FW unlocated
Note: See also N01 (VI.B.10):089(j).
N01 (VI.B.10): 111(a)
falling leaf (aero)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:163(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 111(b)
wintergreen
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:163(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 111(c)
turfite Red
Note: Turfite: a fan of horse-racing.
N01 (VI.B.10): 111(d)
Druriodrama Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 111(e)
bellywash Red
Note: Bellywash: weak liquor.
N01 (VI.B.10): 111(f)
druggeted stairs
Note: Drugget: a coarse woollen material used in the manufacture of carpets.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:163(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 111(g)
stagedoor romance
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:163(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 111(h)
claw setting of platinum
[Photo caption] Lady Elisabeth Bowes-Lyon yesterday received from the Duke of York her engagement ring, which was specially made by a firm of Court jewellers. The ring has a centre sapphire with a diamond on each side, the very large stones being fixed in a claw setting of platinum. Daily Mail (20 January 1923) 5/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:163(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 111(i)
mink (fur)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:163(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 111(j)
a ‘dud’ cheque
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:169(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 111(k)
abortionist
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:169(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 111(l)
runabout (car) Red
Note: See also N04 (VI.B.25):157(b). Runabout: a small automobile.
N01 (VI.B.10): 111(m)
chain letter
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:163(n)
N01 (VI.B.10): 111(n)
w allwitted
Note: W, woman: possibly ‘wallwitted’
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:163(o)
N01 (VI.B.10): 112(a)
carboy of ammonia
Note: Carboy: a large globular vessel, of green or blue glass and covered with basket-work for protection; usually used for holding acids or other corrosive liquids.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:164(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 112(b)
vanity bag
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:164(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 112(c)
Wales (prince of)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:164(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 112(d)
head a fox
[HUNTING ONLOOKERS. By W. H. OGILVIE. Author of “Galloping Shoes”] Lastly, we have the genuine sportsman or sportswoman who hunts on foot because, alas! he or she can no longer afford to ride in these days of heavy income tax and reduced dividends. […] These are folk born and bred in the country, men and women who know the game from A to Z […] They would rather break a leg than head a fox. Daily Mail (22 January 1923) 8/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:164(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 112(e)
funding a debt
[OUR U.S. DEBT] Although Mr. Baldwin's failure to reach an agreement with the United States as to the terms for funding the £856,000,000 which this country owes to the United States is regarded as only temporary, there are undoubtedly certain important differences between the American and British points of view. Daily Mail (22 January 1923) 10/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:164(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 112(f)
back interest
[OUR U.S. DEBT] A further difficulty concerns the question of back interest. Daily Mail (22 January 1923) 10/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:164(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 112(g)
munitioneers Brown
Note: Munitioneer: a worker in a munition factory.
N01 (VI.B.10): 112(h)
overall length (gun)
[France's Biggest Gun] A message from Angouleme to the Journal announces the completion at Ruelle Arsenal of the largest gun ever cast in France. The barrel has an overall length of twenty-three yards and weighs eighty-eight and a half tons. Irish Times (22 January 1923) 5/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:164(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 112(i)
cradle & carriage
[France's Biggest Gun] […] With its cradle and carriage it weighs 230 tons. The shells will weigh about eight and a half hundredweights, and the gun's range is expected to exceed fifty miles. The gun will be used for coast defence. Irish Times (22 January 1923) 5/4
Note: The cradle, in ordnance, is usually taken to be synonymous with the wheeled (gun-)carriage.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:164(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 112(j)
highspeed love Brown
  • FW unlocated
N01 (VI.B.10): 112(k)
one & all Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 112(l)
cushy jobs
Note: See also N09 (VI.B.1):150(i). Cushy: easy, pleasant (orig. British Indian Army slang).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:164(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 112(m)
downdrag
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:164(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 112(n)
undue prominence of figure
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:164(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 112(o)
hoodies (rooks)
Note: Hoodies: hooded crows (Corvus cornix).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:164(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 113(a)
cut & come again / one apiece ) cakes ~ Red
Note: Only ‘one apiece’ is crossed through. From an advertisement in the Strand Magazine for March 1922 for Bird's Egg Substitute: “Every tin of Bird's Egg Substitute [a yellow powder] has the purpose of making the housewife's task lighter — of making better cakes and better puddings at less cost and less trouble. / Whether they be the small one-a-piece cakes, like rock buns, Castle cakes, etc; or the big cut-and-come-again family cakes, Bird's Egg Substitute makes them finer, more appetising and more nourishing.”
N01 (VI.B.10): 113(b)
~ rock buns ~
Note: From an advertisement in the Strand Magazine for March 1922 for Bird's Egg Substitute: “Every tin of Bird's Egg Substitute [a yellow powder] has the purpose of making the housewife's task lighter — of making better cakes and better puddings at less cost and less trouble. / Whether they be the small one-a-piece cakes, like rock buns, Castle cakes, etc; or the big cut-and-come-again family cakes, Bird's Egg Substitute makes them finer, more appetising and more nourishing.”
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:164(n)
N01 (VI.B.10): 113(c)
~ a tin with a purpose Red
Note: From an advertisement in the Strand Magazine for March 1922 for Bird's Egg Substitute: “a tin with a purpose”, a product asserted to make every housewife's cooking tasks lighter.
N01 (VI.B.10): 113(d)
lurcher ( greyhound / Beddington terrier
Note: A lurcher is a crossbreed preferably [in Ireland] between a sheepdog and a greyhound, used by poachers for catching rabbits, or between a whippet and a Bedlington terrier (a breed of small dog named after the mining town of Bedlington, Northumberland, in North East England), for hunting vermin.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:164(o), VI.C.05:164(p)
N01 (VI.B.10): 113(e)
lead (theatre)
Note: See also SA (VI.A):0571(h), N06 (VI.B.11):041(o) and N20 (VI.B.13):225(b).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:165(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 113(f)
hot fomentation to ear Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 113(g)
cartwheel hat Red
Note: Cartwheel hat: a hat with a wide brim.
N01 (VI.B.10): 113(h)
take-off platform
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:165(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 113(i)
invested the village
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:165(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 113(j)
with rosiest of cheeks Red
[JUDGE AND LITTLE JOE. / PARENTAGE DRAMA IN DIVORCE COURT] The boy's name is Joe. He is a sturdy little chap with the rosiest of cheeks and the merriest of blue eyes. Daily Mail (25 January 1923) 5/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 113(k)
splendid friends from / that moment
[JUDGE AND LITTLE JOE. / PARENTAGE DRAMA IN DIVORCE COURT] Joe cast a laughing glance at Mr. Justice Hill, which was returned with equal cheeriness. The judge and Joe were splendid friends from that moment, and Joe was lifted on to a bench before him. Daily Mail (25 January 1923) 5/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:165(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 114(a)
baptised a dog & invoked / a blessing on French fried potatoes
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:165(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 114(b)
bangs (hair)
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 114(c)
jetty (pin)
‘Prelude’: She had on a black stuff dress that smelt under the arms, a white apron like a large sheet of paper, and a lace bow pinned on to her hair with two jetty pins. Katherine Mansfield, Bliss (1920) 30
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:165(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 114(d)
barracouta loaf
‘Prelude’: Alice was making water-cress sandwiches. She had a lump of butter on the table, a barracouta loaf, and the cresses tumbled in a white cloth. Katherine Mansfield, Bliss (1920) 30
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:165(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 114(e)
squiggle Red
‘Je Ne Parle Pas Français’: I see myself standing in front of them, don't you know, like a Customs official. “Have you anything to declare? Any wines, spirits, cigars, perfumes, silks?” And the moment of hesitation as to whether I am going to be fooled just before I chalk that squiggle. Katherine Mansfield, Bliss (1920) 40
N01 (VI.B.10): 114(f)
bouillottes
Note: French bouilliote: hot-water bottle.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:165(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 114(g)
hammertoe
Note: Hammer-toe: a deformation of the toe, where it bends upwards at an angle.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:165(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 114(h)
Spain's prettiest Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 114(i)
competition is life / of trade
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:165(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 114(j)
prune mould
[For the Cook. / Prune Mould.] Ingredients—One pound of prunes, one pint of water, half a pound of sugar, one lemon, one inch of cinnamon, one ounce of gelatine, three-quarters of a pint of water, two tablespoons of raspberry jam. Irish Times (23 January 1923) 2/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:165(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 114(k)
trifle
[For the Cook. / Trifle.] Irish Times (23 January 1923) 2/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:165(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 115(a)
took a strong view Red
[PRISON FOR TYPIST. / RELEASE BEFORE HER CHILD ARRIVES] For obtaining money under false pretences from the Income-tax commissioners, Elsie Whitewich, 23, typist of Surbiton, Surrey, was sentenced at Westminster yesterday to six months in the second division. In passing sentence Mr. Francis, the Magistrate, said […] “I take a strong view […] that no child should be born in prison, and to avoid that stigma I shall make a representation to the Home Office that before the event can take place it may be possible to arrange for the release of this girl.” Daily Mail (27 January 1923) 10/4
N01 (VI.B.10): 115(b)
the Roman devotion / known as benediction Red
[London Letter]: Mass in Church. It was announced this morning with much surprise, and in some cases with reprobation that Mass was celebrated in a Congregational church in the West End yesterday morning. The chapel is the historic King's Weigh House in Duke street, off Oxford street, and it is one attended by many well-known people. Sung Mass has been celebrated at the chapel for a very long period—almost years now. The Roman devotion known as Benediction is also given. Surprise is expressed because the Services are accompanied by incense. The minister at the chapel is Doctor Orchard, a great preacher and, I believe, an ordained priest of the Church of England. Irish Times (23 January 1923) 4/7
Note: See also N25 (VI.B.15):082(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 115(c)
Ch du Bos — S B is afraid / he may make a smell
Note: SB is Sylvia Beach. Charles du Bos (1882-1939) was a French critic and a friend of Joyce in the early 1920s.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:166(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 115(d)
frame up Red
Note: See also: N01 (VI.B.10):061(h).
N01 (VI.B.10): 115(e)
Miss America Red
Note: American beauty contests date back at least as far as Barnum. The Miss America pageant was established in Atlantic City in 1921. “Miss America” is also the name of a boat with which Gar Wood had established the salt water speed record in Los Angeles Harbour on 7 January 1921.
N01 (VI.B.10): 115(f)
can't see Coué
Note: See also: N01 (VI.B.10):004(d).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:166(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 115(g)
where's that girl I made / a date with 5 yrs ago
[A Strange Marriage. Husband Leaves Wife After Ceremony] From the correspondence, which was referred to, it appeared that, in reply to a letter from the petitioner, stating that she was prepared to go out to him in India as as soon as he let her know that he would give her a home, the respondent wrote to her from Calcutta, on 17th November, 1921, stating that he was not in a position to maintain her, and that their marriage was a rash act. He had no intention, he added, of ever living with her, and should probably stay in India for at least another five or six years before going home. Irish Times (20 January 1923) ?5/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:166(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 115(h)
come to no good Red
[Wife's Petition Fails. Co-respondent denounced in court.] William Harrison Sinnett, a farrier, of Liverpool, and the father of the co-respondent, cited in the husband's petition, gave evidence that his son called upon him last September, and said that he was staying at a hotel there with his wife. The witness accompanied him to the hotel, and was introduced to Mrs. Woolf, who was lying in bed undressed. The witness understood from his son that they had been married about two years. Later, they stayed at the witness's house, and occupied the same bedroom. / In cross-examination, the witness admitted that he had fallen out with his son. “I am ashamed to own him as a son,” he said, “He has been a villain? That's him there” (pointing to his son), “and he will come to no good at the finish.” Irish Times (20 January 1923) 5/5
N01 (VI.B.10): 116(a)
cartouche
[Luxor's Treasures. / The King's Underwear. / Irish Times Foreign Service. / From Our Own Correspondent. / Luxor, Friday.] This was the busiest morning at King Tutankhamen's tomb since it was discovered last November. Mr. Carter […] brought out many important objects to-day. […] The King's underwear (in a large oblong box) […] the box is ornamented with the King's and Queen's cartouche and hieroglyphs. Irish Times (20 January 1923) 6/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:166(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 116(b)
embalmed beef
[Pharaoh's Levee.] So far nothing has come to grief, but the fear that some untameable souvenir hunter would suddenly deign to possess himself of a chair-leg or to snatch a handful of embalmed beef as a gift for the folks in Illinois must have been a constant nightmare to the devoted archæologists. Irish Times (20 January 1923) 6/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:166(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 116(c)
men of Meath
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:166(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 116(d)
Cairo (Kahirah = Mars / ascendant)
[The Lure of Egypt—II. / The Land of Goshen—First Impressions of the Pyramids. / By An Irish K.C.)] Fitting enough, the planet Mars was also visible, for, as few people are aware, the name Cairo is a corruption of “Kahirah”, the Arabic name for Mars, that planet, according to ancient astrologers, being in the ascendent when the foundations of the city were being laid. Irish Times (20 January 1923) 9/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:166(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 116(e)
2nd time of asking Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 116(f)
answering her description Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 116(g)
cuts no ice
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:166(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 116(h)
mugger (crocodile) Red
Note: mugger: [Hind. magar] the broad-nosed crocodile of India.
N01 (VI.B.10): 116(i)
she had drunk carbolic Red
[Drowned in a Bath. / Tragic End of Three Young Children. / Mother Poisoned. / How Teddington Crime was Revealed.] Three young children have been found drowned in a bath at Teddington, and the mother has died as the result, it is believed, of poisoning. The tragic affair occurred at No. 17 Addison-road, the house of Mr. Elisdon, a tailor, who carries on business at Kingston, and was discovered as the result of a call made on Mrs. Elisdon by her mother. […] “I called a Mrs. Rogers to come across, and went in, when I heard my daughter going to a drawer. I was told afterward that she drank carbolic […] Evening Standard (27 January 1923) 7/3
N01 (VI.B.10): 116(j)
her hat became too small Red
[Woman's Hair-Dyeing. / “Head Swelled Until Hat Was Too Small.”] The effects of a woman's hair-dyeing operation was described at Marylebone County Court in a case in which Elisabeth Agnes Bovis, a widow, of Park-avenue, Willesden, sued Charles Benbow, hairdresser, of High-street, Willesden, for £100 damages. Plaintiff stated that last March, on the recommendation of the defendant's wife, she (plaintiff) had her hair dyed with “Inecta” at the shop. After about two hours her head began to swell until her hat was too small, and there was great pain. Evening Standard (27 January 1923) 6/3
N01 (VI.B.10): 116(k)
spray of wattle
[The Prince's Wattle.] A real Australia Day smile on his face and a big buttonhole of wattle helped to give the Prince of Wales just that air of unconventionality necessary to harmonise completely with his attendance at last night's reception by the High Commissioner of Australia and Lady Cook. Evening Standard (27 January 1923) 7/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:166(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 116(l)
cooee (Austr)
Note: Cooee: Australian bush-call, used to draw attention to oneself.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:166(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 117(a)
paramount chief Brown
[photo caption] Paramount Chief Sobhaza, of Swaziland, photographed as a boy with his grandmother […] and […] as e appeared before the King at Buckingham Palace. Daily Mail (31 January 1923) 12/3
N01 (VI.B.10): 117(b)
shaker (cocktail)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:166(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 117(c)
he strips well Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 117(d)
stickpin
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:166(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 117(e)
broochpin
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:167(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 117(f)
shucks! (rot) Darkred
N01 (VI.B.10): 117(g)
tuxedos Blue
N01 (VI.B.10): 117(h)
chimeras
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:167(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 117(i)
gas suction
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:167(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 117(j)
coal
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:167(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 117(k)
malting
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:167(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 117(l)
limeburning culm
Note: Culm: anthracite slack, used for burning lime.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:167(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 118(a)
Cooneyite (sect) Red
  • FW unlocated
[GIFTS TO COONEYITES] In the Chancery Division, Belfast, yesterday, the hearing concluded of the action of which Joseph Brown was the plaintiff […] The proceedings involved the disposition of the estate of James Brown, deceased, and there were allegations of undue influence against the defendents and prominent members of the Cooneyite sect. Irish Times (26 January 1923) 3/7
N01 (VI.B.10): 118(b)
love seat (1½) Red
[“FAKED” LOVE SEAT] The Official Referee—Why a love seat? Witness—The term is used for a seat too large for one and not quite large enough for two. (Laughter.) Irish Times (26 January 1923) 6/1
N01 (VI.B.10): 118(c)
Khitmagar (servant)
Note: Khidmutgar (Anglo-Indian): male servant who waits at table.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:167(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 118(d)
slenderise yourself
Note: Slenderize: to make oneself slender (as through diet).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:167(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 118(e)
luge running
[An Irish Ski[…]] There was an abundance of skating, tobaggoning, luging, and skioring Irish Times (27 January 1923) 10/2
Note: See also N09 (VI.B.1):035(g).
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:167(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 118(f)
hemline
Note: Hem-line: the outline of the hem, hence the height from the ground, of a woman's skirt.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:167(j)
N01 (VI.B.10): 118(g)
3 cheers & a tiger!
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:167(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 118(h)
tape readers
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:167(l)
N01 (VI.B.10): 118(i)
disgraceful abominable / old woman = wife (Jap)
[GLIMPSES AT JAPAN] It is extremely difficult for the foreigner to penetrate into the real home-life of a Japanese […] Our host advances and greets us with a low obeisance […] We are now introduced to his “disgraceful and abominable old woman” (wife) […] The ladies are also wearing the obi, a belt a foot wide, which is wound round the body over the kimono. Irish Times (27 January 1923) 10/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:167(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 118(j)
obi = stomacher Red
[GLIMPSES AT JAPAN] It is extremely difficult for the foreigner to penetrate into the real home-life of a Japanese […] Our host advances and greets us with a low obeisance […] We are now introduced to his “disgraceful and abominable old woman” (wife) […] The ladies are also wearing the obi, a belt a foot wide, which is wound round the body over the kimono. Irish Times (27 January 1923) 10/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 118(k)
mistle thrush ~ Blue
[THE THRUSH AND HIS TRIBE] Redwings. […] The Mistle Thrush. […] Another of the family less well known to the ordinary rambler is the Ring-Ousel […] Were the [mistle-thrush] to disappear, there is hardly a winter bird that we would miss more than the courageous Storm-Cock. Irish Times (27 January 1923) 10/2
N01 (VI.B.10): 118(l)
~ redwing ~
[THE THRUSH AND HIS TRIBE] Redwings. […] The Mistle Thrush. […] Another of the family less well known to the ordinary rambler is the Ring-Ousel […] Were the [mistle-thrush] to disappear, there is hardly a winter bird that we would miss more than the courageous Storm-Cock. Irish Times (27 January 1923) 10/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:167(n)
N01 (VI.B.10): 118(m)
~ ringousel ~ .
[THE THRUSH AND HIS TRIBE] Redwings. […] The Mistle Thrush. […] Another of the family less well known to the ordinary rambler is the Ring-Ousel […] Were the [mistle-thrush] to disappear, there is hardly a winter bird that we would miss more than the courageous Storm-Cock. Irish Times (27 January 1923) 10/2
Raphael transcription: not copied
N01 (VI.B.10): 118(n)
~ stormcock ~
[THE THRUSH AND HIS TRIBE] Redwings. […] The Mistle Thrush. […] Another of the family less well known to the ordinary rambler is the Ring-Ousel […] Were the [mistle-thrush] to disappear, there is hardly a winter bird that we would miss more than the courageous Storm-Cock. Irish Times (27 January 1923) 10/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:167(o)
N01 (VI.B.10): 118(o)
eventuated in
[USES AND ABUSES OF LOTTERIES. Dublin Gambling Romances.] […] Mr. Frank Thorpe Porter relates in his “Reminiscences of a Dublin Police Magistrate” that an extensive book-seller in Dublin had formed a connection with the house of Rish and Co. in Cornhill by which he was enabled to do a profitable business in bills in London among the Dublin merchants, and also to deal largely in the tickets and shares of the State lotteries. “One evening,” writes Mr. Porter, “in the year 1794 my father had occasion to call on this gentleman and found him unusually dissatisfied. He said that Rish's people had made a great mistake in sending him several whole lottery tickets instead of quarters, eighths, or sixteenths, and that these lottery tickets had been left on his hands, involving a loss of sixty pounds.” There was not time to communicate with London before the drawing day, and he could only warn them against committing a similar error on the next occasion. However, in about a week after my father ascertained that the mistake had eventuated in one of the tickets turning out a prize for twenty thousand pounds. Rish was no longer censured by the man whose wealth, previously considerable, had received a great and unexpected augmentation Irish Times (27 January 1923) 10/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:167(p)
N01 (VI.B.10): 118(p)
milesman
[Horrifying Deed. / A Kerry Train Wrecked. / Driver and Fireman Killed. Incendiarism Near Enniscorthy.] The guard then went towards the milesman's house. The milesman, who by this time had been released, was coming to his help, and met him in his way. They carried the fireman, Crowley, to the milesman's house, sent to Tralee for help, and hurried messengers to Ardfert for a doctor and a priest. Irish Times (20 January 1923) 7/4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:168(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 119(a)
hat check ~
Now Germany is [teeming] with “steptanzers” which is German for clogdancers. Most of the youths, after demobilisation following the Armistice, learned “steptanzering” by mail from a correspondence school, run by a couple of soft-shoe American dancers, operating from Berlin […] The male “steptanzers” frequently help the hat-check bandits assisting patrons into their overcoats, thus collecting a few tips. Irish Times (27 January 1923) 6/7 [German Cabaret Craze. / By Henry Wales. / Essen, Friday.]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:168(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 119(b)
~ soft shoe dancer
Now Germany is [teeming] with “steptanzers” which is German for clogdancers. Most of the youths, after demobilisation following the Armistice, learned “steptanzering” by mail from a correspondence school, run by a couple of soft-shoe American dancers, operating from Berlin […] The male “steptanzers” frequently help the hat-check bandits assisting patrons into their overcoats, thus collecting a few tips. Irish Times (27 January 1923) 6/7 [German Cabaret Craze. / By Henry Wales. / Essen, Friday.]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:168(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 119(c)
ushabti (male puppet / in Egypt tomb — servant)
[SECRET OF LUXOR TOMB] Among the remaining reliquaries exhibited to-day were […] sundry small articles and a miniature Ushabti figure […] A Ushabti is a small figure of a man, which the ancient Egyptians were in the habit of placing in the tombs of the dead. […] These miniature men wer said to be imbued with life by the magic spell written upon them, and were held to be infallible man-servants to the dead. Irish Times (27 January 1923) 8/3 ?
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:168(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 119(d)
until such time Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 119(e)
Sister Benignus
Note: Brother Benignus was St Patrick's favourite.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:168(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 119(f)
braunge (swagger)
Mrs. Parrott: Haven't you got the mester's chair in yon room, and the mester's bed upstairs in the mester's bedroom? And don't you braunge forth abroad on the street with your hands in your pockets, or sit on yon bench by the Flower Pot spitting like any king?
Albert (uneasily): We haven't made any difference at all. Not a bit! We don't want to. Bernard Gilbert, King Lear at Hordle, (1922) 38
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:168(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 119(g)
rantanned Brown
  • FW unlocated
Albert (fuming): We shall see who's the fool. Maybe it isn't me this time.

Matilda: We can see now.

Albert: You'll have us rantanned if you're not careful. It would have been better, I say, if we had waited a bit before we went to church. It hardly seems right to me for the Parson to be calling, when your Dad preaches at the Primitives.

Bernard Gilbert, King Lear at Hordle, (1922) 47
N01 (VI.B.10): 119(h)
fauce
Matilda (facing him squarely): Look here, my man, you're very fauce this morning. What's it all about? Come on, let's have it. Bernard Gilbert, King Lear at Hordle, (1922) 47
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:168(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 119(i)
to back down
Albert (backing down): I only said as how all the village was talking, and it's true. It's no good your going on at me for it. (He nods towards the sitting-room.) Why not put him back for a bit, to quieten them? Bernard Gilbert, King Lear at Hordle, (1922) 47
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:168(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 119(j)
a dolch of debts
Jacob: Still […] in a city like Toronto, I should have thought you'd have made more than enough to have paid your debts. How came you to have such a dolch of debts? Bernard Gilbert, King Lear at Hordle, (1922) 64
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:168(i)
N01 (VI.B.10): 119(k)
hilling plough / seed potatoes
The scene of this Play is down in Tanvats Marsh, one beautiful Spring morning. As it is half-past nine, John Hind has stopped ploughing-in his potatoes, to have his lunch of bread, fat bacon, and beer; and his son stands talking to him whilst he eats. The two horses are grazing by the side of the dyke, steam rising from their backs, and the sun glints on the share of the hilling-plough, which divides each ridge and covers up the potatoes. One-half of the field is finished, whilst the seed potatoes lie uncovered in the furrows of the other half, awaiting their turn. Bernard Gilbert, King Lear at Hordle, (1922) 82 [the introduction to A Tanvats Nietzsche]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:168(j), VI.C.05:168(k)
N01 (VI.B.10): 119(l)
toss & tave / a-that-how
So, Missis, don't you toss and tave a-that-how, / Or else I shan't be up at five to plough. Bernard Gilbert, King Lear at Hordle, (1922) 84 (from A Tanvats Nietzsche)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:168(l), VI.C.05:168(m)
N01 (VI.B.10): 119(n)
baggerment
It's nobbut baggerment; it passes off / Like the green sickness or a winter's cough. Bernard Gilbert, King Lear at Hordle, (1922) 89 (from A Tanvats Nietzsche)
Note: Baggerment: worthless talk, palaver.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:168(n)
N01 (VI.B.10): 120(a)
pedigree potatoes
Farmers are accustomed to huge prices for pedigree animals, and sums exceeding a thousand pounds have been paid for rams, bulls, and stallions; so that a high figure for pedigree potatoes from which to breed improved and profitable stocks was but a step in the same direction. Bernard Gilbert, King Lear at Hordle, (1922) 94 [from the introduction to Eldorado]
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:169(a)
N01 (VI.B.10): 120(b)
‘bouncers’
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:169(b)
N01 (VI.B.10): 120(c)
then hung up the 'phone
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:169(c)
N01 (VI.B.10): 120(d)
kept wires hot Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 120(e)
long Tom Red
N01 (VI.B.10): 120(f)
optical lens insurance
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:169(d)
N01 (VI.B.10): 120(g)
stedding
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:169(e)
N01 (VI.B.10): 120(h)
turnip kips
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:169(f)
N01 (VI.B.10): 120(i)
evening's hastiness
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:169(g)
N01 (VI.B.10): 120(j)
Aunt Hobblesides Brown
Note: See The Complete Dublin Diary of Stanislaus Joyce, 14: Pappie calls Aunt Josephine […] ‘Aunt Hobblesides’.
N01 (VI.B.10): 120(k)
hobble chain
Note: Hobble chain: a chain for hobbling (fettering) an animal's legs to prevent it from straying or kicking.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.05:169(h)
N01 (VI.B.10): 120(l)
Earwrinkle / Eagkinkle / Earwicker / Eagwickeg Red
  • FW unlocated
Note: Right margin
N01 (VI.B.10): back cover recto(a)
D Shem / Cain
N01 (VI.B.10): back cover recto(b)
A
N01 (VI.B.10): back cover recto(c)
Db
N01 (VI.B.10): back cover verso(a)
 
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