ULYSSES NOTEBOOKS

UN2 (VI.D.7): The Lost Notebook

Print edition: Danis Rose & John O'Hanlon, eds., The Lost Notebook (Edinburgh: Split Pea Press, 1989).

MS: reconstructed from partial copy Notebook details
UN2: (VI.D.7) front cover recto(a)
 
Note: Unknown.
UN2: (VI.D.7) front cover verso(a)
P & ZG 116/117
Note: ZG 116/117 is the call-number at the Zentralbibliothek Zürich for Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (Paris: Librairie Armand Colin, 1902). See index below page 24 and companion index in UN3 (VIII.A.5) Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:232(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) front cover verso(b)
Ari La Rhetor WF 1247
Note: WF 1247 is the call-number at the Zentralbibliothek Zürich for François Cassandre, trans. La Rhétorique d'Aristote en français (Amsterdam: 1733). See index below page 30 and companion index in UN3 (VIII.A.5) Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:232(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) front cover verso(c)
Arist de Coloribus 1537
Note: The tract De Coloribus (On Colours) is unlikely to have been composed by Aristotle. It has been ascribed to Theophrastus and to Strato, among others. The ‘1537’ probably refers to the Thomas Fitzgerald index on notebook pages 1-2. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:232(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) front cover verso(d)
L B. b 18765
Note: Probably the first line of an early chronology of Leopold Bloom. This may have been Copied to the front cover verso of the notebook containing the first draft of Cyclops (Buffalo V.A.8) and/or to UN5 (NLI.5B):020(a) Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:232(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) front cover verso(e)
[Missing]
Note: Presumably the remainder of the Bloom chronology. See also UN5 (NLI.5B):020(b) et seq.color t.b.a.
UN2: (VI.D.7) 1(a)
Thomas & 5 uncles hung d & ¼d 1537
Baron Offaly and tenth earl of Kildare … appointed deputy-governor of Ireland, 1534, but renounced his allegiance and slew Archbishop Allen … after suffering much from neglect, Earl Thomas and his five uncles, whose capture and death reflected the utmost discredit on the government, three of them being wholly free from participation in the rebellion, were on 3 Feb. 1537 executed at Tyburn, being drawn, hanged, and quartered. Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:232(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 1(b)
of stature tall & personable; ~ color t.b.a.
Thomas is described as a man of great natural beauty, ‘of stature tall and personable; …’ Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(d) for use in proto-Cyclops. See also UN5 (NLI.5B):015(n).
UN2: (VI.D.7) 1(c)
~ in countenance amiable; ~ color t.b.a.
  • Ulysses unlocated
‘Thomas is described as a man of great natural beauty, … in countenance amiable; …’ Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
Note: Copied to UN5 (NLI.5B):015(n)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 1(d)
~ a white face, and withal somewhat ruddy, ~
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(e) for UG 12.1009. color t.b.a.
‘Thomas is described as a man of great natural beauty, … a white face, and withal somewhat ruddy, …’ Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
UN2: (VI.D.7) 1(e)
~ delicately in each limb featured, ~ color t.b.a.
‘Thomas is described as a man of great natural beauty, … delicately in each limb featured, …’ Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
Note: Copied to UN5 (NLI.5B):015(n).
UN2: (VI.D.7) 1(f)
~ a rolling tongue and a rich utterance, ~ color t.b.a.
  • Ulysses unlocated
‘Thomas is described as a man of great natural beauty, … a rolling tongue and a rich utterance, …’ Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
UN2: (VI.D.7) 1(g)
~ of nature flexible and kind, ~ color t.b.a.
‘Thomas is described as a man of great natural beauty, … of nature flexible and kind, …’ Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
Note: Copied to UN5 (NLI.5B):015(n)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 1(h)
~ very soon carried where he fancied, ~ color t.b.a.
  • Ulysses unlocated
‘Thomas is described as a man of great natural beauty, … very soon carried where he fancied, …’ Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
UN2: (VI.D.7) 1(i)
~ easily with submission appeased, ~ color t.b.a.
‘Thomas is described as a man of great natural beauty, … easily with submission appeased, …’ Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
Note: Copied to UN5 (NLI.5B):015(n)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 1(j)
~ hardly with stubbornness weighed; ~ color t.b.a.
  • Ulysses unlocated
‘Thomas is described as a man of great natural beauty, … hardly with stubbornness weighed; …’ Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
UN2: (VI.D.7) 1(k)
in matters of importance a headlong hotspur, ~
‘Thomas is described as a man of great natural beauty, … in matters of importance an headlong hotspur, …’ Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:232(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 1(l)
~ yet natheless ~ Not cancelled
‘Thomas is described as a man of great natural beauty, … yet natheless taken for a young man not devoid of wit, …’ Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(c). See also Sheet 14.004(cj), which however derives from a different source. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:232(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 1(m)
~ taken for a young man not devoid of wit, ~
‘Thomas is described as a man of great natural beauty, … yet nathless taken for a young man not devoid of wit, …’ Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:232(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 1(n)
were it not as it fell out in the end that a fool had the keeping thereof
‘Thomas is described as a man of great natural beauty, … in matters of importance an headlong hotspur, yet nathless taken for a young man not devoid of wit, were it not as it fell out in the end that a fool had the keeping thereof. Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:233(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 1(o)
Life by late duke of Leinster in Earls of Kildare
Note: A reference to The Earls of Kildare, and their ancestors: from 1055 to 1773 by The Marquis of Kildare [Charles William Fitzgerald, Duke of Leinster] (Dublin: Hodges Smith, 1862). Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:233(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 2(a)
Thomas Fitzgerald color t.b.a.
THOMAS FITZGERALD […] son of Gerald Fitzgerald, ninth earl [q. v.], by his first wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Zouche of Codnor, Derbyshire, was born in 1513. Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
UN2: (VI.D.7) 2(b)
1534 color t.b.a.
… it was not till 1534 that he began to play an important part in history. In February of that year he was appointed deputy-governor of Ireland on the occasion of his father's last and ill-fated journey to England. Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
Note: See also Sheet 12.007(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 2(c)
Summer day St Mary's Abbey color t.b.a.
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(b)
About the beginning of June [1534] a report obtained currency in Ireland, through the machinations of the Ormonde faction, that his father had been summarily executed in the Tower, and that his own death and that of his uncles had been determined upon by his government. Full of indignation at what he considered an act of gross perfidy, he summoned the council to St. Mary's Abbey, whither on 11 June he rode through the city, accompanied by 140 horsemen with silken fringes on their helmets (whence his sobriquet ‘Silken Thomas’), and there, despite the remonstrances of his advisers and the chancellor Cromer, he publicly renounced his allegiance, and formally declared war on the government. Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
UN2: (VI.D.7) 2(d)
Silken Thomas color t.b.a.
Full of indignation at what he considered an act of gross perfidy, he summoned the council to St. Mary's Abbey, whither on 11 June he rode through the city, accompanied by 140 horsemen with silken fringes on their helmets (whence his sobriquet ‘Silken Thomas’), and there, despite the remonstrances of his advisers and the chancellor Cromer, he publicly renounced his allegiance, and formally declared war on the government. Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
UN2: (VI.D.7) 2(e)
quod defertur non aufertur, duke of Norfolk
The government, though hampered by Grey's promise, had no intention of pardoning him. ‘Quod defertur non aufertur,’ said the Duke of Norfolk, when asked his opinion. Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
Note: A Latin motto, meaning ‘What is postponed is not abandoned‘, sometimes attributed to Thomas More in the form ‘Quod differtur, non aufertur’. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:233(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 2(f)
after attack on Dublin hid in Grey Friar's Abbey in Francis Street
His overtures to the Earl of Ossory were rejected with scorn by that astute and prudent nobleman, who, shortly after his return from England in August, created a diversion by invading and devastating Carlow and Kildare. But an attempt made by his son, Lord James Butler, to surprise Offaly recoiled on his own head, and he was only rescued from his dilemma by the news that the citizens of Dublin had turned on the besiegers of the castle and made prisoners of them. Having concluded a short truce with him, Offaly marched rapidly on Dublin. An assault made by him on the castle was repulsed with loss, and in a gallant sortie the citizens succeeded in completely routing his army. He himself narrowly escaped capture, being obliged to conceal himself in the Abbey of Grey Friars in Francis Street. Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:233(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 2(g)
All put to the sword Pardon of Maynooth, Drogheda color t.b.a.
… about the middle of March 1535 he [Sir William Skeffington] concentrated his forces about Maynooth, which he carried on the 23rd an important event from a military point of view … The garrison, including the commandant Parese, who was charged by the Irish, but on insufficient evidence, with having betrayed the place, were with one or two exceptions put to the sword. The ‘Pardon of Maynooth’ practically determined the fate of a rebellion which at one time threatened to prove fatal to the English authority in Ireland. Dictionary of National Biography (1889), “Thomas Fitzgerald”
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(a). From the form of the unit in the notesheets, it seems that Joyce added ‘Drogheda’, a reference to a similar though later massacre, the butchery of the people and garrison of Drogheda by Cromwell in 1649.
UN2: (VI.D.7) 3(a)
Thursday 16 June 1904 Times
THE TIMES. / LONDON, THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 1904. The Times (London, 16 June 1904), 1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:233(e), VI.C.16:234(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 3(b)
Ascot Meeting color t.b.a.
THE ASCOT MEETING, Thursday. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/1
UN2: (VI.D.7) 3(c)
the third race on the card was the Gold Cup ~ Not cancelled
THE ASCOT MEETING, Thursday. […]
The third race on the card was the Gold Cup, for which Maximum, winner last year, was again in the field, but he had a stronger opposition to face than a twelvemonth ago, when the infirm Rising Glass was the best of his three opponents. He had to meet this time Zinfandel and Sceptre, who had been first and second in the Coronation Cup at Epsom and, as he had not shown to advantage in France this season, he had very few friends, the race being regarded as a match between the two others; for little or no attention was paid to the fourth runner, Throwaway, whose chances were regarded as so remote that odds of 20 to one were offered against him. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:234(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 3(d)
~ for which Maximum, winner last year, ~ Not cancelled
THE ASCOT MEETING, Thursday. […]
The third race on the card was the Gold Cup, for which Maximum, winner last year, was again in the field, but he had a stronger opposition to face than a twelvemonth ago, when the infirm Rising Glass was the best of his three opponents. He had to meet this time Zinfandel and Sceptre, who had been first and second in the Coronation Cup at Epsom and, as he had not shown to advantage in France this season, he had very few friends, the race being regarded as a match between the two others; for little or no attention was paid to the fourth runner, Throwaway, whose chances were regarded as so remote that odds of 20 to one were offered against him. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:234(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 3(e)
~ was again in the field but he had a stronger opposition to face than a 12 month ago when the infirm Rising Glass was the best of his three opponents. He had to meet this time Zinfandel and Sceptre, who had been first & second in the Coronation Cup at Epsom and as he had not shown to advantage in France this season he had very few friends, the race being regarded as a match between the 2 others; ~
THE ASCOT MEETING, Thursday. […]
The third race on the card was the Gold Cup, for which Maximum, winner last year, was again in the field, but he had a stronger opposition to face than a twelvemonth ago, when the infirm Rising Glass was the best of his three opponents. He had to meet this time Zinfandel and Sceptre, who had been first and second in the Coronation Cup at Epsom and, as he had not shown to advantage in France this season, he had very few friends, the race being regarded as a match between the two others; for little or no attention was paid to the fourth runner, Throwaway, whose chances were regarded as so remote that odds of 20 to one were offered against him. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:234(d), VI.C.16:235(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 3(f)
~ for little or no attention was paid to the fourth runner, Throwaway, whose chances were regarded as so remote that odds of 20 to one were offered against him. ~ color t.b.a.
THE ASCOT MEETING, Thursday. […]
The third race on the card was the Gold Cup, for which Maximum, winner last year, was again in the field, but he had a stronger opposition to face than a twelvemonth ago, when the infirm Rising Glass was the best of his three opponents. He had to meet this time Zinfandel and Sceptre, who had been first and second in the Coronation Cup at Epsom and, as he had not shown to advantage in France this season, he had very few friends, the race being regarded as a match between the two others; for little or no attention was paid to the fourth runner, Throwaway, whose chances were regarded as so remote that odds of 20 to one were offered against him. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/1
UN2: (VI.D.7) 3(g)
~ the point of interest was whether Zinfandel would confirm her Epsom running with Sceptre or turn the tables on him and as he looked very well in the paddock he started favourite. ~
THE ASCOT MEETING, Thursday. […]
The third race on the card was the Gold Cup, for which Maximum, winner last year, was again in the field, but he had a stronger opposition to face than a twelvemonth ago, when the infirm Rising Glass was the best of his three opponents. He had to meet this time Zinfandel and Sceptre, who had been first and second in the Coronation Cup at Epsom and, as he had not shown to advantage in France this season, he had very few friends, the race being regarded as a match between the two others; for little or no attention was paid to the fourth runner, Throwaway, whose chances were regarded as so remote that odds of 20 to one were offered against him. The point of interest was whether Zinfandel would confirm her Epsom running with Sceptre or whether she would turn the tables on him, and as he looked very well when seen in the paddock, he started favourite. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:235(b), VI.C.16:236(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 4(a)
~ The race was a peculiar one for Throwaway was allowed to get a long lead, ~
Note: See also UN5 (NLI.5B):012(bo) color t.b.a.
THE ASCOT MEETING, Thursday. […]
The race was a peculiar one, for Throwaway was allowed to get a long lead, the jockeys of Zinfandel and Sceptre being convinced that he would come back to them, as the saying goes, and that they would be able to beat him for speed. But they delayed their efforts too long, and Throwaway was never caught, winning by a length from Zinfandel, who thus occupied the same position that his owner's Rising Glass did last year. Sceptre was never dangerous, and the French horse was last throughout. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/1
UN2: (VI.D.7) 4(b)
~ the jockeys of Zinfandel and Sceptre being convinced that he would come back to them, as the saying goes, and that they would be able to beat him for speed. But they delayed their efforts too long, and Throwaway was never caught, winning by a length from Zinfandel, who thus occupied the same position that his owner's Rising Glass did last year. Sceptre was never dangerous, and ~ color t.b.a.
THE ASCOT MEETING, Thursday. […]
The race was a peculiar one, for Throwaway was allowed to get a long lead, the jockeys of Zinfandel and Sceptre being convinced that he would come back to them, as the saying goes, and that they would be able to beat him for speed. But they delayed their efforts too long, and Throwaway was never caught, winning by a length from Zinfandel, who thus occupied the same position that his owner's Rising Glass did last year. Sceptre was never dangerous, and the French horse was last throughout. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/1
UN2: (VI.D.7) 4(c)
~ the French horse was last throughout. ~
THE ASCOT MEETING, Thursday. […]
The race was a peculiar one, for Throwaway was allowed to get a long lead, the jockeys of Zinfandel and Sceptre being convinced that he would come back to them, as the saying goes, and that they would be able to beat him for speed. But they delayed their efforts too long, and Throwaway was never caught, winning by a length from Zinfandel, who thus occupied the same position that his owner's Rising Glass did last year. Sceptre was never dangerous, and the French horse was last throughout. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:236(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 4(d)
~ No one can for a moment suppose that this was a true run race, and victory may be in fact due to the admirable riding of W. Lane, who is in extraordinary form just now, having ridden four winners on Wednesday and as many more today. color t.b.a.
THE ASCOT MEETING, Thursday. […]
No one can for a moment suppose that this was a true run race, and victory may be in fact due to the admirable riding of W. Lane, who is in extraordinary form just now, having ridden four winners on Wednesday and as many more to-day. Had he not gone resolutely ahead on Throwaway, he might have been caught and beaten for speed. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/1
Note: Copied to Sheet 14.021(a).
UN2: (VI.D.7) 4(e)
~ Had he not gone resolutely ahead on Throwaway ~ color t.b.a.
THE ASCOT MEETING, Thursday. […]
No one can for a moment suppose that this was a true run race, and victory may be in fact due to the admirable riding of W. Lane, who is in extraordinary form just now, having ridden four winners on Wednesday and as many more to-day. Had he not gone resolutely ahead on Throwaway, he might have been caught and beaten for speed. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/1
UN2: (VI.D.7) 4(f)
~ he might have been caught & beaten for speed. ~
THE ASCOT MEETING, Thursday. […]
No one can for a moment suppose that this was a true run race, and victory may be in fact due to the admirable riding of W. Lane, who is in extraordinary form just now, having ridden four winners on Wednesday and as many more to-day. Had he not gone resolutely ahead on Throwaway, he might have been caught and beaten for speed. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:236(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 4(g)
won in a canter color t.b.a.
[W. Lane] had another victory in the New Stakes, for which nine two-year-old ran, the best, as it was thought, being Mr. Neumann's LLangibby, who was trained in the same stable as Pretty Polly. He was made a strong favourite and won in a canter from a colt belonging to Sir Edward Vincent, whose fate it so often is to be second, […] The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/1
Note: Copied to Sheet 14.021(b) and Sheet 14.085(p). See also UN2 (VI.D.7):010(f) below for UG 11.374.
UN2: (VI.D.7) 5(a)
The Gold Cup, value 1,000 sovs., with 3,000 sovs. in specie in addition, added to a sweepstakes of 20 sovs. each, h ft; weight for age, with allowances; the second received 700 sovs. and the third 300 sovs. Two miles and a half. ~ color t.b.a.
Note: See also UN5 (NLI.5B):012(bh), UN5 (NLI.5B):012(bk), Sheet 16.018(u) and Sheet 16.018(v).
THE ASCOT MEETING, Thursday. … THE GOLD CUP, value 1,000 sovs., with 3,000 sovs. in specie in addition, added to a sweepstakes of 20 sovs. each, h ft; weight for age, with allowances; the second received 700 sovs. and the third 300 sovs. Two miles and a half. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/1-2
UN2: (VI.D.7) 5(b)
Mr F. Alexander's b h Throwaway, by ~
Note: See also UN5 (NLI.5B):012(bi) and Sheet 16.018(w). color t.b.a.
THE GOLD CUP […] Mr F. Alexander's b h THROWAWAY, by Rightway—Theale, 5 yrs, 9 st. 4 lb. (W. Lane) … 1
Lord Howard de Walden's ch c ZINFANDEL, 4 yrs, 9 st. (M. Cannon) … 2
Mr. W. Bass's b f SCEPTRE, 5 yrs. 9 st. 1 lb. (O. Madden) … 3
Mr. J. de Bremond's Maximum II., 5 yrs. 9 st. 4 lb. (G. Stern) … 0
(Winner trained by Braime.) The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/2
UN2: (VI.D.7) 5(c)
~ Rightaway-Theale, 5 yrs, 9st. 4lb. (W. Lane) … 1 ~ color t.b.a.
THE GOLD CUP […] Mr F. Alexander's b h THROWAWAY, by Rightway—Theale, 5 yrs, 9 st. 4 lb. (W. Lane) … 1
Lord Howard de Walden's ch c ZINFANDEL, 4 yrs, 9 st. (M. Cannon) … 2
Mr. W. Bass's b f SCEPTRE, 5 yrs. 9 st. 1 lb. (O. Madden) … 3
Mr. J. de Bremond's Maximum II., 5 yrs. 9 st. 4 lb. (G. Stern) … 0
(Winner trained by Braime.) The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/2
Note: See also Sheet 16.018(w) for UG 16.1278f.
UN2: (VI.D.7) 5(d)
Lord Howard de Walden's ch c Zinfandel, ~ color t.b.a.
THE GOLD CUP […] Mr F. Alexander's b h THROWAWAY, by Rightway—Theale, 5 yrs, 9 st. 4 lb. (W. Lane) … 1
Lord Howard de Walden's ch c ZINFANDEL, 4 yrs, 9 st. (M. Cannon) … 2
Mr. W. Bass's b f SCEPTRE, 5 yrs. 9 st. 1 lb. (O. Madden) … 3
Mr. J. de Bremond's Maximum II., 5 yrs. 9 st. 4 lb. (G. Stern) … 0
(Winner trained by Braime.) The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/2
Note: See also Sheet 16.018(aa) for UG 16.1278f.
UN2: (VI.D.7) 5(e)
~ 4 yrs, 9st. 4lb. (M. Cannon) 2 color t.b.a.
THE GOLD CUP […] Mr F. Alexander's b h THROWAWAY, by Rightway—Theale, 5 yrs, 9 st. 4 lb. (W. Lane) … 1
Lord Howard de Walden's ch c ZINFANDEL, 4 yrs, 9 st. (M. Cannon) … 2
Mr. W. Bass's b f SCEPTRE, 5 yrs. 9 st. 1 lb. (O. Madden) … 3
Mr. J. de Bremond's Maximum II., 5 yrs. 9 st. 4 lb. (G. Stern) … 0
(Winner trained by Braime.) The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/2
Note: See also Sheet 16.018(aa).
UN2: (VI.D.7) 5(f)
Mr W. Bass's b f Sceptre, 5 yrs, ~ color t.b.a.
THE GOLD CUP […] Mr F. Alexander's b h THROWAWAY, by Rightway—Theale, 5 yrs, 9 st. 4 lb. (W. Lane) … 1
Lord Howard de Walden's ch c ZINFANDEL, 4 yrs, 9 st. (M. Cannon) … 2
Mr. W. Bass's b f SCEPTRE, 5 yrs. 9 st. 1 lb. (O. Madden) … 3
Mr. J. de Bremond's Maximum II., 5 yrs. 9 st. 4 lb. (G. Stern) … 0
(Winner trained by Braime.) The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/2
Note: See also UN5 (NLI.5B):012(bl) and Sheet 16.018(ab).
UN2: (VI.D.7) 5(g)
~ 9st. 11lb. (O. Madden) … 3 color t.b.a.
THE GOLD CUP […] Mr F. Alexander's b h THROWAWAY, by Rightway—Theale, 5 yrs, 9 st. 4 lb. (W. Lane) … 1
Lord Howard de Walden's ch c ZINFANDEL, 4 yrs, 9 st. (M. Cannon) … 2
Mr. W. Bass's b f SCEPTRE, 5 yrs. 9 st. 1 lb. (O. Madden) … 3
Mr. J. de Bremond's Maximum II., 5 yrs. 9 st. 4 lb. (G. Stern) … 0
(Winner trained by Braime.) The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/2
Note: See also Sheet 16.018(ab).
UN2: (VI.D.7) 5(h)
Mr J. de Bremond's Maximum II,
THE GOLD CUP […] Mr F. Alexander's b h THROWAWAY, by Rightway—Theale, 5 yrs, 9 st. 4 lb. (W. Lane) … 1
Lord Howard de Walden's ch c ZINFANDEL, 4 yrs, 9 st. (M. Cannon) … 2
Mr. W. Bass's b f SCEPTRE, 5 yrs. 9 st. 1 lb. (O. Madden) … 3
Mr. J. de Bremond's Maximum II., 5 yrs. 9 st. 4 lb. (G. Stern) … 0
(Winner trained by Braime.) The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/2
Note: See also Sheet 16.018(ac).
UN2: (VI.D.7) 5(i)
5 yrs, 9st. 4lb. (G.Stern) … 0 (Winner trained by Braime), Betting. — 5 to 4 on Zinfandel, 7 to 4 agst Sceptre, 10 to 1 Maximum II, 20 to 1 Throwaway (offered). color t.b.a.
THE GOLD CUP […] Mr F. Alexander's b h THROWAWAY, by Rightway—Theale, 5 yrs, 9 st. 4 lb. (W. Lane) … 1
Lord Howard de Walden's ch c ZINFANDEL, 4 yrs, 9 st. (M. Cannon) … 2
Mr. W. Bass's b f SCEPTRE, 5 yrs. 9 st. 1 lb. (O. Madden) … 3
Mr. J. de Bremond's Maximum II., 5 yrs. 9 st. 4 lb. (G. Stern) … 0
(Winner trained by Braime.)
Betting. — 5 to 4 on Zinfandel, 7 to 4 agst Sceptre, 10 to 1 Maximum II., 20 to 1 Throwaway (offered).
The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/2
Note: Copied to Sheet 16.012(bn), Sheet 16.018(u). See also UN5 (NLI.5B):012(bm) and UN5 (NLI.5B):012(bn), Sheet 19.003(n) and Sheet 19.003(o).
UN2: (VI.D.7) 5(j)
The last-named cut out the work from Sceptre, with Zinfandel last, ~ color t.b.a.
The last-named cut out the work from Sceptre, with Zinfandel last, until in the line for home, when Sceptre took a slight lead of Throwaway, and Zinfandel took close order. In the run home Throwaway stayed the longest and won by a length; three parts of a length between second and third. Time, 4 mins. 43 2-5 secs. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/2
UN2: (VI.D.7) 5(k)
~ until in the line for home, when Sceptre took a slight lead of Throwaway, ~ color t.b.a.
The last-named cut out the work from Sceptre, with Zinfandel last, until in the line for home, when Sceptre took a slight lead of Throwaway, and Zinfandel took close order. In the run home Throwaway stayed the longest and won by a length; three parts of a length between second and third. Time, 4 mins. 43 2-5 secs. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/2
UN2: (VI.D.7) 5(l)
~ and Zinfandel took close order. ~ color t.b.a.
The last-named cut out the work from Sceptre, with Zinfandel last, until in the line for home, when Sceptre took a slight lead of Throwaway, and Zinfandel took close order. In the run home Throwaway stayed the longest and won by a length; three parts of a length between second and third. Time, 4 mins. 43 2-5 secs. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/2
Note: Copied to Sheet 14.021(c).
UN2: (VI.D.7) 5(m)
~ In the run home Throwaway stayed ~ color t.b.a.
The last-named cut out the work from Sceptre, with Zinfandel last, until in the line for home, when Sceptre took a slight lead of Throwaway, and Zinfandel took close order. In the run home Throwaway stayed the longest and won by a length; three parts of a length between second and third. Time, 4 mins. 43 2-5 secs. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/2
Note: Copied to Sheet 14.021(d) for UG 14.1132.
UN2: (VI.D.7) 5(n)
the longest and won by a length. color t.b.a.
The last-named cut out the work from Sceptre, with Zinfandel last, until in the line for home, when Sceptre took a slight lead of Throwaway, and Zinfandel took close order. In the run home Throwaway stayed the longest and won by a length; three parts of a length between second and third. Time, 4 mins. 43 2-5 secs. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/2
Note: Copied to Sheet 14.021(e).
UN2: (VI.D.7) 6(a)
Cricket, Hayward (Surrey v C. Univ.) 128, 409. 7 wkts
CRICKET. / SURREY v. CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY. […]
Surrey.—First Innings.
Hayward, c. McDonell, b. Keigwin … 128
[…]
Total (7 wkts.) … 409 The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:236(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 6(b)
Jones (Notts v Kent) 14, Iremonger, not out 221 color t.b.a.
NOTTINGHAMSHIRE v. KENT. […]
Nottinghamshire.—First Innings.
Mr. A.O. Jones, c. Penn.jun, b. Fielder … 14
Iremonger, not out … 221
[…]
Total (3 wkts.) … 418 The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/3
Note: Copied to UN5 (NLI.5B):012(bq) for UG 16.1684.
UN2: (VI.D.7) 6(c)
418. 3 wkts color t.b.a.
NOTTINGHAMSHIRE v. KENT. […]
Nottinghamshire.—First Innings.
[…]
Total (3 wkts.) … 418 The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/3
Note: Copied to UN5 (NLI.5B):012(br).
UN2: (VI.D.7) 6(d)
Knight (Leic v MCC) 203, 418 5 wkts
M.C.C. AND GROUND v. LEICESTERSHIRE. […]
Leicestershire.—First Innings.
[…]
Knight, b. Hearns … 203
[…]
Total (5 wkts.) … 418 The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:237(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 6(e)
in the deep field
SURREY v. CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY. […]
Surrey.—First Innings.
[…]
Mr. Phillipp's pick-up and return both in the deep-field and at third man make him a fieldsman much above the average. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:237(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 6(f)
a good wicket
SURREY v. CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY. […]
Surrey.—First Innings.
[…]
As a whole, however, the bowling strength hardly looks sufficient to be likely to get out even a moderate batting side cheaply on a good wicket. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:237(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 6(g)
for the 4th wicket
WORCESTERSHIRE v. YORKSHIRE. […]
Yorkshire.—First Innings.
[…]
Denton, who also played brilliantly, helped Rhodes to put on 129 runs for the 4th wicket, and when Rhodes and Hay were together 132 were added. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:237(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 6(h)
in the slips
LANCASHIRE v. SUSSEX. […]
Lancashire.—First Innings.
[…]
Mr. McLaren was caught in the slips before a run had been scored, […] The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 12/3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:237(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 6(i)
back stop
Note: The back-stop, now virtually obsolete, was at one time a very useful run-saving fielder. Perhaps it was James Joyce's position when he was at school. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:237(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 7(a)
New York, June 15 color t.b.a.
THE NEW YORK STEAMSHIP DISASTER. / CHARGES OF NEGLIGENCE.
NEW YORK, June 15.
Early this morning the steamer General Slocum started from the pier on East River carrying 1,800 women and children, parishioners of St. Mark's Evangelical Lutheran Church, which is situated in one of the most densely-populated districts of the East Side. The occasion was a picnic in connexion with the Church Sunday School. The day was a perfect one. The children and their mothers, dressed in their best and carrying flags, marched to the pier, headed by a band. The destination of the steamer, which had been specially chartered for the picnic, was Forest Grove, Long Island Sound. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 5/6
UN2: (VI.D.7) 7(b)
General Slocum color t.b.a.
THE NEW YORK STEAMSHIP DISASTER. / CHARGES OF NEGLIGENCE.
NEW YORK, June 15.
Early this morning the steamer General Slocum started from the pier on East River carrying 1,800 women and children, parishioners of St. Mark's Evangelical Lutheran Church, which is situated in one of the most densely-populated districts of the East Side. The occasion was a picnic in connexion with the Church Sunday School. The day was a perfect one. The children and their mothers, dressed in their best and carrying flags, marched to the pier, headed by a band. The destination of the steamer, which had been specially chartered for the picnic, was Forest Grove, Long Island Sound. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 5/6
Note: See also UN5 (NLI.5B):012(cr).
UN2: (VI.D.7) 7(c)
women and children color t.b.a.
THE NEW YORK STEAMSHIP DISASTER. / CHARGES OF NEGLIGENCE.
NEW YORK, June 15.
Early this morning the steamer General Slocum started from the pier on East River carrying 1,800 women and children, parishioners of St. Mark's Evangelical Lutheran Church, which is situated in one of the most densely-populated districts of the East Side. The occasion was a picnic in connexion with the Church Sunday School. The day was a perfect one. The children and their mothers, dressed in their best and carrying flags, marched to the pier, headed by a band. The destination of the steamer, which had been specially chartered for the picnic, was Forest Grove, Long Island Sound. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 5/6
UN2: (VI.D.7) 7(d)
occasion was a picnic color t.b.a.
THE NEW YORK STEAMSHIP DISASTER. / CHARGES OF NEGLIGENCE.
NEW YORK, June 15.
Early this morning the steamer General Slocum started from the pier on East River carrying 1,800 women and children, parishioners of St. Mark's Evangelical Lutheran Church, which is situated in one of the most densely-populated districts of the East Side. The occasion was a picnic in connexion with the Church Sunday School. The day was a perfect one. The children and their mothers, dressed in their best and carrying flags, marched to the pier, headed by a band. The destination of the steamer, which had been specially chartered for the picnic, was Forest Grove, Long Island Sound. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 5/6
UN2: (VI.D.7) 7(e)
mothers threw their children overboard color t.b.a.
THE NEW YORK STEAMSHIP DISASTER. / CHARGES OF NEGLIGENCE.
NEW YORK, June 15.
[…]
Mothers threw their children overboard, and some of the few men on the boat, maddened by fear, trampled down women and children in order to get to the sides and leap into the water. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 5/6
UN2: (VI.D.7) 7(f)
men on the boat, maddened by fear, trampled down women and children color t.b.a.
THE NEW YORK STEAMSHIP DISASTER. / CHARGES OF NEGLIGENCE.
NEW YORK, June 15.
[…]
Mothers threw their children overboard, and some of the few men on the boat, maddened by fear, trampled down women and children in order to get to the sides and leap into the water. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 5/6
UN2: (VI.D.7) 7(g)
Responsibility lies at the door of the Government Steamboat Inspectors color t.b.a.
THE NEW YORK STEAMSHIP DISASTER. / CHARGES OF NEGLIGENCE.
NEW YORK, June 15.
[…]
“The responsibility for the hundreds of lives sacrificed lies at the door of the Government steamship inspectors, who declared that the General Slocum was properly provided with fire and life-saving apparatus. In face of this false declaration, look at the facts. The pumps and fire-hose failed to work, not a boat was lowered, not a life raft would float, while the life preservers dragged down those who wore them. The General Slocum, though bearing the inspectors' certificate of full equipment, had no effective means of saving her own hull from fire or the life of a single passenger from drowning.” The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 5/6
UN2: (VI.D.7) 7(h)
The pumps and fire-hose failed to work, not a boat was lowered, not a liferaft would float color t.b.a.
THE NEW YORK STEAMSHIP DISASTER. / CHARGES OF NEGLIGENCE.
NEW YORK, June 15.
[…]
“The responsibility for the hundreds of lives sacrificed lies at the door of the Government steamship inspectors, who declared that the General Slocum was properly provided with fire and life-saving apparatus. In face of this false declaration, look at the facts. The pumps and fire-hose failed to work, not a boat was lowered, not a life raft would float, while the life preservers dragged down those who wore them. The General Slocum, though bearing the inspectors' certificate of full equipment, had no effective means of saving her own hull from fire or the life of a single passenger from drowning.” The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 5/6
UN2: (VI.D.7) 7(i)
Adds one more to the list of disasters directly due to official corruption by this time the meaning of the American word “graft” is known color t.b.a.
THE NEW YORK STEAMSHIP DISASTER. / CHARGES OF NEGLIGENCE.
NEW YORK, June 15.
[…]
The foregoing is not an extract from a “yellow” paper, but is taken from a leading article in the Evening Post, the most conservative organ in the city. It expresses no more and no less than the truth. Yesterday's horror adds one more to the list of disasters directly due to official corruption, and, like the Iroquois Theatre fire, […] could have been prevented if the provisions of the law had been respected and if the swoorn agents of the law had seen that they were carried out.
I presume by this time the meaning of the American word “graft” is known in London. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 5/6
UN2: (VI.D.7) 7(j)
1000 as possible number of dead color t.b.a.
THE NEW YORK STEAMSHIP DISASTER. / CHARGES OF NEGLIGENCE.
(FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.) / NEW YORK, June 15.
[…]
I hesitated yesterday, amid the mass of conflicting reports, to give 1,000 as the possible number of dead, but almost every estimate now reaches that figure, while the Evening Sun says that the victims may reach 1,200. Nearly 600 bodies have been recovered, the majority of which have been identified. Between 600 and 700 persons are missing. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 5/6
UN2: (VI.D.7) 7(k)
The fire originated in the storage-room, highly inflammable material, spontaneous combustion color t.b.a.
THE NEW YORK STEAMSHIP DISASTER. / CHARGES OF NEGLIGENCE.
NEW YORK, June 15.
[…]
Mr. Berry, the coroner, questioned many witnesses yesterday evening, and subsequently issued the following statement: — “The fire on board the General Slocum originated in the storage room on the starboard side forward, in which were stored oils, paint, rope, camp stools, and other highly inflammable material. The fire alarm was sounded promptly, but when the hose was manned there was no water and the the crew were powerless in the ensuing panic. In order that the owners and crew may clear themselves of the charge of negligence, they must show that there was spontaneous combustion in the storage room.” The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 5/6
UN2: (VI.D.7) 8(a)
underlings
THE WAR IN THE FAR EAST […]
The so-called despatch by General Kuropatkin […] appears to consist of a succession of telegrams clumsily pieced together, and with all, or nearly all, of the illumiating paragraphs removed. […] we must rather attribute this tangle of confused dates and muddled incidents to some underling at the Russian capital who has been ordered to strike out all paragraphs explaining the consequences of the movements described. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 6/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:237(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 8(b)
— 5 trappen
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:237(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 8(c)
Paris A large black box found at Louvre, Nap 1st horse, white stuffed horse, branded N on l thigh
NAPOLEON'S HORSE.—Our Paris Correspondent telegraphs that a large box was recently found at the Louvre Palace bearing in big black letters the following inscription:—“To the head of the Imperial Museums in Paris. The Emperor Napoleon the First's horse. From the Natural History Society, Manchester.” On opening the box it was found to contain a white stuffed horse with small brown spots. On the left thigh was branded the letter “N.” with the Imperial Crown. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 6/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:237(i)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 8(d)
Sir Anthony MacDonnell left Euston yesterday (16th) for the Under-Secretary's lodge, Phoenix-park color t.b.a.
Court Circular. […]
Sir Anthony MacDonnell left Euston yesterday for the Under-Secretary's lodge, Phoenix-park, Dublin. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 6/3
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(f) and thence to Sheet 16.017(bh) for UG 16.1666f.
UN2: (VI.D.7) 8(e)
Gordon Bennett ~ Not cancelled
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(k). Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:238(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 8(f)
June 17 (Friday)
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. […]
The following is the list of the starters and the order in which they will leave Saalburg, starting at 7 to-morrow morning. The race is expected to take about 11 hours altogether. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:238(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 8(g)
Homburg
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:238(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 8(h)
hinder wheel
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. […]
Only one of those entered did not appear—namely, Dufaux, with the car of his own make. When driving into Homburg this morning to weigh he had a bad side-slip and broke his hinder wheel. Every one regrets this, more especially as it was the only Swiss car entered, and the only car with eight cyclinders, so that for another year the vexed question of whether four or more cylinders are better for a racing car will remain unsetttled. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:238(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 8(i)
Dufaux Swiss car (8. cylind)
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. […]
Only one of those entered did not appear—namely, Dufaux, with the car of his own make. When driving into Homburg this morning to weigh he had a bad side-slip and broke his hinder wheel. Every one regrets this, more especially as it was the only Swiss car entered, and the only car with eight cyclinders, so that for another year the vexed question of whether four or more cylinders are better for a racing car will remain unsetttled. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:238(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 8(j)
breakdown
Note: See UNB.009(m) below Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:238(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 8(k)
which better 4 or more for racing
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. […]
Only one of those entered did not appear—namely, Dufaux, with the car of his own make. When driving into Homburg this morning to weigh he had a bad side-slip and broke his hinder wheel. Every one regrets this, more especially as it was the only Swiss car entered, and the only car with eight cyclinders, so that for another year the vexed question of whether four or more cylinders are better for a racing car will remain unsetttled. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:238(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 8(l)
general features
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. […]
The only general features were the prevalence of magneto as well as high tension (accumulator) ignition, the general use of the chain as opposed to the live axel drive. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:238(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 9(a)
prevalence of magneto as well as high tension ignition Not cancelled
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. […]
The only general features were the prevalence of magneto as well as high tension (accumulator) ignition, the general use of the chain as opposed to the live axel drive. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Note: Copied to Sheet 14.021(g). Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:238(i)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 9(b)
prevalence of chains as opposed to ~
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. […]
The only general features were the prevalence of magneto as well as high tension (accumulator) ignition, the general use of the chain as opposed to the live axel drive. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:239(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 9(c)
~ live axel drive Not cancelled
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. […]
The only general features were the prevalence of magneto as well as high tension (accumulator) ignition, the general use of the chain as opposed to the live axel drive. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:239(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 9(d)
race 11 hrs
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. […]
The following is the list of the starters and the order in which they will leave Saalburg, starting at 7 to-morrow morning. The race is expected to take about 11 hours altogether. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:239(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 9(e)
85 mile course
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. […]
The course of the Gordon-Bennett race covers 137.5 kilometres, or just over 85 miles. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:239(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 9(f)
Mercedes, Jenatzy, G Not cancelled
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. […]
The following is the list of the starters and the order in which they will leave Saalburg, starting at 7 to-morrow morning. The race is expected to take about 11 hours altogether.
1. Jenatzy, 90-h.p. Mercedes (Germany).
2. Edge, 80-h.p. Napier (England).
3. Werner, 90-h.p. Mercedes (Austria).
4. Lancia, 65-h.p. Fiat (Italy).
5. Thery, 80-h.p. Georges-Riccard (France).
6. Baron de Crawhez, 60-h.p. Pipe (Belgium).
8. Baron de Caters, 90-h.p. Mercedes (Germany).
9. Girling, 72-h.p. Wolseley (England).
10. Braun, 90-h.p. Mercedes (Austria).
11. Storero, 65-h.p. Fiat (Italy).
12. Salloran, 100-h.p. Mors (France).
13. Hantvast, 60-h.p. Pipe (Belgium).
14. Opel, 80-h.p. Opel-Darracq (Germany).
15. Jarrott, 96-h.p. Wolseley (England).
16. Warden, 90-h.p. Mercedes (Austria).
17. Cagno, 65-h.p. Fiat (Italy).
18. Rougier, 100-h.p. Tureat-Mery (France).
19. Angières, 65-h.p. Pipe (Belgium). The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:239(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 9(g)
Napier, Edge, E / Merc, Werner, A / Fiat, Lancia, I
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. […]
The following is the list of the starters and the order in which they will leave Saalburg, starting at 7 to-morrow morning. The race is expected to take about 11 hours altogether.
1. Jenatzy, 90-h.p. Mercedes (Germany).
2. Edge, 80-h.p. Napier (England).
3. Werner, 90-h.p. Mercedes (Austria).
4. Lancia, 65-h.p. Fiat (Italy)
.
5. Thery, 80-h.p. Georges-Riccard (France).
[…] The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:239(d), VI.C.16:239(d), VI.C.16:239(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 9(j)
M, de Caters, G Not cancelled
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. […]
The following is the list of the starters and the order in which they will leave Saalburg, starting at 7 to-morrow morning. The race is expected to take about 11 hours altogether.
1. Jenatzy, 90-h.p. Mercedes (Germany).
[…]
8. Baron de Caters, 90-h.p. Mercedes (Germany).
[…] The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Note: Copied to Sheet 14.021(h) Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:239(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 9(k)
Wolseley, Jarrott, E
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. […]
The following is the list of the starters and the order in which they will leave Saalburg, starting at 7 to-morrow morning. The race is expected to take about 11 hours altogether.
1. Jenatzy, 90-h.p. Mercedes (Germany).
[…]
15. Jarrott, 96-h.p. Wolseley (England).
[…] The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:239(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 9(l)
steep gradients
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. […]
The worst of the curves and the steepest of the gradients are in the neutral areas, and the fronts of all the grand stands have been “westrumited.” The usual dust simooms are thus avoided. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:239(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 9(m)
breakdown gangs
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. […]
Ambulance cars, breakdown gangs, and general supervisors are stationed at intervals along the course. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Note: See also UN4 (NLI.5A):057(f). Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:239(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 9(n)
control — yellow flag
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. […]
The controls or neutral zones are established at the following eight places:—Usingen, Weilburg, Limburg, Idstein, Esch, Königstein, Oberusel and Homburg. In each case the control is indicated to the driver by a huge yellow flag. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:239(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 9(o)
E green, G white, F blue, A bl. yellow, Bel — — ( — ), It — black
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. […]
The colours given to the competitors are:—British, green; German, white; French, blue; Austria, black and yellow; Belgium, yellow; and Italy, black. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:240(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 9(p)
winding reaches (trakts)
THE GORDON-BENNETT RACE. / (FROM OUR SPECIAL CORREPONDENT) / HOMBURG, June 16. […]
Further on are two very winding reaches requiring great care, after which comes a fine run where enormous speeds can be developed. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 7/1
Note: German, trakt, section. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:240(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 10(a)
Epsom Coronation Cup, Derby Course 1 m Not cancelled
xxxx The Times (London), 3 June 1904, p.12
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:240(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 10(b)
Lord Howard de Walden's Zinfandel (sire Persimmon) color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 3 June 1904, p.12
Note: Last three words uncrossed. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:240(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 10(c)
Derby stakes, Mr L. Rothschild's b c St. Amant color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 2 June 1904, p.12
UN2: (VI.D.7) 10(d)
by St. Frusquin … 1 color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 2 June 1904, p.12
Note: See UN5 (NLI.5B):010(c) for UG 8.837
UN2: (VI.D.7) 10(e)
Sir J. Thursby's b c John O'Gaunt … 2 color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 2 June 1904, p.12
UN2: (VI.D.7) 10(f)
St Amant won in a canter color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 2 June 1904, p.12
Note: See also UN2 (VI.D.7):004(g) and Sheet 14.021(b).
UN2: (VI.D.7) 10(g)
Mornington Cannon color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 2 June 1904, p.12
UN2: (VI.D.7) 10(h)
St Amant was wearing what is known as the “rogue's badge”, lightning, thunder, rain color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 2 June 1904, p.12
UN2: (VI.D.7) 10(i)
Jewish Colonization Society meeting, Paris. 2 rue Pasquier, Schwarzfeld Sec
JEWISH COLONIZATION ASSOCIATION.
Notice is hereby given that the ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING of the Association will be held at the offices of the Association 2. rue Pasquier, Paris, on Sunday the 3rd July proximo at 10 o'clock precisely, for the transaction of the following business:—
[…]
Dated the 16th of June 1904
E. Schwarzfeld, Secretary. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 8/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:240(e), VI.C.16:241(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 11(a)
Theatre 12th Night Tree, Sar Bernh. La Sorcière Mond.
HIS MAJESTY'S THEATRE. MR TREE.
Tonight, at 8.15 (LAST NIGHT).
Shakespeare's
TWELFTH NIGHT.
[…]
SARAH BENHARDT in LA SORCIERE,
Monday
next, June 20th. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 8/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:241(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 11(b)
General Bobrikoff, Gov.-Gen. of Finland assassinated color t.b.a.
A terrible crime has been committed at Helsingfors which must cause horror throoughout the civilized world. As GENERAL BOBRIKOFF, the Governor-General of Finland, was entering the Senate yesterday morning, he was fired at three times with a revolver. One bullet struck him in the neck, and the second in the chest, causing but trifling wounds; the third took effect in the abdomen, causing injuries so grave that he is said to be dying. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 9/4
UN2: (VI.D.7) 11(c)
Finnish regiment / covered Russ. / at Crimea
When that Empire had to confront the united forces of England, France, and Piedmont in the Crimea, to whom was the case of St. Petersburg entrusted? It was his loyal Finnish regiments that Czar Nicholas I.—no lover of constituional liberties—chose for this duty, and faithfully and willingly did they perform their trust. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 9/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:241(c), VI.C.16:241(d), VI.C.16:241(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 12(a)
Fall of Feudalism in Ireland by M. Davitt (10s∕ 6d) Harper Bros
xxxx Times Literary Supplement (3 June 1904), 176
Note: Joyce owned a copy of this book (see Michael Patrick Gillespie and Erik Bradford Stocker, James Joyce's Trieste Library: A Catalogue of Materials at the H.R.H.R.C. The University of Texas at Austin, page 127. As it is stamped “J.J.”, it is likely he acquired it in Zurich. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:241(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 12(b)
1595 British agent at Porte Mr Edward Barton slain, employer after became Levant Co (founded James I 1605)
xxxx Times Literary Supplement (17 June 1904), 190
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:242(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 13(a)
Music
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:242(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 13(b)
Vecsey — a nice little boy
ST. JAME'S-HALL.
VECSEY, LAST RECITAL. VECSEY.
The Times says:—
“He is indeed a phenomenon. His execution of all the technical difficulties is so accurate, so easy, and so mature in style that the hearers find it almost impossible to associate the sounds they hear with the nice little boy who stands before them.” The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 1/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:242(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 13(c)
Kubelik
ST. JAME'S-HALL.
SATURDAY AFTERNOON, June 25, at 3,
SECOND and LAST
APPEARANCE this SEASON
of
KUBELIK, KUBELIK. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 1/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:242(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 13(d)
Hughes & Young, Patent Agents, 55, 56 Chancery-lane, Ideas that have brought fortunes color t.b.a.
IDEAS THAT HAVE BROUGHT FORTUNES” (copyright). Booklet post free. Every inventor should read it. Patents secured, sales negotiated, inventors assisted.—Hughes & Young, Patent Agents (est. 1829), 55, 56, Chancery-lane, W.C. The Times (London, 17 June 1904), 1/5
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(l).
UN2: (VI.D.7) 13(e)
jongs on the road to Lhasa
TIBET.—According to the statement of a lama who was captured on Sunday, Gyangtse is held by 7,000 men, who have 600 rifles of European pattern, and 30 jingals. The karo-la is again occupied, and all the jongs on the road to Lhasa are held. No preparations are being made for the defence of Lhasa, but the apparent intention is to appeal for help from China. At Gyangtse every effort has been made to induce the Tibetans to attack the mission camp, but without success. On Monday night a detachment of Gurkhas cut off a Tibetan convoy, killing nine men and taking four prisoners. The Times (London, 16 June 1904), 9/2
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:242(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 13(f)
Heenan v. Sayers color t.b.a.
HEENAN v. SAYERS.—Messrs Debenham, Storr, and Sons included in their sale yesterday, at 26, King-street, Covent-garden, the silver championship belt presented to John C. Heenan, the American pugilist, and inscribed:—“Presented to John C. Heenan by F. S. Dowling, esq., referee and editor of Bell's Life in London, May 30, 1860.” The belt, manufactured by Hancock and Co., represents a roped ring, having the above inscription in the centre, and is decorated by the British Lion, a model of two pugilists, and other adornments emblematic of the celebrated fight between Sayers and Heenan. It was presented to Heenan, and a facsimile to Tom Sayers, after the morable drawn battle which was fought at Farnborough on April 17, 1860. The belt realized £50. The Times (London, 16 June 1904), 9/4
UN2: (VI.D.7) 13(g)
silver championship belt color t.b.a.
HEENAN v. SAYERS.—Messrs Debenham, Storr, and Sons included in their sale yesterday, at 26, King-street, Covent-garden, the silver championship belt presented to John C. Heenan, the American pugilist, and inscribed:—“Presented to John C. Heenan by F. S. Dowling, esq., referee and editor of Bell's Life in London, May 30, 1860.” The belt, manufactured by Hancock and Co., represents a roped ring, having the above inscription in the centre, and is decorated by the British Lion, a model of two pugilists, and other adornments emblematic of the celebrated fight between Sayers and Heenan. It was presented to Heenan, and a facsimile to Tom Sayers, after the morable drawn battle which was fought at Farnborough on April 17, 1860. The belt realized £50. The Times (London, 16 June 1904), 9/4
UN2: (VI.D.7) 13(h)
memorable drawn battle 1860 color t.b.a.
HEENAN v. SAYERS.—Messrs Debenham, Storr, and Sons included in their sale yesterday, at 26, King-street, Covent-garden, the silver championship belt presented to John C. Heenan, the American pugilist, and inscribed:—“Presented to John C. Heenan by F. S. Dowling, esq., referee and editor of Bell's Life in London, May 30, 1860.” The belt, manufactured by Hancock and Co., represents a roped ring, having the above inscription in the centre, and is decorated by the British Lion, a model of two pugilists, and other adornments emblematic of the celebrated fight between Sayers and Heenan. It was presented to Heenan, and a facsimile to Tom Sayers, after the memorable drawn battle which was fought at Farnborough on April 17, 1860. The belt realized £50. The Times (London, 16 June 1904), 9/4
Note: Copied to UN4 (NLI.5A):013(bk) for UG 10.831
UN2: (VI.D.7) 13(i)
Cabdriver's Benevolent Association Dinner, Lord Cadogan in the Chair color t.b.a.
CABDRIVERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. / 15, Soho-square, W. / Patron. / His MAJESTY The KING.
A FESTIVAL DINNER in aid of the ANNUITY FUND of the Association will be held in the Whitehall Rooms, Metropole Hotel, on Monday, the 27th instant, at 7.30 p.m.
THE EARL CADOGAN, K.G., in the Chair. The Times (London, 16 June 1904), 8/5
Note: Copied to Sheet 16.019(c).
UN2: (VI.D.7) 13(j)
M. Polonyi (M.P.H.)
THE AUSTRO-HUNGARIAN SUCCESSION. […]
An issue of considerable interest was unexpectedly raised in the Hungarian Chamber by a prominent member, M. Geza Polonyi. The Times (London, 16 June 1904), 5/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:242(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 13(k)
morganatic marriage unknown in Hungary. If F.F. becomes K of H wife queen her rank
THE AUSTRO-HUNGARIAN SUCCESSION. […]
An issue of considerable interest was unexpectedly raised in the Hungarian Chamber by a prominent member, M. Geza Polonyi. […] the Hungarian Independence party had taken up the standpoint that since morganatic marriages were unknown to Hungarian law the marriage of the heir-apparent was in every respect juridically valid in Hungary. Consequently the issue of the marriage was, in the opinion of the Independence party, entitled to succeed to the throne. Should the Archduke Franz Ferdinand ascend the Hungarian throne his consosrt would under Hungarian law and also according to the view prevalent in Hungarian society be regarded as Queen. The Times (London, 16 June 1904), 5/6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:242(g), VI.C.16:243(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 13(l)
Sapling (coursing)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:243(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 14(a)
King going to Kiel
THE KING'S VISIT TO KIEL. The Times (London, 16 June 1904), 5/5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:243(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 14(b)
Pat O'Brien seated
NEW MEMBER.
MR. KENNEDY, introduced by CAPT. DONELAN (Cork, E.) and Mr. P. O'BRIEN (Tipperary, N.), took the oath and his seat for West Cavan amid Nationalist cheers, in place of Mr. McGovern. The Times (London, 16 June 1904), 7/2
Note: It was Kennedy, not O'Brien, who was seated. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:243(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 14(c)
Alake of Abeokuta, Queen Victoria sent two bound volumes of the Word of God, the secret of England's greatness
Note: Copied to UN5 (NLI.5B):015(q)-UN5 (NLI.5B):015(r) for UG 12.1523f. See also UN2 (VI.D.7):018(e) below. color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 15 June 1904, p.10
UN2: (VI.D.7) 14(d)
plot v. L. Milner (Pretoria)
xxxx The Times (London), 15 June 1904, p.5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:243(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 14(e)
privileged ~ color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 15 June 1904, p.3
UN2: (VI.D.7) 14(f)
~ Royal Hungarian Lottery, rogue & vagabond
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(m) for UG 12.776f. color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 15 June 1904, p.3
UN2: (VI.D.7) 14(g)
Alake in Manchester color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 14 June 1904, p.10
UN2: (VI.D.7) 14(h)
Cotton Growers Association color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 14 June 1904, p.10
UN2: (VI.D.7) 14(i)
made his mark in vistors' book
Note: Copied to UN5 (NLI.5B):015(p) for UG 12.1530. color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 14 June 1904, p.10
UN2: (VI.D.7) 14(j)
girl weavers shout hilarious welcome
Note: Copied to UN5 (NLI.5B):015(o) for UG 12.1532. color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 14 June 1904, p.10
UN2: (VI.D.7) 15(a)
G.B.S. in Times on cane in Navy Not cancelled
xxxx The Times (London), 14 June 1904, p.11
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:243(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 15(b)
Atlantic Rate War
xxxx The Times (London), 13 June 1904, p.8
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:243(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 15(c)
to swear death
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:244(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 15(d)
June 11th funeral of L Powerscourt
xxxx The Times (London), 13 June 1904, p.8
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:244(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 15(e)
Pretty Polly and Saint Amant v Ajax (Fr) for Saint Leger
xxxx The Times (London), 13 June 1904, p.13
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:244(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 15(f)
Corporal Punishment color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 13 June 1904, p.5
UN2: (VI.D.7) 15(g)
Naval Regulations
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(o) for use in protoCyclops. color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 13 June 1904, p.5
UN2: (VI.D.7) 15(h)
on the bare breech on the breech with clothes on, ~ color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 13 June 1904, p.5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:244(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 15(i)
~ 1. Caning of Boys, 2. Birching, 3. Flogging color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 13 June 1904, p.5
Note: Not all crossed out. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:244(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 16(a)
Arch. Frederick leaves Lon. June 12
xxxx The Times (London), 13 June 1904, p.11
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:244(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 16(b)
Const. Anderson dismissed from service (Kiltimagh) protest. obsc. language immoral conduct
xxxx The Times (London), 13 June 1904, p.12
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:244(f), VI.C.16:245(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 16(c)
Hugh Hyacinth, the MacDermot, Prince of Coolavin ~
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(j) for use in protoCyclops, and to Sheet 14.003(b). color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 13 June 1904, p.12
UN2: (VI.D.7) 16(d)
~ died Feb. 6th 1904
Note: Copied via Sheet 14.003(b) to Sheet 14.088(a) color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 13 June 1904, p.12
UN2: (VI.D.7) 16(e)
Rev. John Alexander Dowie, Elijah the Restorer and General Overseer of the Christian Catholic Church in Zion color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 13 June 1904, p.12
UN2: (VI.D.7) 17(a)
E VII going to Kiel
xxxx The Times (London), 11 June 1904, p.7
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:245(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 17(b)
Parl 10/6/904.
xxxx The Times (London), 11 June 1904, p.9
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:245(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 17(c)
Sir Char. Dilke
Sir C. Dilke (Gloucester, Forest of Dean) said there was a matter which was discussed last year in a separate motion — namely, the affairs of the Congo Free State — on which public feeling had been excited for many years past to an extent he had rarely known The Times (London), 10 June 1904, p.6
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:245(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 17(d)
Congo Free State, Mr Casement alleged grave maladministration and ill-treatment
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(u) for UG 12.1542ff. color t.b.a.
Sir C. Dilke (Gloucester, Forest of Dean) said there was a matter which was discussed last yesr in a separate motion — namely, the affairs of the Congo Free State — on which public feeling had been excited for many years past to an extent he had rarely known … With regard to the natives, Mr. Casement had alleged grave maladministration and ill-treatment … cannibal troops … slavery … mutilation … torture The Times (London), 10 June 1904, p.6
UN2: (VI.D.7) 17(e)
Wiseteerley
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:245(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 17(f)
Dublin Police Court 8∕6
IRELAND Dublin, June 8 … In the Dublin Police Court to-day a number of licensed hawkers were fined for having hawked goods in the Phoenix Park, The Times (London), 9 June 1904, p.12
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:245(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 17(g)
hawkers in Phoenix Park, tourists asked to buy mementoes of the murders color t.b.a.
In the Dublin Police Court to-day a number of licensed hawkers were fined for having hawked goods in the Phoenix Park. Mr. O'Shaughnessy, K.C., The Times (London), 9 June 1904, p.12
UN2: (VI.D.7) 17(h)
Lord Lieutenant opened Hib. Mar. Society. Dollymount
IRELAND Dublin, June 8 … This afternoon the Lord Lieutenant opened the Hibernian Marine Society's new school at Dollymount. The society educates boys for the naval and mercantile marine services. The Times (London), 9 June 1904, p.12
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:245(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 18(a)
Gold Stick in Waiting
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(p) for UG 12.1515. color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 8 June 1904, p.13
UN2: (VI.D.7) 18(b)
Alake of Abeokuta
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(n) for UG 12.1515. color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 8 June 1904, p.12
UN2: (VI.D.7) 18(c)
met to do honour to a ruler of Africa
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(q) for use in protoCyclops. color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 8 June 1904, p.12
UN2: (VI.D.7) 18(d)
Alake delivered an address afterwards interpreted color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 8 June 1904, p.12
UN2: (VI.D.7) 18(e)
Queen Victoria gave his father a bible color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 8 June 1904, p.12
Note: See also UN2 (VI.D.7):014(c) above.
UN2: (VI.D.7) 18(f)
crofters
The Crofters Commission … (Report issued) The Times (London), 9 June 1904, p.15
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:246(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 18(g)
£20 odd
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:246(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 18(h)
Reverend C. Voysey, Annesley Lodge, Hampstead, London NW
Note: This is the name and home address of Charles Voysey, the founder of the Theistic Church. Where Joyce got it, and why he wrote it down in his notebook, is a complete mystery. Voysey died in July 1912, so that Joyce could hardly have been corresponding with him in 1917, and certainly not at his earthly address. The Times did announce his Services, along with many others, each Saturday in June 1904, but invariably gave as address the Theistic Church, Swallow Street, Piccadilly, London W. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:246(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 19(a)
King's Proctor showing cause
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(g), thence to Sheet 16.017(bn) for UG 16.1490f. color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 7 June 1904, p.3
UN2: (VI.D.7) 19(b)
decree nisi
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(g), thence to Sheet 16.017(bp) for UG 16.1490f. color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 7 June 1904, p.3
UN2: (VI.D.7) 19(c)
propound a will
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(h) for UG 12.1118. color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 7 June 1904, p.3
UN2: (VI.D.7) 19(d)
oppose probate
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(i) for use in protoCyclops. color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 7 June 1904, p.3
UN2: (VI.D.7) 19(e)
the jury (found) (finding)
xxxx The Times (London), 7 June 1904, p.3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:246(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 20(a)
Encycl. Britannica
xxxx The Times (London), 7 June 1904, p.10
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:246(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 20(b)
~ 30 v. 15
xxxx The Times (London), 7 June 1904, p.10
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:246(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 20(c)
~ sold. off streets ~
xxxx The Times (London), 7 June 1904, p.10
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:246(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 20(d)
~ Maud Gonne MacBride, letter to Freeman's Journal, disgraceful conduct of soldiers in streets of Dublin color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 7 June 1904, p.10
UN2: (VI.D.7) 20(e)
Mark Twain's wife died at Villa di Quarto, Firenze
xxxx The Times (London), 7 June 1904, p.10
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:246(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 20(f)
Pres. Board Agriculture, Lord Onslow
xxxx The Times (London), 7 June 1904, p.12
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:247(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 21(a)
loss in the Irish Sea, March 20, British sailing-ship Lady Cairns of Swansea, with all hands, collision with German s.s. Mona approached each other on opposite tacks in a fog Mona gave no aid, her master feared the collision bulkhead would give way no water coming into the hold
Note: Copied to Sheet 16.026(b). color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 6 June 1904, p.6
UN2: (VI.D.7) 21(b)
a flush of grass.
xxxx The Times (London), 6 June 1904, p.3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:247(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 21(c)
pinch for keep.
xxxx The Times (London), 6 June 1904, p.3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:247(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 22(a)
Lady Flower and Miss Flower are leaving town … till the autumn … return to Stanhope-gardens color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 1 June 1904, p.6
UN2: (VI.D.7) 22(b)
New route Rosslare to Fishguard coming
Note: Copied to Sheet 16.026(c). ‘to Fishguard’ crossed out. Not cancelled
xxxx The Times (London), 1 June 1904, p.7
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:247(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 22(c)
Lord Dudley thanks Kilkenny
xxxx The Times (London), 4 June 1904, p.1
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:247(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 22(d)
Ballsbridge : Lord Lieutenant opened the Mirus bazaar, in aid of Mercer's Hospital color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 1 June 1904, p.10
UN2: (VI.D.7) 23(a)
Limerick Quarter Sessions, plaintiff, Max J. Blond, a Jew, sued to recover for goods supplied to one James Rahilly case of Jew v Christian cf. color t.b.a.
xxxx The Times (London), 1 June 1904, p.10
UN2: (VI.D.7) 23(b)
Hella Elzholz, Lugano c⁄o P.O. Berlin — Steglitz Schloss-str 69
Note: The Berlin street-directories c. 1917 indicate that a ‘Rosa Elzholz’ lived at this Berlin address. Was Rosa Hella's mother or sister? Was Hella the subject of one of Joyce-Bloom's attempted epistolary romances, love by letter? Ellmann (1982, pp.418-9) recounts the story of how Joyce while in Locarno in late 1917 met a young German doctor, Gertrude Kaempffer, and attempted to entrap her into an intimate correspondence with him, using as his address the poste restante in Zürich. It would appear that she was staying at the time in Lugano, having come thence from Berlin. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:247(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 24(a)
brogues Not cancelled
Brogue (Irish). Local lingual accent from the name of the footcovering worn by the peasants. ‘From the brogue to the boot’ (gentleman) ‘all speak the same of him, and can say no other’. Maria Edgeworth, The Absentee, ch. 9. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 49
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:247(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 24(b)
Palæontology — only gigantic bits survive Not cancelled
Le paléontologue ne vit dans la compagnie que d'êtres gigantesques dont l'ossature put jadis échapper à tous les hasards et dont la taille, la force et la beauté créent aujourd'hui, pour l'esprit qui les reconstitue, un monde de merveilles et parfois de chimères, tout différent de notre petit monde terre à terre. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,17
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:248(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 24(c)
Portulans explorateurs, Thévenot, Tournefort, Paul Lucas
Les portulans et les voyageurs de la période franque fournissent—nous le verrons—le véritable commentaire des navigations d'Ulysse: dans Thévenot, Tournefort ou Paul Lucas, nous aurons l'explication rationnelle de ce que nous appelons, faute d'étude suffisante, les légendes de l'Odyssée. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,27
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:248(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 24(d)
Belcher (handkerchief)
Note: Copied to Sheet 16.026(d). color t.b.a.
Belcher (Sporting, 19 cent.). A handkerchief pattern, round spots, light or dark upon a dark or light ground. From a prize-fighter, Jim Belcher, who always carried into the ring a wiping handkerchief of this kind. After Belcher's time, the ‘belcher’ split up into colours, every prize-fighter having his own tints. Belcher's original was white spots on dark blue ground. Until quite recent years, a spotted neck-tie was called a Belcher: now called a ‘moon-tie’. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 25
UN2: (VI.D.7) 24(e)
moontie
Belcher (Sporting, 19 cent.). […] Until quite recent years, a spotted neck-tie was called a Belcher: now called a ‘moon-tie’. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 25
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:248(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 24(f)
birdseye
Quarter pound bird's eye (Low. Class Smokers'). Quarter of one ounce—a pennorth. Asked for quite seriously. Probably begun as a joke. (See Sherry.) J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 204
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:248(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 24(g)
bit of stuff
Bit o'stuff (Street, 19 cent.). A lovely woman—not perhaps of a Penelope-like nature—rarely at home. He waited for a bit of stuff near the stage door of the Comedy Theatre. He was an elderly cove and he had great patience—Cutting. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 31
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:248(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 24(h)
bit of grease
Bit o' grease (Anglo-Ind. Army). A Hindoo stout woman of a smiling character, e.g., ‘She's a nice bit o' grease—she is.’ J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 30
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:248(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 24(i)
Black Maria
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(ab) color t.b.a.
Black Maria (Thieves', 19 cent.). The prison van, probably Anglicizing ‘Black V.R.’, this public conveyance being ink-coloured, and bearing V.R. on each side of it. To the ignorant V.R. would have no meaning; while Maria would; or it may be a rhyming effort. The New York prison van, though of course very different from the English carriage, bears the same name. He ‘protested’ against entering the Black Maria, and on the way up ‘would not admit’ that he was going to the Workhouse, but by this time he probably feels at home up there.—N. Y. Police Report, 1883. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 32
UN2: (VI.D.7) 24(j)
dirk in a sark
Bloody carpet rags (Amer., imported to Liverpool). A mutilated man. All of a sudden the burly coloured man drew a razor from his pocket and started for the light-weight with the remark that he'd make bloody carpet rags of him.—Newsp. Cutting. It should be added that the razor is the American negro's favourite weapon, carried as a rule in a high boot—something after the manner of a Scotch dirk in a Scotch sark. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 35
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:248(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 24(k)
boko (beaucoup)
Boko (Common). A huge nose. Corruption of ‘beaucoup’, the ‘o’ being national and preferred to the French ‘ou’. Said to be descended from the time of Grimaldi, who would observe while ‘joey-ing’ (g.v.) ‘C'est beaucoup’, and tapping his nose. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 40
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:248(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 24(l)
Grimaldi
Boko (Common). A huge nose. Corruption of ‘beaucoup’, the ‘o’ being national and preferred to the French ‘ou’. Said to be descended from the time of Grimaldi, who would observe while ‘joey-ing’ (g.v.) ‘C'est beaucoup’, and tapping his nose J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 40
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:248(i)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 24(m)
boneshaker
Bone-shaker (Youths' 1870 on). The earliest bicycle—which tried to break bones incessantly. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 41
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:248(j)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 25(a)
καλύπτω, — I hide
Voilà donc bien l'Ile de la Cachette, l'Ile de Kalypso (καλύπτω, je cache, je couvre), l'Ile boisée, νησοξ δενήεσσα, l'Ile toute pleine de persil et de fleurs violettes, se dressant sur les flots comme un nombril sur un bouclier, et perlant deux tables, deux étendues planes, couvertes de bois et d'herbes. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,281f.
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.138. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:249(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 25(b)
νησος δενορνεσσα wooded isle
Voilà donc bien l'Ile de la Cachette, l'Ile de Kalypso (Καλύπτω, je cache, je couvre), l'Ile boisée, νησος δενορνεσσα, l'Ile toute pleine de persil et de fleurs violettes, se dressant sur les flots comme un nombril sur un bouclier, et perlant deux tables, deux étendues planes, couvertes de bois et d'herbes. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,281f.
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.137. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:249(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 25(c)
beanpea B.P.
Beanpea (London Streets). A coalescing of B and P (q.v.) into one word, the d being dropped. Doubtless the outcome of time, and the droll idea of combining the two vegetables which come in almost at the same time. Still hastily, too hastily, applied to effeminate youths. The case was thrown out of Court when it came before Lord Chief-Justice Cockburn. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 23
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:249(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 25(d)
drunk as a boiled owl
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.005(u) for UG 12.510f. color t.b.a.
Boiled Owl (People's). Drunk —as a boiled owl. Here there is no common sense whatever, nor fun, wit, nor anything but absurdity. Probably another instance of a proper name being changed to a common or even uncommon word. May be drunk as Abel Doyle which would suggest an Irish origin like many incomprehensible proverbs too completely Anglicised. It is a well-known fact in natural history that a parrot is the only bird which can sing after partaking of wines, spirits, or beer; for it is now universally agreed by all scientific men who have investigated the subject that the expression, ‘Drunk as a boiled owl’' is a gross libel upon a highly respectable teetotal bird which, even in its unboiled state, drinks nothing stronger than rain-water.—D. T., 12th December 1892. Also whitish, washed-out countenance, with staring sleepy eyes. Both were admirably made up, and Twiss had just the boiled-owlish appearance that is gained by working all night in a printing-office.—Ref., 31st May 1885. (See Dead as O'Donnel, Smithereens.) J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 40
Note: See also UN2 (VI.D.7):026(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 25(e)
Abel Doyle (a boiled owl)
Boiled Owl (People's). Drunk as a boiled owl. Here there is no common sense whatever, nor fun, wit, nor anything but absurdity. Probably another instance of a proper name being changed to a common or even uncommon word. May be drunk as Abel Doyle which would suggest an Irish origin like many incomprehensible proverbs too completely Anglicised. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 40
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:249(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 26(a)
Kalypso (Atlanti(s)de)
Pline nous dit: «On parle d'une #[C3]#[AE]le adossée à l'Atlas et nommée Atlantide, traditur et alia insula contra montem Atlantem et ipsa Atlantis appellata Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,263
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.136. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:249(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 26(b)
parsley violet
[…] l'Ile toute pleine de persil et de fleurs violettes, se dressant sur les flots comme un nombril sur un bouclier, et perlant deux tables, deux étendues planes, couvertes de bois et d'herbes. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,282
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.137, 246. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:249(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 26(c)
grotto
Accore du côté de l'Ouest, elle a vers l'Est les deux anses du Roi et de la Reine, avec une grotte appelée la Grotte des Palomas ou des Pigeons, où deux cents personnes pourraient se réfugier. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,273
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.137. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:249(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 26(d)
αμφιρυτη ομφαλος σελενος ορρα ορνιθης
C'est une #[C3]#[AE]le assez haute, avec un sommet, un nombril de 74 mètres,
αμφιρυτη οθι' τ' ομφαλος εστι σελενος
avec des roches et des falaises accores, où venait s'asseoir Ulysse pour pleurer devant la mer inféconde, […] Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,273
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.137f. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:249(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 26(e)
a baby soda
Baby (Tavern, 1875). The conviction amongst men given to creature comforts that the cheapest soda and spirits refresher rose to sixpence at least, led the serated water manufacturers to invent the half-bottle (2d.), which from its small size was dubbed ‘baby’ by all men. ‘Give me a baby lemonade’ was understood by all barmaids, who never blushed. The term has lapsed. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 13
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:249(i)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 26(f)
green curtain (playhouse)
Back o' the green (Theatre and Music-hall). This is a sort of rebus, the ‘green’ being an imperfect rhyme for ‘scenes’, also referring to that historical ‘green’ curtain which has now almost passed away. It represents ‘behind the scenes’. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 14
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:249(j), VI.C.16:250(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 26(g)
barbecue (holocaust) Not cancelled
Barbecue (Old English). Any animal, bird, or large fish cooked whole, without cutting, from beard (barbe) to tail (queue). The triumphal procession of a band of music, to welcome Mrs Langtry, was a comparatively ancient device smacking somewhat of both the circus and the institution known in America as a ‘barbecue’ (a festival where a bullock or sheep is roasted entire, set to music).—Newsp. Cutting. In the United States the word now represents a noisy political meeting. I see they announce a big, oldfashioned barbecue to be given next week by the Brooklyn Democrats, at which Cleveland and Hendricks, Presidential candidates, are to participate.

255: Unrelieved holocaust (Society, 1883). In 1882 the destruction of the Ring Theatre (Vienna), and of a circus at Berditscheff (Russia), both accompanied by terrible loss of life, led a writer in the Times to use the above odd phrase in reference to these catastrophes—whereupon the satirical spirits of society adopted it to ridicule the most absurd incidents.

J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 19
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:250(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 26(h)
banbury cakes color t.b.a.
Banbury (London, 1894). One of the more recent shapes of ‘jam’, ‘biscuit’, ‘cake’, ‘confectionery’, ‘tart’ (q.v.)—a loose woman. Witness took several names and addresses, and some of the females described themselves as 'Banburys'; and said they got their living as best they could.—Raid on the Gardenia Club, The People, 4th February 1894. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 17
Note: ‘cakes’ not crossed through. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:250(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 26(i)
smithereens
Dead as a door-nail (Peoples'; from Ireland). Dead as O'Donnel; on all fours with ‘I'll smash you into smithereens’—that is to say, Smithers' Ruins—S. having had his house pulled about his ears. O'Donnel being dead and Smithers no longer alive, the two folk -phrases become, the one anglicized into ‘door-nail’, the other into a powerful word representing complete destruction, one which is heard to this day amongst the Irish lower classes wherever found. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 105
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:250(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 26(j)
doornail (O'Donnell)
Dead as a door-nail (Peoples'; from Ireland). Dead as O'Donnel; on all fours with ‘I'll smash you into smithereens’—that is to say, Smithers' Ruins—S. having had his house pulled about his ears. O'Donnel being dead and Smithers no longer alive, the two folk-phrases become, the one anglicized into ‘door-nail’, the other into a powerful word representing complete destruction, one which is heard to this day amongst the Irish lower classes wherever found. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 105
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:250(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 26(k)
been to a bible class
Bible Class, Been to a (Printers' Satire). A gentleman with two black eyes, got in a fight. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 27
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:250(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 27(a)
(sailor)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:250(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 27(b)
afters (2nd course)
Afters (Devon). Sweets—pies and puddings. ‘Bring in the afters’ is a common satirical remark in poor Devonshire houses, especially when there are no ‘afters’ to follow. Also used in Scotland, e.g., ‘Hey mon, a dinner, an' nae afters!’ J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 3
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:250(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 27(c)
after you with the push
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(af) for UG 12.1434. color t.b.a.
After you with the push’ (Peoples'). Said, with satirical mock politeness, in the streets to any one who has roughly made his way past the speaker, and ‘smudged’ him. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 3
UN2: (VI.D.7) 27(d)
agony in red
Agony in Red (Soc.). Vermilion costume. When the aesthetic craze was desperately ‘on’ (1879-81), terms used in music were applied to painting, as a ‘nocturne in silver-grey,’ a ‘symphony in amber,’ a ‘fugue in purple,’ an ‘andante in shaded violet’. Hence it was an easy transition to apply terms of human emotions to costumes. There are many terrible tints even now to be found among the repertory of the leaders of fashion: agonies in red, livid horrors in green, ghastly lilacs, and monstrous mauves.—Newsp. Cutting. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 3f
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:250(i)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 27(e)
Alexandra limp
Alexandra Limp (Soc., ab. 1872). An affected manner of walking seen for several years amongst women. Said to have been imitated from the temporary mode in which the then Princess of Wales walked after some trouble with a knee. (See Buxton Limp, Grecian Bend, Roman Fall.) J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 4
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:250(j)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 27(f)
O, mihi, beate Martine
All my eye and Betty Martin (Peoples'). An expression of disbelief, evasive declaration that the person addressed is a liar. Perhaps the finest example extant of colloquial exclamations reaching to-day from pre-Reformation times. St Martin was, and is, the patron saint of beggars. The prayer to St Martin opens, ‘0, mihi, beate Martine.‘ This phrase was used by English mendicants (and is still used by South-Italian beggars) when asking for alms. When indiscriminate charity ‘went out’ in England at the date of the Reformation, this phrase fell into bad repute as representing a lazy and lying class. It is still used by the commoner classes as an expression of doubt, though it has been very widely superseded by ‘humbug’ (q.v.). J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 5
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:250(k)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 27(g)
antitox
Anti-Tox (Amer., reaching England 1885). A drug to sober a drunken person. Tox is, of course, the abbreviation of intoxication. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 8
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:250(l)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 27(h)
applejack (cider)
Apple-jack (Amer.). Spirit distilled from cider or from the pulp of apples already pressed for cider. (See Sweet Waters.) ‘Jack’ is a common term for spirits in U.S.A. In Normandy this liquor is calvados. ‘A grindstun can,’ remarked a weazened farmer, who had just called for some apple-jack.——Newsp. Cutting, 1883. J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 9
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:250(m)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 27(i)
B's (brothers) fenians
B's. (Fenian, 1883). Patriotic Brotherhood. In questionable taste. The members of the Patriotic Brotherhood, or Irish Invincibles, thus styled themselves. It may have had some absurd association with the ‘busy bee’. Patrick Duffy was sworn, and deposed—Finnegan and Devlin were at a meeting of the society held in the spring of 1881. I knew James Hauratty and Patrick Geogeghan, who were both ‘B's’.—Report of the Patriotic Brotherhood Conspiracy (Trial at Belfast, 26th March 1883). J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 13
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:250(n)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 28(a)
exilior, qui, quod altius quam conspici potest usque in nubila erigitur, coelum et sidera non tangere modo sed sustinere quoque dictus est
in arenis mons est Atlaa de se consurgens, verum incisis undique ropibus praeceps, invius, et quo magis surgit exilior, qui, quod altius quant conspici potest usque in nubila erigitur, coelum et sidera non tangere modo sed sustinere quoque dictus est. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,246
Note: See also UN2 (VI.D.7):029(g) for the beginning of this quote. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:251(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 28(b)
(Dion. Orbis Description)
1. Dion., Orb. Descript., v. 67-68. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,246n
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:251(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 28(c)
Muses
Primitivement c'est dans le détroit qu'Atlas possède les Colonnes du Ciel: il est voisin, nous dit Hérodote, des Colonnes d'Hercule, et les manuels de géographie répètent longtemps ce dire d'Hérodote: «Muses, commençons à l'Océan occidental (dit le versif#[C3]#[AE]cateur Dionysos au début de sa Description du Monde), près de la lointaine Gadès. où se dressent les Colonnes d'Hercule, où monte aussi la Colonne vers le Ciel, colonne de bronze inaccessible, voilée de nuages épais.” Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,246
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:251(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 28(d)
hours of Atlas
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:251(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 28(e)
iron (metal) sky / steel
C'est la notion que nous retrouvons dans l'Odyssée: le ciel de fer odysséen, tout semblable au firmament de l'Egypte Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,249
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:251(d), VI.C.16:251(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 28(f)
SD in Marsh's Library, Not cancelled
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:252(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 28(g)
hears again bells.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:252(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 28(h)
FC's false calves
F.C.'s (Theat.). False Calves (i.e. paddings used by actors in heroic parts to improve the shape of the legs). J. Reading Ware, Passing English of the Victorian Era (1909), 126
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:252(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 29(a)
Atlas τλἀω = I carry)
Le personnage d'Atlas n'est qu'un nom commun personnifié, Dans la langue des Ioniens, atlas,ατλας, est le portant: τλἀω, porter. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,244
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.137. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:252(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 29(b)
Telamon, Kion column
Le légendaire Atlas se nomme aussi Télamon. Dans les inscriptions du Pont Euxin, telamon est employé couramment aux lieu et place de colonne: κίων […] Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,244
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:252(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 29(c)
pillar of clouds
Or les navigateurs des âges classiques connaissaient, par la légende homérique et par tous les manuels de géographie, le Pilier des Nuages, «la Colonne de Bronze inaccessible, voilée d'épaisses nuées». Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,245
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.137. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:252(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 29(d)
Apes hill
Le Mont aux Singes cessa de leur appara#[C3]#[AE]tre contin#[C3]#[BB]ment enveloppé de brumes. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,245
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.137. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:252(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 29(e)
Angleterre
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:252(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 29(f)
Hesperides (7) golden apples
La mythologie populaire s'était emparée d'Atlas. Elle en avait fait un personnage célèbre et familier: les pommes d'or des Hespérides, ses filles, avaient donné lieu à une foule de contes populaires. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,246
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:252(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 29(g)
in arenis mons est Atlas de se consurgens, verum incisis undique rupibus praeceps, invius, et quo magis surgitur
Avec ses trois ou quatre mille mètres de roches abruptes, surgissant à pic au milieu des sables et dressant jusqu'au ciel deux sommets pointus, cet Allas touchait et soutenait vraiment la vo#[C3]#[BB]te, in arenis mons est Atlaa de se consurgens, verum incisis undique rupibus praeceps, invius, et quo magis surgit exilior, qui, quod altius quant conspici potest usque in nubila erigitur, coelum et sidera non tangere modo sed sustinere quoque dictus est. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,246
Note: See also UN2 (VI.D.7):028(a) for the ending of this quote. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:252(i), VI.C.16:253(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 30(a)
Rhetoric
La Rhétorique d'Aristote Aristotle La Rhétorique d'Aristote en français, trans. François Cassandre (1733), title
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:253(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 30(b)
Examples
VI.C.16.253(c)
Aristotle La Rhétorique d'Aristote en français, trans. François Cassandre (1733), ii(15): Raphael transcription
UN2: (VI.D.7) 30(c)
Universal —; particular
VI.C.16.253(d)
Aristotle La Rhétorique d'Aristote en français, trans. François Cassandre (1733), ii(22): Raphael transcription
UN2: (VI.D.7) 30(d)
Tecmar Tecmerion — — nal
VI.C.16.253(e)
Aristotle La Rhétorique d'Aristote en français, trans. François Cassandre (1733), ii(23): Raphael transcription
UN2: (VI.D.7) 30(e)
particular to universal
VI.C.16.253(f)
Aristotle La Rhétorique d'Aristote en français, trans. François Cassandre (1733), ii(23): Raphael transcription
UN2: (VI.D.7) 30(f)
common (general) proper special kinds part
VI.C.16.253(g)
Aristotle La Rhétorique d'Aristote en français, trans. François Cassandre (1733), ii(26): Raphael transcription
UN2: (VI.D.7) 30(g)
Sun
C'est ce que font Ulysse et ses compagnons pendant la tempète, dans l'ile du Soleil: […] Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,174
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:254(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 30(h)
Storm: hide in cave
Mais le lendemain, voici la tempête, avec ses «grains» de lourde pluie. On se réfugie alors dans une caverne. Pour les marins étrangers, en effet, la caverne côtière est un g#[C3]#[AE]te tout préparé, un abri contre les éléments, un refuge et une cachette contre les indigènes. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,174
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:254(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 31(a)
1 Recognition par proche 2 Recital
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,576
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:254(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 31(b)
Ulys. Phae galley (52 oars)
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,595
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:254(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 31(c)
Kalypso
Respectant la disposition et la suite du poème, nous en prendrons l'un après l'autre les divers épisodes. C'est dans l'île de Kalypso que s'ouvre l'Odysseia. Depuis sept ans, captif dans cette #[C3]#[AE]le, Ulysse attend l'aube du retour. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,149
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:254(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 31(d)
Hermes gull
Sur la prière d'Athèna et sur l'ordre de Zeus, Hermès s'en va pour délivrer le héros. Hermès plonge du sommet de l'Olympe jusqu'à la surface des flots et longtemps il vole sous la forme d'une mouette. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,149
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:254(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 31(e)
parsley
Et tout autour, c'étaient de molles prairies de persil et de violettes, qu'un dieu même e#[C3]#[BB]t admirées en débarquant et dont son cœur se f#[C3]#[BB]t réjoui. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,150
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:254(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 31(f)
αιθοποςοινος οινοςερυθρος
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:254(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 31(g)
hollow ships
Ce sont des «vaisseaux creux», c'est-à-dire béants, non pontés, qui ont seulement, à l'avant et à l'arrière, des sortes de château, ϊκρια. Ces ikria ne sont, je pense, que des estrades émergeant du vaisseau creux et supportées par quatre piliers; on y monte par une échelle. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,155
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:254(i)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 31(h)
arrest 1902∕ 4 Not cancelled
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:254(j)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 31(i)
acatalectic Not cancelled
Note: An acatalectic line of verse is one having the (metrically) correct number of syllables in the line. The line of verse quoted in “Proteus” is certainly not acatalectic, so the final text's “A catalectic tetramenter” (meaning a syllable is missing) is correct. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:254(k)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 32(a)
Sardinia,
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,564
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:255(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 32(b)
le massacre Achéens
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,564
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:255(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 32(c)
Skylla dogfisheater (Strabon)
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,564f.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:255(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 32(d)
Kalypso — sp raft
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,564
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:255(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 32(e)
le Semite a fourni le bloc, l'Hellène en a tiré la statue
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,567
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:255(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 32(f)
(7 and 10)
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,569
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.363. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:255(i)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 32(g)
7 monsters (Kalypso — Lestryg — Cyclops — Sirens Skylla — Lotos — Nausicaa)
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,569
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:255(k), VI.C.16:256(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 32(h)
3 sublimes (Aeolus — Circe — Hades)
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,569
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:256(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 32(i)
dissonances, Demodocus sings dispute of Ul. & Achilles (Od 8), Sophocles, Ajax (Ul.) dispute, Ag. v. Menelas (Telemachus) (3.130), Ul. v. Thers. (Il. 2), Ach. v. Thers. (Il. 2.220)
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,574f.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:256(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 32(j)
Bonifacio, Lestrygons, Messine & Gibraltar
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,569
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:255(b), VI.C.16:255(d), VI.C.16:255(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 32(k)
Lotoph — Libya, Nausicaa Adriatic, Nisida (Capri)
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,569
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.246. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:255(j), VI.C.16:255(d), VI.C.16:256(a), VI.C.16:257(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 33(a)
Siren song.
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.246. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:257(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 33(b)
Shia — ha — Shinim
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:257(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 33(c)
princeling
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:257(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 33(d)
Cyclops, sourcils de forets, explosions, colères
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(ai). color t.b.a.
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,549
UN2: (VI.D.7) 33(e)
Aeolus = Lipari
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,559
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:257(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 33(f)
Skylla — wreckers
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,559
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:257(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 33(g)
Cyclops, lanceur de roches
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(ah); see also Sheet 12.003(at). color t.b.a.
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,559
UN2: (VI.D.7) 33(h)
Kalypso (Cachette)
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,563
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:257(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 33(i)
end
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:257(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 33(j)
Sikeles (orphans) — isolated
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,563
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:257(i)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 33(k)
Europe
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:257(j)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 33(l)
disguised (1001 Nights)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:257(k)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 33(m)
brother
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:257(l)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 33(n)
Spain (Moors) Kalypso
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:257(m)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 33(o)
Joseph
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:257(n)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 33(p)
topic
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:257(o)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 33(q)
popular eloquence (cf. Dante)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:258(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 33(r)
Irish again for grand funeral (Egyptian)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:258(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 34(a)
Eidothea — Ambrosia to Ménélas against stink of seal
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,48
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.114, 120. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:258(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 34(b)
Wycherley Plain Dealer
The Plain-Dealer, A Comedy. Written by Mr. Wycherley. William Wycherley, The Plain Dealer (edition unknown), title
Note: See also UN1 (NLI.3):005(ai). Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:258(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 34(c)
(as sluttish and slatternly as an Irish woman bred in France
Oliv. As sluttish and slatternly, as an Irish woman bred in France. William Wycherley, The Plain Dealer (edition unknown), II, 1, p.32
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:258(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 34(d)
smutty Not cancelled
Oliv. Well- - - but, my Lord, though you justifie every Body, you cannot in earnest uphold so beastly a Writer, whose ink is so smutty, as one may say. William Wycherley, The Plain Dealer (edition unknown), II,1, p.35
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:258(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 34(e)
cully?
Oliv. Well, we Women, like the rest of the Cheats of the World, when our Cullies or Creditors have found us out, and will, or can trust no longer, pay Debts, and satisfie Obligations, with a quarrel, the kindest Present a Man can make to his Mistress, when he can make no more Presents: for oftentimes in Love, as at Cards, we are forc'd to play foul, only to give over the game; and use our Lovers like the Cards, when we can get no more by 'em, throw 'em up in a pet, upon the first dispute. William Wycherley, The Plain Dealer (edition unknown), II, 1, p.38
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:259(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 34(f)
jaunty way?
Man. Thy courage will appear more by thy Belt, than thy Sword, I dare swear. Then, Madam, for this gentle piece of Courtesie, this Man of tame Honour, what cou'd you find in him? was it his languishing affected tone? His mannerly look? His second-hand flattery, the refuse of the Play-house Tyring-room? Or his slavish obsequiousness, in watching at the door of your Box at the Play-house, for your hand to your Chair? Or his janty way of playing with your fan? Or was it the Gun-powder spot on his hand, or the Jewel in his ear, that purchas'd your Heart? William Wycherley, The Plain Dealer (edition unknown), II, 1, p.39
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:259(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 34(g)
Proteus — Pharo, Prouti
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II, 49
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.113. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:259(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 34(h)
Moses, saved from waves
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(al). color t.b.a.
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,52
UN2: (VI.D.7) 34(i)
Helbig. l'Epopée Odysséenne
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:259(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 34(j)
mammock?
Man. But she was false to me before, she told me so her self, and yet I cou'd not quite believe it; but she was: so that her second falseness is a favour to me not an injury, in revenging me upon the Man that wrong'd me first of her love[.] Her love! #[E2]#[80]#[A6] a Whore's, a Witche's love! #[E2]#[80]#[A6] But what, did she not kiss well, Sir? I'm sure I thought her lips #[E2]#[80]#[A6] but I must not think of 'em more #[E2]#[80]#[A6] but yet they are such I cou'd still kiss #[E2]#[80]#[A6] grow to #[E2]#[80]#[A6] then tear off with my teeth, grind 'em into mammocks, and spit 'em into her Cuckold's face. William Wycherley, The Plain Dealer (edition unknown), IV,1, p.81
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:259(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 34(k)
Who is saved Ulysses or Menelaus
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:259(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 34(l)
Proteus — blueblack wig
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,55
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:259(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 34(m)
seer's waves
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:259(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 34(n)
Le rhythme septénaire régit notre conte odysséen
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,60
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:259(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 34(o)
Maspero. Les Contes Populaires
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,60
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:260(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 35(a)
Descent into Hell
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,322
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:260(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 35(b)
Orpheus, Pollux, Theseus, Héraklès, Aeneas.
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,322
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:260(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 35(c)
Samuel Saul
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,322
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.161. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:260(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 35(d)
evocation (Semitic)
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,324
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:260(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 35(e)
ob
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,323
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:260(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 35(f)
descent (Hellenic)
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,324
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:260(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 35(g)
Tiresias — le d.r.s. (Heb) ~ ~ evokes ghosts
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,323
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.161. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:260(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 35(h)
Averne (ἀ-ὄρνις) birdless
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,327
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:260(i)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 35(i)
pines
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,327
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:260(j)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 35(j)
L.B asks the way back at Glasnevin from J. O'Connell wife
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,329
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:261(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 35(k)
Tiresias of Thebes now man — Wom.
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,329
Note: See also UN3 (VIII.A.5):029(g) and Sheet 15.018(da). Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:261(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 35(l)
Sibyl semitic
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,329
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:261(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 36(a)
winter with Circe
?284 Dans le récit odysséen, nous sommes en été, au cours ou vers la lin de la saison navigante. Car Ulysse et ses compagnons, depuis leur départ de Troie, ont déjà dépensé plusieurs mois chez les Lotophages, les Kyklopes, Aiolos et les Lestrygons. La saison est avancée; ils vont hiverner chez Kirkè où, toute une année, ils resteront à manger, à boire, à faire la fête : Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,311
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:261(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 36(b)
Nekia XI canto (only
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,311
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.161. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:261(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 36(c)
example six cent 40 lines)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:261(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 36(d)
Okeanos = Hok-ewan (Bay of Wealth)
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,316
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:261(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 36(e)
Hades Plouton
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,316
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:261(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 36(f)
Acheron, Styx Kokytos, Pyriphlegeton
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,320
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.161. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:262(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 36(g)
In asphodel fields
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,320
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:262(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 36(h)
White Stone, Leukada Petrin
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,320
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:262(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 36(i)
Erides (disputes)
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,322
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:262(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 36(j)
type Iliad cf. Achilles & Ulysses in Hades
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,322
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:262(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 36(k)
Nostos (Return)
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,322
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:262(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 36(l)
Odyssey
xxxx Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), II,322
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:262(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 37(a)
le sentier humide n'est jamais que le complément du grand chemin solide
Nous aurons par la suite vingt exemples de ces navigations minima pour une route de terre maximum. Nous verrons que le «sentier humide» n'est jamais que le complément du grand chemin solide. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,69
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:263(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 37(b)
Milesians first to exploit Euxine
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(am). color t.b.a.
Aux débuts de l'histoire écrite, ce sont les Milésiens qui, les premiers des Hellènes, entreprennent l'exploitation commerciale du Pont-Euxin. Ils ont à tous les mouillages, depuis Milet jusqu'à Trébizonde, des comptoirs ou des colonies. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,74
UN2: (VI.D.7) 37(c)
Gilgamesh (Assyrien)
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:263(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 37(d)
Jensen
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:263(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 37(e)
2 occupations en Pylos des peuples de la mer
Avant donc les temps homériques, la légende conna#[C3]#[AE]t sur ces rives de Pylos deux occupations des peuples de la mer. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,125
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:263(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 37(f)
(gate) Pylos = Samikon (high)
Mais, si le nom de Pylos est indigène, il se peut que le nom de Samikon soit venu de l'étranger. Same, […] dit Strabon, signifie sans doute la hauteur, […] Mais les indigènes redoutent un peu le passage étranglé du bas, où quelque précaution n'est jamais inutile: cette Porte est soigneusement notée dans leur géographie; la Clef restera célèbre parmi leurs descendants. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,125
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.108. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:263(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 37(g)
Egyptian (Lélex)
Son père, Lélex, venait de mers plus lointaines encore. Car Lélex était un roi égyptien débarqué sur la côte mégarienne. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,125
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:263(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 37(h)
Thessalian Nestor Neleos
La seconde, qui dure encore au temps de la Télémakheia, est personnifiée par Nestor et Nélée: elle est d'origine thessalienne, achéenne, hellénique: rien ne différence les Pyliens des autres peuplades achéennes; ils sont les alliés d'Agamemnon; Nestor est un roi des Grecs; Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,125
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.108. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:264(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 37(i)
Alpheios = cow river
En faveur de l'étymologie sémitique Alpheios = Fleuve des B#[C5]#[93]ufs, on trouverait quelques indices. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,127
Note: Referred to in Stuart Gilbert, James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study (London: Faber and Faber, 1930), p.109. Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:264(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 37(j)
(Semitic)
En faveur de l'étymologie sémitique Alpheios = Fleuve des B#[C5]#[93]ufs, on trouverait quelques indices. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,127
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:264(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 37(k)
Hellene — coast civilisation,
La civilisation apportée par eux pouvait réagir d'abord sur les indigènes de la cote et se ramifier ensuite dans l'intérieur du pays. Les Hellènes suivirent une politique bien différente: Les colonies grecques étaient non seulement commerciales, mais encore agricoles. L'occupation des vastes terrains nécessaires à l'agriculture occasionne des conflits avec les indigènes. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,130
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:264(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 37(l)
natives oppose agriculture
Les Hellènes suivirent une politique bien différente: Les colonies grecques étaient non seulement commerciales, mais encore gricoles. L'occupation des vastes terrains nécessaires à l'agriculture occasionne des conflits avec les indigènes. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,130
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:264(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 37(m)
Phenician — internal
«Les Phéniciens poui-suivaient une politique uniquement commerciale. Ils cherchaient à maintenir des relations pacifiques avec la population des pays où ils avaient affaire. La civilisation apportée par eux pouvait réagir d'abord sur les indigènes de la cote et se ramifier ensuite dans l'intérieur du pays.» Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,130
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:264(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 38(a)
Alexander to revive Troy
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(aq). color t.b.a.
It is indeed a remarkable testimony to the power of sentiment in human affairs that the glamour of Homer should have done so much for Troy as it actually did. On purely sentimental grounds the thoughts of statesmen turned more than once to the idea of making Troy the great city of the world; but the disabilities of its position were too much for them. Alexander's projects resulted only in the greatness of a rival neighbour, Alexandria Troas, where an artificial harbour was a possibility. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 325
UN2: (VI.D.7) 38(b)
Augustus — Horace mocks
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(as). color t.b.a.
Augustus thought of making Ilium the seat of his empire, but Horace had the true instinct when he prophesied that such an elevation would be followed by another fall as great and signal as the former. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 325
UN2: (VI.D.7) 38(c)
Const. began to build capital there before Byzant.
Constantine actually began to build his capital there, till the overwhelming advantages of Byzantium induced him to abandon the project before it was too late. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 325
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:264(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 38(d)
town Dardanelles, every ship must pass by day & show papers
Even when the Turks came, and once more closed the straits, it was not to Troy that they went; the range of cannon led them to build their forts in the Narrows higher up; and the town of Dardanelles, where every ship must pass up in daylight and show its papers, is the real representative of the ancient Ilios. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 326
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:264(h), VI.C.16:265(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 38(e)
Ulysses & Jason ? gone →→→ (Euxine)
The difference between the stories of the Argo and of Troy may serve indeed to measure the degree in which the Iliad is historical. A greater gulf can hardly be imagined than that between the geography of the one and the other. There is nothing in the geography of Homer which can be shown to differ from facts still to be verified; it may almost be said that beyond the Propontis there is nothing in the Argo legend which bears any relation to reality. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 327f
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:265(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 38(f)
Troy true ∕ Sailor's stories
Yet the two tales grew up in the same atmosphere and were handed down by the same people from times which were at least not far apart. The tale of the Argo rested on sailors' stories mingled with fantastic mythology. The tale of Troy must from the first have been limited by a tradition of actual facts. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 327f
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:265(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 38(g)
sordid commercial war color t.b.a.
While they were fighting for trade, they may well have believed themselves to be fighting to revenge an insult. The most sordidly conmiercial war which England ever waged was dignified by its point of honour, characteristically embodied, after the fashion of the eighteenth century, in Jenkins' ear. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 329
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(ap).
UN2: (VI.D.7) 38(h)
Jenkin's ear color t.b.a.
While they were fighting for trade, they may well have believed themselves to be fighting to revenge an insult. The most sordidly conmiercial war which England ever waged was dignified by its point of honour, characteristically embodied, after the fashion of the eighteenth century, in Jenkins' ear. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 329
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(ao); see also Sheet 16.017(bi).
UN2: (VI.D.7) 38(i)
Herodotus opens history with Phenician version of rape of Helen color t.b.a.
The stealing of a queen was no unlikely event even in Mycenaean days; Herodotus opens his history with the Phenician version of the story, which agreed that the war began with a kidnapped princess, though place and details differed. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 329
Note: Copied via Sheet 12.007(an) to Sheet 16.017(bi)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 39(a)
Troy fair — July — Castle lord
One can reconstruct the scene. It begins in July, when the Paphlagonians have had two good months for their long coasting voyage. The actual fair takes place on the low, nearly level ridge at the end of which stands the castle of Troy. The lord of the castle is the presiding genius of the scene … Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 314
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:265(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 39(b)
erects wooden booths, tolls,
The lord of the castle is the presiding genius of the scene; his vassals from the surrounding country gather to provide horses and mules for carriage, to build wooden booths, κλισίαι, for the merchants, and to render the thousand little services which bring in reward at such a time. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 314
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:265(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 39(c)
slaves (with silver)
But the great point of interest is the arrival of the Euzine fleet, with its freight of timber, silver ore, cinnabar, and of course a plentiful store of the most marketable commodity of all, slaves. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 314
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:265(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 39(d)
Troy town vanishes
When August was over, and only two months remained for the voyage back, Paphlagonians and Lykians laded their ships, or so many of them as they had not sold, with the goods they had bartered, and set sail for home. The booths were deserted, and Priam and his retainers sat down to feast through the winter months on the toll they had taken. The “great town” of Troy vanished till next year, and the Trojan country-folk returned to their villages. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 315
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:265(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 39(e)
The older Troy (5th city)
The Greeks went home to tell one another the old tale of how, many years before, there had been an older Troy — the “fifth city” as we call it now — which had been taken and burnt by their own legendary hero Heracles, and to talk over plans by which the hated barrier could once more be removed. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 315
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:266(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 39(f)
legendarily pillaged by Heracles
The Greeks went home to tell one another the old tale of how, many years before, there had been an older Troy — the “fifth city” as we call it now — which had been taken and burnt by their own legendary hero Heracles, and to talk over plans by which the hated barrier could once more be removed. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 315
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:266(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 39(g)
storm breach, Poss. mask fortress, cut off water. Starve it
One thing was plain: those great walls of smooth thick masonry could be neither stormed nor breached by any means within their power. But was it not possible to mask the fortress, and starve it out? By establishing a strong camp at the mouth of the river they could secure the essential command of water Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 315f
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:266(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 39(h)
Trojan war followed by Thalassocracy of Rhodes (which commands narrow channel)
In Homer the Achaians are already in possession of Rhodes, commanding the narrow channel by which the Lykian ships had to pass northwards, and even better placed than Lykia for commerce in every direction. Tradition tells us that the Trojan War was soon succeeded by the thalassocracy of Rhodes; and to the Lykians it must have been evident that this would be the result of the fall of Troy. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 321
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:266(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 39(i)
wanted
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:266(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 39(j)
Lycians only allies not mercenary led by 2 Kings, Glaucos & Sarpedon
Hence it is, because they were in reality fighting their own battle, that the Lykians are in a quite special sense the allies of Troy. Not only are they prominent alike in war and counsel, but they alone are represented by their royal house. Nowhere else is any leader of the allies said to be the king of his country; but the Lykians are led by both their kings, the heads of the two branches of the royal family, as is set out for us in great detail in the famous meeting of Diomedes and Glaukos. In war, Sarpedon is second in importance only to Hector himself, and receives divine burial with more solenm circumstance than the Trojan prince. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 321f
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:267(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 39(k)
scarp color t.b.a.
As seen from the north, the natural approach for the stranger, on the steep scarp of the hill, rising to at least 100 feet above the plain at its feet, circled certainly with a double, probably a triple ring of great walls of masonry, and crowned at the top no doubt by a palace and perhaps by a temple, Troy must, in this country of small heights, have formed a really imposing mass. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 150 and passim
Note: Copied to Sheet 13.006(d). A scarp is the steep face of a hill.
UN2: (VI.D.7) 40(a)
Victor Bérard Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée
It is possible for a community which practises neither commerce, production, nor plunder, to grow rich by taking toll of the industry of others. Given certain economical and political conditions, Troy proclaims itself an ideal site for such exploitation. M. Victor Bérard, in Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée, starting from this correct assumption, offers a solution which, like so much of his work, is suggestive and attractive, but on inquiry appears to be untenable. He has called attention to the dominant influence on Mediterranean commerce of the combination, constantly found through the whole region, of winds and promontories. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 257
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:267(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 40(b)
la loi des isthmes Not cancelled
With high winds constantly blowing in one direction, the rounding of many promontories may be, for a small sailing ship, a sheer impossibility for days, or even weeks, at a time. Hence it was often worth while to land goods on the lee-side of an isthmus, and send them overland either to their destination or to a harbour on the other side, where they could be reshipped and carried #[C2]#[A3]arther. … Without denying the importance of the ‘loi des isthmes’ in certain cases, it must be pointed out that Troy does not in any sense stand upon an isthmus. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 257-259
Note: Copied to Sheet 13.006(e) Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:267(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 40(c)
Sailing by day
Always in fear of the fierce northerly squalls which are the terror of sailors in these regions, the primitive navigator shrank from sailing by night, and sought for passages where he could for the longest part of his voyage keep under the shelter of land to the north, and needed to take to the open for not more than a daylight sail. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 264
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:267(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 40(d)
Water supply
In early times, and indeed so long as galvanised iron tanks remained unknown, the water-supply was a vital question for all navigation. Only a poor supply could be carried in the heavy earthenware jars on which the Greeks depended; and so it was that a delay of even two or three days, wind-bound on a coast where the water-supply was in hostile hands, was a matter of life and death. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 262
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:267(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 40(e)
wine, metal, horses (white), Thracians, Paeonians
We can tell from other passages of Homer some at least of the goods which were brought down to the Trojan mart by this line. The wine of Ismaros, of course; the cellars of Agamemnon are stocked not only by the gifts from the King of Lemnos, but by the superior brands of Thrace. These, however, in time of war come from an enemy's country, and are not brought by the enemy's ships; it ia the ships of the Achaians which make the run day by day … From Thrace, too, came swords of great size … the Paeonian Asteropaios used one himself (xxiii 807-8). Their skill in metal work may further be inferred from the goblet "passing fair" which the Thracians gave to Priam (xxiv. 234), and the golden armour and trappings of the Thracian Rhesos (x. 438-9). The Thracian breed of white horses was famous throughout antiquity; the steeds of Rhesos (x. 434 ff) are a typical product of the country, and the Thracians are horsemen to Homer (xiv. 227), as they were afterwards Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 276f
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:267(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 40(f)
Paphlagonian (mules)
But whether we read Enete or Enetai matters little. … A glance at the map will show that this is the very spot for the starting of a fleet from Paphlagonia to Troy. … There is indeed given, with the mention of the town, an indication of a natural product, too vague to help us in assigning a definite locality, but very interesting in itself. Enete or Enetae is said to be the place “whence comes the race of wild mules.” Mules in the strict sense are of course sterile, and there can be no wild race of them. The word … is certainly used here to indicate the wild ass or onager, which in some three varieties, now referred to a single species, the Equus onager, is found in the deserts of Asia, from Syria to Persia and Western India. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 287f
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:268(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 40(g)
H timber ship makers.
We have come a long way from the Troad — 400 miles to Kytoros, and 300 more to Tripolis. But silver travels far, and we may be sure that it was not the only, probably it was not even the chief, article of export from this region. Of the forests, luxuriant and inexhaustible along the whole shore, we have already spoken. The inhabitants were the most famous shipbuilders of antiquity; and we may imagine that many a newly-built vessel was sold at Troy with its cargo of timber as a single lot, the crew crowding for the return voyage into other older ships laden with the more costly and less bulky merchandise from the south and west. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 293
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:268(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 40(h)
Achilles gives him lump pigiron as prize
The fame of the Chalybes rested not on their silver but on their iron. That this must date from very early days is evident from the fact that the best quality of iron, perhaps steel, took its ordinary name from them. In Homer iron is still a rarity, and used only for small implements. The knife of Achilles (11. xviii. 34), the arrow-head of Pandaros (iv. 485), may well have been fashioned near Tripolis and brought to Troy in Paphlagonian or Halizonian bottoms; even the lump of pig-iron which Achilles gives as a prize may have come hence. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 294
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:268(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 40(i)
Homeric ships vermilion cheeked (miltos) cinnabar (Sinopic)
Even the barren highlands of the interior had goods to barter. The Homeric ships were “vermilion cheeked,” μιλοōπαρηος, and the μίλος or cinnabar from which the paint was made was brought to the coast here from the highlands of Cappadocia. “In Cappadocia,” says Strabo, “is found the Sinopic cinnabar, the best of all, though the Iberian competes with it.” Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 294f
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:268(d), VI.C.16:268(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 40(j)
Halizones
And if Halys, Chalybes, Halizones, and Alybe may thus be grouped as related in stem, it is equally true that the termination of Halizones is similar to that of the Amazons whom legend located on the Thermodon, on the very border of the country of the Chalybes. We can thus identify, if not the names themselves, at least their elements somewhat differently arranged, along the coast in the neighbourhood of the mouths of the Halys and the Lycus. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 293f
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:268(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 41(a)
Trebizond [illegible] ~ Not cancelled
And behind all this we may guess at something still more important. The “birthplace of silver” is near the upper waters of the Euphrates, and from time immemorial the passes through the rugged intervening ranges have afforded an outlet to the Black Sea for one of the oldest of all trade routes — that which came westwards across the highlands of Persia from Turkestan and the Central Asian plateau. The caravan road has led sometimes to Trebizond, sometimes to Samsun ; but between these two points, in the country of Alybe in fact, the west has taken up and carried on the trade of the east, for how many centuries it is impossible to say. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 295
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(au)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 41(b)
Turkestan jade Not cancelled
By this path may have come to Troy and Mycenae the precious jade of which the best known home is in Turkestan, and, for all we know, the carpets of Persia and Mesopotamia. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 295
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(au) Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:269(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 41(c)
Persian carpets
By this path may have come to Troy and Mycenae the precious jade of which the best known home is in Turkestan, and, for all we know, the carpets of Persia and Mesopotamia. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 295
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:269(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 41(d)
amber (Baltic) Not cancelled
This has been always taken to indicate a trade route from the Baltic by the great rivers of Russia to the north coast of the Euzine, and thence by ship to the nearest point of the southern coast. By this long route, perhaps, came the Baltic amber found in most Mycenaean settlements, and evidently a highly-prized possession in the second millennium B.C. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 295
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(ar) Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:269(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 41(e)
along Russian waterways Not cancelled
This has been always taken to indicate a trade route from the Baltic by the great rivers of Russia to the north coast of the Euzine, and thence by ship to the nearest point of the southern coast. By this long route, perhaps, came the Baltic amber found in most Mycenaean settlements, and evidently a highly-prized possession in the second millennium B.C. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 295
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(at) Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:269(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 41(f)
Hill of Hissarlik
The Hellespont was, in fact, its only outlet, and so long as Troy blocked the Hellespont, the gold and silver, the iron and cinnabar, the timber, linen, and hemp, the dried fish and oil, and perhaps the jade and amber, must be taken for barter to the hill of Hissarlik, carried all the way in the ships which the Paphlagonians and Halizones knew how to build and sail. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 296
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:269(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 41(g)
Mysians, Phrygians
(3) Mysians and Phrygians. … We know generally the position of Mysia and Phrygia in historical times; the only additional guide we have is the name Askania. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 297
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:269(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 41(h)
watershed
This certainly means the district in which lay the lake known in historical times as the Askanian Lake. On it stood the town of Nicaea, now Isnik, which gives the lake its modern name. It lies N.E. of Brusa, and close to the sharp bend where the Sangarius, now Sakaria, suddenly changes its course firom N.W. to N.E by the town of Lefke. An easy pass across the watershed between the lake and the river gives access to the great and fertile Daskylian plain from the valley which is the natural highway to the Phrygian uplands. By this road must have passed all the traffic of the river valley so long as trade centred round the mouth of the Hellespont; the land passage is in this case much shorter and easier than by sea from the river-mouth. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 300
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:269(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 41(i)
Maeonians, Carians, Lycians
(4) Maeonians, Carians, and Lykians. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 305
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:269(h), VI.C.16:270(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 41(j)
chimera = jet of burning gas at Deliktash
Of the Lykian localities named in the Iliad we cannot stake much upon the identification of the Chimaera (179) with a burning jet of natural gas at a place called Deliktash; and the Aleian Plain (201) has always been unknown — it hardly seems possible that Homer is here speaking of the historical Aleian Plain which lay along the Pyramus in the east of Cilicia, more than 300 miles from the Xanthos. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 309
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:270(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 41(k)
a wellfound ship
The coasts of Cilicia offer no promontories and but little shelter under their long lines of mountains overhanging the sea. Trade must be carried on in well-found ships, prepared for long runs by night as well as by day, if communication is to be kept up with the great commercial countries of Cyprus, Egypt, and Phenicia. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 310f
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:270(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 41(l)
Carian women stain horses' ivory cheek-piece purple
and finally, in Il. iv. 142, the blood on Menelaos' white limbs is likened to the purple with which a woman of Maeonia or Caria stains ivory to make a cheek-piece for a horse. The precious ornament is stored in a treasure chamber, envied of many a horseman, but reserved for a king, an adornment for the horse and a glory to the rider. Clearly to Homer Carians and Maeonians are merchants and artists, not fighters. Walter Leaf, Troy: A Study in Homeric Geography (1912), 312
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:270(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 42(a)
trophy (Heilsarmee)
trophy […] Heilsarmee […] trophies, as the converts of the Salvation Army are called, told the story of their conversion (Daily News 1901, 23 Sept. S.3) Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 260
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:270(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 42(b)
saved
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:270(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 42(c)
Six in a hundred
ten-in-the-hundred […] Wucherer […] sixty per cent u. thirty-in-the-hundred Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), ?245
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:270(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 42(d)
Real McCoy.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:270(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 43(a)
turnpike sailor (beggar)
turn-pike […] ~ sailor Bettler Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 263
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:270(i), VI.C.16:271(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 43(b)
turd
turd […] Dreck Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 262
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:271(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 43(c)
tumble (understand) color t.b.a.
tumble […] verstehen Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 262
Note: Only ‘tumble’ is crossed through, Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:271(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 43(d)
tufthunter
tuft-hunter Universität: der die Bekanntschaft von Adligen sucht (University: one who seeks the acquaintance of noblemen) Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 262
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:271(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 43(e)
trumpery insanity
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(aw) to Sheet 14.074(ag) for UG 14.1550. color t.b.a.
trumpery […] ~ insanity […] temporary insanity Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 261
UN2: (VI.D.7) 43(f)
(temporary insanity) color t.b.a.
trumpery […] ~ insanity […] temporary insanity Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 261
UN2: (VI.D.7) 44(a)
upper cut
upper […] the stranger administered such a slashing ~ cut that Elias was sent to grass Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 266
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:271(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 44(b)
uphander
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(aj) for use in protoCyclops. color t.b.a.
uphander […] hands up! Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 266
UN2: (VI.D.7) 44(c)
his monkey up
up […] his monkey's up Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 266
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:271(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 44(d)
I ups and told her
up […] I ups an' tells him Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 266
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:271(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 44(e)
the great unwashed
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(ac) for use in protoCyclops. color t.b.a.
unwashed […] the great ~ Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 266
UN2: (VI.D.7) 44(f)
unfurl a reef
Note: Copied to Sheet 16.026(e). color t.b.a.
unfurl […] to ~ a reef Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 265
UN2: (VI.D.7) 44(g)
unbeaten certificate
Note: Copied to Sheet 16.026(f). color t.b.a.
unbeaten […] an ~ certificate Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 265
UN2: (VI.D.7) 44(h)
T
[words beginning with T] Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 240-264
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:271(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 44(i)
2-eyed beefsteak (Kipper)
two-eyed steak [zwei-auguges beefsteak] hering Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 264
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:271(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 44(j)
2 d damn
twopenny-damn […] I don't care a ~ Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 264
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:271(i)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 45(a)
to speak volumes
volume […] it speaks ~s Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 269
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:271(j)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 45(b)
a volley of abuse
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.007(av) for UG 12.1901f. color t.b.a.
volley […] 1. to let (ober utter) forth a ~ (volume) of abuse Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 269
UN2: (VI.D.7) 45(c)
to volley a ball (tennis)
volley […] 2. v. Lawn-Tennis (einen Ball) Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 269
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:271(k)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 45(d)
the vile (Ville)
vile f ville Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 269
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:271(l)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 45(e)
victualling office (box belly)
victualling-office […] boxer-slang: Magen Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 269
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:272(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 45(f)
vet
vet, […] veterinary [surgeon) Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 269
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:272(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 45(g)
he secured the verdict by half a length
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.008(a). color t.b.a.
verdict […] he secured the ~ by half a length […] Impulse secured the victory by a short head Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 268
UN2: (VI.D.7) 45(h)
U
[words beginning with U] Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 265-267
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:272(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 45(i)
utility man
utility-actor, utility-man […] thea. Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 267
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:272(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 45(j)
urinal of planets ~
urinal […] ~ of the planets Irland Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 267
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:272(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 45(k)
~ England's umbrella
urinal […] England's umbrella: Irland Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 267
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:272(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 46(a)
welcher
welcher […] Sport: Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 274
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:272(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 46(b)
weight for age race
weight Sport. ~ for age Rennen Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 274
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:272(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 46(c)
come home by weeping-cross
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.008(b) for UG 12.1029. color t.b.a.
weeping-cross […] to come home by ~ Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 274
UN2: (VI.D.7) 46(d)
watchdogs of civilisation
watchdog […] the ~ of civilisation Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 272
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:272(i)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 46(e)
waspwaisted
wasp's waist Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 272
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:272(j)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 46(f)
warpaint Not cancelled
war-paint Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 272
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:272(k)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 46(g)
walk chalks
walk […] ~ your chalks Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 270
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:273(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 46(h)
waiter's length
waiter […] ~'s length Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 270
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:273(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 46(i)
V
[words beginning with V] Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 268-270
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:273(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 46(j)
to force the voucher
voucher […] to force the ~ Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 270
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:273(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 47(a)
Whistler (revolver)
Whistler […] Revolver Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 278
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:273(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 47(b)
whipjack (false sailor)
whipjack Bettler Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 277
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:273(f)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 47(c)
what with etc
what […] SHAK.: Thus. ~ with the war, ~ with the swear, ~ with the gallows […] Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 275
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:273(g)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 47(d)
to have a wet Not cancelled
wet […] let's have a ~ Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 275
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:273(h)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 47(e)
wet dream
wet […] ~ dream Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 275
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:273(i)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 48(a)
a yorker (cricket)
yorker […] Cricket Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 285
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:273(j)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 48(b)
yarn
Note: Copied to Sheet 16.026(g). color t.b.a.
yarn Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 284
UN2: (VI.D.7) 48(c)
yahoo
Note: Copied to Sheet 12.008(d). color t.b.a.
yahoo […] (Gulliver;s Travels) Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 284
UN2: (VI.D.7) 48(d)
W
[words beginning with W] Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 270-283
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:273(k)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 48(e)
to lay on the wood (slang cricket)
wood […] Cricket: he laid on the ~ Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 282
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:273(l)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 48(f)
wild cat scheme
wild-cat […] ~ scheme Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 280
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:274(a)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 48(g)
wife in watercolours (Mätresse)
wife ~ in water colours Mättresse Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 279
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:274(b)
UN2: (VI.D.7) 48(h)
wide (cricket)
wide […] Cricket: ~ ball Heinrich Baumann, Londinismen (Slang und Cant) (?1903), 279
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:274(c)
UN2: (VI.D.7) back cover recto(a)
Thalassocracies - English, Dutch, Spaniard, Franks, Venetians, Genoese, Arabs, Byzantines, Romans, Greeks, Phenicians
Pareillement, nous verrions les besoins et les habitudes des thalassocrates se traduire dans le choix des routes (l'Archipel du xviiie siècle a ses routes des Anglais et des Hollandais, et ses routes des Français, dans le choix des relâches (venus de l'Ouest, Français et Anglais ne rencontrent pas la terre au même point que les Arabes, Grecs ou Phéniciens venus de l'Est), […] Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,27ff.
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:274(d)
UN2: (VI.D.7) back cover recto(b)
Ancients did not sail in summer
Les Anciens ne naviguaient pas durant l'hiver. Ce port d'été n'avait donc pas à leurs yeux les mêmes désavantages qu'aux nôtres. Victor Bérard, Les Phéniciens et l'Odyssée (1902), I,38
Raphael transcription: VI.C.16:274(e)
UN2: (VI.D.7) back cover verso(a)
 
Note: Unknown.