FINNEGANS WAKE NOTEBOOKS

SD2 (VI.A, handwriting D, part 2): Paris

Facsimile edition: James Joyce Archive vol. 28, ed. Danis Rose.
Print edition: James Joyce's Scribbledehobble (Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 1961), ed. Thomas Connolly.
Manuscript: Buffalo VI.A 744-762, Oct-Nov 1931 Notebook details
SD2 (VI.A) page 744(a)

Dublin (Geo)

nor had topsawyer's rocks by the stream Oconee exaggerated themselse to Laurens County's gorgios, while they went doublin their mumper all the time; (FW 3.06ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 9
SD2 (VI.A) page 744(b)

Isaac / Butt,

not yet, though venissoon after, had a kidscad buttended a bland old isaac; (FW 3.10f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 9
SD2 (VI.A) page 744(c)

sosie sisters, Red

not yet, though all's fair in vanessy, were sosie sesthers wroth with twone nathandjoe. (FW 3.11f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 9
Note: Saucy sisters. French sosie: double, twin, counterpart.
SD2 (VI.A) page 744(d)

clap, Red

The fall (badalgharaghtakamminarronnkonnbronntonnerronntuonnthunntrovarrhounawnskawntoohoohoordenenthurnuck!) of a once wallstrait oldparr is retaled early in bed and later on life down through all christian minstrelsy. (FW 3.15ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 9
SD2 (VI.A) page 744(e)

Finnegan, Red

Finnigan, erse solid man (FW 3.19f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 9
SD2 (VI.A) page 744(f)

bid-/me-to-live, ego te / absolve,

What bidimetoloves sinduced by what tegotetabsolvers! (FW 4.09f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 10
SD2 (VI.A) page 744(g)

there's hair,

What true feeling for their's hayair with what strawng voice of false jiccup! (FW 4.10f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 10
SD2 (VI.A) page 744(h)

elm, Red

The oaks of ald now they lie in peat yet elms leap where ashes lay. (FW 4.14f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 10
SD2 (VI.A) page 744(i)

stone, Red

SD2 (VI.A) page 744(j)

Parr, Red

The fall … of a once wallstrait oldparr is retaled early in bed and later on life down through all christian minstrelsy. (FW 3.15ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 9
Note: Old Parr:English centenarian accused of incontinennce.
SD2 (VI.A) page 744(k)

To and to,

SD2 (VI.A) page 744(l)

Eiffel, Red

a waalworth of a skyerscape of most eyeful hoyth entowerly, (FW 4.36)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 10
SD2 (VI.A) page 744(m)

Laurence O'Toole, Thomas / a Beckett, Red

… with a burning bush abob off its baubletop and with larrons o'toolers clittering up and tombles a'buckets clottering down. (FW 5.02f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 10
SD2 (VI.A) page 744(n)

wine vinegar

O, you're vine! Sendday's eve and, ah, you're vinegar! (FW 5.11)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 11
SD2 (VI.A) page 744(o)

crescent crest,

His crest of huroldry, in vert with ancillars, troublant, argent, a hegoak, poursuivant, horrid, horned. (FW 5.06f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 10
SD2 (VI.A) page 744(p)

faigh/-go-baile, automobile

… tramtrees, fargobawlers, autokinotons hippohobbilies, … (FW 5.31f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 11
SD2 (VI.A) page 745(a)

suds for me,

… a roof for may and a reef for hugh … (FW 006.06-07)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 11
SD2 (VI.A) page 745(b)

Sullivan, / Holohan's Xmas cake, Red

Sobs they sighdid at Fillagain's chrissormiss wake, all the hoolivans of the nation, prostrated in their consternation, and their duodisimally profusive plethora of ululation. (FW 6.16ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 11f.
Note: Song, Mrs Houlihan's Christmas Cake (‘There were plums and prunes and cherries, Raisins and currants and cinnamon too’). See also Sheet iv-34(a).
SD2 (VI.A) page 745(c)

12, De profundis, Red

With their deepbrow fundigs and the dusty fidelios. (FW 6.25f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 12
SD2 (VI.A) page 745(d)

Phil the Fluter, Red

Tee the tootal of the fluid hang the twoddle of the fuddled, O! (FW 6.28)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 12
Note: Song, Phil the Fluter's Ball (‘With the toot of the flute and the twiddle of the fiddle, 0’).
SD2 (VI.A) page 745(e)

adeste fideles, Red

With their deepbrow fundigs and the dusty fidelios. (FW 6.25f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 12
SD2 (VI.A) page 745(f)

Vanessa

With her issavan essavans and her patterjackmartins about all them inns and ouses. (FW 7.04f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 12
SD2 (VI.A) page 745(g)

Pete, Jack & / Martin,

With her issavan essavans and her patterjackmartins about all them inns and ouses. (FW 7.04f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 12
Note: Peter, Jack and Martin: Catholic. Anglican and Lutheran Churches in Swift's Tale of a Tub
SD2 (VI.A) page 745(h)

pass the fish,

So pool the begg and pass the kish for crawsake. (FW 7.07f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 12
SD2 (VI.A) page 745(i)

London Bridge, Red

Grampupus is fallen down but grinny sprids the boord. (FW 7.08f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 12
Note: Song, London Bridge is Falling Down.
SD2 (VI.A) page 745(j)

fish on / table, Kennedy's bread, / O'Connell's Ale,

Finfoefom the Fush. Whase be his baken head? A loaf of Singpantry's Kennedy bread. And whase hitched to the hop in his tayle? A glass of Danu U'Dunnell's foamous olde Dobbelin ayle. (FW 7.09ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 12
SD2 (VI.A) page 745(k)

goodredherring,

So that meal's dead off for summan, schlook, schlice and goodridhirring. (FW 7.18f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 13
SD2 (VI.A) page 745(l)

Ben Edar, Red

Upon Benn Heather, in Seeple Iseut too. (FW 7.28f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 13
Note: Irish Binn Éadair: Howth.
SD2 (VI.A) page 745(m)

the magazine / wall, Red

His clay feet, swarded in verdigrass, stick up starck where he last fellonem, by the mund of the magazine wall, where our maggy seen all, with her sisterin shawl. (FW 7.30ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 13
SD2 (VI.A) page 745(n)

Walhaller, Orange

While over against this belles'alliance beyind Ill Sixty, ollollowed ill! (FW 7.33f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 13
Note: Not in final text. Valhalla.
SD2 (VI.A) page 745(o)

Up lads, Not cancelled

… the site of the lyffing-in-wait of the upjock and hockums. (FW 7.35f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 13
SD2 (VI.A) page 746(a)

pftjscute Red

The great fall of the offwall entailed at such short notice the schute of Finnegan (FW 3.18f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 9
Note: The change from “schute” to “pftjschute” occurred on page 9 of the transition 1 pages; French chute: fall.
SD2 (VI.A) page 746(b)

First Paragraph H, T, ~

riverrun brings us back to @@ Howth Castle & Environs. Sir Tristram, violer d'amores, fr' over the short sea, had passencore rearrived from North Armorica (FW 3.01ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 9
Note: Paragraph 1 introduces H.C.E. and Tristan, among others.
SD2 (VI.A) page 746(c)

~ Peter Sawyer, ~ Red

nor had topsawyer's rocks by the stream Oconee exaggerated themselse to Laurens County's gorgios (FW 3.06ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 9
Note: Not in final text. Peter Sawyer founded Dublin, Georgia, in Laurens county.
SD2 (VI.A) page 746(d)

~ P, G, I, G, F, / Adam, Tristan, S Peter Sawyer, Isaac, S Patrick, Swift, / Guiness (Noah), rainbow,

[Characters and themes introduced in the first few pages.]

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 9ff.
SD2 (VI.A) page 746(e)

Allbrohome! Adsum! Red

Note: Genesis 22:1. God did tempt Abraham and said unto him, Abraham: and he said, behold: here am I. Latin adsum: here am I.
SD2 (VI.A) page 746(f)

Kate tip Red

For her passkey supply to the janitrix, the mistress Kathe. Tip. (FW 8.08)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 13
SD2 (VI.A) page 746(g)

C sees jennies / through telescope, Not cancelled

This is big Willingdone mormorial tallowscoop Wounderworker obscides on the flanks of the jinnies. (FW 8.34ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 14
SD2 (VI.A) page 746(h)

the / cagelanternhouse, Red

SD2 (VI.A) page 746(i)

29, Orange

SD2 (VI.A) page 746(j)

the boy Jones, Orange

SD2 (VI.A) page 746(k)

while L— ~

let young min talksmooth behind the butteler's back she knows her knight's duty while Luntum sleeps. (FW 12.04f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 17
Note: While London Sleeps is a 1926 Warner Brothers film starring Rin Tin Tin: it is also a song.
SD2 (VI.A) page 747(a)

~ sleeps,

et young min talksmooth behind the butteler's back she knows her knight's duty while Luntum sleeps. (FW 12.04f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 17
Note: While London Sleeps is a 1926 Warner Brothers film starring Rin Tin Tin: it is also a song.
SD2 (VI.A) page 747(b)

Swift's verse / on Magazine,

Behove this sound of Irish sense. Really? Here English might be seen. (FW 012.36f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 18
Note: Swift's verse ran: Behold! a proof of Irish sense! Here Irish wit is seen! When nothing's left, that's worth defence, We build a magazine!
SD2 (VI.A) page 747(c)

Egg, Not cancelled

And even if Humpty shell [?]all frumpty times as awkward again there'll be iggs for the brekkers come to mournhim, sunny side up with care. (FW 12.13ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 17
Note: In 2010 text, but not in 1939 text.
SD2 (VI.A) page 747(d)

1132 AD

1132 A. D. (FW 13.33)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 19
SD2 (VI.A) page 747(e)

pipette,

Puppette her minion was ravisht of her by the ogre Puropeus Pious. (FW 14.08f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 19
Note: See also: Sheet i-10(e), SD2 (VI.A):751(b)
SD2 (VI.A) page 747(f)

fake! [vlepo] Red

  • FW unlocated

The silence speaks the scene. Fake! (FW 13.03)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 18
SD2 (VI.A) page 747(g)

Many, / tieckle pharis — Red

Note: This addition was made on page 24 of the copy transition 1 that Joyce was copying from. Daniel 6:25-8. MENE, MENE, TEKEL UPHARSIN ... Thy kingdom is divided and given to the Medes and Persians. [Writing on wall at Belshazzar's feast.]
SD2 (VI.A) page 747(h)

Balthasar, Belshazzar, Red

BELSHAZZAR (6th century B.C.), Babylonian general. Until the decipherment of the cuneiform inscriptions, he was known only from the book of Daniel (v. 2, 11, 13, 18) and its reproduction in Josephus, where he is represented as the son of Nebuchadrezzar and ther last king of Babylon. As his name did not appear in the list of the successors of Nebuchadrezzar handed down by the Greek writers, various suggestions were put forward as to his identity. Niebuhr identified him with Evil-Merodach, Ewald with Nabonidas, others again with Neriglissor. The identification with Nabonidos, the last Babylonian king according to the native historian Berossus, goes back to Jossephus. The decipherment of the cuneiform texts put an end to all such speculations. In 1854 Sir H.C. Rawlinson discovered the name of Bel-sarra-uzar--“O Bel, defend the king”--in an inscription belonging to the first year of Nadonidos which had been discovered in the ruins of the temple of the Moon-god at Muqayyar or Ur.

Note: The addition “balltosser,” was made on page 24 of the copy transition 1 that Joyce was copying from. Not in final text.
SD2 (VI.A) page 747(i)

Evil-Merodach, Blue

BELSHAZZAR (6th century B.C.), Babylonian general. Until the decipherment of the cuneiform inscriptions, he was known only from the book of Daniel (v. 2, 11, 13, 18) and its reproduction in Josephus, where he is represented as the son of Nebuchadrezzar and ther last king of Babylon. As his name did not appear in the list of the successors of Nebuchadrezzar handed down by the Greek writers, various suggestions were put forward as to his identity. Niebuhr identified him with Evil-Merodach, Ewald with Nabonidas, others again with Neriglissor. The identification with Nabonidos, the last Babylonian king according to the native historian Berossus, goes back to Jossephus. The decipherment of the cuneiform texts put an end to all such speculations. In 1854 Sir H.C. Rawlinson discovered the name of Bel-sarra-uzar--“O Bel, defend the king”--in an inscription belonging to the first year of Nadonidos which had been discovered in the ruins of the temple of the Moon-god at Muqayyar or Ur.

Note: Marduk (the Merciful) was the patron deity of Babylon.
SD2 (VI.A) page 747(j)

Nabonido, Neriglissor, Bel- ~

BELSHAZZAR (6th century B.C.), Babylonian general. Until the decipherment of the cuneiform inscriptions, he was known only from the book of Daniel (v. 2, 11, 13, 18) and its reproduction in Josephus, where he is represented as the son of Nebuchadrezzar and ther last king of Babylon. As his name did not appear in the list of the successors of Nebuchadrezzar handed down by the Greek writers, various suggestions were put forward as to his identity. Niebuhr identified him with Evil-Merodach, Ewald with Nabonidas, others again with Neriglissor. The identification with Nabonidos, the last Babylonian king according to the native historian Berossus, goes back to Jossephus. The decipherment of the cuneiform texts put an end to all such speculations. In 1854 Sir H.C. Rawlinson discovered the name of Bel-sarra-uzar--“O Bel, defend the king”--in an inscription belonging to the first year of Nadonidos which had been discovered in the ruins of the temple of the Moon-god at Muqayyar or Ur.

SD2 (VI.A) page 747(k)

~ Defend the King, Blue

BELSHAZZAR (6th century B.C.), Babylonian general. Until the decipherment of the cuneiform inscriptions, he was known only from the book of Daniel (v. 2, 11, 13, 18) and its reproduction in Josephus, where he is represented as the son of Nebuchadrezzar and ther last king of Babylon. As his name did not appear in the list of the successors of Nebuchadrezzar handed down by the Greek writers, various suggestions were put forward as to his identity. Niebuhr identified him with Evil-Merodach, Ewald with Nabonidas, others again with Neriglissor. The identification with Nabonidos, the last Babylonian king according to the native historian Berossus, goes back to Jossephus. The decipherment of the cuneiform texts put an end to all such speculations. In 1854 Sir H.C. Rawlinson discovered the name of Bel-sarra-uzar--“O Bel, defend the king”--in an inscription belonging to the first year of Nadonidos which had been discovered in the ruins of the temple of the Moon-god at Muqayyar or Ur.

SD2 (VI.A) page 747(l)

palace revolution,

BELSHAZZAR ... He was never king himself, nor was he the son of Nebuchadrezzar. Indeed his father Nabonidas (Nabunaid), the son of Nabu baladsu-iqbi, was not related to the family of Nebuchadrezzar and owed his accession to the throne to a palace revolution

SD2 (VI.A) page 747(m)

ma manehs

BELSHAZZAR ... Thus in 545 B.C. he lent 20 manehs of silver to a private individual, a Persian by race, on the security of the property of the latter

SD2 (VI.A) page 748(a)

cyropaedia,

BELSHAZZAR ... The legends of Belshazzar's feast and of the siege and capture of Babylon by Cyrus which have come down to us from the book of Daniel and the Cryopaedia of Xenophon have been shown by the contemporaneous inscriptions to have been a projection backwards of the re-conquest of the city by Darius Hystaspis. The actual facts were very different.

SD2 (VI.A) page 748(b)

hystaspes

BELSHAZZAR ... The legends of Belshazzar's feast and of the siege and capture of Babylon by Cyrus which have come down to us from the book of Daniel and the Cryopaedia of Xenophon have been shown by the contemporaneous inscriptions to have been a projection backwards of the re-conquest of the city by Darius Hystaspis. The actual facts were very different.

SD2 (VI.A) page 748(c)

Diyaleh, (R) Nizallat R, Adem (R),

BELSHAZZAR ... Cyrus had invaded Babylonia from two directions, he himself marching towards the confluence of the Tigris and Diyaleh [rivers], while Gobryas, the satrap of Kurdistan, led another body of troops along the course of the Adhem [river]. The portion of the Babylonian army to which the protection of the eastern frontier had been entrusted was defeated at Opis on the banks of the Nizallat, and the invaders poured across the Tigris into Babylonia.

SD2 (VI.A) page 748(d)

Tamuz (June) ~ Red

BELSHAZZAR ... On the 14th of Tammuz (June), 538 B.C., Nabonidos fled from Sippara ...

Note: See also: N33 (VI.B.4):076(g)
SD2 (VI.A) page 748(e)

~ Marchesvan, (Oct) ~ Red

BELSHAZZAR ... Belshazzar, however, still held out, and it was probably on this account that Cyrus himself did not arrive at Babylon until nearly four months later, on the 3rd of Marchesvan [October]. On the 11th of that month Gobryas was despatched to put an end to the last semblance of resistance in the country “and the son(?) of the king died.” In accordance with the conciliatory policy of Cyrus, a general mourning was proclaimed on account of his death, and this lasted for six days, from the 27th of Adar [November] to the 3rd of Nisan [December].

Note: See also: N33 (VI.B.4):076(k)
SD2 (VI.A) page 748(f)

~ Adar / (Nov) ~ Red

BELSHAZZAR ... Belshazzar, however, still held out, and it was probably on this account that Cyrus himself did not arrive at Babylon until nearly four months later, on the 3rd of Marchesvan [October]. On the 11th of that month Gobryas was despatched to put an end to the last semblance of resistance in the country “and the son(?) of the king died.” In accordance with the conciliatory policy of Cyrus, a general mourning was proclaimed on account of his death, and this lasted for six days, from the 27th of Adar [November] to the 3rd of Nisan [December].

Note: See also: N33 (VI.B.4):076(c)
SD2 (VI.A) page 748(g)

~ Nizam (Dec) Red

BELSHAZZAR ... Belshazzar, however, still held out, and it was probably on this account that Cyrus himself did not arrive at Babylon until nearly four months later, on the 3rd of Marchesvan [October]. On the 11th of that month Gobryas was despatched to put an end to the last semblance of resistance in the country “and the son(?) of the king died.” In accordance with the conciliatory policy of Cyrus, a general mourning was proclaimed on account of his death, and this lasted for six days, from the 27th of Adar [November] to the 3rd of Nisan [December].

Note: See also: N33 (VI.B.4):076(d)
SD2 (VI.A) page 748(h)

ginango

Somewhere, parently, in the ginnandgo gap between antediluvious and annadominant the copyist must have fled with his scroll. (FW 14.16f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 20
SD2 (VI.A) page 748(i)

4 Masters, Red

Now after all that farfatch'd and peragrine or dingnant or clere lift we our ears, eyes of the darkness, from the tome of Liber Lividus (FW 14.28f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 20
Note: The chief compiler of the Annals of Irelans was Brother Mícheál Ó Cléirigh from Ballyshannon, who was assisted by, among others, Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh, Fearfeasa Ó Maol Chonaire and Peregrine Ó Duibhgeannain. These are known as the Four Masters.
SD2 (VI.A) page 748(j)

E Quinet,

Since the bouts of Hebear and Hairyman … fresh and made-of-all-smiles as on the eve of Killallwho. (FW 14.35ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 20-21
Note: The Quinet piece is a recurring motif in Finnegans Wake.
SD2 (VI.A) page 748(k)

Joe Biggar, Red

In the name of Anem this carl on the kopje a parth a lone who the joebiggar be he? [FW 15.29f.]

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 21
Note: Joseph Biggar was a hunchbacked supporter of Parnell.
SD2 (VI.A) page 748(l)

mitchindaddy, Red

It is evident the michindaddy. [FW 16.01f.]

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 21
Note: Miching or mitching, slang for skulking or for dodging school or an obligation.
SD2 (VI.A) page 748(m)

mittonchepp, Red

[The Mutt and Jute dialogue] (FW 16.10ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 21-24
Note: See also: N42 (VI.B.31):186(c), SD2 (VI.A):750(d). Mutton chop. Mutt and Jeff.
SD2 (VI.A) page 748(n)

Brian O'Linn, Red

I could snore to him of the spumy horn, with his woolseley side in, by the neck I am sutton on, did Brian d' of Linn. (FW 17.10ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 22
Note: Song, Brian O'Linn (He made breeches with ‘the skinny side out and the woolly side in’).
SD2 (VI.A) page 748(o)

Moore's Melodies,

Let erehim ruhmuhrmuhr. (FW 17.23)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 23
Note: Let Erin Remember is one of Thomas Moore's Melodies; see also indexes in VI.B.25 and elsewhere.
SD2 (VI.A) page 748(p)

Please stop, Blue

(Stoop,) if you are abcedminded, to this claybook, what curios of signs (please stoop), in this allaphbed! (FW 18.17f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 24
SD2 (VI.A) page 748(q)

Alphabet, Blue

  • FW unlocated

(Stoop,) if you are abcedminded, to this claybook, what curios of signs (please stoop), in this allaphbed! (FW 18.17f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 24
Note: See also: SD2 (VI.A):756(a)
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(a)

lamphouse, Orange

Jarl van Hoother had his burnt head high up in his lamphouse, laying cold hands on himself. (FW 21.10f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 26
Note: MS only
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(b)

Mark, Red

  • FW unlocated

Mark the Wans, why do I am alook alike a poss of porterpease? (FW 21.18f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 26
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(c)

falling stars, Red

  • FW unlocated

And there was a brannewail that same sabboath night of falling angles somewhere in Erio. (FW 21.25f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 27
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(d)

prankqueen,

And the prankquean nipped a paly one … (FW 22.02f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 27
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(e)

O Felix Culpa, Red

O foenix culprit! (FW 23.16)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 28
Note: Latin O felix culpa! (O happy sin!).
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(f)

4 Waves,

the wave of roary and the wave of hooshed and the wave of hawhawhawrd and the wave of neverheedthemhorseluggarsandlistletomine. (FW 23.27ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 28
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(g)

Victoria Nyanza, Red

Homfrie Noanswa! Undy gentian festyknees, Livia Noanswa? (FW 23.20-21)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 28
Note: Victoria Nayanza and Albert Nyanza are two of the great lakes of Central Africa; so named in the 19th Century after Queen Victoria and her husband Albert.
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(h)

usque / ad mortem, Red

Usqueadbaugham! (FW 24.14)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 29
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(i)

Metcalfe,

SD2 (VI.A) page 749(j)

Barnum, Red

… the height of Brewster's chimpney and as broad below as Phineas Barnum; (FW 29.04f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 30
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(k)

pigeons, Red

he was never done seeing what you coolpigeons know, (FW 29.10f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 30
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(l)

no concern of the / Guinesses, Red

Now, concerning the genesis of Harold or Humphrey Chimpden's occupational agnomen … (FW 30.01ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 2 (May 1927) 94
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(m)

glue & gravy, ~ Red

… and discarding once for all those theories from older sources which would link him back with such pivotal ancestors as the Glues, the Gravys, the Northeasts, the Ankers and the Earwickers of Sidlesham in the hundred of manhood (FW 30.05ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 2 (May 1927) 94
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(n)

~ Anker, ~ Red

… and discarding once for all those theories from older sources which would link him back with such pivotal ancestors as the Glues, the Gravys, the Northeasts, the Ankers and the Earwickers of Sidlesham in the hundred of manhood (FW 30.05ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 2 (May 1927) 94
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(o)

~ N.E., ~ Red

… and discarding once for all those theories from older sources which would link him back with such pivotal ancestors as the Glues, the Gravys, the Northeasts, the Ankers and the Earwickers of Sidlesham in the hundred of manhood (FW 30.05ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 2 (May 1927) 94
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(p)

~ Sidlesham ~ Red

… and discarding once for all those theories from older sources which would link him back with such pivotal ancestors as the Glues, the Gravys, the Northeasts, the Ankers and the Earwickers of Sidlesham in the hundred of manhood (FW 30.05ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 2 (May 1927) 94
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(q)

~ hundred Manhood Red

… and discarding once for all those theories from older sources which would link him back with such pivotal ancestors as the Glues, the Gravys, the Northeasts, the Ankers and the Earwickers of Sidlesham in the hundred of manhood (FW 30.05ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 2 (May 1927) 94
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(r)

the / hunt, Red

  • FW unlocated

when royalty was announced by runner to have been pleased to have halted itself on the highroad along which a leisureloving dogfox had cast followed, also at walking pace, by a lady pack of cocker spaniels. (FW 30.16ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 2 (May 1927) 94
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(s)

the play, Red

the problem passion play of the millentury A Royal Divorce (FW 32.32f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 2 (May 1927) 96
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(t)

the Turk Red

(let us call him Abdullah Gamellaxarksky) (FW 34.02f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 2 (May 1927) 97
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(u)

p.28

[Joyce numbered page 98 of the source as page 28 of the first set of transition that he revised.]

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 2 (May 1927) 98
SD2 (VI.A) page 749(v)

make up 7,

SD2 (VI.A) page 750(a)

17 69 teleph, Orange

reach for the hello grip and ring up Kimmage Outer 17.67 (FW 72.20f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 3 (June 1927) 48
Note: It is not clear why Joyce changed the telephone number from 17 67 to 17 69.
SD2 (VI.A) page 750(b)

Boss Pots / ache a tea simmering, / O mavrone, Kerry Osmo? Blue

Note: Greek Men, ti kanete semeron, ho emou mauro kyrio?: well, how do you do today, my dark sir?
SD2 (VI.A) page 750(c)

gesture in ~

SD2 (VI.A) page 750(d)

~ Muttenchepp Red

  • FW unlocated
Note: See also: N42 (VI.B.31):186(c), SD2 (VI.A):748(m)
SD2 (VI.A) page 750(e)

Guiney's Gap, Red

Note: In the Norse Eddas the ‘Ginnunga gap’ is the interval between aeons.
SD2 (VI.A) page 750(f)

The Cap

Tap and pat and tapatagain, three tommix, soldiers free, cockaleak and cappapee, (FW 58.24f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 3 (June 1927) 38
SD2 (VI.A) page 750(g)

Kidney,

SD2 (VI.A) page 750(h)

p.42,

[Joyce numbered page 34 of the source as page 42 of the first set of transition that he revised.]

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 3 (June 1927) 34
SD2 (VI.A) page 750(i)

two cloths [waited],

SD2 (VI.A) page 750(j)

Askimwhose, Orange

SD2 (VI.A) page 750(k)

agin / courting, Red

Note: Agincourt (battle, 1415).
SD2 (VI.A) page 750(l)

crecy, Red

Note: Crécy (battle, 1346).
SD2 (VI.A) page 750(m)

with houx & epheu ~ Red

Note: See also: SD2 (VI.A):751(a) for continuation of this unit. French hous: holly; German Efeu: ivy.
SD2 (VI.A) page 751(a)

~ & missiles too, Red

Note: See also: SD2 (VI.A):750(l) for first part of this unit. Mistletoe.
SD2 (VI.A) page 751(b)

pipette,

Note: See also: Sheet i-10(e), SD2 (VI.A):747(e)
SD2 (VI.A) page 751(c)

tell me allabout / tellme tellme, Red

O tell me all about Anna Livia! I want to hear all about Anna Livia. Well, you know Anna Livia? Yes, of course, we all know Anna Livia. Tell me all. Tell me now. (FW 196.01ff)

Source: James Joyce, Anna Livia Plurabelle (1930) 5
SD2 (VI.A) page 751(d)

vatican [gush] Red

SD2 (VI.A) page 751(e)

alook alike, Red

Mark the Wans, why do I am alook alike a poss of porterpease? (FW 22.05)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 26
SD2 (VI.A) page 751(f)

prim arily, / second arily ~ Blue

  • FW unlocated

whom she had been meaning in her mind primarily to speak with, … yet it was this overspoiled priest Mr. Browne, disguised as a vicentian, who, when seized of the facts, was overheard, in his secondary personality as a Nolan (FW 38.19ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 2 (May 1927) 100
Note: Primarily, secondarily.
SD2 (VI.A) page 751(g)

~ premerily,

primarily to speak with (FW 38.19)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 2 (May 1927) 100
SD2 (VI.A) page 751(h)

from Sara to Isaac Blue

Note: See Genesis 21:5-7 [Sarah laughed when God said she was to bear a child at the age of ninety, hence the child's name of Isaac (meaning ‘he laughed’)] Also, Sarah Bridge over the Liffey.
SD2 (VI.A) page 751(i)

has a finster fra / fenester frame,

SD2 (VI.A) page 751(j)

mocks / for his grapes, Red

Note: Mookse and Gripes.
SD2 (VI.A) page 751(k)

[intimacy]

SD2 (VI.A) page 751(l)

minnilisp extorreor mono / lothe, Blue

Note: Interior monologue. Lisp. Exterior. Monolith.
SD2 (VI.A) page 751(m)

hypnos chilia / eonon, Red

Note: Greek hypnos chilia aionon: sleep for thousands of eons.
SD2 (VI.A) page 752(a)

walk the earth, Red

Note: See also N53 (VI.B.46):124(aa)
SD2 (VI.A) page 752(b)

5th / glaciation,

SD2 (VI.A) page 752(c)

Homo / Neanderthalensis, Red

Note: See also N09 (VI.B.1):173(i).
SD2 (VI.A) page 752(d)

Piltdown,

The wagrant wind's awalt'zaround the piltdowns … (FW 10.30)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 16
Note: See also N09 (VI.B.1):173(g).
SD2 (VI.A) page 752(e)

Heidelberg, Red

diagnosing through eustacetube that it was to make with a markedly postpuberal hyperpituitary type of Heidelberg mannleich cavern ethics (FW 36.36ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 2 (May 1927) 99
SD2 (VI.A) page 752(f)

short shins, Red

SD2 (VI.A) page 752(g)

cave ~ Red

SD2 (VI.A) page 752(h)

~ cavern,

Heidelberg mannleich cavern ethics (FW 37.01)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 2 (May 1927) 99
SD2 (VI.A) page 752(i)

pectoral muscles, Red

SD2 (VI.A) page 752(j)

flint,

SD2 (VI.A) page 752(k)

toe apart, Red

SD2 (VI.A) page 752(l)

Vevere,

SD2 (VI.A) page 752(m)

Dordogne,

SD2 (VI.A) page 752(n)

mousterous, Red

Note: Mysterious, monstrous.
SD2 (VI.A) page 752(o)

fire defences, Red

SD2 (VI.A) page 752(p)

the kill,

SD2 (VI.A) page 752(q)

from his earth, Blue

SD2 (VI.A) page 752(r)

through ~ Red

  • FW unlocated
Note: See also; SD2 (VI.A):753(a) for continuation of this unit.
SD2 (VI.A) page 753(a)

~ slit marrowbone, ~ Red

Note: See also; SD2 (VI.A):752(r) for first part of this unit.
SD2 (VI.A) page 753(b)

~ suck brains Red

SD2 (VI.A) page 753(c)

baby on back, Red

  • FW unlocated
SD2 (VI.A) page 753(d)

pelts, Red

SD2 (VI.A) page 753(e)

bisons are bisons, Red

Note: Bison. Business is business.
SD2 (VI.A) page 753(f)

Masjedsty,

SD2 (VI.A) page 753(g)

p 87

[Joyce numbered page 21 of the source as page 87 of the first set of transition that he revised.]

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 5 (August 1927) 21
SD2 (VI.A) page 753(h)

arabicised,

SD2 (VI.A) page 753(i)

foot

SD2 (VI.A) page 753(j)

J writes letter,

SD2 (VI.A) page 753(k)

put / letter together

SD2 (VI.A) page 753(l)

Maggiesty, Not cancelled

  • FW unlocated
Note: This word (unplaced in text) was written onto page 20 of transition 5.
SD2 (VI.A) page 753(m)

softnosed,

unwishful as he felt of being sent into eternity, plugged by a softnosed bullet from the sap, (FW 35.24ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 2 (May 1927) 98
SD2 (VI.A) page 753(n)

O do

SD2 (VI.A) page 753(o)

psycho [on urns],

SD2 (VI.A) page 753(p)

fornix, Not cancelled

Note: This addition was written onto page 23 of transition 5. Latin fornix: an arch or vault in houses; a brothel-house (because these were in vaults and wells under ground).
SD2 (VI.A) page 753(q)

jerry

SD2 (VI.A) page 754(a)

Boston (Mass), 1st last, / dear (gap) Maggy, many / asleeps between ourworld / and the new, someathome / & moreinausland hate turns / milkmike general, / born gent, present of cakes, / waiting Kate, thank you, / funeral, into life's dinna / forget, hopes soon to hear, / close, fondest to the twins, Red

originating from Boston (Mass.) of the last of the first to Dear whom it proceded to mention Maggy well & allathome's health well only the hate turned the milk on the van Houtens and the general's elections with a lovely face of some born gentleman with a beautiful present of wedding cakes for dear thankyou Chriesty and with grand funferall of poor Father Michael don't forget unto life's & Muggy well how are you Maggy & hopes soon to hear well & must now close it with fondest to the twins (FW 111.09ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 5 (August 1927) 19-20
Note: Basis of inked addition written on facing page: SD2 (VI.A):755(a). The words “thank you” and “close” are not crossed out.
SD2 (VI.A) page 754(b)

underlinings, Red

  • FW unlocated

the innocent exhibitionism of those frank yet capricious underlinings: (FW 121.19f.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 5 (August 1927) 27
SD2 (VI.A) page 755(a)

Add also |a& dinna forgeta|. That there be many asleeps between / someathomes |afirsta| and thoseinauslands |alasta|, / that the beautiful presence of waiting / Kates will until life's |aendswell (close it!)a| ever / be enough to make a young milkmike, / in sweet tarts' tonguage, punch hell's / hate into |ahisa| old |atwina| nicky, and that, Maggesty / or no Majesty, if any boost him born / gentleman and be found heathen by his / privates and hopes to hear his fondest / from the generals he selected, well, / that is his funny role and his / funeral, thank you, too. Everyword / for oneself but |acode Codea| for us all. Not cancelled

Note: This addition was written onto page 23 of transition 5.
SD2 (VI.A) page 755(b)

Etzelbug, Ildico,

SD2 (VI.A) page 755(c)

Kak, Hengst, sez you Red

Note: See also N42 (VI.B.31):266(a). ? Dutch kak: shit.
SD2 (VI.A) page 755(d)

Jerry,

Note: See also: N42 (VI.B.31):201(e)
SD2 (VI.A) page 756(a)

Thus the alephbeth's complete and / clare as ailmbeitcoll: Galowidus / in his superboria, Grazia O'Marray / with all her gracies, the nome or / norm we neme foregranted, / capitular and dear family movebacks / with the pentmark of this beach, the / plodder pod |ain his pinksa|, the prattlepate in the / privy, the stud the elucidatorials of / sempiterserials, the mulierculine minner / sins |achinchinoisea|, |aAmazoniaa|, the death dreams we in / succuba under as incubus life's / old swingswong, the yumspeach appleness odorosying Miss Fragranzia in / Flagrante and/or (wh for whichever ~

Note: See also: SD2 (VI.A):748(q). SD2 (VI.A):757(a) is a continuation of this unit; N33 (VI.B.4):119(a) and following units comprise a listing of the old Irish alphabet.
SD2 (VI.A) page 757(a)

~ is writer vice averse is to read) / Donn Giam Sorisabbondrio [of] and / Dam Genm Wemandwein. ~

Note: See also: SD2 (VI.A):756(a) for first part of this unit.
SD2 (VI.A) page 757(b)

~ So now to our duck-and-/jerry Sh!

SD2 (VI.A) page 757(c)

epistopor palonbo

SD2 (VI.A) page 757(d)

[?]imkichorassing, from aboast / Hemania,

SD2 (VI.A) page 757(e)

Smbdy punches H or X?

SD2 (VI.A) page 757(f)

news or tasks

SD2 (VI.A) page 757(g)

H Gog G O G. Red

The grand old Gunne, they do be saying, that was a planter for you! (FW 25.21f)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 1 (April 1927) 29
Note: It was also on page 29 of transition 5 that Joyce revised to: Begog but he was! The G.O.G!
SD2 (VI.A) page 757(h)

becklein Blue

Note: German Bächlein: rivulet.
SD2 (VI.A) page 757(i)

baechstein

SD2 (VI.A) page 757(j)

H whitening Red

SD2 (VI.A) page 757(k)

whiteley Orange

Note: See also: N42 (VI.B.31):134(d) and N41 (VI.B.33):079(a).
SD2 (VI.A) page 757(l)

othr

SD2 (VI.A) page 758(a)

fionn X [testiness],

SD2 (VI.A) page 758(b)

[insomnia, / avarice & ?],

SD2 (VI.A) page 758(c)

Hans Prahl, / Messires, Jakob

SD2 (VI.A) page 758(d)

chip off the old flint, Blue

Note: Entered by Sheet i-10(i). Chip off the old block.
SD2 (VI.A) page 758(e)

Carriers,

SD2 (VI.A) page 758(f)

Buick,

SD2 (VI.A) page 758(g)

Brig. Gen. Moonshine

SD2 (VI.A) page 758(h)

Balder's ash, Orange

  • FW unlocated
Note: See also: N41 (VI.B.33):070(c), source of FW 233.17: balderdash, nonsense.
SD2 (VI.A) page 758(i)

the / Derby,

SD2 (VI.A) page 758(j)

jury of the / Liffey,

SD2 (VI.A) page 758(k)

meat / took a drop, Red

SD2 (VI.A) page 759(a)

Reilly Peerson, Red

BALLAD OF PERSSE O'REILLEY (FW 44.24)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 2 (May 1927) 104
SD2 (VI.A) page 759(b)

war zaybooby?

SD2 (VI.A) page 759(c)

met you too late,

I have met with you, bird, too, late, or if not, too worm and early: (FW 37.13f)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 2 (May 1927) 99
SD2 (VI.A) page 759(d)

white pudding, fried bread,

SD2 (VI.A) page 759(e)

clingers,

SD2 (VI.A) page 759(f)

D will be / a talker,

SD2 (VI.A) page 759(g)

Infant Majesty, Blue

Note: This correction, “Majesty“ to “Infant Majesty“ was made on page 106e of the copy of transition 6: the page originally contained: teaching His Majesty how to make waters worse. (FW 166.18f)
SD2 (VI.A) page 759(h)

agnostic determined,

… when he is a gnawstick and detarmined to, (FW 170.11)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 7 (October 1927) 35
Note: See also: N42 (VI.B.31):221(g)
SD2 (VI.A) page 759(i)

God C 1st riddle,

… asked of all his little brothron and sweestureens the first riddle of the universe: when is a man not a man? (FW 170.04)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 7 (October 1927) 35
SD2 (VI.A) page 759(j)

G fish

So low was he that he preferred Gibsen's teatime salmon tinned, as inexpensive as pleasing, to the plumpest roeheavy lax or the friskiest parr or smolt troutlet that ever was gaffed between Leixlip and Island Bridge (FW 170.25-28)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 7 (October 1927) 35
SD2 (VI.A) page 759(k)

X pur et / pia bella Orange

… chanting the Gillooly chorus, O pura e pia bella! (FW 178.17)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 7 (October 1927) 42
Note: Not in final text.
SD2 (VI.A) page 759(l)

telescope

the only once he did take a tompeep throug a threedraw eighteen hawkspower telescope out of his westernmost keyhole (FW 178.28)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 7 (October 1927) 43
SD2 (VI.A) page 760(a)

eye trompit, Blue

This explains the litany of septuncial lettertrumpets honorific, highpitched, erudite, neoclassical which he so loved as patricianly to manuscribe after his name. (FW 179.21f)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 7 (October 1927) 43
SD2 (VI.A) page 760(b)

all / that sort of thing, Blue

a. a. t. s. o. t. (FW 180.16)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 7 (October 1927) 44
SD2 (VI.A) page 760(c)

Wyndham,

SD2 (VI.A) page 760(d)

[slarled],

SD2 (VI.A) page 760(e)

smell,

… ordered off the gorgeous premises in most cases on account of his smell … (FW 181.10ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 7 (October 1927) 45
SD2 (VI.A) page 760(f)

p 138 letter

Who can say how many pseudostytic shamiana, how few or how many of the most venerated public impostures, how very many piously forged palimpsests slipped in the first place by this morbid process from his pelagiarist pen?

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 7 (October 1927) 45
Note: 138 is the page-number written at the top of page 45 of the copy of transition 7 (see James Joyce Archive volume for I.6-I.7, page 510).
SD2 (VI.A) page 760(g)

pen, ink, paper,

… twisted quills, painful digests, magnifying wineglasses, solid objects cast at goblins, once current puns, quashed quotatoes, messes of mottage, unquestionable issue papers, seedy ejaculations, limerick damns, crocodile tears, spilt ink, … (FW 183.20ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 7 (October 1927) 47
SD2 (VI.A) page 760(h)

C cycles,

… all marryvoising moodmoulded cyclewheeling history … (FW 186).

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 7 (October 1927) 49
SD2 (VI.A) page 760(i)

Anchises,

Note: Anchises was the father of Aeneas.
SD2 (VI.A) page 760(j)

hesitency,

for no longer will I follow you obliquelike through the inspired form of the third person singular and the moods and hesitensies of the deponent (FW 187.28ff.)

Source: James Joyce, “Work in Progress”, transition 7 (October 1927) 51
SD2 (VI.A) page 760(k)

lashes / & yells,

SD2 (VI.A) page 760(l)

[Roma Theodosius / Morawa R]

SD2 (VI.A) page 760(m)

Attila Bleda,

SD2 (VI.A) page 760(n)

lizards / in wall

SD2 (VI.A) page 761(a)

truhite,

SD2 (VI.A) page 761(b)

gould,

SD2 (VI.A) page 761(c)

Franklin / sens & Maher,

SD2 (VI.A) page 761(d)

I don't / think that was very nice / of him,

SD2 (VI.A) page 761(e)

S. Patrick car with 2 / white buffalos accompanied/ by birds,

SD2 (VI.A) page 761(f)

2 sisters,

SD2 (VI.A) page 761(g)

wood of druids,

SD2 (VI.A) page 761(h)

refuses / to serve car,

SD2 (VI.A) page 761(i)

Sithric

SD2 (VI.A) page 761(j)

Fell Fethlene Kleboch, / Tara,

SD2 (VI.A) page 761(k)

plain of Breg

SD2 (VI.A) page 762(a)

25 kinglets,

SD2 (VI.A) page 762(b)

lights out, / bonfire, end of year,

SD2 (VI.A) page 762(c)

27 circles,

SD2 (VI.A) page 762(d)

holy Saturday,

SD2 (VI.A) page 762(e)

wax, hydromel,

SD2 (VI.A) page 762(f)

K eats / alone, easter, eternal son,

SD2 (VI.A) page 762(g)

jordan water in springs,

SD2 (VI.A) page 762(h)

mockes made dwarfs,

SD2 (VI.A) page 762(i)

frogs' vespers, Orange

SD2 (VI.A) page 762(j)

Ton nom!

SD2 (VI.A) page 762(k)

Liber ([Bared]) Blue