Finnegans Wake

Letters of James Joyce

Extracts related to the composition of Finnegans Wake

Selected by Danis Rose and John O'Hanlon

Extracts from Joyce's Letters (published and unpublished)
concerning the writing of Finnegans Wake

JJ = James Joyce
Letters I, II, III = Letters of James Joyce, vols. I, II, III (Viking Press, 1966),
Selected Letters = Selected Letters of James Joyce (Faber, 1975)
BL = British Library (Harriet Shaw Weaver materials)
NL = National Library of Ireland (Paul Léon materials)

1904

3 December 1904 Letters II (to Stanislaus Joyce): Nora's father is a baker. There are seven in the family. Papa had a shop but drank all the buns and loaves like a man. The mother's family are ‘toney’ and … intervened. Sequestration of Papa. Uncle Michael supports Mrs and the children, while Papa bakes and drinks in a distant part of Connacht. Uncle M is very rich. Papa is treated very contemptuously by the family. Nora says her mother would not lie with him. Nora has not lived at home but with her grandmother who has left her some money.
    She has told me something of her youth, and admits the gente art of self-satisfaction. She has had many love-affairs, one when quite young with a boy who died. She was laid up at news of his death. Her uncles are worthy men as you shall hear. When she was sixteen a curate in Galway took a liking to her: tea at the presbytery, little chats, familiarity. He was a nice young man with black curly hairs on his head. One night at tea he took her on his lap and said he liked her, she was a nice little girl. Then he put his hand up under her dress which was shortish. She however, I understand, broke away.

1907

11 February 1907 Letters II (to Stanislaus Joyce): It is strange where you get ideas for stories. Stupid Woodman gave me The Boarding-House, Ferrero The Two Gallants. Others I though of myself or heard of. (See N03 (VI.B.3).073(c)

1909

11 December 1909 Selected Letters (to Nora Joyce): The four Italians have left Finn's Hotel and live now over the show [the Volta cinema in Mary steet]. I paid about £20 to your late mistress, returning good for evil. Before I left I told the waitress who I was and asked her to let me see the room you slept in. She brought me upstairs and took me to it. You can imagine my excited appearance and manner. I saw my love's room, her bed, the four little walls within which she dreamed of my eyes and voice, the little curtains she pulled aside in the morning to look out at the grey sky of Dublin, the poor modest silly things on the walls over which her glance travelled while she undressed her fair young body at night.

1922

SOUTH OF FRANCE 11/12 October to *14 November 1922

30 October 1922, Beach Letters (JJ to Sylvia Beach, dictated): I was able to correct the first half of Ulysses for the third edition and to read the first two volumes recommendes by Mr. Schiff of A la Recherche des Ombrelles Perdues par Plussiers Jeunes Filles en Pleurs du Côté de chez Swann et Gomorrhee et Co, par Marcelle Proyce et James Joust … Please send me any good news there is as it will remind me that I was once a writer dans le temps.

8 November 1922, Letters I (JJ to Harriet Weaver, dictated): That solitary detective is an interesting figure. Is he what the English call a King Beaver, that is an Irish constabularyman with red whiskers, riding a red bicycle?

26 Avenue Charles Floquet, Paris

25 November 1922, Letters III (JJ to Harriet Weaver): My eyes have not been and are not well … Everything else sent me to Nice was forwarded. Strange to say the writer whom I mentioned in my letter asking for them — Mr Marcel Proust — died this day week. His name has often been coupled with mine … I am sure you are anxious to be away in Cheshire. King Beaver will never find you there.

8 December 1922, BLHW (JJ to Harriet Weaver): I am wondering whether your odyssey round London has been undertaken in the hope of surprising detective-sergeant King Beaver curled up asleep round a lamppost

30 December 1922, BLHW (JJ to Harriet Weaver): I hope you got my book. [gift copy of Edward Sullivan's edition of The Book of Kells]. You will need a large magnifying glass for it. I used to pore over the pages (when not poring over the advertisement columns of Irish newspapers of before the flood) in the days when the shaker of the earth had not yet bereft me of vision.

1923

UP 8 January 1923

6 February 1923 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Then it had to be arranged about my being admitted to the American hospital as a bogus American (this Dr Borsch is arranging) … in a way I was glad of all these obstacles for I detest the operations. But next week they must begin — alas! I have been able to do some reading and note taking with my back to the light but of course it cannot go on like that. All I hope now is that they will be successful … I am very glad that you like the Book of Kells. What can I say about the Odyssey? I made heaps of notes about it (supposedly) which I could not fit in. I was trying lately to sort these out according to a brandnew system I have invented for the greater complication and torment of myself. But I need eyes for that.

6 February 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I did not get the copy from Mr Rodker. When it comes I shall try to push on with the corrections.

16 February 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Lucia Joyce): the dionine treatment was begun on Thursday (15 February 1923) and continued yesterday. He is to go again today … My father was not able to continue the corrections as you wish because the copy from Mr Rodker arrived only to-day but as soon as this experiment is over he will continue them here and in the hospital.

26 February 1923 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): … my power to read or write … I had before 1/10 of normal vision in that eye. Now I have 1/7 or 1/6 but this is only good for longrange vision.

26 February 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Dr Borsch has just tested my sight … the vision of my eye has nearly trebled since the start of the dionine treatment

11 March 1923 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I continue the dionine treatment with Dr Borsch. I am sure you are blaming me for my cowardice and procrastination … my sight has slowly improved … Yesterday I wrote two pages — the first I have written since the final Yes of Ulysses. Having found a pen with some difficulty I copied them out in a large handwriting on a double sheet of foolscap so that I could read them.

ca. March 1923 NLI(JJ540-41) (to John Stanislaus Joyce): I see by the Irish papers which Nora's uncle … sends me every day

18 March 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver, dictated to Giorgio Joyce): I am dictating this to my son because Tuesday (13 March 1923) I got sudden flare up in the eye. I spent several sleepless nights partly in fier and partly wrighting wich I dictated the next morning. The page you call historic will be of course yours with the manuscript when and if ever completed. The passage is towards the end of the book, but only the brief draft written without notes.

28 March 1923 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): These few lines will let you know the conjunctivitis ended yesterday … and so on Tuesday next (3 April 1923) I go into hospital … The first dental operation will take place on Wednesday, the second on Thursday. (3 and 4 April 1923) In spite of my eye attack I got on with another passage by using a charcoal pencil (fusain) which broke every three minutes and a large sheet of paper. I have now covered various large sheets in a handwriting resembling that of the late Napoleon Bonaparte when irritated by reverses.

2 April 1923 Letters III (to Aunt Josephine): Here at last is the list. I shall be very glad if you will please fill it up in your free moments and return it registered to above address [Shakespeare & Co] … I am in no hurry for the book but would like to have it back in a few months.

Maison de Santé Ambroise Paré, Neuilly, Paris.

5 April 1923 BLHW (from Nora Joyce to Harriet Weaver): First dental operation yesterday ten extracts seven abscesses one cyst removed my husband was extremely weak but improved this afternoon

10 April 1923 BLHW (from Lucia Joyce to Harriet Weaver): The other operations which are much lighter will be tomorrow and Wednesday (11 April 1923) and probably he will return home on Wednesday night if

26 Avenue Charles Floquet, Paris

14 April 1923 BLHW (from Lucia Joyce to Harriet Weaver): My father has returned from hospital but he cannot write as the sight in his right eye has diminished so that he cannot read print at all.

20 April 1923 BLHW (from Giorgio Joyce to Harriet Weaver): The radiograph was taken yesterday and if it is favourable my father will be operated on Wednesday or Thursday. (25 or 26 April 1923) His sight is slowly improving

23 April 1923 BLHW (from Lucia Joyce to Harriet Weaver): The Ex-ray photograph was successful and … my father will be operated on next Thursday morning (26 April 1923) in Dr Borsch's clinique

Dr Borsch's Clinique, 39 rue du Cherche-Midi, Paris

25 April 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I go into the clinique today … the prospect seems murky but if my sight comes back I will face it

29 April 1923 BLHW (from Lucia Joyce to Harriet Weaver): He is still in the clinique

26 Avenue Charles Floquet, Paris

6 May 1923 BLHW (from Giorgio Joyce to Harriet Weaver): My father is now at home again

22 May 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): very slow improvement of vision … I can do a little reading and writing with my right eye

28 May 1923 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I cannot see or see very slightly as it is still a long way from reading vision … Nevertheless I have gone through some of my notes with what sight I have.

10 June 1923 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): My small flat is all upside down with ten cases of books and manuscripts, three sacks of newspapers, four trunks, four valises, three hatboxes etc. I expect to leave Paris on Saturday (16 June 1923) … As regards the sight it seems to be getting very slowly better. I can now do some reading and have raced through many accumulated books and notes.

11 June 1923 Letters III (to Claud Sykes): I can read and write a fair amount even now … We are leaving Paris for the summer. If you are passing here before 15 instant … ring me up

11 June 1923 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): … get for me (if not to buy, as a loan) a copy of Morgante the Lesser by ‘Sirius’ (pseudonym of Edward Martyn) published 1890? I should very much like to read it when I get to London.

Terminus Hotel, Calais 18-21 June 1923

18 June 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Will stop tonight in Calais

20 June 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Wednesday 3.45p. The wind is blowing up into a nice storm. It is worse than yesterday. It is not only a question of our nerves etc. but also the long standing about on the piers here and in Dover while they are checking luggage and passports? I don't want to risk it with my eyes. This is extremely tiresome. If possible we will cross by early boat tomorrow.

London 21 Jun- ?? 1923

Alexandra House, Bognor

3 July 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): send papers and letters to this address but not Arabia as we shall change in a few days

?4 July 1923 BLHW (from Harriet Weaver): I have sent you today the Proverbs of Wales and Catalogue of Plays … no hope of my securing Arabia Deserta … for 2 or 3 months … Mr Doughty … lives in Eastbourne so perhaps you could … extract a copy from headquarters

5 July 1923 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Anyhow here I am [in Bognor] and I like it very much …

11 July 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I go about a great deal and have catalogued about 40 pages of notes

12 July 1923 Letters III (to Sylvia Beach): Will you please order the following books (American): (1) English Speech and Literature by E Vizetelly (2) Ireland and the Making of Britain by O.J. Fitzpatrick … also information on (1) New Book of Kings by Davidson (2) The Complete Peerage (8 vols) edited by Lord Howard de Walden … I have also catalogued about 40 pages of notes in spite of the heat wave (see N03 (VI.B.3).155(d) and N03 (VI.B.3).155(e)

19 July 1923 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Pur commencer may I have recourse to your offered aid and ask you to type the enclosed (2 copies)? I shall send you the original sheet (now quite illegible) when I have transcribed what is on the back of it. I think it would give me pleasure to see the first page of type. I hope it is legible.

19 July 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I go on sorting my notebooks and tomorrow or next day I shall draft some of the other pages

26 July 1923 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): May I trouble you to make three copies of this at your leisure? Please keep one for yourself for in moving today I have lost one of your typed sheets and I should like to have a complete set of these scattered passages when needed. [Written on bottom verso of S. Kevin faircopy]

29 July 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I have catalogued another fifty pages or so and am drafting out another part which I may send on tomorrow as a final affliction … If I could leave on Wednesday (1 August 1923) I could see you before you go away for next weekend and in that case you could give me the typescript instead of posting it … my attempt to debolshevise my notes. Time, I suppose is necessary. Of course I accumulated more notes and papers and books here. However on the other hand I have sifted out several square feet of material. I was very pleased to get that first page of typescript not that it is definitif but for the pleasure of seeing it.

2 August 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I shall leave Bognor either tonight or tomorrow. By the next post I hope to send on the third pattern for your loam. If all the sentences take as much trouble as these three it will be slow work. But they are only landmarks

2 August 1923 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I send you this as promised — a piece describing the conversion of S. Patrick by Ireland. You may keep the other rough drafts. (On S. Pat faircopy)

Belgrave Residential Hotel, 6-7 Montague Street, W.C.1

3 August 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I have just arrived here … I wonder could you send me whatever you have typed — the Kevin or Patrick episodes — or both … But if you have not typed either let them stand over. I want to see how they look in type. I feel very well and resemble the red Egyptian

12 August 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I enclose the other piece I spoke of. Perhaps you may have time to type it too. It has given me a pain in my back writing it out and I shall not draft any more here now but begin to pack up my notes

13 August 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Many thanks for the typed sheets. I enclose the first drafts I spoke of. That marked (A) is the first of all

Victoria Palace Hotel, Paris

19 August 1923 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): We are staying here … Many thanks for indeed for so kindly typing those clauses [for Pinker]

23 August 1923 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): Of course I have broken my promise and have begun drafting other parts in spite of the heat, noise, confusion and suffocation.

Hotel de l'Univers, Tours

30 August 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): We have been here since Monday (27 August 1923) and I have seen S. Patrick's cave in the monastery which is by no means as pleasant as the room his degenerate disciple occupies … We shall probably return to Paris on Monday (3 September 1923). I shall send you another passage from my book as soon as I get back.

Victoria Palace Hotel, Paris

10 September 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): We chase flats very much in the style of the animals in the piece enclosed … I enclose another piece a description of Isolde's first parent. I had it typed at once in order to read it. I think it would be monstrous to inflict the typing of the book on you. You would get no pleasure from the text. The type after all is a dress rehearsal of print. I am working at another piece which I shall send on. I have now paged the pieces (unnumbered, of course) into a folder … if what I am doing here shapes itself … difficult for me to explain what I am at and I hate saying anything which is not clear — to myself at least. I hope my extract of earwigs may give you some mildly comic relief. If not perhaps the next one — another part of the Tristan part — will.

9 October 1923 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I sent those four fellows out of the house yesterday and when they come back from the vast I shall send them on. Today I send you the rough sheets with a plan of the verse and a forgotten page of H.C.E. But please don't read them yet — in fact, they are illegible. On Saturday (13 October 1923) I shall send the typed copy and the fair copy. I am glad to get rid of them as they gave me a lot of trouble … Mr Hueffer has been made editor of a new Paris review [The Transatlantic Review] Mr Pound (to whom I had shown the pieces I have written) came round to say that the front pages of the first issue were to be reserved for me with a trumpet blast … I felt (as I tried to explain to him) that I could not allow them to be printed yet. The construction is quite different from Ulysses where at least the ports of call were known beforehand. I am sorry that Patrick and Luchru-Berkeley are unsuccessful in explaining themselves. The answer, I suppose, is that given by Paddy Dignam's apparition: metempsychosis. Or perhaps the theory of history so well set forth (after Hegel and Giambattista Vico) by the four eminent annalists who are even now treading the typepress in sorrow will explain part of my meaning. I work as much as I can because these are not fragments but active elements and when they are more and a little older they will begin to fuse of themselves … I shall do nothing for a couple of days

9 October 1923 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Today I send you … a forgotten page of H.C.E.

9 October 1923 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I sent those four fellows out of the house yesterday and when they come back from the vast I shall send them on. Today I send you the rough sheets with a plan of the verse and a forgotten page of H.C.E. But please don't read them yet — in fact, they are illegible. On Saturday [13 October 1923] I shall send the typed copy and the fair copy. I am glad to get rid of them as they gave me a lot of trouble

9 October 1923 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Mr Hueffer has been made editor of a new Paris review [The Transatlantic Review] Mr Pound (to whom I had shown the pieces I have written) came round to say that the front pages of the first issue were to be reserved for me with a trumpet blast … I felt (as I tried to explain to him) that I could not allow them to be printed yet. The construction is quite different from Ulysses where at least the ports of call were known beforehand.

9 October 1923 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I am sorry that Patrick and Luchru-Berkeley are unsuccessful in explaining themselves. The answer, I suppose, is that given by Paddy Dignam's apparition: metempsychosis. Or perhaps the theory of history so well set forth (after Hegel and Giambattista Vico) by the four eminent annalists who are even now treading the typepress in sorrow will explain part of my meaning. I work as much as I can because these are not fragments but active elements and when they are more and a little older they will begin to fuse of themselves.

10 October 1923 Letters III (to Lily Bollach: STA): After our interview of the other evening it seems to me very unfair to have inflicted on you such difficult work. It is very kind of you to undertake … The text must be impossible for a foreigner and I ought to have known it. However as you are doing this piece may I ask you to make this one addition? On the last page of the prose part (before the verse begins) after the words ‘oremus prayer’ and before the words ‘for navigants etc’ please insert these words: ‘to Peregrine and Michael and Farfassa and Peregrine’

12 October 1923 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): I send you express the piece so that it may reach you before the weekend. I have been a long time in the company of these old gentlemen-historians and am rather tired of them. On the other [side of this letter] I am scribbling a plan of the verses which follow the prose immediately.
Pronoun | Evangelist | —— | Four Masters | ore | Symbol | Liturgical colour | Day | Province | accent
A: thou | Matthew | Matt Gregory | Peregrine O'Clery | gold | —— | blue-black | Palm Sunday | Ulster | Belfast
B: she | Mark | Marcus Lyons | Michael O'Clery | silver | lion | moonblue | Holy Tuesday | Munster | Cork
C: you | Luke | Luke Tarpey | Farfassa O'Mulcrony | steel | calf | red | Spy Wednesday | Leinster | Dublin
D: I | John | Johnny MacDougall | Peregrine O'Duignan | iron | eagle | black | Good Friday | Connacht | Galway

12 October 1923 STA (to Lily Bollach): Many thanks indeed for your kind letter and your great promptness in typing the whole of my MS so quickly. … It is all right and I have already sent it off. I wish my MS were a little more interesting so that your work might be less dull, especially after your long office hours. I am very grateful to you for offering to continue but I hope you will at once let me know whenever you feel unequal to the task. Perhaps you can meet me at the usual place on Tuesday [16 October 1923] at 6.15?

17 October 1923 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I was glad to hear that the Earwicker absurdity did not make you worse … if [the atrocious weather] continues I despair even of my four evangelists' episode (or sketch) having any effect. It is finished but I am filing the edges off it. The wild hunt continues in the Paris jungle … I compose ridiculous prose writing on a green suitcase which I bought in Bognor. I want to get as many sketches done or get as many boring parties at work as possible before removal somewhere … let me know any impression you may have of the passages sent.

23 October 1923 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Many thanks for you letter and kind appreciation of the foursome episode. It is strange that on the day I sent to you a picture of an epicene professor of history in an Irish university college seated in the hospice for the dying etc after ‘eating a bad crab in the red sea’ I received a paper from Dublin containing news of the death at the age of 41 of an old schoolfellow of mine in the hospice for the dying, Harold's Cross, Dublin, professor of law in the university of Galway who, it seems, had lately returned from the West Indies where his health collapsed. More strangely still his name (which he used to say, was an Irish (Celtic) variant of my own) is in English an epicene name being made up of the feminine and masculine pronouns—Sheehy. It is as usual rather uncanny. I have written to his father (an ex M.P. for Meath) and did not care to think of it too much. I think the reading of that passage in the future (if it is ever read) is likely to cause less unhappiness to mortals than any reacting of the event which accompanied it (repetitions of which are likely to be more frequent than perusals of my prose). … Mr Hueffer is very insistent I give him the Earwicker episode … I am gathering my scattered wits for a different essay and have made plans and jigsaw puzzle sketches in the penumbra of this room. It is now raining and blowing hard outside. My cold passed away.

23 October 1923 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Many thanks for you letter and kind appreciation of the foursome episode … Mr Hueffer is very insistent I give him the Earwicker episode.

?23 October 1923 (to Harriet Weaver): I showed [Miss Beach] the Patrick piece

2 November 1923 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): You will be disappointed when you open this. It is not new MS but the fair copy of Mamalujo which I forgot to send. I have since worked over the typed copy again and have now definitely abandoned it. I could not do much these last weeks as my wife has been attending the dentist for some unpleasant work — now finished. … P.S. I have written in the additions.

2 November 1923 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I have prepared a nice intricate Mah Jongg puzzle for myself and shall start on it on Monday (5 November 1923) … Does the British Muslim Society publish any propaganda paper? If so I should like to see a copy (see B11-30)

17 November 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I am better and have leave to read and write … I had to leave off what I was doing as too complicated for me then but continued another part dictating and today by writing and copying … I was very glad to see the Nobel prize go to Yeats

19 November 1923 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): Thanks also for Arabia Deserta … I wish I could get away somewhere and read [it] for my own pleasure but alas in spite of it all I am working overtime again … I cannot stop now but must try to block out (roughly, at least) certain parts of the book before my next holiday. The passages typed represent twice or three times as much, the rest being already written in the sense that additions will be made all over the present text from notes to which I have now no access … I shall send on the typescript of the next piece as soon as it is done

UPLund 13 December 1923 (to Lily Bollach): Let me apologise for my rudeness in leaving such a load of MS for you all of a sudden with a single word of explanation. But I have been working so much and wanted to get rid of it. I do hope the mere sight of it with all the corrections did not annoy you and that you are not too busy at present to type some of it — if you have been able to read it. Perhaps you can manage to meet me tomorrow (Friday) (14 December 1923) at 6.15 or 6.30 at the corner of Avenue Gabriel? If not convenient for you please fix your own time and place. I shall call to your concierge for the reply.

15 December 1923 Letters I (to John Quinn): Ford has been asking me to give him something for his review, but I am not ready yet.

17 December 1923 Letters III (to Valery Larbaud): I want to show you what I have done … I shall have a fair lot ready in a week or so and perhaps you would like to see the typescript. How I write in present circumstances I don't know — influence of ad maiorum dei gloriam perhaps

17 December 1923 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I enclose a long piece with the final script. The others [earlier drafts] are in a book [MS 47471b], all scrawled over in red pencil. I shall send it when it is full. To do so now would mean tearing out the leaves. I hope this extract will give you some pleasure in the reading. … These last weeks have been really dreadful and we seem to be sinking deeper into the morass. I stopped work in despair for a week and then started again night and day. I work like a person who is stunned. I cannot imagine any position more grotesque …

17 December 1923 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): … My sight continues to be good enough … In spite of the atmosphere of this ‘Norweegickan’ hotel [Victoria Palace Hôtel, 6 rue Blaise Desgoffe, Paris: see FW 46.21 47472-115 I.2:3.2] I am [well]. I am working at another piece which will be finished and will send it on at once.

18 December 1923 Letters III (to Lily Bollach): I called and got the typesheets — all done to my astonishment!

18 December 1923 STA (to Lily Bollach): Here is the copy of my novel which I ought to have brought yesterday … I shall inflict some more MS on you in a few days but in case it is not before the 25th allow me to wish you a happy Christmas.

23 December 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): You will notice in the next extract and later than I shall write in a veiled way here and there explaining what critics did not observe in my last book and replying indirectly to their observations.

31 December 1923 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): A new year's gift in the form of more MS will follow in a day or two … I have been working very hard to find two other pieces (the MS I am sending) before the end of this tiresome year.

1924

Victoria Palace Hotel, Paris

7 January 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Here is what I managed to get done. The pieces divided by a red line are not consecutive. There are three longish pieces in between. The first one is nearly finished … I hope you will like the enclosed pieces. I am afraid to stop writing.

16 January 1924 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Did you get the MS and typescript sent you a week or so ago? I am sending you more enclosed, also the pages to replace the faulty ones. The passage ‘Let us now … Shem the penman’ follows the words ‘the hen saw’. Between the words ‘penman’ and ‘Revered’ are three further passages, a description of Shem-Ham-Cain-Egan etc and his penmanship, Anna Livia's visits and collaboration and delivery of the memorial by Shawn the post. I finished the calligraphy expertise a day or two ago but have felt so tired since that I have scarcely energy enough to hold a pen.

19 January 1924 STA (to Lily Bollach): Many thanks for your kind letter. Of course I ought not to have given you such short notice. I shall come on Monday (21 Jan) as you suggest at 6.30 but if you are too busy or feel tired I hope you will not bother as another day will do quite as well

4 February 1924 STA (to Lily Bollach): I am leaving some MS for you which I hope you will not find too difficult. I wrote out three of the pages again even after the last revise as I thought they were really too impossible to send you. I hope your work will allow you time to do them if you are not overfatigued (as I am) with this miserable weather.

5 February 1924 STA (to Lily Bollach): In my usual hasty fashion I left over some MS for you last night. I fear some of the pages are really dreadful but do not know what to do with them. I do hope they are not too difficult and that the so-called Latin is at least legible. I have one favour to ask. My sight is not the best and I find it hard to read type at night. The ink on the last sheets were to me rather faint. Can this be remedied in the future I mean? If not, it does not matter. I hope the MS will not give you too much trouble and that you may have time to do it when (and if) your work is lighter than it was.

5 February 1924 Letters I (to John Quinn): I have not seen Ford for five or six days. He has been pressing me to give him something, but I am not eager for publication at present. I could, perhaps, detach one passage for him, but he fears prosecution and seizure on the charge of blasphemy. The second number of his review came out on Saturday (2 February 1924) — pancake night

N.D. (probably February) 1924 Letters I (to Robert McAlmon): Ford has come so often to the well and talked about support given me in the past that I have consented to give him the four masters bit (which is only a sidepiece) for his next number. The review is very shabby in my opinion.

8 February 1924 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I send you some new MS, a piece I had omitted, a page to replace one typed and a fresh batch of typescript. I hope it will reach you safely. The fresh text follows after the words ‘Shem the penman’. I continue to work on, hopeless as the situation seems … Perhaps the nightman sketch I send may produce by allopathy a mood of contentment …

8 February 1924 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I send you some new MS, a piece I had omitted, a page to replace one typed and a fresh batch of typescript. I hope it will reach you safely. The fresh text follows after the words ‘Shem the penman’. I continue to work on, hopeless as the situation seems … I have consented to give [Ford] for the next issue the Mamalujo episode, the only sidepiece I could detach. The correspondent of the Times here was appealed to and, having examined it, gave his opinion that it would not lead to prosecution for blasphemy … Perhaps the nightman sketch I send may produce by allopathy a mood of contentment … P.S. Of course I cannot find the earlier MS. If I look for it any more I shall be unable to do anything for the day. I saw it yesterday. When I see it again I will shoot it at sight.

8 February 1924 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I have consented to give [Ford] for the next issue the Mamalujo episode, the only sidepiece I could detach.

14 February 1924 STA (to Lily Bollach): I am also enclosing some additional MS [I.7§2.2] and I hope you will be able to find time to type it. The fault is of course in my own eyesight as the other sheets are quite legible to anyone else but if I am not troubling you too much I should prefer to have the MS typed heavy like the last sheets you were kind enough to do. P.S. Will you please retype from the word ‘gallons’ to avoid a break and also could you let me have two blank sheets to serve as title and end page.

17 February 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I enclose the end of the Shem piece, an apostrophe to him as Cain. I am afraid I cannot confine this person to private circulation. It is out of my power since you yourself put him in currency. Perhaps I ought to explain that Shemus is the Irish for James, that Anna Livia (Eve) means mother of all the living, that Dublin is built on the river Anna Liffey, (a stream only 50 miles long but with great windings, shallow, and darkred brown in colour (her hair)) and that what the Norwegian constable says is: Hvorledes hav De det idag, min sort Herre? (How are you today, my black gentleman) just as in the piece I am now doing Madam Earwicker's poetical composition which begins touchingly: High Hellsker gone ladies hen smake a lily pigger is in old Danish form Jeg elske jaalades en smukke lille Pige (I love so much a pretty little girl)

?18 February 1924 Letters III (to Robert McAlmon): I don't think [Miss Weaver] likes the tone of my last effusions though Larbaud to whom I read it thinks they are the strongest pages I have written. The task I have set myself is dreadfully difficult but I believe it can be done.

20 February 1924 Letters I (to Italo Svevo): A propos of names: I have given the name of Signora Schmitz to the protagonist of the book I am writing. Ask her, however, not to take up arms, either of steel or fire, since the person involved is the Pyrrha of Ireland (or rather of Dublin) whose hair is the river beside which (her name is Anna Liffey) the seventh city of Christianity springs up, the other six being Basovizz, Clapham Junction, Rena Vecia, Limehouse, S. Odorico in the Vale of Tears and San Giacomo in Monte di Pietà.

25 February 1924 Letters III (to Ford Madox Ford): As it is already the 25th can you please let me have my typescript back and the first proofs? I should like to check them.

29 February 1924 Letters I (to Robert McAlmon): The T.R. sent me round a proof. O, my goodness! And I will not send it back to the printer as I do not trust his brains. So I wrote for Ford's secretary to come round. No reply. It is grotesque, I think. And I was promised a proof a fortnight ago and told I could revise it twice and tomorrow will be the 1 March … P.S. It's all right … My piece is put off till April so I shall have time to repair the breakages.

29 February 1924 LUND (to Richard Wallace): I am very much obliged to Mrs Wallace for leaving round that book so promptly. I shall return it in a few days as the Anna Livia piece is nearly finished — as am I!

6 March 1924 Letters III (to Ford Madox Ford): It is now 5.30 and there is no sign of the proof promised me for Tuesday evening. (4 March 1924) As arranged I must revise this proof again and be sure that my revisions are made even if the piece has to be held over for another number. Will you please see that I get it at once.

7 March 1924 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I have finished the Anna Livia piece. Here it is. After it I have hardly energy enough to hold the pen and as result of work, worry, bad light, general circumstances and the rest. It is a chattering dialogue across the river by two washerwomen who as night falls become a tree and a stone. The river is named Anna Liffey. Some of the words at the beginning are hybrid Danish-English. Dublin is a city founded by Vikings. The Irish name is Baile Átha-Cliat (Irish script) (Ballyclee) = Town of Ford of Hurdles. Her Pandora's box contains the ills flesh is heir to. The stream is quite brown, rich in salmon, very devious, shallow. The splitting up towards the end (seven dams) is the city abuilding. Izzy will later be Isolde (cf. Chapelizod).

14 March 1924 LUND (to Richard Wallace): May I trouble you to return this book to Mrs Wallace and thank her. I am afraid I am a day or two overdue but I have been working very hard. I have finished the Shem-Cain piece and also the Anna Livia one. If you ever wish to hear them let me know. The dentist, I hope, will finish with my wife tomorrow.

14 March 1924 Letters III (to Ford Madox Ford): Thanks for you note and for the trouble Mrs Ford and yourself took to check my proof. However, as it seemed to me almost impossible that you could revise such a tricky proof I went to Clarke's. The foreman had gone and the clerk could not find my proof. He thought it might be on the machine. I asked him to telephone to me tomorrow morning and then drove to Quai d'Anjou but, not finding you, left my name. My checking of the proof would mean a delay of about an hour and much relief to myself. I hope it is still possible. I explained in a letter to Mrs Ashworth that I could not go to the printer's on Thursday but would go on Friday. (13 and 14 March 1924)

15 March 1924 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I hope none of the MS was lost. It is eleven pages [actually, 12]. The first words are ‘O tell me’ the last ‘waters of. Night!’ I shall send you two pages which have been written again to replace. But they do not change the piece. It should be read in successive runs.

15 March 1924 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): On Monday (17 March 1924) I shall try to start Shaun the Post. This would make the second part of my book fairly complete with the letter. The first part is not written yet. You did not say if you liked the piece? I read it to Mr Larbaud who was enthusiastic about it. I think I shall fall all of a heap after the Shaun piece. It has been such a struggle.

N.D. 16 March 1924 Letters III (to Ford Madox Ford): The proof (sent me without the former one to check it by!) is quite impossible. I glanced over it. Not only has it not been read but many of the most glaring blunders are still in it. I gave the typescript to you, as you remember, under pressure and on the distinct understanding that I could write in notes to which I had not then access. I think it is due to me to hold the piece over for your next issue as the printer seems to be still learning his trade

16 March 1924 STA (to Lily Bollach): I have been so illmannered in not thanking you or writing that I am almost ashamed to ask you to do me a great favour. I should like to have the pages marked with a red cross done again and reinserted, perhaps more spaced but that does not matter. There are only a few (I am speaking of the last piece you were kind enough to do) and, as tomorrow is S. Patrick's day and I want the folder back, I wonder could you steal time to type them in. I shall call in any case … I have been dreadfully overworked … P.S. I shall make a green cross in honour of S. Patrick instead of a red one.

18 March 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I enclose the revised sheets for the last piece. Lest the envelope open or be opened I shall send them registered … There is a review in the Literary Supplement of New York Times of a book on me by Mr Herbert Gorham, I think. There is also an essay in a book called On Strange Altars … Now that those two riverines are sound asleep I shall go out for a few minutes' walk.

24 March 1924 Letters III (to Robert McAlmon): I have been working myself silly and revising proof of the four masters or evangelists for the T.R. What a job, too!

24 March 1924 Letters III (to Lily Bollach STA): I am dreadfully late in acknowledging receipt of the second typescript which you rushed off for me so promptly. It was very kind of you indeed as it was a mere whim of mine to have it for that day [17 Mar] … The spelling ‘eygs’ is all right — a mixture of Danish and English which is intentional.

24 March 1924 Letters III (to Lily Bollach STA): My excuse for my discourtesy is that I have been revising proof after proof of a passage which will appear next week in the Transatlantic Review — the piece about the four old men typed by you some months … I shall of course send you a copy of the review immediately it comes out. I hope I may be able to see you this week as there is another small matter I want to bother you about.

24 March 1924 Letters III (to Valery Larbaud): Enclosed is revised typed copy of Anna Livia. Have you heard the four masters bit? It will be in the Transatlantic Review next number. I read you a mere sketch a year ago. But perhaps you read it in the folder. But I don't think you had time.

24 March 1924 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): In making notes I used signs for the various characters. It may amuse you to see them so I shall write them on the back of this. … Shaun is going to give me a very great deal of trouble. … H (Earwicker, H C E by moving letter round) A Anna Livia C Shem-Cain D Shaun W Snake P S. Patrick T Tristan I Isolde X Mamalujo N This stands for the title but I do not wish to say it yet until the book has written more of itself.

24 March 1924 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I hope you got the MS book. I am very glad you like Anna Livia … All Pandora's gifts are not maladies. Shaun's map: for this see any postage stamp of the Irish Free State. It is a philatelic curiosity. A territorial stamp it includes the territory of another state, Northern Ireland. In making notes I used signs for the various characters. It may amuse you to see them so I shall write them on the back of this. I have been very busy revising over and over the proofs of the four old men, Mamalujo. It comes out this week. They have now taken a lamp out of my room … Shaun is going to give me a very great deal of trouble. / H (Earwicker, H C E by moving letter round) / A Anna Livia / C Shem-Cain / D Shaun / W Snake / P S. Patrick / T Tristan / I Isolde / X Mamalujo / N This stands for the title but I do not wish to say it yet until the book has written more of itself.

6 April 1924 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I asked Miss Beach to send you the Transatlantic Review. You will notice revisions in it … Mr Gorham's book on me arrived … I am afraid it was in part responsible for a nervous collapse I had a few days ago …

6 April 1924 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): For some days past I have not been allowed to read a line … Dr Borsch says I must limit my work in present conditions to a half or a third. I have been working ten hours a day in semi-dark for the past seven months. I am to be operated on when the fine weather comes I suppose in May … I hope to resume with Shaun tomorrow. I had done about a third. But he (already a dawdler) will be longer on the road. … strangely enough, the Shaun the Post piece is very amusing — to me, at least. It is extremely hard to write.

12 April 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Thanks … for Dr Collins' book which I will return, I hope, today or tomorrow.

12 April 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I am sorry Mamalujo did not give you much pleasure. I am too exhausted still to discuss the question except to say that, in my opinion, any one page of the Proteus episode, your favourite, needs at least as much annotation as any one page of M.M.Lucia Joyce — probably more, though naturally a study of youth is livelier than a blur of senility … I have followed Dr Borsch's your injunctions so well that I have ceased to work altogether. I even allow the Dublin daily papers to accumulate. Shaun is asleep at his post

?17 April 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): The difficulties of the Shaun piece are incredible but if I succeed in it I (and the book) will get a new lease of life, I hope.

24(27) April 1924 Letters III (to Lily Bollach STA): I wanted to write to you several days ago but I have had a rather bad nervous collapse from overwork … Mr Valery Larbaud asked me to let him have a copy of the Anna Livia piece (enclosed) and I have also promised one to a relative in Ireland who has done a good deal of research for me. So could you make three fresh copies of it without the blanks in the paging?

25 April 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I work only 3 hours a day. I have finished the second draft (not the final) of the first part of Shaun the Post. When it is written out I shall call and inflict it on you in two or three days. The second part (far more difficult) I dare not even attempt yet Perhaps the semi-completion of the first part will aid me

1 May 1924 UP (to Lily Bollach): If it is not too much trouble and if you have had time to copy the other piece do you think you could let me have a few copies of the enclosed verses also. I shall call tomorrow evening (Friday) (2 May 1924) as Mr Larbaud is going to Italy on Monday. (5 May 1924) I hope you got the book I sent.

2 May 1924 Letters III (to Valery Larbaud): Here is one of the pieces of verse I spoke to you of. Tomorrow I will send you Anna Livia corrected. It is already typed but I revise the typescript always

7 May 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Dr Borsch suggests to me to be operated towards the end of May … This hotel is a babel of tongues, most of the waiters cannot speak either French, English or German. They are all vikings. The operation, my son's tuitions … the extremely difficult passage I am trying to write and the uselessness of going away if we have no place to come back to keep me here … I am still working at Shaun … The Shaun piece is long, long as the night he travels through. He is now halfway. I hope he will finish his journey … I was invited to give lectures at the Sorbonne but refused … in these latitudes as in one district of the otherworld fire is everlasting.

7 May 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I commissioned [Tuohy's portrait of John Joyce] to complete my family portraits when I still believed that after 10 years of labour fate would allow me to rest in a house of my own

13 May 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I am afraid I have not shown very much interest in [the second French edition of Ulysses] or anything else lately except in puzzling over Shem and Shaun in my haunted dungeon … Punkt … I am very fatigued, in sight of the operating table and half stupified by the gloom, noise, expense and uncertainty in which I try to work … I shall try to finish the first half of Shaun before the next big event — whatever it may be.

21 May 1924 Letters III (to Lily Bollach STA): Do you think you could manage to type these verses (the first I have written for six years) and leave six copies with your concierge by tomorrow (Thursday) (22 May 1924) evening? … I am going to make another trip (into a hospital) and I wanted to arrange another matter with you before I do so. Are you free Friday evening at 6.30 p.m. (23 May 1924) at the usual place?

21 May 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): My hands are as the hands of those who stray among the blackberry bushes.

22 May 1924 Letters III (to Valery Larbaud): All my books and MSS are packed up (Anna Livia with them) so I cannot find what I promised. It is impossible to work any longer in this hotel. However, I send you a short poem — the first I have written in six years ((A Prayer))

24 May 1924 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): The weather became very hot a few days ago … I went out, bought another case, packed and put to storage all my books, gathered my MSS including Shawn (30 pages of my large notebook, foolscap size) which I could not write out again, made a parcel of them and telephoned to Miss Beach who came and removed them hastily so that there is as much literature in my room as in your office. I was to have gone on with the writing a little longer but the nine months' labour was quite enough for me. I found my vision, power of attention all gradually getting worse yet I knew that if the books or even the MSS were left here I would go on. So I stopped. Hence this fountain pen which I bought when I had left off writing. I am sorry I could not face the writing out of Shawn which is a description of a postman travelling backwards in the night through the events already narrated. It is written in the form of a via crucis of 14 stations but in reality it is only a barrel rolling down the river Liffey. To write a book like this I should have a study of my own where I could quickly get at my books and papers. Otherwise it is impossible.

24 May 1924 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Dr Rosenbach sent me a message asking me what would be my price for the corrected proofs of Ulysses. When he receives a reply from me all the rosy brooks will have run dry.
Rosy Brook he bought a book
Though he didn't know how to spell it.
Such is the lure of literature
To the lad who can buy it and sell it.
[German Bach, brook] See

2 June 1924 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): This Norweejicker must have been reading my MS surreptitiously, I fear … it would be well to go into the clinic and have it over … and ‘my sight is growing thicker on me with the shadows in this place’. My memory too is dulled. I cannot remember accurately the first page of Shaun and he is not here to aid me … The operation … will be made on Saturday. (7 June 1924)

4 June 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): The postponement of the operation is very boring to me … I do not know what I shall do when I come out of the clinic. Perhaps I shall go for a rest to Britanny first. I should like to see the Wembley Exhibition and collect several hundred sacks of savage newspapers … I asked [my son's teacher] to look for a place [in Nice] where we could stay for a few months about the end of the year … Perhaps I could take one case of books and do some work but I will think of that later on … It must be very exasperating for you … to see me floundering about like a half blind seal, giving forth plaintive yelps of distress. Perhaps I was wrong to begin such a difficult book after having ended Ulysses. I began to see very clearly this morning the fusion of the second and third parts. How often in the day have I to resist the temptation to go down to Miss Beach's shop and get out, at least, the typescript or even the unfinished MS of Shaun?

7 June 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Operation postponed till Wednesday (11 June 1924) as Doctor had forgotten Whitsuntide recess

8 June 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Having nothing to do or read or write I am waiting for the next two days to pass. I have taken a flat in Nice … from 1 October to 1 May

11 June 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Operation performed

15 June 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Lucia Joyce): My father is feeling well after the operation … will be able to come out in a few days.

23 June 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Lucia Joyce): My father has come back from the clinic and is feeling very well .. the sight has slightly improved

27 June 1924 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): It is now seventeen days since the operation … Shaun, after a long absurd and rather incestuous Lenten lecture to Izzy, his sister, takes leave of her “with a half a glance of Irish frisky from under the shag of his parallel brows”. These are the words the reader will see but not those he will hear. He also alludes to Shem as my “soamheis” brother; he means Siamese. This is a better room …

27 June 1924 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): It is now seventeen days since the operation … The eye is still bandaged but I am allowed to read as well as I can with the other.I am very doubtful of the result. So far there is practicaly no improvement in the vision … The long drudgery and disappointment in Trieste … and then the labour of Ulysses must have undermined my strength … I mention this because whenever I am obliged to lie with my eyes closed I see a cinematograph going on and on and it brings back to my memory things I had almost forgotten. The sight I have now … is not enough to do the kind of work I feel impelled to do except very slowly and painfully and in very favourable conditions of light and climate which Paris does not offer … Bloom's day … For instance Shaun, after a long absurd and rather incestuous Lenten lecture to Izzy, his sister, takes leave of her “with a half a glance of Irish frisky from under the shag of his parallel brows”. These are the words the reader will see but not those he will hear. He also alludes to Shem as my “soamheis” brother; he means Siamese. This is a better room … I found that my memory was getting lame so in the clinic I started to learn by heart the Lady of the Lake … It is not a sign of intelligence but it is very useful. I have invented a whole system of my own — by which I keep my brains from falling about but I have been forced to drop most of it owing to the grotesque way I live now. I showed Mr Larbaud the signs I was using for my notes HCE Anna Livia Shem Shaun. He laughed at them but it saves time

Hôtel de France et Chateaubriand, Saint-Malo

10 July 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): We stay here for a day or so on the lookout.

11 July 1924 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I left Paris after a final interview with Dr Borsch … There is a Breton fair on under my windows.

12 July 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Quimper is full up till 17 instant … Can you get these books for me? [Camille Jullian, De la Gaule a la France; Life of S. Patrick by Professor J.B. Bury; Growth of Civilisation by W.J. Perry; Conn the Shaughraun by Dion Boucicault] [The first] you could probably get at the Odéon gallery and send on here. The others to Quimper … I am sending to myself c/o you a parcel of books which I shall not need as I travel about. Please put them on my seachest … I am correcting the revise for Cape and will send it to you on Thursday (17 July 1924)

25 July 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): If this reaches you on Saturday (26 July 1924) will you please order for me from Burns Oates and Washbourne the books on the enclosed slip [S. Patrick by Dean Kinane; S. Patrick by Canon Fleming; Boulogne-sur-mer by Canon Fleming; Life of O'Connell by Thomas Luby; Life of Wolfe Tone by Wolfe Tone]

29 July 1924 Letters I (to Valery Larbaud): ((On Irish language)) I shall answer your questions on Breton in a few days but I think Breton, though more spoken, has incorporated more Latin words (for an obvious reason) than Irish has. I think the Latin words in Irish are chiefly (I) ecclesiastical — the oldest (sagart = priest-sacerdos: leabhar = book, liber) (2) administrative — Norman and Norman-English (post = post: seanad = senate) As for English words of Anglo-Saxon origin they should be rare. The Irish peasant had no need to change the word uisge (ishgö) into ‘water’. And though Breton (when … blessed by rome and câliné by S. Pseudonymous and Co) is probably more picturesque, of course Irish as a language is FAR SUPERIOR

30 July 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I wanted to visit Dinan and Renan's birthplace. I am not sure now whether I shall do so or not. When the weather is bad I read a little in the town library … Though I came here to rest and wait for second sight I wish I could add to my meagre thanks something more definite concerning my mental wrestlings with the next part of my book (Messrs Earwicker and family having been left to fight it out between them — the French academy would condemn the preposition but he is one against more than one —) nevertheless I hope that by the time I reach London I shall have gone through the first round or so … I have reached nearly the end of the Wembley dinnerparty

30 July 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I hope the Tonans' programmme for this summer is now ended

5 August 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I read a good deal here. I am glad you sent the books so promptly. We have visited Dinan, Dinard, Mont S. Michel, Dol etc. Mr Lloyd Morris and his mother were here and we had a pleasant outing together

16 August 1924 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): For the last ten days I have proofreading — the revise of A Portrait … for Mr Cape. Thank goodness it went off today! … Can you call at the Freeman's Journal or Irish Times office in London and get a copy of their paper for Monday 11 August? You will find in it … a rather startling reference to me made by Mr Yeats in crowning with bay the spiritual victors of the Irish Olympic Games … (In this connection you may refer to the closing paragraph of Shem the Penman piece beginning Pariah … and ending … Anna Livia.) … But it is true that I have been thinking and thinking how and how and how can I and how can it — all about the fusion of two parts of the book — while my one bedazzled eye searched the sea like Cain — Shem — Tristan — Patrick from his lighthouse in Boulogne. I hope the solution will presently appear … We leave for Quimper — Hôtel de l'Epée — on Monday. (18 August 1924) After a short stay there I have to go to Paris to see Dr Borsch

17 August 1924 Letters III (to Sylvia Beach): We leave here tomorrow for Quimper … Up to today Camille Jullian's book has not come. I sent you two loads of books last night. Did you receive the Irish Times? … I suppose you have Mr Murry's new book, reviewed in Criterion? … The extract I read is rather feeble I think.

Hôtel de l'Epée, Quimper (From 18 August 1924)

21 August 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Thanks for Jullian's book.

26 August 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): For how much will Samuel French hire out the prompt copy only (without parts) of Jim the Penman — for reading purposes … My sight in that eye seems to be nearing extinction. I have the other (with its 1/3 of vision) but how long can I continue to overwork it?

28 August 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Hotel Epee Vannes address

Grand Hôtel du Commerce et de l'Épée, Vannes

29 August 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Please wire Auguste Morel's address caind

30 August 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I am staying here for a few days … [Morel] lives on an island off the coast here. A year ago I sent you good wishes from S. Patrice. Here there is only a trace of his nephew (at Elven) and unfortunately his name is German. Though I am a rolling stone I gathered a good deal of moss in Britanny in the way of books and maps and legends … If I could have closed down the clockwork in my head however the holiday would have been more beatic

Carnac

1 September 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Greetings from Cyclopean Carnac

1 September 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Am spending the day among the alignments here. [Morel] is with me in the land of the Cyclops

Victoria Palace Hotel, Paris

7 September 1924 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): We returned here a couple of days ago … My sister-in-law is a devotee of S. Patrick … She gave me a pocket breast-plate in the new Irish colours with part of his famous prayer on it cut in the form of a shield. At the top is a cross and at the end are the words: all rights reserved. This must be the first case of copyright in the history of humanity … I hope that in a day or two I shall have fixed up something about a flat so that we can leave for London … I see less than before.

7 September 1924 BLHW (insert): In hoc Signo Vinces “Oh, Church of the Irish! as ye are children of Christ, so be ye children of Rome.” — St. Patrick. Breastplate of St. Patrick I, ……, rise up today The Shield of God protecting me from the hand of every man who plots against me, near or far, alone or with others. Christ be with me. Christ be before me. Christ be after me. Christ be above me. Christ be at my right hand. Christ be at my left hand. Christ be in the fort. Christ be in the chariot. Christ be in the ship. Christ be in the heart of every man who thinks of me. Christ be in every eye that sees me. Christ be in every ear that hears me. Permissu Ordinarii Dioce. Dublinen. (All rights reserved.)

13 September 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): The sight has really got worse. [Dr Borsch] said that it may take three or six months but that he undertakes it will come back … I have taken a furnished flat here for six months … We leave for London on Tuesday morning (15 September 1924) … possible holdup at the coast if the sea is rough. I know that Equinox rages hereabouts but hope to skip across his path like Macintosh before the viceroy's coach and four. My son is coming with us

Hotel Terminus, Calais

17 September 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Held up by weather Hotel Terminus hope to leave tomorrow.

Euston Hotel, London

19 September 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Staying Euston will call tomorrow

24 September 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I could not give you any definite address till today … Has Bury's book come?

1 October 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): We shall be there [Paris] in a few days, I suppose … Thanks for Bury's book. It is not attractive but the appendix is valuable.

6 October 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I must stay on here for a day or two … a book I asked you to get is out Medieval Woman by Eileen Power [the book referred to may be Medieval People (1924) or Medieval English Nunneries (1922)].

9 October 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach):

UPLewis 11 October 1924:

8 Avenue Charles Floquet, Paris

14 October 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I have been working hard revising Shaun and in the middle of unloading of boxes, bundles, trunks etc.

16 October 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Can you get for me direct a monograph on César Franck published by John Lane, Bodley Head … Would you like to hear the Shaun piece which Miss Weaver wants to hear also … Saturday or Sunday? (18 or 19 October 1924)

30 October 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Mr Walsh has just come and gone. He interrupted me in the continuation of Shaun at which I am toiling away by the hour … In the meantime I shall ply black and red pencils — unless you send me the game of painted ladies as a change … A card has reached me from Texas University sent by Mr and Mrs John Bondfield telling me that on the 15 instant there took place the birth of their son, James Joyce Bondfield. I do not know who they are. But as for J.J.B I can see myself in old age fleeing from place to place to escape his murderous hatchet when he comes to the age of the use of weapons … do not forget the patron saint of pens, rice and yeggyolk. All rights reserved.

2 November 1924 Selected Letters (to Aunt Josephine): Only yesterday morning I was going to write to you — as usual about some point in my childhood as you are one of the two persons in Ireland who could give me information about it … best wishes for your recovery.

6 November 1924 Letters III (from Valery Larbaud): I hope I shall have the great treat of hearing some new chapters of your book

8 November 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): This German proposal … takes my mind off the lovely postboy … Valery Larbaud dines with me tonight

9 November 1924 III and Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): I wonder why Mr. Eliot has to fly over here to see what Shaun calls the proprietoress ((?FW 406)) … my sight … is very weak today so I shall not write much more. I think that I have solved one — the first — of the problems presented by my book. In other words one of the partitions between two of the tunnelling parties seems to have given way. I shall be glad to have Penguin Island.

16 November 1924 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Many thanks for Penguin Island. I shall read it again in English … Borsch … is to do the operation on me on 27 Instant — for cataract … I am preparing for it by trying to learn a page of the Sirens for the record and by pulling down more earthwork. The gangs are now hammering on all sides. It is a bewildering business. I want to do as much as I can before the execution. Complications to right of me, complications to left of me, complex on the page before me, perplex in the pen beside me, duplex in the meandering eyes of me, stuplex on the face that reads me. Amen. And from time to time I lie back and listen to my hair growing whiter. Mr Eliot ran in yesterday with an invitation from the proprietoress which I did not accept but I promised to send him a piece for the review … Just at present it is hard for me to interest myself in feuds. If anybody were to tell me that Mr Pickwick wrote The Sorrows of Satan I would at once agree. So long as I can ramble on towards idiocy repeating: Are you Charles Floquet, late late everlate? I want you: all is well.

20 November 1924 Letters III (to Valery Larbaud): Thanks for the typescript … Ulysse … I am to be operated on the 31

21 November 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Can you please lend me your Treatise on Glaucoma. I want to look up something in it before I see Borsch tonight.

21 November 1924 Letters I (to Robert McAlmon): By what date (latest) do you want my copy and on what date (earliest) will the book be out because I promised to give him [T.S. Eliot] a piece for the April number of his review and what I give you will depend on your date, that is, as being a piece earlier or later than his.

27 November 1924 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): The operation was put off because the gramophone people wanted the record made at once. Interior monologue would not do nor the growl of the cyclops nor the sirens so I read the late J.F. Taylor's speech from Eolus. That's done … operation tomorrow … I have been working very hard and am tempted to put off the operation because I feel so tired and because I am so deep in the ether of Shaun. Johannes Epistolifera, ora pro me! … What would you like me to give Mr McAlmon for his book? He wrote to me about it. It is a very good idea, I think.

29 November 1924 BLHW (from Nora Joyce to Harriet Weaver): Operation fully performed

? December 1924 BLHW (from Nora Joyce to Harriet Weaver): It took half an hour for the operation on Saturday (29 November 1924) My husband was able to see immediately afterwards, but not since

10 December 1924 BLHW (from Nora Joyce to Harriet Weaver): Apparently it takes rather a long time for the blood to absorb … the sight will begin to get better as soon as the eye is decongested

20 December 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I would like Meredith's Richard Feverel. Have you it?

23 December 1924 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I have leave to read a little but not to write … The cataract was removed

30 December 1924 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I should like the book marked on the enclosed list ((not extant)) if you can get it.

30 December 1924 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): Since Saturday (27 December 1924) there is … a small but definite return of some kind of vision in my eye … I can make out objects dimly even without a lens

1925

8 Avenue Charles Floquet, Paris

I and UP 13 January 1925 (to Harriet Weaver): Many thanks for that passage about the rivers. The coincidence you mention about the Dane [a river in Cheshire] is strange but I am well used to these things. Here is another. I mentioned to you a Dublin nabob who fed his guests when Lord Mayor off golden plates, sir Benjamin Guinness of the brewery, Dublin's Noah. He restored S.Patrick's cathedral too. He had two sons, lord Ardilaun afterwards and lord Iveagh. My father unseated the former for Dublin city. No conservative was ever returned after. The elder brother had some form of leprosy (see Ulysses), Arthur was his name. He was morose and charitable. The younger brother Cecil ‘jockeyed’ him out of his birthright in a perfectly legal way. He married another Guinness as his father did before him. I suppose you see the map as I do. I cannot find anything at present about Noah's wife (the medieval figure of the mystery plays is one of the models for Anna Livia) Elizabeth, afterwards Lady Guinness, but thinking of the subject I wondered what the Irish word for Guinness's vineyard's beverage would be. It is lin dub or dub lin … I will soon send you the rest of Shaun — if the post accepts his bulk.

18 January 1925 Letters III (to Lily Bollach): I intended to have written to you before now but to my surprise on my return to Paris I had to undergo another operation on 29 November, this time for cataract! If you are not too busy I should be obliged if you could type some more of my incomprehensible MS. If convenient we could meet … tomorrow (Monday) [19 January 1925] at 6.30 or so

19 January 1925 S.Ill. (to Lily Bollach): Will you please excuse me for this evening as I find I have still some changes to make in the MS. If I can finish by the morning I shall send you a pneu. I think you are not free on Wednesdays?

21 January 1925 STA (to Lily Bollach): At last I have finished the MS and hope it may not be inconvenient for you to meet me — fog permitting — at 6.30 or so tomorrow (Thursday). (22 January 1925) I must apologise for not coming the last evening but I hope my note reached you in time.

26 January 1925 STA (to Lily Bollach): With … thanks and compliments.

27 January 1925 STA (to Lily Bollach): Please excuse me for the oddlooking parcel I left last night. Here is the rest of the MS. The typescript you kindly left for me so promptly is excellently done and very clear and legible. Many thanks. I have not yet heard from London but expect a letter by any post. When I do I shall let you know.

27 January 1925 Selected Letters(to Harriet Weaver): I ought to tell you a few things. The Irish alpahbet (ailm, beith, coll, dair etc) is all made up of the names of trees. nath (Irish script) (orah) is H. oyin O. Bruno Nolano (of Nola) another great southern Italian was quoted in my first pamphlet The Day of the Rabblement. His philosophy is a kind of duallism — every power in nature must evolve an equal and opposite in order to realise itself and opposition brings reunion etc etc. Tristan on his first visit to Ireland turned his name inside out. The Norwegian-Danish language has neither masculine nor feminine: the two genders are common and neuter. The article follows the noun Manden, hence Landen. Man siger at jeg er blevet Konservativ (they say I am still a Tory) is the first line of a poem by Ibsen. The words expressing nightmares are from Greek, German, Irish, Japanese, Italian (my niece's childish pronounciation) and Assyrian (the stargroup called the ‘gruesome hound’). I speak the latter language very fluently and have several nice volumes of it printed on jampots. Most coastal towns in Ireland (E) are Danish. The poor old fellows were often wreckers. In ancient Dublin there was a ceremony similar to that of the Doge wedding the Adriatic sea. I hope this may help you. You would probably find it out if the piece were in print. It is hard to believe in typescript.

27 January 1925 Selected Letters(to Harriet Weaver): Tomorrow I shall send you MS and typescript of the first two watches of Mr Shaun (what I read, slightly revised) and the day after MS and typescript of the rest [III.3, the third watch]. There is an interruption near the middle (indicated in the MS). I shall be anxious to hear what you think of it. I don't know how I managed to do so much with the operation and convalescence and holiday. I hope you will write to me about it.

27 January 1925 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): Miss Beach will send you a book of spirit talks with Oscar Wilde which will explain one page of it. He does not like Ulysses. Mrs Travers Smith, the ‘dear lady’ of the book, is a daughter of the late Professor Dowden of Trinity College, Dublin

30 January 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I am busy these days correcting typescript … it is a boring job.

31 January 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I send you the rest of Shaun — only the typescript because the French Shaun charged 12 francs for the MS. I have not found out why — revenge or a new rule. Tonight it is too late ‘as I am rushing for the post’. I shall send the MS separately. Day Sorker etc is De sorger for vandflod i verdens marken jeg ligger med lyst torpedo imder arker / last lines of the same poem by Ibsen is let you arrange for a new deluge over the world and I'll lay my torpedo under the ark.

2 February 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I am trying to finish the revision for Mr Eliot before that [the clinic]. Tristan's words are from Parnell's message to the Irish people during the split.

2 February 1925 Letters III (to Valery Larbaud): I enclose typescript which you may like to see. When you have read it I would be glad to have it back and hear what you think of it … I was to have gone to the clinic today

7 February 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Lucia Joyce): My father went to the clinic to be operated on this morning. Dr Borsch could not do anything because he says the other eye is inflamed. … My father will send the rest of the MS by Mr. McAlmon.

10 February 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Lucia Joyce): He would like to hear Mr. Muir's article and will send it back if you send it registered.

15 February 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Lucia Joyce): Dr Borsch says [the conjunctivitis] will go in four or five days and then he will operate. My father … sends you inclosed a photograph of Leopold Bloom's house in Dublin now a small grocery shop … I think Mr McAlmon will bring you [the disc] and the MS.

Clinique des yeux, 39 rue de las Cherche Midi

23 February 1925 Letters III (dictated): I have been here for eight days. The pain in my eye persists

8 Avenue Charles Floquet, Paris

26 February 1925 Letters III (from Lucia Joyce): I came back here yesterday fairly well to have a rest before the operation and to try to revise the piece for Mr Eliot … With this attack in the good eye I am practically helpless but I managed to do some revision even in the dark as I want to send off the piece before I go back … I will try to send you MS by Mr McAlmon if I see him. I should be glad to hear Mr Muir's article read to me before I send off the piece which is an indirect reply to criticisms

7 March 1925 Letters III (in big black pencil): This is the most I can do so please forgive the style of paper and pen. My lease of this flat was up on the 15 instant … I asked to have it renewed for two months … I cannot see a word of print yet. It is very boring. Mr Eliot wrote to say that April no. had gone to press. Mr Auguste Morel helps me and with him, some red ink and a magnifying glass I shall have the piece ready before the tooth and eye act starts … I wish I could do more but it is useless to think until these new troubles are over, but I will send you the Criterion piece (new version) as soon as I can. … I wanted to send you a new book by Mr Pound, a large paper edition of the kind you do not like much but I will wait till I can write better.

13 March 1925 Letters III (to Ernest Walsh, dictated): When [the Criterion piece] appears (July next) I shall send you something and if you wish you may use my name as that of a future contributor … I have to return to the clinic in a week in order to undergo another but less serious operation, after which I hope I shall be able to work with more ease. At present I am unable to read or write.

25 March 1925 Letters III (dict to Lucia Joyce): I was able just to finish the revision of the piece for Mr Eliot but fear it would have to be copied out again as I doubt whether any typist would be able to make it out. There was little or no improvement in the sight of my right eye until the last few days when fresh trouble broke out in it … I should like to hear Vico read to me again in the hope that some day I may be able to write again. I put an advertisement in the Mail for a reader but got not even one reply

31 March 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver, typed): Many thanks for the copy of the New Republic with Mr. Muir's interesting article … When is [Miss Marsden's] book to be published, for I gather from your letter that it is not finished? … The second semi-attack has removed all print out of my field of vision … I cannot send the Criterion piece to be typed yet

1 April 1925 Letters III (to Lily Bollach): (large black pencil) I want to give you some MS next week if I am better but I am not well enough yet — the MS I told you of … Please write with a heavy black pencil. I cannot distinguish one word of print or pen but can pencil with a magnifying glass

4 April 1925 Letters I (to Robert McAlmon): I have had a relapse since I saw you but am now better so if you have received the proofs of the book I should very much like to revise my contribution now that I am between two operations. On Tuesday or Wednesday of next week (7 or 8 April 1925) I shall probably return to the Clinic … So please mail me those few pages if you have them

5 April 1925 STA (to Lily Bollach; large hand; incomplete): to me. I should like 3 copies (original and 2), very black type. The part with all the accents is to remain as it is. I hope to see you about the middle of the week and beg you if this work is too absurdly difficult not to have any hesitation in telling me so. I shall risk sending it in any case.

8 April 1925 Letters III (to Robert McAlmon): May I ask you to buy and send me by a trusty messenger these 2 discs and also to order for me the 2 pieces of music. They are for Giorgio. This [letter] is my best writing — already a progress. One operation today at 5.30 and the last (I hope) on Tuesday next (14 April 1925) … What about the proofs and my silly idea? … Gustav Holst $.okAt the Boar's Head$.ck …

?9 April 1925 STA (to Lily Bollach — large hand): Many thanks indeed. Can you meet me tomorrow (Friday) at 6 pm? I do not know what other time or place to suggest. One of my operations is over, thank goodness. I am afraid you had a terrible job with this MS but hope you will pardon it in the circumstances. I hope you may be able to come tomorrow evening as I should like to arrange about the reat of the MS.

11 April 1925 Letters III (large black pencil): Dr Borsch's operation was fixed for Tuesday (14 April 1925) … I hope he will do it by Thursday (16 April 1925) … The piece for the Criterion nearly drove me crazy. It came back from the typist (to whom I was too blind to explain its labyrinths) in a dreadful muddle. Yesterday with 3 magnifying glasses and the help of my son we chopped it up and today Mr Morel will come and sew it up on his sewing machine. I want to send it off before I go into the clinic. I shall send you a copy, I hope, by Monday. (13 April 1925)

13 April 1925 STA (to Lily Bollach, large hand): I am sorry you could not come the other evening but I am enclosing 100 francs in settlement of my account. If you have not time here perhaps you could drop me a line from London (address: 12, rue de l'Odeon, Paris) to say if you received it safely … I shall be in London probably before you leave and if I have any MS perhaps I might inflict it on you?? I go into the clinic tomorrow night or Wednesday morning for what I hope will be the very last operation.

13 April 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Easter … The operation is fixed for Wednesday morning (15 April 1925) if Dr B's inspection on Tuesday (14 April 1925) is satisfactory … though I can write this I cannot yet read … Mr Morel took away my typescript and promises it back for tomorrow. If so, I shall send it to you on Tuesday … Perhaps a good spell of [weather] may lead Mr Raphael Tuck's men to snapshot those shy streams. Vico is so full of ‘folgore’ and ‘auspice’ he never mentions Father (?Time)

15 April 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I am leaving for the clinique ‘for a few days’. I shall send you a telegram from there. Enclosed is the piece for Mr Eliot which I sent off with the combined momentum of self, 4 magnifying glasses, Mr Morel and my son. And now — a fiat lux!

Clinique des yeux, 39 rue de las Cherche Midi

16 April 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Nora Joyce): Operation made hoped success

18 April 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver, dictated, in French): A few dictated lines to tell you that I have been here since Wednesday (15 Apr) … did you get the piece written on the machine?

8 Avenue Charles Floquet

25 April 1925 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver, in thick black-pencil): I am home again … There is a slight, very slight return of vision in the operated eye … The other eye is not yet cured and I cannot read print at all without ‘the loan of a lens to see as much as I once saw’ … Dr Sigerson's statement about the Norse in Ireland before S. Patrick justifies my precipitate jumbling of the fifth and tenth centuries in the last phase of Shaun (‘Norke He raven flag etc’). I go to the clinic every morning and rue de la Paix every evening … I have some proofs to correct for Mr McAlmon and I had better do it before the other eye gets disabled.

ca. 25 April 1925 Letters III (to Robert McAlmon): Please give me a day or two to check that proof? The dreadful weather these last few days made my eyes impossible.

ca. Spring 1925 Beach (to Sylvia Beach): Can Miss Moschos come about 5 to fetch more MS to be typed? Have you The Lunatic at Large? May I have Shem the Penclub's letter back?

BL ?Spring 1925 Beach (to Sylvia Beach): 1) Musical America … Have you the Calendar for May. Mr Edwin Muir wrotes he has done another article on me … Also — have you The Evolution of the Dragon by Eliot Smith Art and Ritual by Beatrice Harrison

1 May 1925 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver, large hand): I am no worse, possibly a little better … I am reluctant to go away an ‘unfinished job’. I can write this and even see a few of the letters! It is the first of December today (winter time) and the light is dazzling … The day is awfully long and boring and all I can do is to listen to a few records and scribble an odd note … a London shop sent me a disk lately (the de Reszke quartet in an English foursome part — cf. Mr Earwicker's speech p.1. ‘our fourposter singing etc’ — which gave my ear and brain great pleasure) in three days! I ‘wrasted the page redhanded’ from the Sunday Times but I hope you will be able to join the fragments

N.D. May 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): for pro Honofrio read Rebus de Hibernicis / for biky, like, read bisexycle / for grunted and growled (?) read grunted and gromwelled

Victoria Palace Hotel, Paris

N.D. May 1925 (to M. Darantiere): If it is not too late would you make the following change in the piece of my new book that you are publishing for Mr McAlmon? At the end instead of: Saint Martin's summer read Saint Swithin's summer. I publish in the criterion of the end of June another fragment where there is a word of acknowledgement to yourself. Miss Beach will send you a copy. P.S. Excuse these scribblings. I am ill.

??? Hotel de Bourgogne et Montana, Paris

29 May 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): We have partly moved in but I am covered in dust … We do not sleep there tonight

May-June 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Ulysse won! … Homer Joyce

2 Square Robiac, Paris

2 June 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I want to direct my bleareyed attention to the piece for Mr Walsh and another for The Calendar. I thought of repaying … my study and the slowness of my wit and sight in writing and revising have dissuaded me … I notice that things by Mr Eliot appear simultaneously in Dial and Criterion and others do the same … I could not stipulate this as I am ‘wanted’ exclusively and moreover I cannot make conditions when I write as I do

13 June 1925 Letters III (to Leon Paul Fargue): Here we are moved in at last

13 June 1925 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I am working hard at Shem and then I will give Anna Livia to the Calendar. Morel will have to type all again as my typist is away. I have got out my sacksful of notes but can scarcely read them, the pencillings are so faint. They were written before the thunder broke.

13 June 1925 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): There has been so much hammering and moving going on here that I could scarcely hear my thoughts … I hope you have the Contact book. I put in a few puzzles more into my piece. … Tuohy … wants to come here to paint me … Did Fossett change those words? They was two. Doesn't matter. ‘Gromwelling’ I said and what? O, ah! Bisexycle that was the bunch. Hope he does, anyhow. O rats! It's just a fool thing, style. I just shoot it off like: If he ain't done it, where's the use? Guess I'm through with that bunch. (With apologies to Robert McAlmon)

17 June 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): On the other hand I have about 60,000 English words to sell in seven or eight lots … I don't think I can pose at present for Mr Tuohy.

18 June 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I have been working all day through piles of notes and I hope the other man brings my sailcloth awning as the sun roasts the nape of my reflective head

1 July 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I have been working all day amid noise and workmen till now on Shem. My sight is momentarily impaired … I shall therefore stop now, have the last corrections made and send off the piece and lie down … I want this Shem piece and the river piece to be as finished as I can make them. I am doubtful as to their succession

5 July 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Will you please make the following changes in the piece I left you: a) page 17 line 4, after designed and before to do etc insert, your birthwrong was, b) page 6 last line cancel up their sleeve insert daggers down their back

N.D. July 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Will you please add these? Page 18 line 10 cancel too insert long Page 7 line 10 and 11 cancel Millions insert Sheols cancel women insert houris

N.D. July 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): What about the Criterion? Lazarus-lêve-toi!

8 July 1925 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I could not write till now (not even now) as I have been getting into ever deeper Liffey water. I want to leave the piece with Miss Beach for the September Calendar. I have taken immense pains with these three pieces. I hope they justify it. The richer they are the less hard will be the other parts of the book if … and when … I still have several days more to work on Anna Livia and then I need to go away for a rest … I wish I had finished this piece and was sitting in a railway carriage … Do you want me to send on the typescript. I should prefer not for a reason which I shall explain later.

14 July 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Will you please make the enclosed correction [not included] Has the Criterion come out? I have now quite finished the Anna Livia piece except that Morel has to retype a page or so

20 July 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Here is your dictionary and E.W's letter. Let some body copy out the paragraph in ‘Who's Who’ (American Library) and send him that.

20 July 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): When Criterion comes will you please send copies to my brother, and Mr Healy

21 July 1925 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): The Criterion is out. The piece for This Quarter has now gone to press and I have sent off the piece for the Calendar. We are leaving for Fécamp (Normandy) address: Hotel des Bains. I saw Dr Borsch. I have to undergo another operation when I come back in September.

Grand Hôtel des Bains et de Londres, Fécamp

23 July 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Escorted by three thunder storms we arrived here the day before yesterday. I have been looking round for a suitable place but have not found one yet. The address I gave will be good for a few days.

27 July 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Please excuse this hasty note as my eye is not very well … Can I soon correct proofs of C as with my sight …?

27 July 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Will you please make these alterations in A? I hope the paging and line indication is right … I have only an incomplete version of A here [long list of changes follows, mostly from N18 (VI.B.8) pp. 1-21]

27 July 1925 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): we leave tomorrow for Rouen, Hôtel de la Poste. Even here I cannot escape Shaun and I added or changed about a hundred things in Anna Livia which I sent on to Miss Beach who is holding the MS …

27 July 1925 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): we leave tomorrow for Rouen, Hôtel de la Poste. Even here I cannot escape Shaun and I added or changed about a hundred things in Anna Livia which I sent on to Miss Beach who is holding the MS … While I was returning from an excursion to S. Valéry the idea for the last watch of Shaun came into my head. But I suppose I ought to ease off. When you return to London I shall explain why I did not send the typescript.

Grand Hôtel de la Poste, Rouen

28 July 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Address Hotel de la Poste

29 July 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Page 5 last line is VENERSDERG The rest is right. I wish Walsh would stay in one place till I have corrected the proofs. How will you manage to send A from the desert? When did a river rise in a desert? My sight is queer but not bad …

29 July 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Page 5 last line is VENERSDERG The rest is right. I wish Walsh would stay in one place till I have corrected the proofs. How will you manage to send A from the desert? When did a river rise in a desert? My sight is queer but not bad … I suppose the International Blue Book is worth subscribing to on account of the colour. The spaces could be filled in exactly from Who's Who? … I am much impressed by Anna Sequana here. I suppose you did not get a copy of the York, Townley or Chester Mystery plays for me? I have them somewhere. I cannot remember the absurd names given to Mrs Noah (who is as quaint as A) in them. But no matter … If cheques arrive for me there (Criterion or Quarter) will you …

31 July 1925 Letters III (to Sylvia Beach): The Anna Livia sign is a simple equilateral triange or delta A. Before you go can you make the few more changes enclosed [long list follows, mostly from N18 (VI.B.8) pp. 21-36] and also order that interesting book [Queer Fish] for me. Will you leave A with Miss Moschos in case I think of anything else? … Did you send Criterion to Pound and Larbaud …

31 July 1925 Letters III (to Sylvia Beach): I have a rather large change to make on the fourth last page of C so I hope Walsh sends me the proof quickly as I want to banish the whole Earwicker family from my mind.

31 July 1925 Letters III (to Herbert Gorman): I want to go to the south of France, Bordeaux, as soon as possible. I intended to go on Tuesday next (4 August 1925)

6 August 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): greetings from here (Les Andelys: Hôtel du Grand-Cerf; near Rouen)

UP ? August 1925:

8 August 1925 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): [on Exiles]

8 August 1925 BLHW (from Ernest Walsh): Your wire just arrived via Lloyds. And I answered it to Rouen. And I am writing in duplicate both to Paris and Rouen so you know as quickly as possible that the proofs are not ready yet. We are printing the next number of THIS QUARTER in Milan and that means a delay. … I will forward the proofs to you the moment they are ready … As for the proofs when they are ready we must get around the difficulty in case your sight is not good at the moment. If your manuscript is correct we might manage the proofreading ourselves.

Grand Hotel du Raisin de Bourgogne, Niort

8 August 1925 BLHW (8 Aug from Ernest Walsh): … the proofs are not ready yet. We are printing the next number of THIS QUARTER in Milan and that means a delay … I will forward the proofs to you the moment they are ready

10 August 1925 Letters III (to Ernest Walsh): My sight is worse and I have to go to Paris at the end of September to undergo another (the 7th) operation on my eyes. I want to correct the proofs of these two pieces while I can … The editor of The Calendar wants to publish his piece on 1 October. Can you let me have a proof of your piece early in September and fix the date of appearance before the 1 October? In that case he will set his piece now and I can check both and be finished with them

Bordeaux

10 August 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Kind greetings from here

Régina Palace Hotel et d'Angleterre, Arcachon

13 August 1925 Letters III (to Herbert Gorman): Staying here

14 August 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Weather is better here.

15 August 1925 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I left Rouen (where we were drenched for 9 days out of twelve) and stopping a night in Niort and Bordeaux reached here … my sight is curious — even in the good eye … Mr Gorman … is in … Paris. Mr Walsh has been holding me up with his delay in printing Shem and now the editor of the Calendar has written for the fourth or fifth time to know if he can announce A for October. I think I shall say yes for I want to correct these two pieces at once and get a few minutes of torpor before the next act

15 August 1925 Letters III (to Ernest Walsh): You have not replied to my letter from Niort … My sight is getting worse, I think, so I shall be very glad if you will have the piece set at once and sent to me. I will correct it and the other piece at the same time … It does not matter if your review is delayed a few days after 30 September as long as it is dated September … I am glad that you found the piece suitable.

ca. 21 August 1925 Letters III (to Sylvia Beach): Between these delays and no proofs and the unexpected long journey down here with four breaks I feel more fatigued than when I left Paris … My sight is getting so bad in the good eye even that I am beginning to think I have an incipient cataract in it too. I want to correct both proofs as soon as possible. Hold A till my next letter arrives — probably Saturday morning — with last corrections and then send it off registered please. You will see by Walsh's letter that This Quarter may not appear for months yet and I cannot hold up the Calendar indefinitely. Walsh's review may come out on time. In any case please suggest that the Editor of Calendar add a footnote at the beginning of the piece to the effect (v. The Criterion, (July 1925), This Quarter, September, 1925) That is all I can do

ca. 21 August 1925 Letters III (to Sylvia Beach): My sight is getting so bad in the good eye even that I am beginning to think I have an incipient cataract in it too. I want to correct both proofs as soon as possible. Hold A till my next letter arrives — probably Saturday morning — with last corrections and then send it off registered please. You will see by Walsh's letter that This Quarter may not appear for months yet and I cannot hold up the Calendar indefinitely. Walsh's review may come out on time. In any case please suggest that the Editor of Calendar add a footnote at the beginning of the piece to the effect (v. The Criterion, (July 1925), This Quarter, September, 1925) That is all I can do

22 August 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I wrote to Walsh to send … me the proofs … I also wrote to Moulder to send me two books he has. No answer. Can you ring him up on the telephone. He sent them to the concierge … But the concierge is gone! And has sent me the keys of the flat by slow mail and lord knows what he did with the books, perhaps lock them up in the flat. I wanted to add in an allusion or two from these books but it is hopeless. I never was in such a muddle about hotel, proofs, cheques, eyes, concierges etc. Please send off A with these new changes ((I.8:1.5' B.8 pp.70-83)) and ask the Calendar to set it as quickly as possible as I am going to take a holiday in hospital

22 August 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Please send off A with these new changes [long list follows, mostly from N18 (VI.B.8) pp. 70-83] and ask the Calendar to set it as quickly as possible as I am going to take a holiday in hospital

23 August 1925 Letters III (to Valery Larbaud): Will go to Dax after for a week or so before returning to Paris

29 August 1925 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I am waiting for the proofs of C and A. Many thanks also for the unbreakable script which I may use … I know that Dd ought to be about roads, all about dawn and roads, and go along repeating that to myself all day as I stumble along the roads hoping it will dawn on me how to show up them roads so as everybody'll know as how roads etc … the landlord turned all the English guests out of the hotel … He will never rival H.C.E. and, on that subject, liffle Anna countrymouse keeps me awake half the night.

1 September 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I expected my big cheque today. We leave when it arrives … Hotel Metropole, Bordeaux … I shall get there on Thursday (3 September 1925)

Hotel Bayonne, Bordeaux

4 September 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Address Hotel Bayonne here

5 September 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Arrive Paris this evening

2 Square Robiac, Paris

6 September 1925 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): Just a line to say we got back last night to this semi-arctic clime. On arriving I find that the Calendar printers flatly refuse to compose Madam Anna Livia (Ricorso Storico di G.B. Vico) … I am proposing to meet [Gorman] halfway at Boulogne — where the Patricks came from.

26 September 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I have had a so-and-come attack of conjunctivitis … the day after I came back … I could not do much. Nevertheless I have achieved something … I did not see Gorman … too tired to go to Boulogne … For tonight I will only say that the Calendar affair ended a few days ago but there is a slight epilogue to follow.

27 September 1925 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): When I got back … There was also a letter from the Calendar the tenor of which you know. I did not wish to antagonise them on account of Mr Muir's articles and their attitude … even when I had withdrawn the MS telegraphically they sent me a galleyproof with it and said they would say my contribution was ‘postponed’ … I therefore arranged a pleasing epilogue of which you will hear about the middle of next week …

27 September 1925 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I cannot make head or tail of Mr Walsh's review This Quarter. Miss Beach and I have written and wired … but cannot get any answer. Nobody knows where he or Shem is. He (Mr Walsh) proposed that Pound correct my proofs. I wrote to to Mr Pound assuring him that I wanted nothing better than to check them myself and asking him would it be possible to have my piece set first …

27 September 1925 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): My eyes are getting better … Having returned from Shaun MacCormack's concert and having read this, as heretofore, S.O.S. agonising appeal you will, I am sure, agree enthusiastically with somebody somewhere in Shakespearestown that the words of Mercury are harsh after the song of Apollo. But an epilogue there will be.

28 September 1925 Letters III (to Stanislaus Joyce): Tuohy's portrait of Pappie is touring U.S.A. I askes him to try to do a sketch of mother from photographs. He managed to get two faded ones. Has Eileen any? If so it would be advisable to send copies of any or all at once to him (Prof. P. J. Tuohy, Metropolitan School of Art, Kildare Street, Dublin), as he is thinking of going to Spain. … The English printer of The Calendar refuses to set up a piece of my new book. It comes out therefore complete (the piece) on Wednesday (30 September 1925) in a Paris review

10 October 1925 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I hope you got the Navire d'Argent and are pleased with my retort courteous … I began Dd (otherwise the last watch of Shaun) a few days ago and have produced about three foolscapes of hammer and tongs stratification lit up by a fervant prayer to the divinity which shapes our roads in favour of my ponderous protagonist and his miniscule consort. I composed some wondrous sequences for Dd during the night and wrote them out in the dark very carefully only to discover that I had made a mosaic on top of my other notes so I am now going to bring the astronomical telescope into play.

10 October 1925 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): There is a rumour here that Mr Walsh was arrested, that Mr Pound bailed him out and that Mr Walsh is in bad health … I have no notion where the MS of C is at present. I should like this settled before I enter the waste land. Which things being so, I began Dd (otherwise the last watch of Shaun) a few days ago …

10 October 1925 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I began Dd (otherwise the last watch of Shaun) a few days ago and have produced about three foolscapes of hammer and tongs stratification lit up by a fervant prayer to the divinity which shapes our roads in favour of my ponderous protagonist and his miniscule consort. Shall I send you the corrected typescript of A there or wait till you return? I composed some wondrous sequences for Dd during the night and wrote them out in the dark very carefully only to discover that I had made a mosaic on top of my other notes so I am now going to bring the astronomical telescope into play.

19 October 1925 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): For goodness sake will you please take charge of this fellow. I cannot stand any more of him. I don't know if I have corrected all his errors and omissions. Anyhow please keep him in the cage till called for.

22 October 1925 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I have been laid up for about ten days with a lamentable sort of a cold … Two days ago the proof of C arrived from Como. I corrected it, rubbed on more boot polish and sent it back express. I hope it comes out in a week or so. I ought to go into the clinic then, ought I not? … I send you some advance press opinions of A.

22 October 1925 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I am working at Dd still.

23 October 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Will you please return the review to Miss Beach when you have read it? Mr Paline's hint to the authorities is much appreciated.

5 November 1925 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): Mr Walsh has been moving from Como, via Milan … with my proofs and typescript and letters and Miss Beach's following him while he sends explosive letters full of what she calls ‘guesswords’ etc. Goodness knows what sort of text of mine he will offer his readers if ever the second number comes out … Roth … And yet number 1 apparently came out on 15 with a piece of mine in it. I have sent two cables to New York but have got no information yet. New press opinions of A are: ‘all Greek to us’ …

5 November 1925 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I have been working very laboriously these last few weeks and have almost made a first draft of Dd. … I shall go to see Dr Borsch … and ask him to let me finish Dd before the next match

11 November 1925 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): There is no news about Mr Roth … Borsch … arranged provisionally for Monday 23 instant and said I would be all right for Christmas … I am using indiarubber to cancel words to avoid difficulties with my MS. What the language will look like when I have finished I don't know. But having declared war I shall go on jusqu'au bout

21 November 1925 Letters III (to Italo Svevo, dictated): Next Wednesday or Thursday I shall be at the clinic where I must undergo an operation … but I expect to be out for Christmas

?October 1925 LUND (to Eric Pinker): A few weeks ago there appeared in the Nation (London), New Republic (New York), Nation (N.Y.) and other papers a fullpage advertisement of a quarterly Two Worlds (15 September, no 1) published by Mr Samuel Roth, 500 Fifth Avenue, N.Y., editors, Mr Ford, Mr Pound, and Mr Arthur Symons. It announced in no 1 a first instalment of a new book by me and for no 2 a second instalment. Mr Ford says he knows nothing of the review beyond the advertisement. I never gave Mr Roth anything or even wrote to him. I had a letter from him about four years ago which I did not answer. A second letter, dated 25 September last (ten days later than no 1) arrived asking for a contribution, long or short. I did not answer the letter which on the other hand expressed great admiration and made some extraordinary suggestions about buying up forests for paper in order to secure a great publicity. I can make nothing of the affair and I believe neither Mr Pound nor Mr Symons know anything of this use of their names. Can you find out something about it? … I am going into hospital for a (seventh) operation on my eye so am notifying you of these few points now as I shall not be able to attend to my correspondence for some time after Thursday next. (26 November 1925)

23 November 1925 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I am not going into the clinic this morning … scopolamine … The ‘scopo’ obstructs my sight in reading and I cannot finish Dd before Wednesday. (25 November 1925) I must do this before I go in if I am to have any peace … I need another £80 … to prevent myself from being troubled in Bulldogham Palace … It is a dreadful bore especially now that my slow brain has got to work well after two months' labour … Your MS this time will be partly written by Lucia (who calls it ‘cinese’ (Chinese). I mean the penscript not the pencil draft. It will be finished tomorrow surely — of course only as a first draft but I perceive that I have written more of the book than I had thought.

23 November 1925 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): Your MS this time will be partly written by Lucia (who calls it ‘cinese’ (Chinese). I mean the penscript not the pencil draft. It will be finished tomorrow surely — of course only as a first draft but I perceive that I have written more of the book than I had thought.

23 November 1925 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I am not going into the clinic this morning … scopolamine … The ‘scopo’ obstructs my sight in reading and I cannot finish Dd before Wednesday. I must do this before I go in if I am to have any peace.

5 December 1925 Letters III (to Lily Bollach STA): many thanks for your letter. I could not reply as my eyes were dilated with scopolamine and at twelve o'clock today I enter the clinique for a 7th operation. Please excuse me but I have a long piece that I wanted you to be kind enough to type for me but it must wait till I come out when I hope you will not be so overworked

6 December 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Nora Joyce): Operation Performed Saturday (5 December 1925)

6 December 1925 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Lucia Joyce): My father … passed a rather good night and to-day to everybody's astonishment he seems much better than he has ever been on the day following an operation … My mother was against the operation as he had been working so hard for the past three months

17 December 1925 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver from Lucia Joyce): My father has been home since Tuesday (15 December 1925) … He has had no sight in the eye since the operation on account of the blood and he has pain and dizziness

31 December 1925 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I have not leave to write but am sending this to wish you a very happy New Year … P.S. Did you get H.C.A.?

1926

2 Square Robiac, Paris

20 January 1926 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver, large hand): … why are you not going to the Euston Hotel? 732 rooms … manager … Mr Knight. He is a very knice kman.

20 January 1926 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver, large hand): Even yet I cannot see a light before my eye and have had continual bouts of neuralgic pain in the wound … I cannot read or even think … I would like to do some work but my state makes me avoid it.

24 January 1926 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver, large hand): I would like to have the collection of 50 selected songs for low voices edited by Dr Fellowes ((Sunday 24th))

III and UP 5 March 1926 (to Harriet Weaver): I think there is a very slight improvement of vision … Mr Roth sent a cheque for $100 for the Contact and Criterion pieces. It was sent in, dishonoured at first but later on (2 or 3 days) paid. He is printing A in March and C in June and says he will pay something. He offers $300 for Dabcd which took me twelve months hard labour. Hemingway saw him in New York and says he made a very bad impression on him. He admitted that the edition was not confined to 450 copies, that he had 5000 or 10,000 subscribers, that he had successfully used my name as a draw and that he did not think he needed me any more now as my book was too difficult for his public and that he did not believe in paying his contributors much though he admired my work personally … many thanks for Dowland's songs … I hope something I have written may bear comparison with Come silent night for instance. I used the rhythm of William Bird's Woods so Wild in describing Isolde in the last piece. This, completed and revised, I read a week ago to a small audience, Miss Beach. Morel, the Wallaces and Nuttings. It produced stupefaction, I think. That evening I was exhausted to the point of idiocy and since then, though I wanted to revise Dabc for Mr Roth, could not do so. Instead I read a few books and plays, the Life of Sims Reeves, Juno and the Paycock, Figgis's book on Blake ((VI.B.13 216f, 229))

5 March 1926 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I think there is a very slight improvement of vision … Many thanks for Dowland's songs … I hope something I have written may bear comparison with Come silent night for instance. I used the rhythm of William Bird's Woods so Wild in describing Isolde in the last piece. This, completed and revised, I read a week ago to a small audience, Miss Beach. Morel, the Wallaces and Nuttings. It produced stupefaction, I think.

5 March 1926 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I was exhausted to the point of idiocy and since then, though I wanted to revise Dabc for Mr Roth, could not do so. Instead I read a few books and plays, the Life of Sims Reeves, Juno and the Paycock, Figgis's book on Blake …

18 March 1926 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I am working away at Dabc though the latest report about Mr Roth does not encourage me to carry out my plan of giving him the four watches … My eye is [a little] better since I wrote last.

23 March 1926 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Lewis has published a large book The Art of Being Ruled and in the beau milieu of it is what looks like a very determined onslaught on my offending work if I am to judge by some of the epithets “demented” “stuttering” “punster” “squinting” etc. I am reading it in order to get at the use of these terms … I am now going to hear Pound's friend, M. Tinayre, in a concert. He has a tiptap tanner voarse like C of old.

30 March 1926 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Some (very little) sight is coming into my eye … I also enclose a letter from Hemingway which seems to knock on the head my plan for sale of Dabcd. I am working hard on him and am delighted with the four facets of his character. It will all hang together and it can go up for the auction … I am ploughing through [Lewis's] book but have not yet finished it so as to know what I am doing dans ??cette galère. Anyhow it is plain from the cuttings you sent that his slogan (Mr Joyce and Mr Jingle) had gone around. I am replying to this in a most grotesque addition to Db

3 April 1926 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I have finished Lewis's book. ????? is all I can say for the moment

17 April 1926 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I finished the revision of Dabcd yesterday. Today I copied out the sheets of Da which were unreadable to have them retyped. Tomorrow and Monday (18 and 19 April 1926) I shall do, I hope, the same for Db. Then Dc will take three or four days. Then the typing of these and the ‘man of four watches’ is complete. I am not sure for the moment how much I have done. I shall know when I read it. I am to read Dab, interval, and Dc to a small group, this time including Antheil and a young American [Lewis] Galantière who is preparing a course of lectures on U. I think I have done a great deal. My brother says that having done the longest day in literature I am now conjuring up the darkest night. I will send you Dd complete in typescript and the necessary new pages to insert into Dabc.

III and UP 17 April 1926 (to Harriet Weaver): The passage in [Lewis's] book runs from pp390 or so to 410, roughly. You will notice a grotesque version of it in Db when I send it. … Have you read Le Culte des Héros yet? What do you think of it? Every time I read a piece I go round with the hat after begging those present to remember it and help me by finding things for me. They all seem to forget about it as quickly except Miss Beach who knows how to whistle books out of the air.

2 May 1926 Letters III (to Lily Bollach, STANFORD): First of all, thanks for your Christmas card. I have undergone two more eye operations — the latter very severe — and could not write … Can you meet me … next Tuesday (4 May 1926) … I hope so as I have some work which I would ask you to type if you have any free time. I have written it out very clearly and large.

5 May 1926 SIF (to Lily Bollach): Will you please make the following changes in Da : 1) near the beginning instead of: O murder! : read : O murder mere, how did you hear? 2) near the end instead of : altogether too hairy : read : altogether too fly and hairy. I have changed my plans about Brussels so if you will meet me on Friday (7 May 1925) at 6.30 I shall give you Dd not to hasten your work at all but to get rid of the entire piece.

16 May 1926 Letters III (to Lily Bollach): The phrase in my MS reads ‘by that noblest of magistrates at his Saxon tannery with motto O'Neill etc’. You are right about ‘my face’ and ‘too’. One more change. In the speech that precedes the verse (Dc near end) Day soaker four vanfloats etc / for ‘Magrath or MacMonagh’ read ‘O'Bejorumsen or Mockmacmahonson’ [VI.B.17 95] Do you think you could leave part of say Dab on Monday (17 May 1926) with your concierge so that I could be revising it in the meantime? You are having a terrible time with my MS, I am afraid. I am sorry to be the guilty cause and hope for your own sake it will soon be over.

21 May 1926 SIC (to Lily Bollach): Many thanks. The MS is excellently done. It is no trouble to me to call every evening as my doctor is quite near there. I have revised nearly all and will call tomorrow Saturday [22 May 1926] evening to see if there is any more done. Yes. You are right. The violet ribbon is better. But please use whichever you have.

I and SL 21 May 1926 (to Harriet Weaver): Dabc came back typed and Dd will be here on Sunday or Monday. (23 or 24 May 1926) To what address can I send them and is the post safe … I wish you would read through Dabcd and tell me how thay interact … Wyndham Lewis rang me up twice last week … he is to bring out a critical review (6 times yearly) The Tyrocritic (I hope he will correct the misspelling). It is to be all critical and philosophic and contain no creative work. But he wanted to make an exception in my case and asked me would I give him something. I said I would with great pleasure … If I have not filled in a gap in my typescript before sending it it means that I could not think of the question to insert there. It has bothered me for some time. I have the book now fairly well planned out in my head. I am as yet uncertain whether I shall start on the twilight games of C D and I which will follow immediately after A or on K's orisons, to follow Dd. But my mind is rather exhausted for the moment. Have you read Saint Patrice? There is a book on Bruno (though not on Nolan) by Lewis McIntyre (Macmillan) I do not know if Vico has been translated. I would not pay overmuch attention to these theories, beyond using them for all they are worth, but they have gradually forced themselves on me through circumstances of my own life. I wonder where Vico got his fear of thunderstorms.

21 May 1926 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I have the book now fairly well planned out in my head. I am as yet uncertain whether I shall start on the twilight games of C D and I which will follow immediately after A or on K's orisons, to follow Dd. But my mind is rather exhausted for the moment.

21 May 1926 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Dabc came back typed and Dd will be here on Sunday or Monday [23 or 24 May 1926]. To what address can I send them and is the post safe … I wish you would read through Dabcd and tell me how thay interact. … If I have not filled in a gap in my typescript before sending it it means that I could not think of the question to insert there. It has bothered me for some time.

21 May 1926 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Have you read Saint Patrice? There is a book on Bruno (though not on Nolan) by Lewis McIntyre (Macmillan) I do not know if Vico has been translated. I would not pay overmuch attention to these theories, beyond using them for all they are worth, but they have gradually forced themselves on me through circumstances of my own life. I wonder where Vico got his fear of thunderstorms.

7 June 1926 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I hope you received Dabcd. I shall be writing to hear how you like it — if you like it. While reading it could you make a complete list of words misspelt. Some, of course, are intentional, most, but there must be others overlooked by my dim sight. Will you let me know if the ‘plot’ begins to emerge from it at all? Between the close of A at nightfall and Da there are three or four other episodes, the children's games, night studies, a scene in the ‘public’, and a ‘lights out in the village’. Have you finished Saint Patrice? If so, I should like you to read St John Irvine's [Ervine's] Life of Parnell to begin with. It is not good but you ought to know some of the facts. For instance the word ‘hesitency’. Irishmen usually remember the Piggott trial by this catchword. I shall send you Bédier's Tristan et Iseult as this too you ought to read. Cain and Co., Swift etc and the ‘other fellow’ I shall leave to your own interpretative discernment. After my somewhat cloudy interview with Lewis, as I told you, I saw Pound

7 June 1926 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I hope you received Dabcd. I shall be writing to hear how you like it — if you like it. While reading it could you make a complete list of words misspelt. Some, of course, are intentional, most, but there must be others overlooked by my dim sight. Will you let me know if the ‘plot’ begins to emerge from it at all?

7 June 1926 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Between the close of A at nightfall and Da there are three or four other episodes, the children's games, night studies, a scene in the ‘public’, and a ‘lights out in the village’.

7 June 1926 Letters III (to Lily Bollach STA): I have at last revised and sent off Dabcd. The work was excellently done and very promptly. Many thanks. Will you please let me know how many hours of dreadful labour it cost you

19 June 1926 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I send you for two days Dabcd, as I promised. Will you please make the corrections below. [enclosure “A” see VI.B.12-30] P.S. I wish Dabcd were wellaway!

29 June 1926 STA (to Lily Bollach): I hope … it will suit you to meet me at 6.45 on Thursday next.

15 July 1926 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): The Japanese came to see me and was delighted with the japlatin I showed him in Dbc … I am beginning to perceive dimly objects to the left of me … Dabcd (no bids) has been offered to the Dial. I have done a piece of the studies, C coaching D how to do Euclid Bk I, 1. I will do a few more pieces, perhaps I picture-history from the family album and parts of X discussing … A Painful Case and the w-A household etc. I will leave them in the rough when and if I go away …
What have you learned in the hills about H, A, C, D, T, I, J, K, O, Q etc. It would be of service to me if you could jot down notes from time to time as ideas connecting them may strike you … I hope dear Shaun of grace keeps you amused

15 July 1926 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I have done a piece of the studies, C coaching D how to do Euclid Bk I, 1. I will do a few more pieces, perhaps I picture-history from the family album and parts of X discussing … A Painful Case and the w-A household etc. I will leave them in the rough when and if I go away … What have you learned in the hills about H, A, C, D, T, I, J, K, O, Q etc. It would be of service to me if you could jot down notes from time to time as ideas connecting them may strike you.

21 July 1926 FITCH: [Sylvia Beach mails Shaun to Dial]

25 July 1926 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): The Dial telegraphed it would pay ½d a word for Dabcd but must see my text first. It has gone and I feel about as diffident as a young lady of 19 … I finished the Euclid lesson but will not attempt anything more for the present … By the way the pieces in Dabcd connected with the Roderick O'Conor passage are respectively pp. 52, 53, 82, 83, 102. If I turned to anything it would be to them now. I certainly have a capacity for work but I wish I had more agility and imagination.

25 July 1926 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I have been for years staring at an old print of the sacrifice of Cain and Abel and it is only a week ago it struck me how tactful it was of Abel to slit the throats of the firstlings (without any divine injunction as yet to kill the Cains of the flock). However I used it in the triangle.

Ostende

6 August 1926 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Greetings from here. By chance we stopped at the Auberge Littoral Palace A.L.P. but leave on Monday (9 August 1926) for some cheaper place.

Hotel du Phare, Ostende

10 August 1926 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): You see where I am now but we shall have to change again … D is here. When I arrived I walked into a pharmacy to buy ouate. The chemist said: Are you J.J.? I said: I am. He said: I'm Pat Hoey from Dublin. Hoey and Joyce are the same name. I knew him 25 years ago.

11 August 1926 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): We have been here a few days … Q = Isolde's companions. O = the 12. I = Tristan fou so I had to change her to J

Hotel de l'Océan, Ostende

18 August 1926 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): There is no news yet from The Dial. … P.S. I don't know how long we stay here … My wife does not particularly like the damp and dark and deep blue ocean when he is “onaisy”

18 August 1926 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Mr Patrick Hoey whom I met here … is a great admirer of my works and pomps and has all the first editions. He is in fact a very good D all the more as his name is the same as my own. Joyeux, Joyes, Joyce (Irish Sheehy or Hoey, the Irish change J into Sh e.g. James Sheumus, John Shaun etc) He very often uses the identical words I put into D's mouth at the Euclid lesson before coming down here.

24 August 1926 Letters I (to Sylvia Beach): Do not do anything till you return to Paris and till the Dial replies. I think we shall stay here till 1 or 2 prox and then go to Ghent for a few days. In any case we shall remain in Leopoldland … A curious thing. I was sitting on a rock under the phare a few sunsets ago when a child, a barefoot girl of about four, clambered up the slope and insisted in filling my pockets with tiny shells from her apron. I told her in Flemish (I have now taken 43 lessons in it!) that I did not want them but she went on all the same. It was only after I had given her a coin and she had gone that I remembered the lighthouse of Patrick's papa in Boulogne and Caligula's order to his soldiers at the tower to gather up the seashells.

29 August 1926 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I have found the post here rather slow — 2 days from Paris … I was glad to have your notes on my voice [from disk] and would like more about my non-rhetorical accent, when you feel so inclined

29 August 1926 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Goyert arrived with the complete Ulysses — to appear in October! They give only 14 days for revisions but it will take at least 6 weeks. working morning and afternoon in this heat … and the Dial?

2 September 1926 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Did you get the extra corrections for Dabcd? If so, please add p.111. l 22 for ‘mayo’ read ‘mayom’ … Has Clodd's Story of the Alphabet come? A book I would like is: La Jeunesse de Swift by Emile Pons, editeur?

11 September 1926 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I have been going over Dabcd all day and send you these final corrections. Please copy and send on … Dabcd is a titlesign or private mark for myself like the others, for reference. She may use some such title as Ford or Walsh or The Criterion used. If she likes I will read proof. When does it start to come out? [she=Marianne Moore]

13 September 1926 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Hotel Poste Ghent

Ghent

16 September 1926 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): With kindest regards from here but only en route for Antwerp

16 September 1926 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Just a view from this interesting old town where we are staying a couple of days

17 September 1926 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Grand Hotel Antwerp

Grand Hotel, Anvers

19 September 1926 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Will you please cable them: Joyce requests return typescript with corrections? … I think the communal library of Dublin (Ga) ought to have an autographed copy of Dubliners?

20 September 1926 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Hotel Astoria Bruxelles

Hôtel Astoria & Claridge, Brussels

22 September 1926 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Wyndham Lewis writes that he will call on you. I suppose he wants his piece. I have been working at it for the past few weeks again. Here it is. Can you have it typed for me in very legible type, double spaced, original and three copies? (My typist is on vacation in Italy) and sent to me to check. Lewis can have it then … I spent a great deal of time on the piece for Lewis.

?23 September 1926 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I have lost the postal receipt for the MS I sent you yesterday … I have no other copy … I sent you back Dubliners signed. As regards Dabcd when it comes back you may dispose of it to anyone who will print it gratis for if the Dial will not even pay you that modest sum no other review will.

24 September 1926 Letters I and BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Dabcd was accepted by the Dial for 600 dollars and a week later they cabled, declining to print it as it stood whereupon I recalled it. (I enclose it in four pictures from the G.P.O vestibule here.) I then set to work, in spite of moving about, to finish the A [triangle] piece for Wyndham Lewis … I finished it and sent it to Paris to be typed and hope to correct it tomorrow and send it to you with the MS. I suppose no other review will take Dabcd … Antwerp I renamed Gnantwerp … I finished my course of 64 Flemish lessons and will use bits of the language I have picked up for friend Sookerson, I think. See N09 (VI.B.1).053(g)

24 September 1926 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I then set to work, in spite of moving about, to finish the A [triangle] piece for Wyndham Lewis … I finished it and sent it to Paris to be typed and hope to correct it tomorrow and send it to you with the MS.

24 September 1926 Letters I, BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Have you finished reading Patran and Tristpick and so on? A rather funny idea struck me that you might ‘order’ a piece and I would do it. The gentlemen of the brush and hammer seem to have worked that way. Dear Sir. I should like to have an oil painting of Mr Tristan carving raw pork for Cornish countrymen or anicebust of Herr Ham contemplating his cold shoulder … I hope you are well after your absence from London and looking forward to the favour of your esteemed orders which will meet with our promptest execution

25? September 1926 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): All safely arrived. Thanks. Here are three copies, for you, for Lewis and my own (all of them initialled) I have not corrected it. Perhaps if you have time these next days and are reading the piece again you could do it as it strains my eyes. Goodbye now, Geometry!

26 September 1926 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I return the Dial's letter … ask them for return of typescript.

26 September 1926 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I sent you the piece for Lewis. If I have not signed his copy please forge my signature, printed … please request its prompt return if unaccepted and ask for proof, if accepted … I am glad you like it. I send you these few changes to make. They are not changes really. I corrected it in a bad light yesterday. In the Latin text: read ‘liviana’ ‘aliud’ ‘agnoscere’ p 3 ‘aquilittoral’ p 4 ‘ourland's p 5 ‘synchronismwash?’ p last ‘paraparnelligoes

26 September 1926 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): Here is A2 MS and typescript. Please let me know what you think of it, when read? The Dial proposed to delete one third of Dabcd! Lewis, it seems, has been to Paris and asked for the MS and is coming here as he wants to see me. ‘And I have done with you too, Mrs Delta’ — for the moment. She will babble anon.

29 September 1926 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Hold Typescript arrive this evening

2 Square Robiac, Paris

16 October 1926 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I set to work at once on what you told me and shall go on. I know it is no more than a game but it is a game that I have learned to play in my own way. Children may just as well play as not. The ogre will come in any case.

8 November 1926 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): I set to work at once on your esteemed order and so hard indeed that I almost stupified myself and stopped, reclining on a sofa and reading Gentlemen Prefer Blondes for three whole days. But this morning I started off afresh. I am putting the piece in the place of honour, namely the first pages of the book. Will try to deliver same punctual by Xmas. But cd send sample, viz. page 1, if customer so desires. The book really has no beginning or end. (Trade secret, registered at Stationers Hall) It ends in the middle of a sentence and begins in the middle of the same sentence. Your piece is the prelude to the Contact piece which is continued by the manuscript you have, the Criterion, This Quarter and Navire d'Argent where the first part of the book ends. The third part you have also Dabcd. I have written only a small part of the second ending with Roderick O'C. The fourth will be shorter than the others … I gave Dabcd to [Lewis] Galantière to sell in the U.S.A. … Pound … asked me to send him Dabcd to read … You may perhaps see me disguised as an Italian organist grinding out this prosepoem under you window maugre the prohibition on the corner … respeakfolly yours / M.M. Inkpen & Paperasses / (Writers to the Signet)

8 November 1926 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): I gave Dabcd to [Lewis] Galantière to sell in the U.S.A. … Pound … asked me to send him Dabcd to read … You may perhaps see me disguised as an Italian organist grinding out this prosepoem under you window maugre the prohibition on the corner … respeakfolly yours / M.M. Inkpen & Paperasses / (Writers to the Signet)

8 November 1926 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): I have written only a small part of the second ending with Roderick O'C.

??November 1926 Letters III (to Ezra Pound): Miss Beach has sent you the typescript I had made for you. As you know the Dial accepted it … It is the whole of part 3 of the book. There are 4 parts, divided each into 4 sections. Some of part 1 appeared in Contact, Criterion, This Quarter and Le Navire d'Argent (the end of that part). A piece of part 2 was in the Transatlantic Review. None of part 4 has been printed. Please let me know what you think of it. The sign on the cover means nothing. It is to distinguish it from other similar books. I use the signs D C A w etc through my notes instead of letters as they are quicker to make and read as references

15 November 1926 Letters III (from Ezra Pound): Ms. arrives this Adrienne Monnier All I can do is wish you every possible success. I will have another go at it, but up to the present I make nothing of it whatever. Nothing so far as I can make out, nothing short of divine vision or a new cure for the clapp can possibly be worth all the circumambient peripherization.

15 November 1926 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver):

brings us back to

Howth Castle & Environs! Sir Tristram, violer d'amores, fr'over the short sea, had passencore rearrived from North Armorica on this side the scraggy isthmus of Europe Minor to wielderfight his penisolate war; nor had stream rocks by the Oconee exaggerated themselse to Laurens County, Ga, doublin all the time; nor avoice from afire bellowsed mishe mishe to tauftauf thuartpeatrick: not yet, though venisoon after, had a kidscad buttended a bland old isaac; not yet, though all's fair in vanessy, were sosie sesthers wroth with twone jonathan. Rot a peck of pa's malt had Jhem or Shen brewed by arclight and rory end to the regginbrow was to be seen ringsome on the waterface.

Dear Madam: Above please find prosepiece ordered in sample form. Also key to same. Hoping said sample meets with your approval

yrs trly
Jeems Jokes

Howth (pron Hoaeth) = Dan Hoved (head)
Sir Amory Tristram 1st earl of Howth changed his name to Saint Lawrence, b in Brittany (North Armorica)
Tristan et Iseult, passim
viola in all senses and moods
Dublin, Laurens Co, Georgia, founded by a Dubliner, Peter Sawyer, on r. Oconee. Its motto: Doubling all the time.
The flame of Christianity kindled by S. Patrick on Holy Saturday in defiance of royal orders
Mishe = I am (Irish) i.e. Christian
tauf = baptise (German)
Thou art Peter and upon this rock etc (a pun in the original Aramaic)
Lat: Tu es Petrus et super hanc petram
Parnell ousted Isaac Butt from leadership
The venison purveyor Jacob got the blessing meant for Esau
Miss Vanhimrigh and Miss Johnson had the same christian name.
Sosie = double
Willy brewed a peck of maut
Noah planted the vine and was drunk
John Jameson is the greatest Dublin distillery
Arthur Guinness ” ” ” brewer
Arthur Wellesley (of Dublin) fought in the Peninsular war.
rory = Irish = red
rory = Latin, roridus = dewy
at the rainbow's end are dew and the colour red
bloody end to the lie in Anglo-Irish = no lie
regginbrow = Germ regenbogen + rainbow
ringsome = Germ ringsum, around
When all vegetation is covered by the flood there are no eyebrows on the face of the Waterworld

[Drawing]

Mare Vestrum and Nostrum

Hill of Howth ————— Amnis Liffey ——— (Magazine Hill)

A --------- old plain of Dublin -------- Phoenix Park ------ Z

A … Z = Your postcard

exaggerare = to mound up
themselse = another Dublin 5000 inhabitants
Isthmus of Sutton neck of land between Howth Head and the plain
Howth = an island for old Geographers
passencore = pas encore and ricorsi storici of Vico
rearrived = idem
wielderfight = wiederfechten = refight
bellowsed = the response of the peatfire of faith to the windy words of the apostle

24 November 1926 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): The phrase about the Waterworld's face is mine own. Please correct ‘Sir Tristram, violer d'amores, fr'over the short sea, has passencore rearrived fra North Armorica on the scraggy isthmus of Europe Minor’ etc. I sent Dabcd to Pound at his request and he has written turning it down altogether, can make nothing of it, wading through it for a possible joke etc. … I have been greatly overworked and overworried these last few weeks and yesterday took to the sofa again. Today I restarted. One great part of every human existence is passed in a state which cannot be rendered sensible by the use of wideawake language, cutandry grammar and goahead plot. I think you will like this piece better than sample.

26 November 1926 Selected Letters (to George Bernard Shaw): my felicitations … Nobel prize

29 November 1926 Letters III (to Lily Bollach STA): A … tragic event … my excuse for the delay in answering you … do anything for your friend … literary or commercial work.

29 November 1926 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): Madam i ave today finished the draft No 2 in nice MS of peece of prose yr respected O/ to me which i will now give 1 coat of french polish to same which will turn out A1 as desired
it is a very nice peece and i ope same will be found most sootable to your bespoke in question
i am, Madam trly yrs C (his mark)

3 December 1926 Letters III (from Harriet Weaver): Mr C Sir, Pleased to hear job completed barring coat 3 polish. Congratulate you on smartness of execution of order solicited, given and received a bare two months ago, days on sofa not excluded. Further order: please to insert, incorporate or otherwise include in text of work now in hand or of any work hereafter to be in hand numpa one firstclass beauful phrase anent the face of waterworld which it would be many pities if same was to soccomb or be drownded in note for private consumption on premises only. Yours ffly Revaew Teirrah p.p. H.W.

3 December 1926 TCD (to Tuohy): Dear Tuohy; Excuse my long silence. The death of my sister's husband in Trieste in most tragic circumstances (please do not allude to it in writing as I have not yet told my wife the whole story) and a big lawsuit and agitation which I have to arrange against a ‘crook’ American who is pirating and imitating [?] Ulysses and after writing it. My own new book takes up all my time. Yes, I will try to give you a few more sittings though, as I told you, I am not greatly interested in the [visage in question]. I don't think you quite understand what I wanted in the case of my mother. The portrait of my father is still in the douane and I have asked an expert to reduce the duty. This is pending. It would be tedious to send it back [end of letter torn off]

5 December 1926 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): To t.r. Mem: … Insertion desired duly made / C joiners hand / checked by J.J. overseer / Re w pp v to xxvi

15 December 1926 Letters III (to Stanislaus Joyce): I am also very hard at work.

17 December 1926 Letters III (to Mrs Myron Nutting): I am glad you liked the piece I read. I was not at all well and had a collapse after it like the old gentleman in it but am better today.

21 December 1926 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I enclose your piece. … I hope you will like it.

21 December 1926 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I enclose your piece. I read it a few days ago to a small audience. Though I was partly smothered by a cold and in a state of exhaustion it seems to have made an impression … I think it will make a good opening.

30 December 1926 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): P.S. Your piece will appear in March in a new Paris review Transition.

1927

2, Square Robiac, Paris

8 January 1927 Letters III (to Stanislaus Joyce): Will you please send me Lecky and Kettle's two books?

16 January 1927 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): It is impossible to get a reply from Lewis (who was so anxious to have something of mine for his new review) so I have sent the piece to New York to try to get American copyright. I am plunged again in work. I want to try to finish Part 1 before 2 February or very soon after and, if possible, get away for some weeks. I cannot work at Part 3 in this way. It is too much. I must take it easier. Nobody else does it or a tithe of it

N.D. January 1927 (from Sylvia Beach to Wyndham Lewis, draft in J's hand, Buffalo X.G.1): I am greatly surprised not to have had any reply to my several letters and therefore send this registered. Have you received and accepted Mr Joyce's MS and if so when will it appear? In view of what has occurred he has decided to try to secure American copyright for everything he publishes here and he wishes to know the approximate date of the appearance of your review so that he may instruct his agent in New York to place it there about the same time. I enclose a protest about the case and will be glad if you will return it signed.

24 January 1927 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): The Jay Jay Safety Pun Factory. / Lutece (Frankrike). / All work suspended as from 11.32 this a.m. / Wouldbea A Punnyman / (Manager) / 24 Ginnarino 1927

?25 January 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Please ring me up and tell me in good Amurrican what you think of me, my money, my plans, my birthday, my muddles, my loans, my promises, my soup sociables etc …. What are Huddleston's and MacLeish telephone nos?

26 January 1927 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I read A on Sunday (23 January 1927) to a small circle of Miss Monnier's friends at her request. It had a deep affect — especially on me for I went home at once (it was 6 pm) and fell sound asleep for 11/2 hours. I can get no news of Lewis. Goodness knows what he is doing or where my typescript is. I had a day or two ago a letter from Pound which perturbed me very much. He does not mention the protest but says he is bringing out a review. This I knew and offered him something. It is unfit, he said, and adds that it is all a bad stunt. Very good. Perhaps so.

1 February 1927 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): Your letter gave me a nice little attack of brainache. I conclude you do not like the piece I did? I have been thinking over it. It is all right I think — the best I could do. I will gladly do another but it must be for the second part or the fourth and not till after the first week in March or so, as the editors of transition liked the piece so well that they asked me to follow it up … I am rather discouraged about this as in such a vast and difficult enterprise I need encouragement. It is possible Pound is right but I cannot go back.

1 February 1927 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): … the editors of transition liked the piece so well that they asked me to follow it up and I agreed to finish off the part between the end of Contact and Criterion for the second number. Part I will then have been published …

10 February 1927 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Your second letter is worse than the first. Your accusation that I am wasting my talent is such a grave one that I should prefer to think out my doubtful and discouraged defence … Dunning … Roth has offered through a lawyer offering $1000 if I will admit that he offered this before publication. I am not replying.

18 February 1927 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): I want the case of Pound's soundness of judgement at the present moment more gone into. I am glad you agree about Dunning … I am working on but in a grumbling quarter convinced way. I am sorry the piece gave you no pleasure. It was hard when writing it to keep myself at the right pitch and perhaps it suffered.

18 February 1927 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver):
H
I have no copy in the house. It is after the battle when the gnarlybird comes out
after the words ‘too moochy aveerd’
before „ „ ‘She jest does hopes’ etc
insert ‘Of Burymeleg and Bindmerollingeyes and all the deed in the woe’

26 February 1927 Letters I (to Claud Sykes): I got your novel from your publishers I think and shall start to find out the mystery as soon as this lawsuit is well launched … I will send you the opening pages of my new book, a piece which will appear here 15 March. If you can solve its ninetynineangular mystery will you please let me know.

2 March 1927 Letters III (to Ezra Pound): By the way will you please send back Dabcd, registered. I want to try to have it copyrighted in America.

2 March 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I am overwhelmed by works and worries. I enclose proofs of The Giant's Howe which I hope will please you better in print. Two curious things. Huddleston told me he is of Scandinavian stock and was born in Barrow-in Furness, where there is a giant's mound. A chinese student sent some letterwords I had asked for. The last one is w. It means ‘mountain’ and is pronounced ‘Chin’, the common people's way of pronouncing Hin or Fin.

2 March 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I had to revise w and read it again for the editors of Transition. They liked it so much that they want the suite for the April number and will then reprint May to July the Criterion, This Quarter, and Navire so as to publish seriatim all Part I.

2 March 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): … the editors of Transition … want the suite for the April number and will then reprint May to July the Criterion, This Quarter, and Navire so as to publish seriatim all Part I. I am working away at the suite of w … Dring! Dring! Five minutes rest here! Next stop Humphreystown!

16 March 1927 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): The P.E.N. club of London invited James the Punman to be guest of honour at a dinner in London on 5 April … We leave here on 29 instant as it takes a week to cross the Woebegone … Transition is held up a week by legal formalities but I suppose, as you don't like w any better in his nice print frock that he will not appeal to you even in his 39 articles of clothing. As for me I am working away at the suite (I will sell my chance of going to London to end it all every word. O go on, go on, go on!). The typescript is like a caviare sandwich

16 March 1927 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): As for me I am working away at the suite (I will sell my chance of going to London to end it all every word. O go on, go on, go on!). The typescript is like a caviare sandwich

29 March 1927 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I expect to arrive in London on Sunday evening. (3 April 1927) I shall stay at the Euston … I return to Paris on Wednesday (6 April 1927) … I shall be working here till the last moment. The typescript I sent you is not the final.

31 March 1927 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I shall leave with Morel on Sunday (3 April 1927)

4 April 1927 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Detained will cross today

Euston Hotel, London

5 April 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Will you please send a copy of no 1 of Jolas's review to Mr George Godwin

UPLewis 8 April 1927

2 Square Robiac, Paris

16 April 1927 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): I finished my revision and have passed 24 hours prostrate more than the priests on Good Friday. I think I have done what I wanted to do. I am glad you liked my punctuality as an engine driver. I have taken this up because I am really one of the greatest engineers, if not the greatest, in the world besides being a musicmaker, philosophist and heaps of things. All the engines I know are wrong. Simplicity. I am making an engine with only one wheel. No spokes of course. The wheel is a perfect square. You see what I am driving at, don't you? I am awfully solemn about it, mind, so you must not think it is a silly story about the mooks and the grapes. No, it's a wheel, I tell the world. And it's all square.

20 April 1927 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I have sent you through Miss Moschos the revised MS and no 1 of Transition. Goyert arrived from Germany with a ton and a half of proofs [of German U] on which we are now working.

N.D. 1927 Letters I (to Sylvia Beach): Can these words be still cut on the plate after (as sung by Phoblacht) Music by O. Gianni! Music by A. Hames¡ (the second exclamation mark upside down)

26 April 1927 JJ from Harriet Weaver): “wheeling square” … “squaring the wheel”

ca. May 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Will you please forward this MS — the rest of Parts 1 and 3 to Miss Weaver, registered, as I want to get all this rubbish out of the house. It fell all round the taxi when I made it up.

28 April 1927 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I may leave Paris next week as I have ceased working and sent all manuscript out of the house. What name or names would you give N?

UPLund 1 May 1927 (to Eric Pinker): If you have not been able to secure American publication for the two pieces I sent you will you kindly return them to me? Is there any other way by which I can protect them?

12 May 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): My verses have gone to the printer and last night I finished correcting proofs of my new book which will be published in a day or two. I mean instalment 3 … I shall use some of your suggestions about N of which you have a right idea. The title is very simple and as commonplace as can be. It is not Kitty O'shea as some wit suggested, though it is in two words. I want to think over it more as I propose to make some experiments with it also. Will you please send back Lewis's The Enemy as no answer can be got from him either to return my MS (which he was so anxious to have to the exclusion of all other creative artists etc) or to send on the copies I persuaded Miss Beach to order. My remarks about the engine were not meant as a hint about the title. I meant that I wanted to take up several other arts and crafts and teach everybody how to do everything properly so as to be in the fashion … I lay down my pen anyhow and if I knew anyone who I thought had the patience and the wish and the power to write Part II on the lines indicated I think I would leave the chair too and come back in a few years to indicate briefly how Part IV should be done. But who is the person? There is no such absurd person as could replace me except the incorrigible god of sleep and no waster quite so wasteful though there is one much more so. Peer Gynt says at least: Han er faderligt syndet imod min Person / Men økonom! — nej, det er han ikke! P.S. I want to see as a test if you can read these 2 lines of Norwegian? It is when the ship stolen from Peer Gynt blows up at sea with all his goods. He is on the strand, stranded.

12 May 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I shall use some of your suggestions about N of which you have a right idea. The title is very simple and as commonplace as can be. It is not Kitty O'shea as some wit suggested, though it is in two words. I want to think over it more as I propose to make some experiments with it also. Will you please send back Lewis's The Enemy as no answer can be got from him either to return my MS (which he was so anxious to have to the exclusion of all other creative artists etc) or to send on the copies I persuaded Miss Beach to order. … Peer Gynt says at least: Han er faderligt syndet imod min Person / Men økonom! — nej, det er han ikke! P.S. I want to see as a test if you can read these 2 lines of Norwegian? It is when the ship stolen from Peer Gynt blows up at sea with all his goods. He is on the strand, stranded.

12 May 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): … last night I finished correcting proofs of my new book which will be published in a day or two. I mean instalment 3 …

13 May 1927 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver):
Phoenix park.
— symbol used by Michelet to explain Vico's theory
O felix culpa! S. Augustine's famous phrase in praise of Adam's sin. Fortunate Fault! Without it the Redeemer wd not have been born. Hence also for the antecedent sin of Lucifer without which Adam wd not have been created or able to fall.
Ex nihilo nihil fit
Ex male bonus fit
Out of nothing comes nothing
— — evil — good
Nicky (Old Nick, Lucifer, Satan)
Mickelmassed (Michael, his conqueror = much heaped up)
Malum in Latin means evil and apple.
Hill, rill, ones in company &c
This rhythm occurs often.
Arthur Guinness, Sons & Company, Ltd
Awful Grimmest Sunshat Cromwelly, Looted.
— — Sons & Company, & their carriageable tochters
Hill = w
Rill = A
Less be proud, be proud of them but naturally, as hill (go up it) as river (jump it).
Norronesen = Old Norse, warrior
Irenean = Irishborn, peace (eirene)
secrest = superlative of most secret
soorcelossness = the source is not yet to be found any more than that of the Nile
Quare siles = Why are you silent
Homfrie Noanswa (Albert Nyanza)
Unde gentium festinas? Where the dickens are you hurrying from?
Livia Noanswa (Victoria Nyanza)
the source of the Nile, later supposed to represent w + A
the quarry & the silexflint suggest w silent
undy, gentian & festy hues suggest A running & bubbling.
Wolken = (woollen cap of clouds (wolkin — welkin)
Frowned = He is crowned with the frown of the deaf
Audi urio (I long to hear)
Es urio (” ” ” eat)
Eavesdrip = wd listen to the dripping drops of his house's e(a)ve Awater
mous = Chaucerian form to suggest distance in time
dinn = Oriental mixture of din & djinn, the noise of an angry armed spirit, to suggest distance in space
bottles (battles) = the vintner's dream of Satan & Michael
far ear = far east
mous at hand = close at hand
Mark! (the king & the admonition)
His vales etc   His hills begin to be clouded over in the effort to hear
With lithpth Ababble
Hairfluke (Herrfluch = the curse of the Lord on you for not talking louder, he tries to grab her hair which he hopes to catch by a fluke
If he could bad twig her
twig = Anglo-Irish = understand
twig = beat with a twig.
Impalpabunt
Oculos habent et non videbunt
Aures habent et ” audient
Manus ” ” ” non palpabunt
His ear having failed, he clutches with his hand & misses & turns away hopeless & unhearing (he abhears)
Mr Garnett says he can only stare (a man of letters, of a literary family and a very whimsical and good writer himself) like a cow at this. So much the worse for the cow.

Spring 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I signed or endorsed [the cheque] in payment for contributions ‘now appearing’ but evidently not ‘appearing and to appear’ for Roth himself in his letter offered to buy other extracts.

ca. May 1927 Beach Letters(to Sylvia Beach): Could you get me a cheap very legible vulgate edition of the bible, old and new testament in Latin?

15 May 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Now I shall arrange to go away and rest a little. The book about the Danes is very interesting.

19 May 1927 JJ (from Harriet Weaver): “One Squared”

20 May 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I am afraid you will find it tedious but I think you ought to read the proofs of instalment 4. I send you herewith the final MS additions, and the proof should be read with both, my handwriting will be more familiar than my son's, the final additions are in green ink. I shall correct the proof from the perhaps faulty copy in Eliot Paul's possession at the same time. It will be sent to you in a few days. Also if any of my additions have not appeared in instalments 1, 2 and 3 I should be glad if you would indicate page and line, referring to transition.

20 May 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I leave tomorrow for Holland and will send my address. Mr Donald Friede, owner of Boni and Liveright, offered me $2000 down and 15% royalties to publish my new book, but I declined. As regards that book and its future completion I have asked Miss Beach to get into closer relations with James Stephens. I started reading one of his last books yesterday Deirdre … He is a poet and Dublin born. Of course he would never take a fraction of the time or pains I take but so much the better for him and me and possibly for the book itself. If he consented to maintain three or four points I consider essential and I showed him the threads he could finish the design. JJ and S (the colloquial Irish for John Jameson and Son's Dublin whiskey) would be a nice lettering under the title. It would be a great load off my mind. I shall think this over and wait until the opposition becomes more general and pointed.

Hotel Victoria, The Hague

UPLewis 23 May 1927: (Sgravenhage)

24 May 1927 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): We are staying here on account of bad weather at Scheveningen. I think you had better send on the corrected proof of transition 4 to me here, registered, so that we do not contradict each other to the printer

UPLewis 25 May 1927: (Scheveningen)

SL, BL 27 May 1927 (to Sylvia Beach): I had a dreadful time with a savage dog on 25 inst. … If I could do the trick of gentleman into fox [see N03 VI.B.3.161(k)] I could save my breath better. … Thank Mrs Antheil [who was from Russia] for the words. I shall use some of them.

28 May 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Is there any packet for Miss Weaver in your shop. I asked her to correct proof of transition 4 from my latest MS but she writes that she has not received it. It has verses in green ink in my handwriting on last page

28 May 1927 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I cannot understand about the lost MS? Have you a MS ending with verses in green ink in my wiriting: ‘Sold him her lease of nineninenintie’ etc and ending ‘That's what she's done for We [?him]’? I am writing to Miss Beach about it. I thought Miss Moschos sent it weeks ago. I am glad you agree to check it. I cannot from memory. Please let me know if you have these pages. It is my fault to have sent it away but I wanted to clear the decks.

31 May 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I have no news about the MS but I hope you got it. I got your letter with your guess at the translation … Archer's literal … — He (God) is fatherly toward me in person / But economicalthat he is not! the racier version, more in the lilt, would be — He feels like a father for yours truly P.G. / But a stickler for thriftHoly Paul, that he isn't! As regards the title, ‘one squared’ can be used in the ‘math’ lesson by the writer of Part II if he, or she, is so ‘dispoged’. The title I projected is much more commonplace and accords with the J J & S and A.G.S. & Co sign and it ought to be fairly plain from a reading of w. The sign in this form means H.C.E. interred in the landscape … I discovered yesterday that [James Stephens] was born in Dublin on 2 February 1882. As regards w it seems to be rolling round the globe over all kinds of toes … A writer in a review of it in Laurens County, Georgia, says: We and the Oconee river of all places are in it too …

31 May 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Another (or rather many) says he is imitating Lewis Carroll. I never read him till Mrs Nutting gave me a book, not Alice, a few weeks ago — though, of course, I heard bits and scraps.

31 May 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): But then I never read Rabelais either though nobody will believe this. I will read them both when I get back. I read a few chapters of a book called La langue de Rabelais. I have little inclination at present either to read or write … Mr Lindbergh, a Norwegian Swedoyank, has arrived in Paris … Do you think the man or clergyman who wrote that pamphlet might be interested to see t.1?

ca. May-June 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): By the way the current no of Studies has another article about Guinness's brewery.

4 June 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Many thanks for proof and note received. Am working hard at former and will forward at once as soon as I get Miss Weaver's set. I have made many changes.

6 June 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Herewith … Also the proofs of my ‘Absurdity’ no. 4. Please ask E P to see the corrections through. Did Eliot give leave to reprint Absurdity no. 5. I go to Amsterdam tomorrow and will wire address there. Having been revising since Thursday (2 June 1927) and am very tired … P.S. Giorgio had a letter from my brother. He thinks it inadvisable to send MSS by post and must wait a good opportunity to send by hand. To avoid mistakes I print the Latin phrase from S. Augustine with the garbled version used by w / SECURUS * JUDICAT * ORBIS * TERRARUM / SIGARIUS * VINDICAT * URBES * TERRORUM

6 June 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Leave morning Hotel Krasnopolsky Amsterdam

Hotel Krasnopolsky, Amsterdam

9 June 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): My agent Pinker has returned the MS of Dabcd. Nobody in NY would pay a dime for it, apparently.

9 June 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Can E.P. make the following changes. I cannot page them as I have no proof / Towards the end when C is supposed to be ejected by the female bar / for ‘Your garbage about our father!’ read ‘Your guff and your gaff and your garbage about our father!’ ‘farver!’ / A little earlier wher C swears a pagano-Christian oath / for ‘his heroes in Warhorror’ read ‘our hairoes in Warhorror’. … Yes, I worked many days on the proof and suppose I shall now start on the Criterion piece.

9 June 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Please reserve a copy of Liam O'Flaherty's Tim Healy's Life for me as it may be withdrawn.

10 June 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): A few more. In the same paragraph which begins ‘And whereas distracted’ I made a mistake in my quoting. It ought to be ‘abaht our farver’ not ‘about’ Also for / Drinkbattle's Dingy Dwellings / read Drinkbattle's Dingy Dwellings / (toegang) (toegang)

12 June 1927 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Peter Sawyer the Great lived in this hut while he studied shipbuilding and before he built S. Petersburg, Georgia, if he built it. Do you think you could read through a 10 page article in Dutch? There is a very interesting one in the Haegrch Maanblad on the admiralty-trip-chart of Hanno on which according to Victor Berard the Odyssey is based. We are here for a few days only … Many thanks for the corrected proofs which I checked and sent off from The Hedge. I suppose it is out by now.

13 June 1927 JJ (from Harriet Weaver): “Dublin Ale”

14 June 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Address Hotel Victoria Hague

Hotel Victoria, The Hague

18 June 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Is it too late to have the following changes made in the final verses of transition 4 / instead of
Goo, the great gudgeon gulped it all! / How was the C.O.D. / Bum!
to read / Goo, the groot gudgeon gulphed it all! / Hoo was the C.O.D. / Bung!
I am afraid I must leave Holland either Sunday or Monday (19 or 20 June 1927) morning for Ostend-Paris

19 June 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Can you correct another copy of transition from the proof and let me have it. The corrections are not all made or quite right. I got Tim Healy and Convegno. We leave tomorrow morning

20 June 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Hotel Central arrive one tomorrow

2, Square Robiac, Paris

23 June 1927 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): The dreadful cyclone in Holland drove me out … I arrived here the day before yesterday … Your guesses get nearer but N is the name of a ‘place where’ not a ‘thing which’ or a ‘person who’. You did not answer my question about Johannes Vermeer's View of Delft. I hope you got transition 4. There is such confusion here since I got back that I can't read it

N.D. June 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): … insert an errata slip [Pomes] … Also I would like to reread “The Enemy” tomorrow before I correct the final revise for transition 5

28 June 1927 BLHW (from Harriet Weaver): “Ireland's Eye” … “Phoenix Park” … “Dublin Bay”

1 July 1927 Letters I (to Michael Healy): That dialect I spoke of, I think, is called Shelta. I fancy it is some corrupt Irish written backwards and used by gentlemen who don't pay the rent … I get about fifty denunciations a week of my new work from all parts of the English-as-she-is-speaking world including Australia

3 July 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Pinker, my ‘agent’ sent back Dabcd from the U.S.A. No editor there would pay a cent for it

10 July 1927 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): That clergyman's name is Rev. James Cropper. Ireland's Eye (ey = island in Danish) is an islet off Howth Head. Phoenix Park is rather close but it is a place not built by hands — at least not all — whereas N is. I have been checking proof after proof and am tired. The dinner I had arranged for at Miss Beach's between J.J. and S. is of course off for the present. The footnote about him in the book I send confirms my statement

26 July 1927 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver):I am working night and day at a piece I have to insert between the last and C. It must be ready by Friday evening. (29 July 1927) I never worked against time before. It is very racking. … Two of your guesses were fairly near the last is off the track. The piece I am hammering at ought to reveal it.

26 July 1927 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): I am glad you got the booklet [Pomes Penyeach] … Miss Beach and Miss Monnier have gone to Savoy … More kilos of abuse about w … I enclose [enclosed] an explanation of one of the added phrases on p. 1 of last instalment [L'Arcs en His Cieling Flee Chinx on the Flur.]

8 August 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I am enclosing the second (incomplete and uncorrected) draft of the new piece. I hope it may stand the air of the heights

14 August 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I sent you the first draft of the questionnaire with a letter a week ago but I fear I sent it to Savoie not H.S. Yesterday I sent you draft 3, now finished. It has been terrible work in the circumstances. In question 11 I have allowed Shaun to speak with the voice of The Enemy. The opposition to my book is now so acute and general (even Miss Weaver in a letter yesterday speaks of ‘wallowing in its verbiage’) that it would seem to me almost a good policy to take 6 months holiday and rest.

14 August 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): At last I finished the piece for t.6 and had the MS sent you in two parcels … No 11 is D in his know-all profoundly impressive role for which an ‘ever devoted friend’ (so his letters are signed) unrequestedly consented to pose … I wanted it as ballast and the whole piece is to balance Dabcd more accurately. I never worked against time in this way or in such troubling conditions. I think it is right enough. D doctus is a bit husky beside the more melodious Shaun of the third part but the words of Trismegistus are harsh too after the songs of MacCormack … I need months and months of rest as I am wound up …

14 August 1927 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): I am more and more aware of the indignant hostility shown to my experiment in interpreting ‘the dark night of the soul’. The personal rancours of disappointed artists who have wasted their talents or perhaps even their genius while I with poorer gifts and a dreadful lot of physical and mental hardship have or seem to have done something would not apply in your case. And this is one of the chief reasons why, being unable to change, [I] proposed to discontinue my way of writing. The first and third parts being done (5 years work) I could perhaps do the second and the short fourth, but I need rest, and a lot of it. Any duffer ought to be able to pick the threads for part 2 out of the immense sombre melopées of I and 3 … As to ‘Phoenix’. A viceroy who knew no Irish thought this was the word the Dublin people used and put up a monument of a phoenix in the park. The Irish was: fionn uísge (pron. finn ishghe = clear water) from a well of bright water there.

20 August 1927 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Since writing I have been slaving at the enclosed to get it in before the final printing. It is to be included between / Paragraph ending ‘holly in his ives’ (in typescript) and / Paragraph beginning “As I have now successfully explained” … I shall write later on when I get these proofs off my mind. You could have gone a ?? further for you ??guess. With this addition of Pope Shaun the ?? First Part I is finished — et moi ainsi pour le moment

N.D. August 1927 BLHW (from Harriet Weaver): “Finn MacCool”

30 August 1927 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): This is to … tell you that the first word of your guess is right with an apostrophe ‘s’ so I suppose you can finish it. But I wish you would tell me on what words or phrase in question 11 you base your assumption that the model I use is the singer of Mother Machree! I have read it over a half a dozen times always more astonished. I am tempted to add a question 13 (for private perusal) Who is that infallible who pontificates over the arts of architecture, sculpture, drawing, painting, fiction, economics, philosophy etc etc etc etc, who writes as if he were the pope and preaches as if he were a parson, and so on. But it is useless to continue … an edition of t 6 was printed and bound but I held it up by wire as you may notice from the paging 106a, b, c, d, e, f, etc. I shall wait to see how it is received but I have obtained Miss Beach's promise that if I decide to ask James Stephens to write parts II and IV and he agrees she will publish the hotchpotch resulting therefrom

27 August 1927 unpublished (Elliot Paul to J.J.): Shall I have the section from This Quarter set up before you revise it, if you care to, or would you prefer to make your corrections on the printed pages you now have?

N.D. September 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Have you any books on Spengler or Whitehead? Who are they? What have they written? transition 6 to [list of names]

14 September 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I was besides working on a revision of C which I finished Monday (12 September 1927) … I feel you do not think the work I am engaged in at present worth the sacrifice and even then in view of the general and particular opposition — I do not guarantee to write it … My sight is not good, many more operations have made me more diffident than ever. Some of the hostile criticisms of my new work seem to me imbecile but I would agree to sacrifice 1/4 if the rest is read or printed to be read and there is no other way … I suppose I spent a good 10,000 hours writing Pts 1 and 3 but I could not undertake even to sketch part 2 and the end unless my mind during the time is completely freed from strain.

14 September 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I was besides working on a revision of C which I finished Monday (12 September 1927)

17 September 1927 JJ (from Harriet Weaver): “Finn's Town” … “Finn's City”

29 September 1927 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Lucia Joyce): My father has been ill in bed for the last few days

1 October 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): The transition signed is for McAlmon

8 October 1927 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I was quite ill last week, a collapse, but am all right. I am working very hard on the final revise of A on which I am prepared to stake everything … I am glad you like the new C. But I am utterly ‘moidered’ (Irish for confused in the head) by Anna Livia. I have spent at least another 150 at her toilet

18 October 1927 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I finished revision of A last night — about 1200 hours of work in al on 17 pages! … I hope you will like it. Of two things one — either it is what I hope or I am a fool

ca. 18 October 1928 Letters III (to Valery Larbaud): I have just finished revision of Anna Livia for transition no 8. What a job! 1200 hours of work on 17 pages. She has grown — riverwise — since the night you heard her under the sign of Ursa Minor. Her fluvial maids of honour from all ends of the earth now number about 350 I think.

28 October 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I anticipated. I did not really finish with A till 6 yesterday evening. The final proofreading took me five hours. I do not know what to think of it. Hundreds of river names are woven into the text. I think it moves. I hope you will like it and will write me about it as I am considerably wound up.

29 October 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I have not yet done with Mrs A.L. t.8 is out I believe but I am still working away on the final revise, as I am to read it to a group of ‘critics’ on Wednesday next. (2 November 1927) Between t.8 which you will receive and the version there will be at most I suppose a difference of 50 or 60 words or expressions … When I have at last got her off into the Irish sea I shall sigh with relief.

4 November 1927 Letters I and BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): The reading seems to have made a profound impression on the audience (about 25 people of the world's 1500 million) but I have been literally doubled in two from fatigue … I was much better this morning but began to work again this afternoon. An offer was made to me by a man who called on me a few weeks ago to give me £300 … for permission to publish a part of my new book in an edition de luxe of 600 copies at £2 each … So I am trying to put on to A of t8 the revisions which in the usual course I should have left till the coming out of the whole in book form. t.8 has not yet arrived. I read from an advance copy

N.D. November 1927 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): [revisions for ALP see XB109]

N.D. early November 1927 Letters III (to Ezra Pound): I had not a moment for I was working all day on Anna Livia (transition 8) which I had to read after in its final amended form, putting in an extra 200 hours on the 1000 I told you of. And after that I did not feel at all well, nervous collapse etc. … Part 1 has just finished in transition and next month I should begin to publish there serially Part 3. But I do not intend to publish there serially Part 2 or the shorter Part 4 when the 8 or 9 instalments of Part 3 are finished. Miss Beach, of course, has first claim on the right to publish but if my American copyright is secured I shall bear in mind your suggestion [as to possible U.S. pubishers]

9 November 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I suppose you now have transition 8. Since it came out I have woven into the text another 152 rivernames and it is now final as it will appear in the book except that I cannot get the way to render this in the annals ‘On this day the Liffey at Essex bridge was completely dry for two minutes’ … My state of exhaustion continues but then I put in three more days on A since my last letter and in fact I have been obliged to write to the editors of transition to omit me from the next number

9 November 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I have been obliged to write to the editors of transition to omit me from the next number

9 November 1927 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I had a rather strange dream the other night. I was looking at a Turk seated in a bazaar. He had a framework on his knees and on one side he had a jumble of all shades of red and yellow skeins and on the other a jumble of greens and blues of all shades. He was picking from right and left very calmly and weaving away. It is evidently a split rainbow and also Parts I and III. And now may Allah who is infallahble guide this epistle of his lowliest and shed upon his sconce the quietude of the carpetweaver.

BL ca. 10 November 1927 (to Sylvia Beach): I will call about 7.70 and bring ‘Cranly’ [the Ulysses counterpart of John Francis Byrne]; [Joyce's replies (underlined) to Sylvia Beach's queries re marked up transition 8 follow:] p.33 rara por Orbe and ? poor p 26 2nd word in left margin dongu 1st right bingkang p.24 word after ‘saffron’ struman p.26 after ‘wupper and’ lauar p.27 the two chirsines chirrines p.30 Olona? Olona [p.33] wharon Wharnow p.32 left margin can't make out 2 words in line inserted but the grapes that ripe before reason to them that divide the vinedress (i.e. males)

BL mid-November 1927 (to Sylvia Beach): Will you please make these additional corrections in A and return to me. transition 8 [to go to] 1) Sykes 2) Marcel Brion 3) Wells of the £300 look with a note calling his attention to beauty of text and copious rewriting of same done by me since publication in transition

BUFF ca. mid-November 1927 (to Sylvia Beach): p.22 right margin for Potters' River please correct also on my copy herewith to Potters Rivier Was a copy of t8 sent to Irish Statesman? There is no mention of it in the Publication Received? J.J.

14 November 1927 BLHW (Sylvia Beach to Harriet Weaver): Mr Joyce asked me to send you his copy of the November No of Transition and to ask if you will please make the additions and corrections on your copy and to return his whenever it is convenient for you. He has also been staying in bed for the last day or two, quite worn out after the terrific labours of rewriting Anna Livia. He seems to be very unhappy because the new work doesn't please you for whom it is being written. He wouldn't mind about anybody else not liking it. He often says to me bitterly “Miss Weaver doesn't care for it” and yet he feels that some parts of his new work are the best work that he has done and that he can do.

4 December 1927 JJQ (to James Stephens): I should like to meet you and have your opinion on another — and to me at least, more important — matter.

1928

2 Square Robiac, Paris

1 January 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): A week or so ago I sent you copies of the Paris Times with pro and con references (one, I suppose to my visit to James Stephens and a lot of other gossip) to my ‘recantation’ of my work in deference to the opinion of a valued friend. In reply you say you suppose I am well and hard at work. I am neither. I have done no work for over two months and the doctor refuses to allow me even to revise proof at present … I have been aware of the untenability of my position more or less for fifteen months, since my return here from Brussels but it has now reached an acute state. I have neither the mind nor the heart any more to continue to ‘waste my genius on a mere curiosity of literature’

7 January 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I have been better these last two days

15 January 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Wells cabled agreeing to pay 1350$ and is sending the money. Padraic Colum has written an introduction. Rodker has written an enthusiastic article about it, I heard.

20 January 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Please send the Colum preface to Miss Weaver

end January 1928 Letters III (to Elliot Paul): If compatible with exiting text and still possible make the following changes please. page 1. A Tullagrove etc has a septain inclinaison / \ page 6 raucking his flavourite turvku in the smukking precincts of lydias / page 7 lying low on his rawside / And (something follows here which I forget but if compatible add) diesmal he was laying him long on his laughside

ca. February 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Please send a copy of transition 11 to Budgen but to nobody else except Miss Weaver.

15 February 1928 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I wanted the current issue of t. and the first half of Dabcd which I had set up to reach my lawyers before any other person could copyright them and have them set up there at my expense but Mr Jolas has been ringing up to say the printer had a special holiday etc and so t. 11 has gone to America.

15 February 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): P.S. Yes. Curiosa Mathematica is the title. I am reading Alice. It seems to be all once upon a night and a very sleep night it was, just like my opus.

24 February 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I am still here ‘moidered’ with work … I have had to take on a kind of temporary secretary, McGreevy, to help my eyelessness. Friede has made over his copyright to me by transfer deed … Lewis has been sent on a mission to India by Chatto & Windus for his next ‘indiapepper edition shortly’ … Thanks for Blast. I have to struggle through 16 notebooks for the revision of Da alone … I send you proofs as they grow

Hotel du Rhin et de Newhaven, Dieppe

21 March 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): The revision of Da nearly flattened me out so I left for here for a week or so. I hope you got the MS. Two copies of T12 are being sent you, can you check one by the MS and return it to me at Paris. My evidence against Roth was taken as you see by the N.Y.H.

25 March 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Thanks for C.T and t12. Please send the latter with P.P. to Prof. Charles Davies, University College of North Wales, Bangor, Grande Bretagne (not Angleterre) and a short note to say it is not proposed at present to publish serially Pts II or IV.

26 March 1928 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver):
Ondt (Nor) = angry
Gracehoper = Graeshoper (Nor)
Floh = Ger. Flea
Luse = O.F. louse
Bienie = Biene (Ger) bee
Vespatilla = Lat. Little wasp Ital.
Pupa = entom. Term: = doll
pulicy = Ital. Dial = pula = flea
commence insects = commit incest
everlistings = laurel bushes
harry me &c = Vico, thunderclap, marriage with auspices, burial of dead, providence
puce = Fr. Flea
fourmish = Fr. antagonistSpinner's = Ger. Spider
fourmilierly = Fr. Anthill
Tingsomingenting = Nor = nothing
Besterfarther = Nor grandfather / also conqueror
Zeuts = Zeus = Zeit (time)
myrmidins = myrmis Ger. Antagonistpszozlers = Pol. Bee
summerfugl = Nor butterfly
sphex = insect
Nix &c = Ger. Dial = Nothing
Pou = Fr. Louse
lopp = Nor. Flea
Weltall = Ger. Universe
raumy = Ger. Space
psyche = Gr. Butterfly / also E. Gloss
laus = Ger. Louse
mouche = Fr. Fly
chairmanlook = Germanlooking
wetting with waps (betting, wasp. Wop (Americ. Slang for Italian)
sylph = entom. Term
Iomio = Ital Dio mio! (he is not on the sociallist but on the egolist).
Crick = cricket
whilepaper = time also wallpaper
lustre = 5 years also chandelier
mensa & seccles (tables and settles) / also months and siècles
ephemerids = insect living a day
the ternitary = eternity also termitary (white anthill)
cicada = Ital. Kind of cricket
grillo = Iutal. Cricket (aver grillo in capo = to have a bee in one's bonnet)
leivnits = Leibnitz also live nits ie young lice (cf akKant, schoppinhour etc. And other philosophers)
Tossmania = Tasmania, he stands on his head to be really ‘antipodal’
phthin = Gr. Louse
lugly = ugly and luglio, It = July
Tournedo = tornado and tournedos (we turn our back to the wind)
tilehats = tall hats (tile, slang) also tiles from huts
Bora etc = Bora (Adriatic wind) / Aurora Borealis
tetties = It. Roofs also dial. Breasts [titties]
coppe = rooftiles (It. Dial)
unshrinkables = pyjamas
swarming of = Ger to be enthusiastic over (i.e. himself)
monkeynous = monkeynuts also the ‘nous’ ratio nal in telligence cf monasticism
confucion of minthe, confession of mind / ‘infusion de menthe’
api = Ital. Bees
Lido
cosy fond tuttes = Così fan tutte (Mozart) / So do Ladies All.
Be jiltses etc. = By Jesus Christ / also By Jaysus wept / Dublin accent
schneezed = Germ to sneeze in snow (Schnee)
eyeforsight = Eifersucht Ger. Jealousy
wittol = O.F. - a conniving cuckold
spizz = Ital dialect = itch
spass = Germ amusement
formicolation = Lat. Ant also penis & [?melding]
amiesing = Ger. Antagonistfaith hope & charity
Dorcu = Irish grasshopper
Dunshager = Irish anthill
odderkop = other head / also Nor spider
myre = mire also Nor ant
actual grace
sanctifying ”
despair and presumption are sins against hope
Χορος

Grand Hôtel de la Poste, Rouen

28 March 1928 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): We left Dieppe last evening … I fatigued myself to exhaustion point over Da. I am glad you like the fable … I have been reading about the author of ‘Alice’. A few things about him are rather curious. He was born a few miles from Warrington and he had a strong stutter and when he wrote he inverted his name like Tristan and Swift … We return to Paris in a day or two

28 March 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Have you the Sheehy programme. If it is dated will you please write Mr Healy and ask him to try to get a copy of the Freeman's Journal for the day following. It will be difficult for the office was burned in the 1916 rebellion. If not, can somebody copy out the criticism on the performance.

UPLewis 29 March 1928:

2 Square Robiac, Paris

UPLewis 1 April 1928:

5 April 1928 Letters III (to Valery Larbaud): I got back here Saturday (31 March 1928)

6 April 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Somewhere — between — Newhaven — and the — diepp — sea.

8 April 1928 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): Svevo has sent me Veruda's portrait of his redheaded wife, Mrs S. (v. Anna Livia: her name is Livia S.) … The transition people are beginning to bother me again for the June instalment but I have not energy enough to say yes, aye or no

16 April 1928 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I shall try to get away this week

Dijon

19 ?April 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Solved Lewis Carroll riddle in train (Yvan)

Hotel Carlton, Lyon

20 April 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Hotel Carlton here Changed plans please ring … transition office

Avignon

21 April 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Between - the - Popes - and - the - Muddyle(ssanesses) … on my way to Toulon. Please note complete change of maddress

21 April 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Dijon-Lyon-par-Avignon- It's long toulong for me!

UPLewis 23 April 1928:

Grand Hotel, Toulon (Var)

23 April 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Grand Hotel here please telephone … transition office

26 April 1928 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): A line to say I am here

24-27 April 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I did not get a letter from Paul yet but got a kilo of proofs and a letter from Sage. I don't feel a bit inclined to start on them yet … I also solved L.C.'s problem about the [Jabberwock]

28 April 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I think Miss weaver would like a copy of Breaking Priscian's Head

28 April 1928 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): … am trying to rest here. But transition has sent me a heap of proofs to revise for June and September

2 May 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Am trying to work on proofs but cannot work up energy enough. It took me 3 days to plow through 1 notebook and I brought 16 along — just for a holiday … I am learning a little provençal every day but really do not feel up to it

7 May 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): ALP just received leaving Hotel Europe Avignon

Hôtel d'Europe, Avignon

8 May 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): correcting […] Colm has not revised

8 May 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Am working all day at A. This should have been sent me months ago and not on top of transition proofs too in the middle of my holidays

10 May 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I return A. Proofs A. B and C are to go back to Wells Proof F is to go to Wells after McGreevy has carefully copied all my revisions on to proofs D and E Proof D is to go to Colum after McGreevy has copied your copy of my notes to him and with D that copy is to go to Colum also. Proof E with my copied corrections is to be returned to me express registered. The final proof G will be sent by me through you to New York. What is the date of publication and what is the last limit they give me for revision? … On the banks of Anna Rhoda

12 May 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Leaving Avignon [today] address Hotel Carlton Lyons

Hotel Carlton, Lyon

13 May 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Staying here till Thursday (17 May 1928)

2, Square Robiac, Paris

20 May 1928 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I returned here to a mountain of proofs, A and Db and c. I am feeling rather lazy about it and will have to give myself some sort of a kick or prod up.

27 May 1928 Letters III (to Frank Budgen): I have a lot to do for the next few days or so but will write to you again after t13 comes out

3 June 1928 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): Will you please add in whatever you have on your copy of t.12 on the copy sent you on Thursday (31 May 1928) and tear out the pages and send them back. I am working desperately hard for t.13 as the final revision of A took a dreadful lot of time … I think you will like Db when you see him in full dress

4 June 1928 Letters I (to Valery Larbaud): … two U.S.A. publishers to my astonishment have just made me an offer of $11,000 (dico, undicimila dollari) in advance royalties on my ‘work in progress’.

5 June 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I am crazed with proofs … I am arranging to have all those articles when they make 12 ie. O. published together here as a symposium

7 June 1928 James Joyce Archive (Sylvia Beach to Crosby Gaige): Mr Joyce asked me to send you the following additional corrections in “Anna Livia Plurabelle”: page 1 line 27 for “lough” read “Loch” / page 5 line 13 for “alas alacs” read “aleffe, the leaks”

21 June 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Have just finished (11.55 a.m) final & fifth revision of Db. What a job! I shall write as soon as I get breath. Can you please copy the missing words and phrases on to one copy of t12 tear them out and send them to me as I want to put them in my book? … I hope you will like the compli wangler Db when you see him … epistolically yours

26 June 1928 Letters III (to Stanislaus Joyce): We may leave for Copenhagen in a few days. Can you remember if you sent me my Danish Berlitz book? If you did I shall look for it. If not can you send it. It is a grey blue book.

30 June 1928 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): Of course you didn't believe I was really finished with Db for all. This week I have been cabling, phoning, writing express letters etc but at last he comes out Monday, (2 July 1928) only 31 days behind scheduled time. I will send you a few shafts on the duskier bits as soon as the text is released.

7 July 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): t13 has not yet come out

Central Hotel, Zurich

15 July 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): t13 having at last appeared we left Paris and are going on today to Austria … Have you seen WL's book Childermass? If so, please read carefully pp 90-100 and 170-180.

Hotel Europa, Innsbruck

17 July 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): After 3 days of trains … we are here where He Cthunders Every moment at 38° … The Inn is the fastest river I ever saw. It is grey silver and runs like a (windhound) loose.

17 July 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Stifled by heat after having been held up for an hour in the A.L.P.s by a thunderstorm, which stopped our electric train we are here when H.C.E. he cthunders everymoment.

UPLewis 17 July 1928:

UPLewis 22 July 1928:

Hotel Mirabell, Salzburg

UPLewis 23 July 1928:

24 July 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): We reached here yesterday … Did you get t13? … [Stuart Gilbert] is writing a book on Ulysses

30 July 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Do you read Db.

2 August 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I met John Drinkwater here … I must wait a little more before I write about Db. I seem to have little or no energy.

5 August 1928 Letters III (to Stanislaus Joyce): Stuart Gilbert … and his wife are coming here on the 16th.

8 August 1928 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): Here is a short note on p130 of t13.

The Maronite (Roman Catholic) liturgy, the language of which is Syrian, is at the back of it. On Good Friday the body of Jesus is unscrewed from the cross, placed in a sheet and carried to the sepulchre while girls dressed in white throw flowers at it and a great deal of incense is used. The Maronite ritual is used in Mount Lebanon. Db departs like Osiris the body of the young god being pelted and incensed. He is seen as already a Yesterday (Gestern, turning back his glance amid wails of ‘Today!’ from To Morrow (to-maronite's wail etc). The apostrophe balances the hyphen Guesturn's, Tomaronites.)

This censing scene is led up by
licet ut lebanos (p.12) = this may be used as incense (libanos is Greek for incense)
The words ‘at my frank incentive’. ‘Idos be’ (idos is also Greek for incense and the name of an ‘artificial tongue’ ‘thurily’ (for thoroughly)—t(h)us—t(h)uris is Latin for incense ‘Weih?—Up the Shameeroaugh!’ Weihrauch is German for incense. Here it sounds also shamrock but means a cloudscreen or shamescreen ‘licensed and censered’ p.13 etc, also ‘sedro’ Syriac for [prayer].

The choir of girls splits in two: those who pronounce Oahsis and those who pronounce Oeyesis (cf Our Father who/which art etc). The Latin is ‘Quasi cedrus exaltata sum in Lebanon etc’ see A.P.T.A.A.A.Y.M. Belvedere College chapter. There are in all 29 words in the threnody 6 × 4 = 24 and the final 5 = 29 (Tu autem, Domine, misereree nobis!).

8 August 1928 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): This leapyear chorus is repeated lower down in imitation of the Maronite and Latin ‘pax’ given by embrace of arms. The girls do nothing really but turn to one another, exclaiming one another's name joyfully (Frida! Freda! etc). These are 29 words for “Peace’ taken from or modelled on the following tongues and variations (German, Dano-Norwegian, Provençal, French, Greek, French variations, Malay, Echo, Gipsy, Magyar, childrens, Armenian, Senegalese, Latin variation, Irish, Diminutive, N. Breton, S. Breton, Chinese, Pidgin, Arabic, Hebrew, Sanskrit, Hindustani and English = O for goodness sake leave off!). This word was actually sighed around the world in that way in 1918.

8 August 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I think I left 4 pacifettes the Japanese and the Drunken variation, the Russian and Czechoslovakian sisters Myra. But here they are now. I have begun revising Dc today.

12 August 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Lucia Joyce): He himself has trouble with his eyes, but the doctor hopes it is a superficial attack. He has had to stop work which he had begun

25 August 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Lucia Joyce): His eyes have been a little better these last few days. I think we will probably return to Paris next week

Hotel Vier Jahreszejten, Munich

BL 29 August 1928

1 September 1928 Letters III (to Benjamin Conner): (dictated) I have been ill with my eyes the last three weeks … I was much relieved to receive the copies of parts 10 and 11 of Work in Progress and to know that the copyright of this portion of the book also has been properly taken out in my name in the United States. I hope you received for this purpose also copies of Transition No 13

Stuttgart

3 September 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): (train stop only)

Hôtel Maison Rouge, Strasburg

3 September 1928 Beach Letters (to Adrienne Monnier and Sylvia Beach): I am dictating this on the train to Mr Gilbert between Munich and Stuttgart. My eye got better in Munich … but I shall not be able to do any reading or writing several weeks

Paris??

Hotel Continental, Le Havre

8 September 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Recovering here but still semidark

9 September 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): … ask Bird by 'phone to send me express Nodier's book on the Seine

14 September 1928 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Returning today

2 Square Robiac, 192 rue de Grenelle, Paris

20 September 1928 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver, typed): We got back here a few days ago … (Stuart Gilbert and article on t.13) … He also read to me in Salzburg several chapters or rather sketches of chapters, of his exposition of Ulysses … I suggested to him to link it up here and there with Berard's book on the Phoenician origin of the Odyssey and also with the work in progress … I am most uncommonly fatigued and it is a physical impossibility for me to attempt revision of the piece for T-14 which therefore will have to come out without me … A.L.P. has not yet arrived … I even thought of proposing to Gage that he ask Edgar Wallace to do [a preface for a new fragment], the tortoise and the hare … About fifty pages of Rebecca West's book were read out for me yesterday

20 September 1928 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver, typed): We got back here a few days ago … I am most uncommonly fatigued and it is a physical impossibility for me to attempt revision of the piece for T-14 which therefore will have to come out without me … A.L.P. has not yet arrived … I even thought of proposing to Gage that he ask Edgar Wallace to do [a preface for a new fragment], the tortoise and the hare … About fifty pages of Rebecca West's book were read out for me yesterday

2 October 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): (typed): (illegible) … and get on with the Transition proofs … (insert: John MacCormack and racehorses)

?7 October 1928 Letters III (to Valery Larbaud, dictated): I suppose Miss Beach told you about my collapse. I cannot see a single word of print … Anna Livia Plurabelle … has come out

23 October 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver, typed, here corrected): although they changed my lenses I still cannot distinguish a word of print except the large headlines in the newspapers … My doctor who by the same token has a rivery name Fontaine (cf. Drinkwater) … Of course I can't do any work though I take two Spanish lessons per diem through the ear in the insane belief that I shall one day soon be able to come to terms with print again … Gilbert is preparing an article for the N.R.F. on work in progress … I am glad you liked ALP … You will receive a copy of Transition 14 with three articles on my opus by Rodker, Sage and McGreevy. The latter, who did a good deal of copying for me last year is rather useful in explaining parts of it to Eliot for instance … though Shaun himself [John MacCormack] has been three times in the Trianons this last week … We did not meet … I hope he will ride up on a thoroughbred Irish stone wall flier one of these evenings … I am sure you are passing many valuable things through your hands in going through Miss Marsden's work and if I had sufficient energy I should be as restless as a little boy outside a pantry thinking of all the nice little bits I could pilfer with no loss to her but oh the difference to me. I do not know that there will be any occasion for such regret in the future as I told the Transition editors that I saw no prospect of doing any work on proofs … Mr Laney who is kindly typing the present letter … I will send you in a day or two the only thing I have written in the last four months, a short description of madness and blindness descending upon Swift composed in what Gilbert calls the damnedest trinity of colours, with a commentary

Maison de Santé, Neuilly

16 November 1928 Letters III (to Valery Larbaud): (written in heavy black pencil) These few lines to tell you my wife was operated on the 8 … we go home in a day or so and then, after 15 days autovaccine treatment return here for 4 days more radium … I can see my own handwriting in this black graphite but cannot see one word of any print but capitals!

2 Square Robiac, Paris

28 November 1928 Letters I (to Ralph Pinker): I had already declined this offer of Mr [Guinzburg]

2 December 1928 Letters I and BLHW (to Harriet Weaver, typed): The person who is now in complete command seems to be Leon Paul Fargue and as he has offered to collaborate with me in Frenchifying some passages of work in progress, there is no reason why I should complain … perhaps some review of [A.L.P] may appear in the foreign literary news between a Spanish and a Russian book notice. Being unable to read or write, I have been taking oral lessons in these two languages and also in Danish, this time with a Dane as I wanted to vary the Norwegian pronunciation … I hope Miss Marsden's book [The Definition of the Godhead] came out punctually yesterday and I am looking forward to thieveries on an unheard of scale as soon as I can find an accomplice as rascally minded as myself to read it to me

2 December 1928 Letters I and BLHW (to Harriet Weaver, typed): … we return to the clinic tomorrow … As regards myself I cannot yet read or write anything except books for infants … Nevertheless I had them retype in legal size, twice or three times this, with triple spacing, section three of Shaun, and this, when it has been read to me by three or four people, I shall try to memorise as to pages etc (there are nearly a hundred) and so hope to be able to find the places where I can insert from the twenty notebooks which I have filled up since I wrote this section. The notebooks, written when I was suffering from my eyes or lately, are quite legible to me as they were scribbled with thick black pencil, but the other ones, about thirteen, I am relying on my improved sight to help me over …

Maison de Santé, Neuilly

15 December 1928 Letters III (to Stanislaus Joyce): … cannot read a word of print except capitals. Nevertheless am trying to work in this poor athmosphere (I am in the room next to her to keep her company)

15 December 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): We have got permission to leave here today much to our relief! … I can write this at last but all I can see to read is children's books with very large print.

2 Square Robiac, Paris

31 December 1928 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I received Miss Marsden's book. Many thanks. A dreadful time for work till early hours with Dc but I will finish it if I finish myself

1929

2, Square Robiac, Paris

10 January 1929 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I am hopelessly overworked and my sight has got progressively worse … enclosed are notices for A … I can scarcely see this scrawl … I need another week's sight to finish Dc.

24 January 1929 Stuart Gilbert (Stuart Gilbert diary): Visited J.J. three days running to finish proofs of his installment for transition. Mrs Fleischmann did the greater part. She is an admirable secretary to J.

26 January 1929 Letters III (to Stanislaus Joyce): I return to the clinic with Nora on the 4th … My reading sight seems to have come to an end … Nevertheless with the help of about ten assistants I was able to check the next installment for Transition which comes out this week

6 February 1929 UP (Harry Crosbie diary): went to Shakespeare and Co to ask JJ for fragment.

20 February 1929 UP (Harry Crosbie diary): received letter from Sylvia Beach agreeing

UP early Mar: (Harry Crosbie diary) visited JJ's flat

5 March 1929 Stuart Gilbert (Stuart Gilbert diary): J.J., urged by Giorgio, tells Scylla that the offer of $1000 for a fragment of W. in P. made by an obscure Yank, Crosbie, is not enough.

30 March 1929 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Contract not signed yet. I am trying to revise my text but am stupified still more by iodine. Try to get a copy of the pamphlet issued by Grosvenor House Hotel, Park Lane. The illustration about me will amuse you.

4 April 1929 SIBS (to Caresse and Harry Crosbie): I hereby acknowledge the receipt from you of … $1,000 … being the one-half payment … for the publication of the three fragments … ‘The Ondt & Gracehoper’, ‘Mookes and Gripes’, ‘The Triangle’, to be edited by the Black Sun Press … The corrected proofs of these fragments will be [the Crosbies'] property.

10 April 1929 Stuart Gilbert diary: Am fulfilling my vocation as a typist by copying J's fragment for the Crosbie people.

12 April 1929 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I am very busy revising the fragment and don't feel at all well … Have you a copy of Blast II and is it possible to have that Welsh-English dictionary? … I hope to finish my revision in a week or so.

12 April 1929 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): P.S. Don't let Shawn paint your halldoor a Union Jack pattern to pay off the viridisation of the Dublin red pillarboxes.

18 April 1929 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): Thanks for Blast II but what I want is the English-Welsh part! … The queer allusion to me is in the illustration of that hotel catalogue of marvels. Have you seen the new number of W.L.'s Enemy? A lot of it was read to me but I should prefer the book advertised in Pearson's W. ‘Want to join the police?’

26 April 1929 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I am working night, noon and morning. C.K. Ogden is doing the preface … You will scarcely recognise my fables now … I was awake nearly all last night trying to solve a problem in elementary mathematics — all this for a word or two.

9 May 1929 Stuart Gilbert (Stuart Gilbert diary): J.J. who is still — has been for a month — absorbed in preparing, complicating the book of extracts for the Crosbie press

9 May 1929 UP (to Caresse Crosbie): Erratum The Mookse and the Gripes The sentence I changed today, p.3 should read: Hic sor a stone, singularly illud, and on hoc stone Seter satt huc sate. Herewith ‘O & G’ with final corrections.

N.D. May 1929 UP (to Caresse Crosbie) The printer did not yet give me proof of the triangle piece so I could do nothing this weekend. I hope the enclosed O amd G is quite legible. If you can revise it I do not want to see it again.

24 May 1929 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I ended my task pro tem today at noon. Final revision of the 3 fragments.

27 May 1929 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): O is out today … I gave the title ‘Tales Told of Shem and Shaun’ to the Crosbye's book. J.N.W. Sullivan having declined to do the preface I proposed to them C.K. Ogden (author in part of The Meaning of Meaning) who did a very useful introduction … The book is out on Saturday [1 June 1929] …

27 May 1929 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Aldington came to see me. Des Imagistes the collection of poems published about 1500 years ago is to come out in a new form, i.e. contributions of today by the three more or less unknown contributors. I, not having any verse and not wishing to seem un-colleaguelike proposed giving him Kevin's page from Pt II. I have looked for it but can't find it, high or low. So could you please make me a copy when you have time therefor.

28 May 1929 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): I have had too much to do, being up sometimes till 1.30 fooling over old books of Euclid and algebra. Faktorovich … is a Russian (a bolshevik too and possibly a semi-official one) but I don't mind as we never talk politics and he is most obliging but chiefly he represents a class of my readers … the foreignborn admirers. To succeed O I am planning X that is a book of 4 long essays by 4 contributors (as yet I have found only one — Crosbye — who has a huge illustrated edition of the Book of the Dead, bequeathed to him by his uncle) — the subjects to be the treatment of night (cf B of D and S. John of the Cross ‘Dark Night of the Soul’), the mechanics and chemistry, the humour and I have not yet fixed on the fourth subject. This for 1930, when I shall also, I hope, send out another fragment, this time about w with another preface, A and $.ss having by that time passed into currency … I have also proposed to a young Dublin artist to do an illustration of the old earwig's funeral (Time, Saturn) which, as you will see, I introduced into the Ondt and Gracehoper. And that, I think, ends my activities for the moment (UP enclosure on Trobridge and Swedenborg (Divine Wisdom))

28 May 1929 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): [contains unpublished enclosure on Trobridge and Swedenborg (Divine Wisdom)]

2 June 1929 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): The Dial (May) has a curious article on me which you should read … Can you get me the enclosed so that I may take 1000 mls trip nowhere (enclosure on “1,000 Miles Up the Amazon”)

17 June 1929 HCD (Harry Crosbie diary): Tales Told ready.

UP ?? June 1929: I got the books safely and hope you got mine and the reviews

30 June 1929 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Departure delayed few days

6 July 1929 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): We are all going including Mrs F.

10 July 1929 BLHW (Sylvia Beach to Harriet Weaver): Joyces left Paris this morning.

Euston Hotel, London

10 July 1929 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Arrived

Imperial Hotel, Torquay

III 14 July 1929

16 July 1929 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Everyone seems delighted with this place … James Stephens is coming down here on Saturday (20 July 1929) for a weekend to talk about my book … He seemed … moved by my proposal to hand over the work to him if I found my sight or the opposition demanded it … I thought it better my proposal to James Stephens should come now so that if I am forced to it in the end it may appear less abrupt

16 July 1929 Beach Letters (dict to Stuart Gilbert to Sylvia Beach): Eliot … wants to do also for [Faber and Gwyer] a paper-covered edition of Anna Livia Plurabelle. Please send him this at once as he has read it but has no copy. I saw Drinkwater, Stephens and Ogden; the latter wants to do a disc of my reading the last 4 pages of Alp

17 July 1929 Letters III (to Caresse Crosbie): Before you leave Paris … see that the full number (25 and 25) press and author's copies have been left with Miss Beach. She was 10 or 13 short when I left.

22 July 1929 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Also two copies ‘Exag’ to Gilbert this hotel and one to me large paper. Will send you to Les Deserts copies of Criterion Miscellany.

30 July 1929 Selected Letters (to Valery Larbaud): (typed) I had to work literally night and day on Shem and Shaun and then I left … [Mrs F] is typing this … sending you … a curious book … by … Robert Bridges

early August 1929 Letters III (to Frank Budgen): Let me know when you can if you got the books alright … You ought to glance at Tomlinsons London River too.

ca. 1 August 1929 BL, unpublished: I put off your date till the 6 as you would be uncomfortable travelling or arriving on a bank holiday. Can you send the [Irish Statesman] with Y.O's article to C K Ogden … buy the I.S. for this week too

12 August 1929 Letters III (from Frank Crowninsheild, answers by JJ): … how long has Joyce been at this new book, (7 years. Since October 1922. Begun at Nice.) and how soon after Ulysses (1922) did he conceive it. (Eight months after publication of Ulysses) How long will it be,in words? (about 2/3 of it has appeared.) When will it be published? (I cannot say.) Who will publish it? ( ) Are the sketches in it to be consecutive and interrelated? (It is all consecutive and interrelated.) How is Joyce's health? (Health good enough. Eyes again very weak.) Where is he? (On holidays in Torquay (Devon) and London.)

UPLewis 13 August 1929:

Royal Hotel, Bristol

UPLewis 15 August 1929:

16 August 1929 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach):

20 August 1929 Stuart Gilbert (Stuart Gilbert diary): Torquay. The Great Man … Pleased to have two secretaries, Mrs. F. and me … Went through “Ondt” with him … J. collects girl's papers, Poppy's (?) paper, Peg's Journal etc. Has a wild idea of getting A.L.P. published in one complete number of these … J. observes (1) the heroine is fair, vilainess dark, (2) few references to food, except dainty things, choc, etc., (3) on great occasions the girl wears special dress or hat — she has only one good one. He sees that this differs from “Nausicaa”

Euston Hotel, London

UPLewis 18 August 1929:

UPLewis 22 August 1929:

UPLewis 28 August 1929:

13 September 1929 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I am coming back early next week, exhausted, penniless but in need of a holiday and need rest but I have accomplished a great deal as you will hear

2, Square Robiac, Paris

20 September 1929 Letters III (to Valery Larbaud): Have just got back here

22 September 1929 Letters I (to C.P. Curran): On my return here after a long holiday in England I found your thoughtful present [an 18th cent. painted woodcarving of the Arms of the City of Dublin]

25 September 1929 UP (NL MS 5754; to District Justice Flood): On coming back here after a three months' holiday in the south of England I found your letter and books. It was very good of you to remember me and no books could be more useful or interesting. My sight is so bad that they must be read to me but it will be a pleasure to hear them. You must allow me, however, upon occasion to return your courtesy.

13 October 1929 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): It has been a dreadful months work but I have only two days more of it.

19 October 1929 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver, typed): Do you think you could stand reading another sentence about my eye, because I don't think I could write it this evening having just knocked off work on the city piece … now that I have practically finished for the moment my work in progress (?) I am doubly disinclined to go [to lecture at Oxford] … I shall feel rather pleasantly stupid eight or ten days from now. The disc hasn't appeared yet.

19 October 1929 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver, typed): I have not stopped working yet But I had better send you off some news. Crosby Gaige's successor Wells wrote for another fragment and I am trying to leave the city piece fit to submit to his agent here. I have finished however the work for Transition and also my connection with the review as you will see by a note in it.

19 October 1929 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver, typed): I have finished however the work for Transition and also my connection with the review as you will see by a note in it.

22 November 1929 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver, typed): James Stephens was over here for a week. I saw him nearly every day and explained to him all about the book, at least a great deal, and he promised me that if I found it was madness to continue, in my condition, and saw no other way out, that he would devote himself heart and soul to the completion of it, that is the second part and the epilogue or fourth … I hope you like Transition and the use I have made of your book on the City churches

22 November 1929 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver, typed): I have been sleeping sixteen hours a day for the past three weeks incapable of reading, writing or speaking … I am no longer bound down by Transition but I have the Earwicker fragment still hovering over me. Where am I to get the energy within me or the manifold assistance outside to cope with this fragment for private publication at present I don't know.

12 December 1929 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver, typed): The negotiations with the Fountain Press, N.Y., which was to have brought me an advance of twentyfive thousand francs, one half for the fragment H.C.E. were held up by the financial panic following the Wall Street crash and a similar project with the Black Sun Press foundered yesterday when Crosby committed suicide in N.Y. … Curtius has published a book on me too

29 December 1929 Stuart Gilbert (Stuart Gilbert diary): J.J. is now all Sullivan … He does no other work apparently, has done none for a month

1930

2, Square Robiac

3 January 1930 NLFF (from Richard de la Mare): Mr Eliot's own copy of ALP sent to you with the proofs by mistake … return it to me … of course there is no need for you to correct the proofs yourself — unless you wish to make any actual alterations from the Crosbie Gaige text — because I will get the collation done here in this office.

End 1929 The end of '29 brought a call for help with Haveth Childers Everywhere. A large volume of Encyclopaedia Britannica—reading of the study—research in common usage. “Putzandow Cars” [added in draft 12++]. Regular work and walks. Joyce's departure for consultations with his oculist, Pagenstecher, in Wiesbaden [early April, 1930].

Early 1930 Our Friend James Joyce by Mary and Padraic Colum (Gloucester, Mass: Peter Smith, 1958) page 103: As I look over the text of Haveth Childers Everywhere, I come to “tendulcis tunes like water parted …” “Water parted,” I cried as I typed this passage. “You're drawing on Goldsmith, Joyce.”

Early 1930 Our Friend James Joyce by Mary and Padraic Colum (Gloucester, Mass: Peter Smith, 1958) page 100-101: Around 1929 [in fact, it was more likely early 1930] I had an opportunity of helping Joyce at his writing table. True, the help was slight, and there were others in his entourage who also lent a hand and a head. … The Joyces were living in Square Robiac then, and it was a relatively carefree time for all of them, it now seems to me, looking back on it. … Joyce was there alone, with Herbert Gorman. … “We've just worked your name into into Work in Progress,” Gorman announced. I made a suitable reply. (The name is in the book, but, I am forced to think, impersonally: “—The S.S. Paudraic's in the harbour.”)

27 January 1930 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Stuart Gilbert): First, about Mr J's sight — the ‘good’ eye is still inadequate for reading; but, strangely enough, the other is slowly coming into action … I think there is hope that in time he may be able to read with it … Meanwhile Mr J is spending busy days — launchina an opera singer! … For the time being Work in Progress does not progress but I hope Mr Joyce will soon have launched his singer at Covent Garden or the Metropole and return to H.C.E. and Missisliffi!

31 January 1930 (Stuart Gilbert diary): At last J.J. has recommenced work on W. in P. The de luxe edition by ? soon to come out — about the old lady A.L.P., I think. Another about the City (H.C.E. building Dublin). Five volumes of the Encyclopedia Brit. on his sofa. He has made a list of 30 towns, New York, Vienna, Budapest, etc. Mrs Fleischmann has read out the articles on some of these. I “finish” Vienna and read Christiania and Budapest, etc. When ever I come to a name (of a street, suburb, park, etc.) I pause. J. thinks. If he can Anglicise the the word, i.e. make a pun on it, Mrs F. records the name or its deformation in the notebook. Thus “Slotspark” (I think) at Christiania becomes Sluts' park. He collects all queer names, in this way and will soon have anotebook full of them … He is curled on his sofa, while I struggle with Danish or Rumanian names, pondering puns.

8 February 1930 (Stuart Gilbert diary): On Friday evening (7 February 1930) enter Miss Beach and Mr Kahane … to sign contract for another fragment

18 March 1930 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver, typed): … As a result of [Sullivan] and the revision of H C E, I am quite flattened out and in fact for the last two days having quite a series of miniature fainting fits, lasting only a few seconds … Miss Beach naturally feels that the book she has been waiting for and has helped me so much with, is not being energetically enough given to her by me … and my inclination to cease where I am and let someone else write the rest … I do not think that if I cease working there is much point in my continuing to live in Paris … as for my books it is useless to transport immense loads of what I cannot read so that I think I shall keep only the signed gift books and good old dictionaries

18 March 1930 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver, typed): I finished the revision of the fragment for publication last night at seven, and, I suspect, my literary career at the same time … A.L.P. is announced to appear on May 1st. I offered H.C.E. to the Fountain Press, successors to Crosby Gaige. They declined to pay the price asked, whereupon I gave it to Babou and Kahane of Paris, who will bring it out on the 12th of April. … When I ceased contributing to Transition I felt a sudden kind of drop as I was determined not to attack the second part in such an ill-equipped state (the revision of this last fragment has been a frightful job, extending over two months day and night sometimes till one in the morning, with seven different people helping me to do seven different parts of the labour, but of course such a condition of affairs could not continue)

St Gotthard Hotel, Zurich

9 April 1930 Zurich, (to Paul Léon, dictated, in French):
Pouvez-vous faire faire encore ces modifications du „Fragments“:
Pour „So help me Cash!“ lire „So, hump me Cash!“
Pour „my vonderbuilt hutch in sunmednht“ „my vonderbuilt hutch in sunsmidnought“
Pour „ediculous Passivucant“ „eilighs ediculous Passivucant“
Pour „the pick of Pim's etc“ „the peaks of Pim's etc“
aprés „Recent behaviour.“ inserez „Sherlook is lorkin for him.“
Avant „Noksat“ inserez „Per Peeler and Pawr!“ /
aprés „Mons Meg's Monthly“ inserez „Comes out aich Fanagan's wake“
Pour „everyday salmon“ „everadayde saumone“

11 April 1930 Tulsa (from Paul Léon): Many thanks for your letter in French (I think it better this way than to use an adjective) — I have found 6 of the corrections — cannot find “the peak of Pims” or “the Noksat” (or so it seems to me) after which “the Peeler and Pawr” have to come in — I am getting the third proofs tomorrow and promised them to Babou for “Mundai”. Further I found “Peace perfect peace” and “for Amiens peace sake” on the next page — what to do? would “pax's sake” do?

12 April 1930 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Lucia Joyce): … wire … to the Hotel Rose, Wiesbaden, Germany for which we leave on Monday (14 April 1930) where he is to be seen by the oculist

13? April 1930 Zurich unpublished (to Paul Léon, dictated, in German): … 1) [for] (demosthenated) [read] (domonsthrenated) 2) [for] (lairdie meiresses smuling) [read] (lairdie meiresses kiotowing and smuling)

Hotel Rose, Wiesbaden

16 April 1930 Letters III (from Lucia Joyce to Adrienne Monnier): (in French) … telephone Mr Paul Léon Littré 88-89 if it is still possible to change the word “ships” to “skivs” in the phrase “seamen. We segn your ships and wives.” … [Giorgio] should lend to Mr Léon the little black notebook containing all that has been published up to now of W. in P. which is in the cupboard beside his desk

18 April 1930 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Lucia Joyce): He finished his visits to Dr Pagenstecher to-day who confirms in every point the opinion of Dr Vogt of Zurich … He has arranged an appointment with Dr [?] Personne(?) the most famous eye doctor in Paris for Wednesday and unless his opinion is in reasonable contradiction he is inclined to return to Zurich as soon as possible for the 1st operation for which it seems special instruments have to be made. We expect to reach Paris on monday night

Paris

28 April 1930 (Stuart Gilbert diary): Two months [since last entry] … At the beginning of the month J.J. went first to Zurich then to Wiesbaden to “see” oculists. (Not back yet, I think) … For the latest fragment Haveth Childers Everywhere, J.J. had as volunteer workers Colum, Léon (a Russian lawyer) … and in less degree myself … Copenhagen, Budapest, Oslo, Rio I read to him. Unfortunately he made the entries in his black notebook himself and when he wanted to use them, the reader found them illegible. On the last day he inserted punnishly the names of 60 Lord Mayors of Dublin (taken from the Dublin Postal Directory of 1904). He has been depressed lately; perhaps the Sullivan campaign has not succeeded as well as he hoped

St Gotthard Hotel, Zurich

13 May 1930 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver, telegram re Operation):

23 May 1930 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Helen Fleischmann): … there is absolutely no news about his eye … he sees absolutely nothing with the eye. I arrived here last night from Paris … Lucia is home in my apartment

28 May 1930 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Helen Fleischmann): He would like you please to send him a book called “Sampson the Nazarite” just published by Martin Secker … he is very much bored with the stupid newspapers which seem to be the only thing we can find to read to him so is anxious to have this book the subject of which interests him

1 June 1930 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Helen Fleischmann): He also received the book I asked you to send and is very happy to have it and Mrs Joyce was reading it to him today and he seemed very much interested

4 June 1930 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Helen Fleischmann): Thank you for … the clippings about the McCormack film [Song of my heart] … Mr Joyce is leaving the clinic tomorrow and coming here to the Hotel. I think he will have to remain in Zurich however another week or ten days. Giorgio and I are going back to Paris tomorrow

2 Square Robiac

18 June 1930 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Nora Joyce): We got back here last night

22 June 1930 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Lucia Joyce): My father's sight gets better slowly every day. He says the enclosed explains the mystery of J.J. … He would like you to send him a guide to Wales as one cannot find one here in the time

23 June 1930 (Stuart Gilbert diary): He is back — vision slightly improved in the left eye. Visitied Dujardin with him.

30 June 1930 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from M. Moschos): Mr J Joyce … will arrive Wednesday morning (2 July 1930) in London

Grand Hotel, Llandudno

18 July 1930 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I wrote this all MYSELF

25 July 1930 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Glad to have your good news. Excuse this first attempt.

UPLewis 28 July 1930:

28 July 1930 Letters III (to Valery Larbaud): This is one of the first p.c's I have been able to write for about 2 years

Randolph Hotel, Oxford

1 August 1930 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): We are staying here over the bank holidays

3 August 1930 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver):

Les Golf Hôtels (Hôtel de la Plage), Étretat

1 September 1930 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver):

ca. September 1930 BLHW (from Nora Joyce): Paris was intolerable so we came here for a week

6 September 1930 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): Tuohy … committed suicide in New York. We shall remain here only a few days more … we had 9 days of unbroken sunlight … the manager is one Ramon Joyce … Portugese-French

9 September 1930 Letters III (to James B. Pinker): … ring up T.S. Eliot at Faber and Faber's … about his plan of publishing H.C.E. in the same miscellany. This should appear before the end of February 1931 as the fourth and final fragment is to be published in an edition de luxe as usual first in Paris here in April next, These fragments from what reviewers call Work in Progress really have no title but for convenience' sake a few words taken from the text have been put on the title page … I wrote all this letter with my own hand

2 Square Robiac, Paris

23 September 1930 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver, typed by Paul Léon)

26 September 1930 NLFF (from C.W. Stewart): We thank you for the signed agreement for Haveth Childers Everywhere.

27 September 1930 Letters I and BLHW (to Harriet Weaver, typed): I sent you some manuscripts which I found among old newspapers also some letters to Quinn which they want to publish. What is your attitude with regard to the last one. Before I reply to Dublin I should like to hear from you … Carducci, Darius Milhaud and Antheil are setting pieces for Hughes book … My sight continues to improve a wee-bit

1 October 1930 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): If Carducci's article is in the currect Music and Letters will you please send me 3 copies

5 October 1930 Letters III (to Mrs Herbert Gorman): [My wife's] idea now is to have a summer residence in London so as to avoid the hundreds of pounds I spend yearly in hotel bills there

22 October 1930 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I began to write the 2nd part on Sunday last — but with what labours! It is always like this when I start a fresh bout. I have exchanged my old machine for a Remington portable and hope to learn how to use it myself.

25 October 1930 Gilbert (Stuart Gilbert diary): I am no longer useful, as he has a permanently attached slave in Léon.

ca. November 1930 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I have written 1003 words, Lord knows how thay sound.

5 November 1930 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver, typed by JJ): I have got beyond the 1000 word mark but will not have the first draft of about 3ooo words ready for a good while yet … I am only learning [to type] and cannot see the keyboard so well by lamplight … saint GUy Fawkes' Day L93o

14 November 1930 (Stuart Gilbert diary): I rarely see J.J. now. He has started working again, but seems to go very slowly. About 8 pages (hand-written). He got me to play over to him a number of children's games (songs) in the Novello edition. His favourite is “Looby (?) Light”.

14 November 1930 NLFF (from Richard de la Mare to Sylvia Beach): We are sending you proofs of Mr James Joyce's HAVETH CHILDERS EVERYWHERE, as it is to appear in our Criterion Miscellany. Will you be so kind as to forward these to him for us?

17 November 1930 NLFF (from Richard de la Mare): Will you … let me know what colour you would like the cover of HAVETH CHILDERS EVERYWHERE to be?

22 November 1930 Selected Letters and BLHW (to Harriet Weaver, typed): (II.1§2.0; 47477:6-21) I enclose the final sheet of the first draft of about two thirds of the first section of Part II (2.200 words) which came out like drops of blood … I had to put off my journey to Zürich five different times but am leaving to-morrow with the Gormans and my wife … I think the piece I sent you is the gayest and lightest thing I have done in spite of the circumstances … The scheme of the piece I sent you is the game we used to call Angels and Devils or colours. The Angels, girls, are grouped behind the Angel, Shawn, and the Devil has to come over three times and ask for a colour, if the colour he asks for has been chosen by any girl she has to run and he tries to catch her. As far as I have written he has come twice and been twice baffled. The pice [sic] is full of rythms [sic] taken from English singing games. When first baffled vindictively he thinks of publishing blackmail stuff about his father, mother etc etc etc. The second time he maunders off into sentimental poetry of what I actually wrote at the age of none: “My cot alas that dear old shady home where oft in youthful sport I played, upon thy verdant grassy fields all day or lingered for a moment in thy bosom shade etc etc etc etc.” [47477:15] This is interrupted by a violent pang of tooth acke after which he throws a fit. When he is baffled a second time the girl angels sing a hymn of liberation round Shawn. The page enclosed [47477:21] is still another version of a beautiful sentence from Edgar Quinet which I already refashioned in Transition part one beginning since the days of Hiber and Hairyman etc. E.Q. says that the wild flowers on the ruins of Carthage Numancia etc. have survived the political rises and downfall of Empires. In this case the wild flowers are the lilts of children. Note especially the treatment of the double rainbow in which the iritic colours are first normal and then reversed.

Carlton Elite Hotel, Zurich

24 November 1930 NLFF (from T.S. Eliot to Sylvia Beach): Is Joyce Paris or Zurich please wire address writing

25 November 1930 NLFF (from Sylvia Beach to T.S. Eliot) Joyce Zurich Hotel Elite Carlton probably returning Paris Thursday (27 November 1930)

25 November 1930 Letters III (to Livia Svevo): I am here again seeing prof. Vogt … back in the spring for … operation

25 November 1930 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Nora Joyce): My husband saw the doctor … operation [not now but in] Spring

27 November 1930 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I am returning to Paris by the next train … Chuffy and Glugger are the boys' names for themselves

2 Square Robiac, Paris

30 November 1930 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver, large type): I shall try to complete the first draft of the games before Xmas and to finish the first section of part 2 before going to Zurich [in the Spring]

4 December 1930 NLFF (to FF): Your publication fragment must be postponed till April letter explains

22 December 1930 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver, large type): Mrs Colm has started a scheme with an American publisher for the issue of a Joyce anthology … I had no end of trouble betweeen Faber and Faber and Babou and Kahane. By an oversight on Miss Beach's part I signed over to the latter the exclusive rights for H.C.E. so that I had to hold F and F's book due this week but got permission to bring it out in April by giving B and K an option on the next fragment. I am still suffering from insomnia which is a dreadful bore and I will not be able to complete the first draft before the end of the year if even then. Gorman is engaged on a biography of me for which I have to supply copiously with information and I am also trying to explain to Miss Monnier's sister who knows no English the text of Chapelle D'Izzied (the next fragment) for which she is to do a hieroglyph [sic] preface … This machine is my new toy and that's my weakness now but the big one I gave Miss Monnier for it is the bane of her life … good wishes of a crispness nice

1931

2, Square Robiac, Paris

3 January 1931 Letters I (to George Antheil): I am quite content to go down to posterity as a scissors and paste man for that seems to me a harsh but not unjust description

25 January 1931 Letters I (Lucia Joyce to Livia Svevo): My father … suggests As a Man Grows Older or Goodbye, Deo Gratias … Or better he thinks Adieu Deo Gratias

29 January 1931 BLHW (Stuart Gilbert to Harriet Weaver): Mr Joyce asks me to transmit a brief communiqué … He has been suffering from rather acute insomnia lately … I'm glad to say Work in Progress is again in progress. Just now I've been reading to him long medieval homilies on angels (and devils), the gist of which will enter into the “Children's Games” section of W. in P. Others also are assisting, I hear

4 February 1931 NLFF (from Paul Léon to T.S. Eliot): He has been lately nervously exhausted on account … Sullivan … He is working at Part II but his eyes are still a great hindrance. Moreover the recent marriage of his son and the fact that he is changing his apartment have taken up a lot of his time.

16 February 1931 Letters I and BLHW (to Harriet Weaver, typed): I have sent away four fifths of my books keeping only dictionaries and books of references … I have been working a great deal at [the French A.L.P.] with Leon and Soupault … I have also been working with Gorman for his biography … I am also trying to conclude section 1 of Part II but such an amount of reading seems to be necessary before my old flying machine grumbles up into the air. Personally the only thing that encourages me is my belief that what I have written up to the present is a good deal better than any other first draft I made. My insomnia is better

18 February 1931 Letters I and BLHW (to Harriet Weaver, typed): BIFUR … owes me Frcs. 5.000 … Kahane who is separated from Babou came forward with a proposal to do 300 copies of my fourth fragment for which Miss Monnier's sister is preparing a pictorial preface. The fragment is to be called Chapelle d'Izzid and offered 60.000 francs but wanted an option on it for nothing … [at Sitwell meeting met Louis Gillet] … I enclose some rubbish I found in a sack, that lay in the house that Joyce leaves

1 March 1931 (Stuart Gilbert diary): To J.J. bi-weekly I read information concerning Angels and Devils (from Aquinas; Le Diable by Abbé ?; Waite's Magic [VI.B.33.45]) and play English children's singing games, German children's ditto, Dalcroze and French popular songs. He is obviously bored with the whole business, but they seem to be passing through a financial crisis

4 March 1931 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver, typed): … Trieste … lunatic … railway guard Kobletz … Janni Corte … to say nothing of arranging all my correspondence and notes and trying to follow with various readers the books I am using for the present fragment which include Marie Corelli, Swedenborg, St Thomas, the Sudanese war, Indian outcasts, Women under English Law, a description of St. Helena, Flammarion's The End of the World, scores of children's singing games from Germany, France, England and Italy and so on

4 March 1931 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver, typed): … to say nothing of arranging all my correspondence and notes and trying to follow with various readers the books I am using for the present fragment which include Marie Corelli, Swedenborg, St Thomas, the Sudanese war, Indian outcasts, Women under English Law, a description of St. Helena, Flammarion's The End of the World, scores of children's singing games from Germany, France, England and Italy and so on

4 March 1931 NLFF (from T.S. Eliot to Paul Léon): Ask … Babou … permission … one shilling edition of HAVETH CHILDERS EVERYWHERE … end of this month or beginning of April. Our publication date is Thursday.

10 March 1931 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I do not want to dictate [the rest of the letter-series] to Leon who [typed] the [previous letters]

11 March 1931 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver, typed): … Miss Monnier and Miss Beach have written to you to come over for the séance on the twentysixth which for all I know may celebrate the close of my Paris career, just as that of the 7th of December, 1921, opened it. … Gilbert is leaving Paris in a day or two for the south, so that I shall have nobody to help me with the reading except Léon who however, not having read a word I have written except the piece he revised for Babou, has no idea what the book is about or what I want. I take up some of my daughter-in-law's time trying to copy into one large book the worst of my illegibly scrawled notes.

11 March 1931 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver, typed): … McGreevy has also left Paris … My wife is now much opposed to the idea of leaving this place and going to London. Lucia also. She having given up dancing began to attend drawing classes and seems to have astonished her master by her designs … In reading a book on the legal position of women, I find that under Scots law I am legally married

29 March 1931 Letters III (to Michael Lennon, typed by JJ): I am moving from this address on the 10th prox.

Hotel Powers, Paris

11 April 1931 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): These few lines to let you know our address

17 April 1931 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I shall begin my fifth hegira on Sunday (19 April 1931) and hope to arrive in London Whittington-like that evg. (w.p.). Will you please reserve rooms for us at Garland's (Lucia comes too)

Terminus-Hôtel, Calais

23 April 1931 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Held up by the winds but hope to cross this afternoon … You and Miss Monnier are to read the cahier d'etudiant in the last parcel Paul Léon brought you and then pass it on to Giorgio. It ought to amuse you considerably.

Hotel Belgravia, London

UPLewis 24 April 1931:

25 April 1931 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): If Leon did not bring you by mistake a carnet noir in the last parcel I have lost the book in which I made all my notes for the children's games. Will you please look and if you find it forward registered. I sent you back the book on L. Carroll.

29 April 1931 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Book and cheque safely received.

5 May 1931 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I hope to write to [Mrs Colum] in a day or so on a subject which is most dear to her

7 May 1931 Letters III (to Ezra Pound): (typed by JJ) heterodaktylographically yours

28b Campden Grove, London

UPLewis 8 May 1931:

10 May 1931 Letters I (to Sylvia Beach): I have taken this tiny place at a low rent

11 May 1931 Letters III (to May Joyce Monaghan) My sight is a little better. I can write … but alas! cannot read.

7 July 1931 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I have spoken with Eliot and am agreeing to accept the written offer his firm has just made to acquire the rights of Work in Progress for £150 down on signing the contract. Terms 15%.

8 July 1931 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I had offered to lend [my nephew George, son of Charles] my typewriter to learn with and to give him £1 a week for helping me with my notes 3 hours a day … Eliot and Pinker are today arranging the contract terms for Work in Progress and I have offered American rights to Viking Press

13 July 1931 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): In addition to Faber's offer for W i P (£400 advance of 15% royalties rising to 20%) and Viking Press (£600 of 15% royalties) Harcourt Brace cabled yesterday they would pay £600. As I have to decide within a few days, pending two other American offers and two English ones, will you please let me know your views? Are you interested in publishing the book yourself?

15 July 1931 Letters I (to Adrienne Monnier): … l'anglais est: Lead, kindly fowl! etc. Or, la référence est à l'hymne fameux de Newman Lead, kindly light!

18 July 1931 Letters III (to Stanislaus Joyce): I had offered my nephew George who is workless £1 a week if he would help me with my notes from 2 to 5 pm every day but his stepmother (he is 21) took from him the Exagmination … etc etc … The affair as you know is clear as mock turtle. Having eloped with my present wife in 1904 she with my full connivance gave the name of Miss Gretta Greene … but … see Hargreave's Laws of England page 471-2

19 July 1931 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Harper's now offer advance of £750 of 15% royalties and Viking £850 of 15% royalties including a signed edition on special paper of 150 copies. Pinker says … Viking … If you disapprove of the Vikings offer wire me so early on Monday (20 July 1931) as I must sign or decline that afternoon … After production of lawbooks by Monro and an act of 1892 [the registrar] finally did officiate. While I was signing the roll the King was signing … the Marry-your-Aunt Bill … Marry-your-Wife Bill

31 July 1931 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver):

UPLewis 3 August 1931:

UPLewis 5 August 1931:

The Lord Warden Hotel, Dover

7 August 1931 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Just arrived here after long coastal journey.

N.D. August 1931 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach) Herewith the first proposed proofs of W i P

20 August 1931 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach):

28B Campden Grove, London

22 August 1931 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver):

27 August 1931 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): I am leaving London again for a short holiday on Saturday (29 August 1931)

27 August 1931 Letters III (to T.S. Eliot): What about my proofs and what has your sales manager done with my versicles?

Salisbury

31 August 1931 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach):

28B Campden Grove, London

UPLewis 1 September 1931:

6 September 1931 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver):

16 September 1931 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): We leave here in a few days

((in NLMS 16 February 1934 Pl says JJ must have left London on 24 September 1931))

Lord Warden Hotel, Dover

III ?17 September 1931:

ldquo;La Résidencerdquo;, Paris

27 September 1931 Selected Letters and BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): [if gen. elect.] the £ will come down to 60 … Will you please send me G.M.'s book?

1 October 1931 Letters III and BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Why doesn't W.L do something since the pounds gone ezra. Strange to say I am trying to write.

8 October 1931 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): My wife feels homesick for her Kensington flat (Grrr! Chickens from Backer's) … There was a long article in Harper's; in Huddleston's book, in Axel's Castle etc … Natheless I work all day, smiling unto mineself

2 Avenue S. Philibert, Paris

UPLewis 11 October 1931:

ca. 15 October 1931 Letters III (to T.S. Eliot): I have mislaid in moving here the proof you sent me. The opinion here is that it is good but the slightly larger and heavier one you spoke of sending would be better. Can I have a page? … I have started my work again as well as one can in rather uncertain circumstances.

17 October 1931 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I am working all day but without any help

26 October 1931 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): My eyes are too tired this evening as I scarcely lifted them from the paper since morning

27 October 1931 Letters III and BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I finished pulling together the first 8 episodes last night and as I am quite fatigued and it a splendid day Giorgio is taking us for a long country drive … To my great relief I find that much more of the book is done than I had hoped for

28 October 1931 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): During the winter will the MS of W.i.P. be accessible to you? I may have to ask you to consult it here and there

4 November 1931 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): PS. No. I did not want the printed transitions. These I have two copies of to work on. I wanted you to be able to get at the MS. There are several mistakes in printing and I don't remember what I wrote

19 November 1931 Letters III (to Stanislaus Joyce): Please return these samples of my daily mail by return

21 November 1931 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I [want to know when you expect to have access] to the MS of W.i.P. … I got Lucia (by a ruse) to make me elaborate capitals for the poems … Faber and Faber who were to have sent me a large type proof sent me on Nov. 20 … a proof pulled on Oct 16 which is identical with the proof pulled on 21 Sept. … I am stitching away like a cobbler

22 November 1931 Letters III (to T.S. Eliot): I was waiting for the proof promised me when we decided that the one pulled on 21 September was not clear enough. It has now (21 November) reached me and apparently was pulled on 16 October and is identical with that of 21 September, see enclosed. I suppose that ends the matter. Do you want to set up part I? If so, I could send it.

27 November 1931 Letters III and BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I am working very hard. Everything seems now to be well disposed … there has appeared in the Catholic World (N.Y.) an article — leader — on me which Colum and his wife say is so vulgar and scurrilous that they will not show it to me … Michael Lennon

7 December 1931 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I went out with Colum to see a film L'Afrique vous parle. I think I have done a good job for Lucia. She has made initial letters for P.P. on large sheets and I wrote the text

17 December 1931 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): T.S. Eliot has been appointed professor at Harvard and is to leave England next year. Good Lord! Have I to deal with those printers face to face?

18 December 1931 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): In the midst of all this Monro Saw write me they want 6d (sixpence) to give to the Insurance people who say they simply must have a look at my furniture every Saturday with a dark lantern

19 December 1931 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): In Living Authors Nicholson says he is the grandson of Archibald Hamilton Rowen, the Irish leader (from whom Richard Rowan and Archie in Exiles take their names.

22 December 1931 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Your letter and a violent tirade over the telephone came about the same time while I was trying to write out a funny piece of verse about those insurance people to the lilt of ‘Sing a Song of Sixpence’. Such is life. You will see I have used up some things that you told me about your aunt in the additions but this was not meant mockingly. We are all, au fond, foolish in one way or another

30 December 1931 BLHW (Padraic Colum to Harriet Weaver): James Joyce asked me to write and tell you that his father died last night in Dublin.

2 Avenue S. Philibert

1 January 1932 Letters I (to T.S. Eliot): I will prepare the end of Pt. I after a few days' rest.

1 January 1932 Letters III (to Ezra Pound): Extract from The Groves of blarney (Air: The Bells of Shandon) by Richard Milliken / And there's a stone there that whoever kisses / … / Extract from Work in Progress, Part I, section 6 (it is the second of the four masters, who here represents Munster, answering … [as in transition 6 except “and, sure, … leave … in theirafall braceletting”]

4 January 1932 BLHW (Stuart Gilbert to Harriet Weaver): I am going to Passy twice a week now to help in the progress of ‘W. in P,’ which is advancing rapidly.

6 January 1932 BLHW (Thomas McGreevey to Harriet Weaver, typed) Mr Joyce has some atropine in his eyes — there is nothing wrong with them, it is only precautionary … Everything seems to be now all right but it was only this evening that the confusion of the two drafts was cleared up

17 January 1932 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): The weeks since then have been passed in prostration of mind. Gilbert came here four or five times but I could not collect my thoughts or do anything. I am thinking of abandoning work altogether and leaving the thing unfinished with blanks. Worries and jealousies and my own mistakes. Why go on writing about a place I did not dare to go to at such a moment

28 January 1932 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): I forgot to say Jolas is bringing out a Transition number which is to be an attack on Goethe (whose centenary it is) and a homage to me … I also bargained that he should print passages from the three recent attacks on me by Lennon, O.G. and ‘One who knows him’.

6 February 1932 BLHW (letter destroyed by Harriet Weaver):

13 February 1932 Letters I (to T.S. Eliot): I am somewhat better and am trying to get on with my work.

15 February 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): (2 versions of Ecce Puer) (Grandson born)

28 February 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Paul Léon): Mr Joyce has been unwell this last week consequent upon a blast in his left eye

1 March 1932 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I am sorry to hear that Mr Joyce was rather unwell last week.

12 March 1932 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): Very many thanks for having sent me a copy of the new transition

13 March 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I have been working hard every day … I ought to go to Zurich, the cataract in the right eye being now total … I feel personally unworthy of your munificence, of my wife's constant devotion, of my father's lifelong and almost piteous pride but I feel quite worthy of Miss Beach's and Miss Monnier's friendship and interest

3 April 1932 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): (BaleruLarmpo) B is pronounced in modern Greek as V / U as y / M P is the only way they have for writing our B

9 April 1932 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver):

Hôtel Belmont, Paris

17 April 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver, typed): I am dictating this to Gilbert in his flat. I gave up my Passy flat on the 8th, but had to remain on till this morning … This morning we all went to the Gare du Nord … Lucia had a violent hysterical attack … the only thing to be done is abandon all attempt to keep up a residence in London … I have been working practically all day for some time past

7 May 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): As for W i P I cannot continue it for the moment … Not being allowed to do any work I put James Stephens's poem on the wind into French, Italian, German, Latin and Norwegian

2 Avenue S. Philibert

22 May 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): We are back here … Zurich impossible at present too.

22 May 1932 Letters III (to Constant Huntington): With regard to [Zeno] the only things I can suggest … are a preface by sir J.M. Barrie, author of My Lady Nicotine and …

31 May 1932 NLPK (from Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): He has also received a letter from Miss Sara Allgood, the actress, with a view to a public recitation or reading of Anna Livia Plurabelle by her at some London theatre

8 June 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): If you see T.S. Eliot will you explain to him it is impossible for me to do a thing in such circumstances [Lucia]

10 June 1932 NLGC (Paul Léon to Alf Bergan): Mr Joyce whose eyesight during the last few days has grown steadily worse … he would like to know if you could give him any more details about the matter you mention in the letter you addressed to him. I mean did his father desire only his and his wife's name to be engraved on the tombstone or those of the other members of his family which are buried in the same grave? What character is the tombstone to have religious or otherwise?

14 June 1932 NLGC (Alf Bergan to Paul Léon): As far as I could gather I think deceased meant that only his and his wife's names should be on the tombstone, but he was not definite about it. Neither did he indicate what character the tombstone was to have, but appeared to leave the matter entirely to your client's discretion. (On back in Paul Léon hand: “In Loving Memory / of / John Stanislaus Joyce, of Cork / born 4 July 1879 dies 29 December 1931 / and of his wife / Mary Jane of Dublin / born 15 May 1869 died 13 August 1903 / R.I.P.” Sent 6th December 1932)

20 June 1932 Letters I (to T.S. Eliot): I worked all the winter and I wish I could go on.

25 June 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): [Lucia] bought 3 books … One of these is Don't be Tired (all about nerves), the second is a theological treatise about the creator and the third a book supposed to be written in La Salpetrière hospital (the Paris Bedlam) describing very minutely a case of progressive madness which ends in the subject scooping out his own grave and penning his own epitaph … Miss Beach … has a footballing female now (to replace the oriental Miss Moschos) whom I should not care to encounter on a dark road at night … Lucia's book will appear on the 15 August … By the way [McGreevey] and Beckett have kept off the grass completely for the last 6 weeks … Of course I cannot write a line in such circumstances but I hope to be able to do so if I get somewhere on the lake of Zurich though it is no ideal place to spend a Summer

Carlton Elite Hotel, Zurich

7 July 1932 NLMS (from Paul Léon to Messrs Monro Saw): Mr Joyce who left yesterday for Zürich … where his address will be c/o Mr Georges Borach, 21 Bellerive strasse)

NLPL 7 July 1932

10 July 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver):

10 July 1932 UP (Maria Jolas to Harriet Weaver):

12 July 1932 Letters III (to Paul Léon): Vogt saw my eyes on Monday 10 July. (10 July was a Sunday) He says I should have come to him before and is afraid it is now too late … or attempt two very difficult operations in succession, the first early in September. In the latter course I may have to face a 5-6 months residence in Switzerland. This means a total cessation of work

13 July 1932 Letters I (to T.S. Eliot): What am I to do about my book? Of course I can always refund the advance if I have to abandon it. But I want to finish it. Impossible to write in such circumstances … I really do not know what to do about W.i.P.

14 July 1932 NLPK (fromPaul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): All during the last three months or more he has been in a terrible state under the influence of his daughter's health who is suffering from a severe break down … Mr Joyce is at present in Zürich — Carlton Elite hotel … The news about Mr Joyce's eyesight are not comforting lately

20 July 1932 NLPL (to Paul Léon): If you write to me please type your letter … I have written to Faber and Faber offering to pay back the £150 advance of royalties on W.i.P. and cancel the contract. The news today from Feldkirch is better but … writing seems out of the question.

21 July 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Today's news from Germany will probably upset my wife … In all this muddle I wrote to Eliot, offering to refund the £150 advanced on Work in Progress and cancel the contract … who could work in such a whirl of worries

22 July 1932 Letters I (to Stuart Gilbert): I showed Beckett's acrostic to Mr and Mrs Jolas

22 July 1932 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): My father sent me a message by a friend in the curious roundabout delicate and allusive way he had in spite of all his elaborate curses (he is quoted on the jacket of an amusing book Lars Porsena or The Future of Swearing) that if I thought fit he would like a tombstone to be placed on his grave bearing the names of himself and my mother

23 July 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Also from F and F who ask me to postpone for 6 months. To attempt to write in present (or future?) circumstances would mean writing for money. The only writing for money I can do is letters to you or MS and Co

27 July 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): F and F have written again asking me to wait … And I am the bloke what was trying to write a youmorose book abaht things in genal

29 July 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Monday (1 August 1932) is the Swiss national holiday as it happens to be S. Lubbock's Day in England too

31 July 1932 NLPL (to Paul Léon, typed): Vogt operated with success on sir James Frazer aged 75

4 August 1932 NLPK (from J. Ralph Pinker to Paul Léon): As far as we can find put there have been no readings by Miss Allgood.

5 August 1932 Selected Letters (to Alf Bergan): It was very kind of you to act as you did about poor Pappie's will and … tombstone

8 August 1932 Letters III (to Lucia Joyce): I could perhaps work with Jolas down there. That's an idea.

ca. 8 August 1932 NLPL (to Paul Léon): The eye is better. Lucia and my wife phone all the time for me to go down there and WORK with Jolas. I spent afternoon with the girl here looking for my notebooks but they have all disappeared.

UPLewis 12 August 1932:

Hotel zum Löwen, Feldkirch

15 August 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I got off and am here … [Lucia] has done lettrines up to “N”. Can you find out if Clodd's Story of the Alphabet can be obtained.

17 August 1932 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Please send me registered the brown carnet and/or any others you may have. Mrs Jolas leaves for Paris.

17 August 1932 Letters III (to Stanislaus Joyce): When you get back to T. can you get Lucia La Storia dellla Scrittura or dell'Alfabeto (Biblioteca del Popolo, Sonzogno) 15c She is doing an alphabet for another book.

Liechenstein

UPLewis 18 August 1932:

Hotel zum Löwen, Feldkirch

UPLewis 22 August 1932

UPLewis 26 August 1932:

28 August 1932 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Will you please send me by return the carnet I left in your house … I am trying to paint up section I of Prt II for October transition in order to repay the Jolases for their kindness … I got Gilbert to open one of my boxes in Passy and send me 15 other carnets.

29 August 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): A.B.C and papers recd. Trying to work in impossible circumstances. Please send 1 Studio to Léon and 1 to me.

30 August 1932 NLPL (from Paul Léon to JJ): Will send you carnet today. I have besides quite a number of them bound in one bundle which you said you did not want for the present. What about them?

3 September 1932 NLPL (to Paul Léon): I am still waiting for that notebook. Please keep the others. How many are there? … I return to Z'ch on Thursday probably (8 September 1932) … The Jolases will be back in Paris on Friday. (9 September 1932)

6 September 1932 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): We leave for Z'ch tomorrow … I have been working all day since I came here. It is a risk to present myself to the writing public (for those are my readers) after some years and in such a whirl. But I will do it. By the next post you will get the first proof (unfinished) which please read and return to Mrs Jolas. As regards blame every young writer in the world blames me for having written U. So Jolas says, anyhow

8 September 1932 NLPK (from Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): In the last Sunday Express (4 September 1932) you must have seen a great publicity article about Miss Sara Allgood … take the necessary steps in case she thinks it unnecessary to apply to you before giving her evenings.

8 September 1932 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Returning Z'ch today. Got the carnet. Will remain about a week and shall then be dropped off to Nice.

8 September 1932 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Returning to Zurich. Address. Elite Hotel, for about 6 days.

Carlton Elite Hotel, Zurich

ca. September 1932 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Have had slight eye attack — better today. My wife is in Feldkirch.

14 September 1932 NLPL (to Paul Léon): I leave for Nice in a few days.

Hotel Metropole, Nice

20 September 1932 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Thanks for the words.

22 September 1932 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): We are all here … I am busy trying to get on alone with W i P for transition

26 September 1932 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Vogt … operation too difficult … I have to go back to Zurich every 3 months for the next year and a quarter … This summer like the beard of Polonius is far too long. I have been trying to work for the new Transition

2 October 1932 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Please forward Dr Jung's article to Miss Weaver when read … Thanks for the words, all used.

2 October 1932 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): You will receive a copy of Jung's curious letter of apology about his article on me … I am trying to work but have no proofs and nobody to help me.

5 October 1932 Selected Letters (to W.B. Yeats): [No to] the Academy of Irish Letters (if that is its title)

10 October 1932 UP (to Harriet Weaver): … The Dutch printer is so delighted with what he doesn't understand of W i P that he offers me 40% (!) if I will let him bring out the fragment like A.L.P.

10 October 1932 UP (to Harriet Weaver): My cahier being overcrowded I want to get rid of the enclosed waste paper. Can you spend a quarter of an hour in the Brit. Museum and get me the enclosed words. I am cut off from all my books … I am trying to work … The Dutch printer is so delighted with what he doesn't understand of W i P that he offers me 40% (!) if I will let him bring out the fragment like A.L.P. … Irish Words for / rainbow / angel / blue / orange / green / violet / indigo / dumb / curtain / sailor / Lord / peace / sleep / game / children / The only letters in the Irish alphabet to confuse you are Ᵹ = g / ꞅ = s / Please do not forget the pips, e.g. b = b / ḃ = v etc / P.S. I have Goethe's book in German.

14 October 1932 NLGC (from Eugene Jolas to Paul Léon): I am rushing to get the number to press.

17 October 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I will send you the last of the MS that encumbers my table tomorrow … Now I must get at those proofs … Thanks for the words … we could leave on Sunday [23 October 1932]

17 October 1932 NLPL (from Paul Léon to JJ): I am trying to append what is supposed to be the gist of the Anzeige of Goethe's Farbenlehre. I am under the impression that grosso modo it will do except a few addition as for instance the one about the Regenbogen. Anyhow your edition is not complete it contains merely the DIDAKTISCHEN TEIL. The POLEMISHER Teil and the Historischer Teil both lack.

18 October 1932 Letters III (to Alf Bergan): We will be leaving here in a few days for Orange

18 October 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Leaving Nice tomorrow.

??Orange

Hotel Lord Byron, Paris

21 October 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I was rushed out of Nice … My wife is to look for a flat and I am to write … [Kahane] was speaking of throwing on the market as a remainder the 100 odd copies of H.C.E. unless I buy them

22 October 1932 Letters III (to Georg Goyert): I can write my own writing but cannot read anybody else's! … I am trying to work

23 October 1932 Beach Letters (to Sylvia Beach): Can you lend me a complete Chaucer for a few days … Mine is locked up. I want to read his poem ABC

31 October 1932 NLPK(from Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): As they are printing only two tales the title should be TWO TALES TOLD BY SHEM AND SHAUN … subtitle FROM WORK IN PROGRESS

31 October 1932 Letters I (Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): Mr Joyce was pleased with the arrangement you have made … the title should be Two Tales of Shem and Shaun

9 November 1932 NLFF (from F.V. Morely): TWO TALES … the long delay in arranging for this book is partly my fault for not having a copy of the original. As to proofs I have arranged to have them collated with the Black Sun edition, word for word, by two separate readers, and plan to check them also word for word myself. Will that be all right? Simultaneously and at the same price (2/6) we plan to publish Eliot's fragments of SWEENEY AGONISTES … for Christmas.

10 November 1932 Letters III (to F.V. Morley): As you see I can write. Unfortunately I cannot read except with a very strong magnifying glass. I went to Zurich in July and Professor Vogt …. found that my sight had somewhat improved … I am glad to hear you are bringing out another fragment of W. i P.

11 November 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): No trace of the MS. Your bundle of notes came safely. Jolas is afraid some unscrupulous person may have the MS and wants me to complete the instalment without delay. I typed the last four pages from memory and shall have to start again on the notes tomorrow with what calm you can imagine. Unforunately Stuart Gilbert cannot help me. The Albatross Press flung the whole printed test of Ulysses (about 900 pp) into his hall yesterday and he has to check it … Faber and Faber are bringing out for Xmas ‘The Mookse’ and ‘The Ondt’ … Reece … liked her alphabet and has written to the manager of Burns and Oates about using these lettrines for a reprint of Chaucer's A.B.C. poem … Reece lent Lucia a stack of books about this kind of work … Jolas has just come so I must go down.

11 November 1932 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): No trace of the MS. Your bundle of notes came safely. Jolas is afraid some unscrupulous person may have the MS and wants me to complete the instalment without delay. I typed the last four pages from memory and shall have to start again on the notes tomorrow with what calm you can imagine. … Jolas has just come so I must go down.

Hotel Lenox, Paris

17 November 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Faber and Faber will also bring out the 2 Tales of S and S in a week or so, and the Servire Press, The Hague, want to do the transition instalment. No trace of the MS. Thanks for the notes. I shall try to make something of this today with Stuart Gilbert

17 November 1932 NLSP (from Paul Léon to Carolus Verhulst of the Servire Press): I beg to acknowledge receipt of your letters addressed to me concerning the fragment Mr Joyce is publishing in the coming number of Transition … forwarded your letters to Mr Pinker … I hope he will find his way to arrange for a publication of a deluxe edition as planned by you.

17 November 1932 NLFF (from Paul Léon to F.V. Morely): I have had two applications from the Servire Press editors of Transition asking for the right to publish in a deluxe edition of the new fragment of Work in Progress.

17 November 1932 NLPK (from Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): Servire Press … The fragment in question is the one to be published shortly in the coming number of TRANSITION — it is I believe some 40 pages.

21 November 1932 NLPK (from J. Ralph Pinker to Paul Léon): in my opinion it would not be a good thing to allow the Servire Press at this juncture to publish any further extracts from Work in Progress … You see, if an edition is published on the Continent the American copyright is lost.

22 November 1932 NLFF (from F.V. Morely to Paul Léon): Faber … should be consulted

23 November 1932 NLFF (from Paul Léon to F.V. Morely): … the fragment … exists for the moment only in proofs and the number of Transition in which it is to come out will not be ready for another month or so

23 November 1932 NLPK (from Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): I cannot however send you any parts of the fragment since the number will not be out for another month or so.

24 November 1932 NLPK (from J. Ralph Pinker to Paul Léon): Will you please send me as soon as possible copy of the manuscript of what will form the instalment in “Transition”.

42 rue Galilée, Paris

25 November 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver, typed): The MS never turned up. However I set to work on the notes you kindly sent over and patched it all up again. I fired them off in envelopes which I hope you got safely. I have also written an intervening passage and hope to complete the whole fragment tomorrow or next day. Faber and Faber do not want the dutch press to bring it out in a deluxe edition as they want to have an option on it first. It may be possible as Leon suggests to combine the two firms' offers though personally I doubt whether an English publishing firm would agree to put its imprint on types set up on the continent. I am rather puzzlled by the evident anxiety of F. & F. to bring out chunks of my gibberish but evidently there is some demand for it. We moved into the above address a few days ago … I made it a condition with either F. & F. and the Dutch firm that in case of the editing of the fragment there should be an initial and a tail piece

25 November 1932 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver, typed): I have also written an intervening passage and hope to complete the whole fragment tomorrow or next day.

25 November 1932 HRHRC (to Stuart Gilbert, dictated): Dear Gilbert, Can you please type and return this [passage “Creedless ... Lucanhof.”] it comes between the words “stop” [and the paragraph beginning “Was he Pitssched”.
Also in this same paragraph after the words “Was he”; please insert “as certain have dognosed of him” and in the sentence which ends with the words “Clio's clippings” insert at a suitable place the words “as might occur to anyone”. This brings the piece down to the unfinished sentence ending with the words “Our river” [255.11] I hope to finish it tomorrow and to add another paragraph which will link up the final two pages. After which may the devil take me and it.

9 December 1932 NLFF (from F.V. Morely to Paul Léon): would be glad to see the text of the new fragment … Should there be a spare set of the proofs that would serve quite adequately

12 December 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Paul Léon): The only strength [Mr Joyce] … is his work which he continues through thick and thin every afternoon

14 December 1932 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Paul Léon): Mr Joyce … is alone in his opinion that his daughter should be kept home … last week he had two lachrymose collapses … He had two simultaneous offers for the deluxe publication of the new fragment from Transition

27 December 1932 NLPK (Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): I am still waiting for the proofs of the new fragment which have not reached me yet … You can absolutely reassure your brother and Huebsch since all the fragments published up to now i.e. ALP, HCE, the Two Tales and the new one will constitute in all not more than a hundred pages and this is about one twentieth of the entire book

28 December 1932 NLSP (from Carolus Verhulst of the Servire Press to JJ): I should like to suggest 10% … of the sales as her share of the profits and 30% … as your own.

1933

42 rue de Galilée, Paris

2 January 1933 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver, typed by P.L) I had a long by others foreseen nervous collapse on Saturday (31 December 1932) … it seems to have temporarily greatly weakened my sight … Indo-Chinese prince … Rene Ulysse … hallucinations of the ear (how I deserve that!)

3 January 1933 NLPK (from Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): I am also enclosing the final proofs of the new fragment of which I am sending a copy to Mr Morley as he requested me to do so … I have heard nothing from the Servire Press for the moment, have you? … Please kindly note that two of your copies of proofs are corrected. The copy I sent to Messrs Faber and Faber is not. Will you please therefore communicate to them the corrected text as in your possession should they decide on a publication.

3 January 1933 NLFF (from Paul Léon to FF): At Mr Morley's request I am enclosing a copy of the proofs of the new fragment to be published shortly in TRANSITION …. Please note that this is an uncorrected text — the text as corrected is in Mr Pinker's hands and I have asked him to communicate to you the corrections.

4 January 1933 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver from Paul Léon): Mr Joyce … the situation has to a great extent exhausted him both physically and morally. He tries to react by working very hard, at least as much as he has the chance, but I have seen him suffering so deeply and with such disastrous effects on his strength that my impression is that he is sometimes at the end of his forces

5 January 1933 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I am glad to hear that he clings to his work so far as he can as a relief from the exhausting strain of the situation … Many thanks for having sent … from time to time pages of his MS, including the three enclosed with your present letter.

6 January 1933 NLPK (from J. Ralph Pinker to Paul Léon): Thank you also for the proofs … I have sent one copy to New York on to-day's mail.

10 January 1933 NLPK (from J. Ralph Pinker to Paul Léon): I have been to see Mr Morley of Faber and Faber and he is quite willing to bring out a limited edition of the new fragment from Work in Progress but before making any suggestion with regard to terms, etc, he wishes to wait and hear whether the Viking Press are willing to collaborate in such an edition.

23 January 1933 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): {telegraph) wreath .. George Moore

29 January 1933 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): A letter from Paris, if posted by 5 p.m. is delivered here by 8.30 the following morning.

3 February 1933 GILLET (memoir): Last year, of course, nothing could be done. When one lives in such anxiety and such distress … it's easy to say: shut yourself up and work. But when your art and your life are one, when they are interwoven in the same fabric, as in my case, there you are

4 February 1933 NLGC (Alf Bergan to Paul Léon): I have just heard from Messrs Harrison Sculptors that they have erected the Headstone.

5 February 1933 UP (to Harriet Weaver from Myrsine Moschos): He is considerably better but is obliged to take another week of rest and relaxation.

7 February 1933 NLPK (from J. Ralph Pinker to Paul Léon): Huebsch believes that Joyce and everyone concerned will do better in the long run by not putting out these little bits of books but holding everything with a view to making a really big explosion with the complete book when it comes out.

12 February 1933 NLSP (from Paul Léon to Carolus Verhulst of the Servire Press): Would you kindly on publication of the coming number of Transition send two copies of it with exact date of publication to Mr Joyce … and also a tirage à part of his fragment which he needs to keep for his work and for which it would be a pity to spoil a complete number. I cannot yet give you a definite answer about a separate publication of the fragment.

17 February 1933 NLSP (from Carolus Verhulst of the Servire Press to Paul Léon): TRANSITION number 22 … exact date of publication is February 28th. Under separate cover I am sending you one tirage à part of your fragment, to keep it for your work.

18 February 1933 NLPK (from Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): I hear that the Transition number is en route and will be for sale either next week or the week after.

TRANSITION 22 (II.1): published Feb 21 1933.

27 February 1933 NLPK (from J. Ralph Pinker to Paul Léon): I note that you are sending me two copies of “transition” for American copyrighting.

10 March 1933 NLFF (from F.V. Morely): Received of Miss Harriet Weaver, on behalf of Mr James Joyce, the first eight episodes of Work In Progress, constituting Part I of the whole.

12 March 1933 NLFF (from Paul Léon to F.V. Morely): Miss Weaver has most probably handed to you the MS of the first part of Work in Progress and Mr Joyce asks me to write to you to forward the enclosed sample of an edition of Mr Rémy de Gourmont's work the type of which pleases him especially. It is I believe a type of Elzevir or some derivation of it and I am sure that should you be able to obtain some similar character it would please Mr Joyce very much indeed.

12 March 1933 NLFF (from Paul Léon to F.V. Morely): Have you come to any decision about the New Fragment of W.i.P. Mr Pinker approached you about?

14 March 1933 NLPK (from J. Ralph Pinker to Paul Léon): Faber and Faber … have decided not to issue a limited edition of the latest fragment … we are now free to take up the matter with the Servire Press.

14 March 1933 NLPK (from Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): I have written to Mr Morley asking for some corrections to be made in the event of a new printing of ALP and HCE but I will not bother you with these details as they can be done direct.

14 March 1933 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): Mr Joyce … very pale indeed … still extremely nervous … He has started work on overhauling the fragments of the second part and I do think that work will take his mind from his family affairs.

16 March 1933 NLFF (from F.V. Morely to Paul Léon): We had better leave the limited edition to the Servire Press … We are anxious that we should be allowed to do a cheap edition … in due course.

16 March 1933 NLSP (from Carolus Verhulst of the Servire Press to Paul Léon): We have sent … a separate print of Vander Pyl's article to Mr Joyce.

17 March 1933 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver from Paul Léon): Hull Daily Mail [copies] … What [Mr Joyce] needs principally is I firmly believe some absolute rest and this he is not only not getting now but seems to despair of getting ever … The visit to Zurich is necessary … About Mr Budgen — for completion of his book he must go to Dublin in order to paint Chapel Izod (I am not sure of my spelling) the source of the Liffey to illustrate his book

20 March 1933 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): Please always write frankly. I shall take nothing in bad part. I deserve any hard thoughts anyone can harbour against me. You are yourself the greatest stand-by to Mr Joyce at this time.

21 March 1933 Letters I (to W.K. Magee): I have been wretchedly, though not gravely, ill

23 March 1933 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver from Paul Léon): All these bad thoughts are due in a small degree to the fact that he is yet unable to concentrate his mind on his work … For I do think Mr Joyce belongs to his work and unless he is able to do it he will not get well

27 March 1933 NLPK (from Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): Servire Press … I think we can agree to the terms … Miss Joyce is going to do the capitals in the next few days.

2 April 1933 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): Messrs Monro Saw sent in their account yesterday … his monthly income will be reduced as from next month by more than a third i.e. it will be £45 … This has dealt a very serious blow at Mr Joyce … very pessimistic giving up any hope to go to Zurich at all or even continuing to write, and work on his book … The voyage to Zurich is indispensable Mr Joyce will not bring himself to work until and unless he has taken Dr Vogt's opinion. Secondly you know as well as I do the character of his work the difficulties of it the repeated lapses into loss of confidence which they provoke in him. Considering all this I am afraid that he does not get not only sufficient but even enough encouragement from his immediate surroundings.

3 April 1933 NLPK (from Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): Would you also kindly add … that the type they have chosen for the Transition fragment as published is entirely different from the one in the first proofs (a copy of which I sent to you or to Mr Morley) and has met with a chorus of universal disapproval as being too blurred and difficult to decipher.

16 April 1933 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): Mr Joyce … a very painful attack of colitis … He seems to have got into his mind that his health is definitely wrecked and his sight never to be repaired … he himself does nothing … to try and get started on his work.

24 April 1933 NLPK (from J. Ralph Pinker to Paul Léon): Servire Press … plan to publish this edition at the end of this year but they cannot absolutely guarantee this … ask if Mr Joyce wants to make any alterations in the fragment and what title he will select for it … propose to use the type as used in the enclosed circular.

25 April 1933 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver from Paul Léon): On Friday night (21 April 1933) Mr Joyce suffered from a very bad attack of colitis … If I were to describe his state today I would call it that of a listless disgust and apathy in connection with the most vital problems of his life and work. The latter is not even considered today and whenever I mention the subject Mr Joyce merely waves his hand in despair and resignation … He has arranged to stay in the flat until the 15th of May … His usual remark is ‘let everything go to pieces’

4 May 1933 NLPK (from J. Ralph Pinker to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of the 1st inst. I note what you say with regard to the printing of the fragment.

4 May 1933 Letters III (to Valery Larbaud): I wondered whether your flat would be rentible during June-August. I should like a small quiet flat to work in all the summer while my wife is house-hunting and then to move into fixed quarters about September

7 May 1933 Letters III (Paul Léon to Frank Budgen): I sent you by request a volume about dreams which I should like to have back however as I should like to read it myself … will send you … play by André Obey … LOIRE, the chief character is Anna de la Loire and her five daughters — tributaries. You will find the resemblance very striking in many parts … If you will send me registered your chapter on W.i.P. it will be read and commented upon … As regards the Nausicaa chapter you will receive a ponderous volume of some six hundred large pages on the origin and history of what he chooses to call ‘Le Manteau de Tanit’

8 May 1933 NLSB (from Sylvia Beach): March 25 Martin Chuzzlewit 10,00 / March 30 Yeats' Poems 36,00

20 May 1933 NLMS (from Paul Léon to Messrs Monro Saw): As in all probability Mr Joyce will leave with his family for Zürich on Monday. (22 May 1933)

22 May 1933 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): Mr Joyce asked me to send you for safe keeping the receipt I received for Mr Morley of Messrs Faber and Faber for the corrected episodes of Work in Progress that I delivered up to him in March.

Hotel Habis, Zurich

24 May 1933 NLPL to Paul Léon): Greetings

29 May 1933 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I shall send tomorrow a report of first 2 consultations with Vogt.

UPLewis 31 May 1933:

42, rue Galileé, Paris

UPLewis 19 June 1933:

20 June 1933 NLPK (from Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): As far as the title is concerned since all the fragments have really no titles but merely quotations of several words I think Mr Joyce has made up his mind to choose a quotation for this one too. The title will then be “THE MIME OF MICK, NICK AND THE MAGGIES”.

23 June 1933 NLGC (from Budgen to JJ): Many thanks for the information about the Altkatholikka Kirke, Paul Suter's wife is or was of that confession … In describing (briefly) our visit to the island of Lady St. Leger could I bring in her name?

UPLewis 23 June 1933:

Le Grand Hotel, Évian-les-Bains

4 July 1933 NLPL (to Paul Léon): GRAND HOTEL

6 July 1933 Letters III (to Stanislaus Joyce): We stay here a few weeks and then go to Zurich for August.

6 July 1933 NLPL (from Paul Léon to JJ): I have also received from Budgen two books which I am keeping (Breton and German Catholic prayer book) … I have taken the valise with books home so that I have them both here now (the second from rue Galilée)

6 July 1933 NLPL (from Paul Léon to JJ): Enclosed the copy of Quinet's quotation from your notebook. Possibly N09 (VI.B.1).084(g).

7 July 1933 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Frank Budgen … has not got the books from Basel on Music and Letters.

7 July 1933 NLPL (to Paul Léon): I have telephoned to Edmond Jaloux in Lausanne and we go there on Monday (10 July 1933) … Thanks for the E.Q. piece. Please verify it chez moi etc chez lui. Is it ‘rianti’ or ‘fraiches et riantes’? … Now I shall go up and write but I have a nice old pain coming on.

7 July 1933 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I am glad … that he had been able to work in Paris and to make a start at Evian.

9 July 1933 NLPL (to Paul Léon): However, I go on with the damn thing. Yesterday I walked 8 km by myself. I have also worked, as well as I could, about 3½ hours per day.

UPLewis 10 July 1933:

Grand Hôtel de Russie, Geneva

12 July 1933 NLPL (to Paul Léon):

UPLewis 13 July 1933:

St Gotthard Hotel, Zurich

17 July 1933 Letters I (to Frank Budgen): Am back here in the city of S.S. Felix and Regula (= Prosperity and Order) … Allude to the Baroness S.L [St Leger] as the Lady of the Lake … She gave me a whole trunk full of stuff which I used largely in Circe

18 July 1933 NLGC (from Budgen to Paul Léon): Many thanks for three copies of Der Katholik

19 July 1933 NLGC (from Budgen to JJ): To the last chapter W.i.P. I am adding a page or two on Chapelizod where I bring in Shem and Shaun and the Maggies and the twelve as well as the bigman landlord of the Mullingar Inn. Mr Kernan, by the way, is a Scowegian looking man. One never knows whether he is scowling or laughing. I have read Lefanu's “The House by the Churchyard”. I shall bring in somehow the ”Stalworth Elm”. There's a good bit too by Devereux on the river but I shall leave that out. How to end it I don't quite know but I must know before Saturday. (22 July 1933)

19 July 1933 NLPL (to Paul Léon): We return probably to Paris on Sunday (23 July 1933) … prof. Fehr … has not received the pamphlet Das Wort by Rudolf Leonard (the man who was helping to translate A.L.P. into German with Goyert)

NLFF 19 July 1933 (from Faber and Faber) sent copy of TWO TALES to George Goyert

Hotel Habis Royal, Zurich

23 July 1933 NLPL (to Paul Léon):

Hôtel Richemond, Geneva

31 July 1933 NLPL (to Paul Léon): HOTEL RICHMOND

31 July 1933 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): The money reached Mr Joyce in time to leave Zurich on Sunday morning (30 July 1933) for Nyon.

13 August 1933 Letters III (to Stanislaus Joyce): I got your wire of 2 August but no letter since then … I ask because the crétin of a concierge in Z'ch has misdirected half my mail

28 August 1933 Letters III (to Frank Budgen): Friday 1 September is Miss Weaver's birthday … [for the frame] bog oak … It is a lustreless black fossil wood

42 rue de la Galilée, Paris

3 September 1933 Selected Letters (Lucia Joyce to Frank Budgen): The frase of the latin mass which you could not read is on Ulysses page I. The old catholics Augustiner Kirche are a good example of a Mooks gone Gripes. They separated from Rome in 71 when the infallibility of the pope was proclaimed a Dogma but they have since gone much more apart. They have abolished auricular confession they have the eucarist under two species but the faithful received the cup only at Whitsun. I see no prayers to the B V M or the saints in their prayer book and no image of her or them around the church. But most important of all they have abolished the Filioque clause in the creed concerning which there has been a schism between western and eastern christendom for over a thousand years, Rome saying the Holy Ghost proceeds from the father and the son. Greece and Russia and the East Orthodox churches that the procession is from the father alone, ex patre without Filioque. Of course the dogmas proclaimed by Rome after the split are not recognised by the east such as the Immaculate conception. See the Mooks and the Gripes that is West and east, paragraph beginning when that Mooksius and ending Phioquus. All the grotesque words in this are russian or greek for the three principal dogmas which separate Shem from Shaun. When he gets A and B on to his lap C slides off and when he has C and A he loses hold of B.

4 September 1933 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): Mr Joyce suffered a bad collapse Wednesday morning last (30 August 1933) and has been in bed ever since.

10 September 1933 Letters I (to Frank Budgen): Please bring with you or send me Lefanu's book. I want to see something in it. My own copy is in the garde-meuble

12 September 1933 NLGC (from Frank Budgen to JJ): It's very kind of Gilbert to read the proofs … Thanks for the Irish paper. I had of course seen the news item in the D. Telegraph … I walked near it on my way to Chapelizod one day … If I can get down to town myself I will have Lefanu's book sent to you.

23 September 1933 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver from Paul Léon): Mr Joyce returned … three weeks ago and almost as soon as he arrived he collapsed with those terrible pains which have poisoned his existence during the last several years … Mr Joyce had lost seven kilos during the summer … Mr Budgen … came with the proofs of his book through which Mr Joyce went with him and Mr Gilbert. It is a long time since I have seen Mr Joyce so interested in anything as he has been in this work making suggestions, remembering points etc. … Now instead of making progress with his own book he is trying to help Mr Gilbert in a translation of some French novel … getting an unfurnished flat as the only means of terminating his long neglected book which I believe can only be achieved in some conditions of comfort and ease surrounded by his books which at present are scattered in some three or four different places in two countries

26 September 1933 NLSP (from Paul Léon to Carolus Verhulst of the Servire Press): as I have not heard anything from Mr Pinker I would like to know how things stand with regard to the publication of Mr Joyce's last fragment.

26 September 1933 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I have as far as possible put other things aside in order to do what I blame myself very much for not having made a greater effort to do years ago — that is, to steep myself in his Work in Progress and try my hardest to cope with its difficulties.

30 September 1933 NLSP (from Carolus Verhulst of the Servire Press to Paul Léon): Further I did not yet receive reply to my request if it was possible for Mr Joyce to put some new material in this volume.

3 October 1933 NLSP from Paul Léon to Carolus Verhulst of the Servire Press): I beg to inform you that there has never been any question as to adding any more material to the publication.

4 October 1933 NLFF (from F.V. Morely to JJ): There is a thing called the Sunday Times Book Exhibition … (Sutherland House, Mayfair) from Nov 6th - Nov 20th and in connection with the exhibition there is to be a Loan Collection of manuscripts and incunabula. The Loan Collection is whirmering for a manuscript of yours; and I want to know if I could have your permission to lend them pages 28 and 29 [BL Add. MS 47475 fols. 105v, 106r, from I.2§2.8+] of the corrected text of WORK IN PROGRESS? These are pages of “transition” with interesting corrections and additions.

5 October 1933 NLSP (from Carolus Verhulst of the Servire Press to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of October 3rd. We understand from it, that the text, as published in Transition, is the final one … We certainly shall bring the book out and it will certainly be before May 31st next.

8 October 1933 NLPK (from J. Ralph Pinker to Paul Léon): Have you … heard from the Servire Press … You will remember that the contract was held up until they had decided on the get-up of the edition.

13 October 1933 NLFF (from F.V. Morely to Paul Léon): Thank you … for your letter of the 12th. I shall get in touch with Miss Weaver about the manuscript pages, and shall give Mr Joyce's message to Mr Eliot

8 November 1933 NLPK (from J. Ralph Pinker to Paul Léon): Servire Press … say .. most suitable time for them would be to publish between April 1st and May 31st.

18 October 1933 Letters III (to Stanislaus Joyce): I should have gone to Zurich today but have put it off, being slightly grippé. Hope to go next week.

5 December 1933 Letters III (to T.S. Eliot): Sullivan is in the midi so I have not gone to Zurich.

7 December 1933 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I am much obliged … for … the batch of Work in Progress M.S.

8 December 1933 Letters III (to Stanislaus Joyce): Santa Lucia '33 Her candle is burning quietly in the drawing room.

9 December 1933 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): I … wish to tell you that the the fragments in MS sent to you do not contain the present work but were work on in the summer.

12 December 1933 NLRH (from Bennett Cerf to Paul Léon): Have you made final arrangements as yet for the publication of WORK IN PROGRESS in America? We should dearly like to publish this book and bring it out, possibly in the format that will duplicate that of ULYSSES.

1934

42 rue de la Galilée, Paris

1 January 1934 NLPK (from J. Ralph Pinker to Paul Léon): I wrote to you at the beginning of last month with regard to the cover design for The Mime … May I, please, hear from you with regard to this?

3 January 1934 NLPK (from Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): Mr Joyce promises me the cover of The Mime … in the course of the next few days.

Carlton Elite Hotel, Zurich (NLMS 8 January 1934) [PROBABLY SHD BE 1935]

42 rue de la Galilée, Paris (date uncertain)

9 January 1934 NLFF (from F.V. Morely to Paul Léon): I promised Mr Joyce to send him the enclosed original page specimen for WORK IN PROGRESS. I believe he approved it the time it was set up. If he still approves, and if we can be told the total length of the book, we can begin setting the part of the text we have.

11 January 1934 NLPK (from J. Ralph Pinker to Paul Léon): This is to acknowledge safe receipt of the cover of The Mime … which I have forwarded at once to the Servire Press.

5 February 1934 NLPK (from J. Ralph Pinker to Paul Léon): Mr Morely … asks whether the specimen page for Work in Progress which he sent is satisfactory to Mr Joyce … If Mr Joyce does approve, then Fabers can get ahead with the setting up of the part of the text in hand. They are ready to begin any time Mr Joyce gives the approval of the page.

10 February 1934 NLSP from Carolus Verhulst of the Servire Press to Paul Léon) To-day I have sent you as registered bookpost a proof of pages 23 to 48 for “The Mime …” The printers informed me that it was impossible for them to go any further because they have not sufficient material. I shall send you proofs of pages 49 to 80, as soon as we have printed the first 3 sheets

11 March 1934 UP (to Harriet Weaver from Paul Léon) I will not dwell upon the atmosphere which until quite recently has influenced and enervated Mr Joyce, robbing him day after day of his power of concentration and not permitting him to use his creative genius … the departure of Miss Joyce to the Sanatorium in Nyon … Mr Joyce's thought actuated by this feeling has turned to his work and the last three years come unvoluntarily back to his mind — three years of unceasing worry about Miss Joyce which have caused him almost to abandon his work — it is remarkable that he was even able to accomplish what he did, I mean the publication of his last fragment … evening in Mr Joyce's honour … satisfaction to hear his fragment read quite well … I think some definite move should be done to induce Mr Joyce to take an unfurnished flat where he could at last have his books around him, his desk, his solitude for reflection and creation … With his books around him I am sure he could terminate W.i.P. within six months or a year

24 March 1934 UP (to Harriet Weaver): Am just being kidnapped for a short tour to Lyons, Marseilles

Paris-Monte Carlo-Neuchâtel-Zurich

Hôtel Heloer, Ventimiglia

UPLewis 1 April 1934:

1 April 1934 Letters III (to Frank Budgen): Going to Monte Carlo … Yes, thanks. I got the House by the Churchyard

Hôtel Moderne et des Trois Dauphins, Grenoble

9 April 1934 UP (to Harriet Weaver): Borach's tragic death … Mr Bailly is driving us to Neuchatel so that I may at last get to Zurich

10 April 1934 NLPK (from J. Ralph Pinker to Paul Léon): Servire Press … will publish The Mime … by the end of this month.

Carlton Elite Hotel, Zurich

UPLewis 14 April 1934:

15 April 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon):

17 April 1934 UP (to Harriet Weaver): Vogt has had me under observation for about a week … will write fully from Paris in a day or so

? April 1934: “Epilogue to Ibsen's Ghosts”

42 rue de la Galilée, Paris

UP and

24 April 1934 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): We did 2500 kilometres in the Bailly car … Borach … I saw [Vogt] many times this visit … Come back end September … I enclose a prospectus of a new fragment which should be out in a fortnight now. Also a thing I wrote in the train partly returning from Z'ich. My son and his family sail for the U.S. on 19 prox … McAlmon was here and read me parts of his book … I asked him not to make my wife say ‘as mute as a clam’ … but ‘as dumb as an oyster’

24 April 1934 Letters III (to Mme F. Raphael.) I am very sorry to hear of the dreadful accident … Let me thank you once again for your quick and excellent transcriptions. You have rendered me a very great service.

25 April 1934 Letters III (to Frank Budgen): I've just come here to Paris … I saw Vogt in Z'ch … upset by the tragic death [March 1934] of my friend Borach … I prefer Puffing Billy [train] to Staggering Bob [automobile]

2 May 1934 Letters III (to Frank Budgen): I have a grocer's assistant's mind.

UPLewis 6 May 1934:

11 May 1934 NLPK (from J. Ralph Pinker to Paul Léon): Mr Morley … sent you and Mr Joyce a specimen page … the original page set up some years ago … anxious to know whether Mr Joyce still approved it.

13 May 1934 UP (to Harriet Weaver): Faber and Faber are still debating about the proof page they sent me three years ago as a specimen.

14 May 1934 NLPK (from Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): the type as set is the same Mr Joyce saw two or three years ago … it is probably too early to start setting the book into print..

1 June 1934 Letters I (to Lucia Joyce): Today at last I have been able to send off the [Mime] … Let me know if the book pleases you. I like it very much. Lord knows what my prose means. In a word, it is pleasing to the ear.

1 June 1934 Letters III (to Giorgio Joyce): I send this off today. Also the fragment of W.i.P. … I work every day alone at my big long wide high deep dense prosework … we are looking for a flat

15 June 1934 Letters I (to Lucia Joyce): As to the typewriter … there is one here in the house

25 June 1934 NLRH (from Bennett Cerf to Paul Léon): The fragment that you sent is already in [?Suingburg's] hands. He is stopping at Brownes.

Dieppe

9 July 1934 NLPL (to Harriet Weaver): ARRIVONS 6h

42 rue de la Galilée, Paris

10 July 1934 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I have signed a lease for … 7 rue Edmond Valentin … habitable by September … I have been working about 5 to 7 hours a day for some time … Thanks for the list of errors in the fragment. That is rather a pity.

10 July 1934 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): Léon began to read to me from a scientific publication about Irish trees. The first sentence was to the effect that the oldest tree in the island is the elm tree in the demesne of Howth Castle and Environs. (see N46(VI.B.36):206(c))

13 July 1934 Letters III (to Giorgio Joyce): … we started moving into the new empty flat … our plan is to put all the workmen on the job and then leave for Spa (Belgium) perhaps with the Gilberts

Hotel Suede, Liège

19 July 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): HOTEL SUEDE

Grand Hotel Britannique, Spa, Belgique

20 July 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): HOTEL BRITANNIQUE

21 July 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Please send the I. Times in batches of 3 or 4. Please type any messages.

22 July 1934 Letters III (to Giorgio Joyce): Here's my hotel

25 July 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Have you witten to Monro to have my two cases of books from Cooks sent. This will take about 2 months.

28 July 1934 Selected Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): If any notice of my fragment appeared in the English press in which Lucia's name is mentioned will you please send it to me. The Dutch firm was willing to do the Chaucer poem without any money from my side. We came here a day or so ago to allow … workmen time to get in order … a flat … Did Léon send you a bundle of MS? … I have been working very hard and hope to get on quickly once I am in dock again.

29 July 1934 Letters I (to C.P. Curran): I have to thank … you for the present of your essay on S. Laurence O'Toole and the two plays by Denis Johnstone

30 July 1934 Letters III (to Giorgio Joyce): We have been here now 11 days

31 July 1934 Letters III (to Stanislaus Joyce): I send you the Irish Times [21 July 1934 p.7], O G's poem

2 August 1934 NLRH (from Bennett Cerf to Paul Léon): I wish that we were going to be the publishers of WORK IN PROGRESS.

2 August 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Is Monro sending the cases of books?

4 August 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): The Irish Directory should be corrected so: delete “and author” add after birth date “, Dublin,” Books: give titles of the other fragments adding “fragments from WiP.” address: 7 rue Edmond Valentin, Paris.

6 August 1934 NLMS (Paul Léon to Messrs Monro Saw): Mr Joyce has taken a new flat … still being arranged and on the other hand Mr Joyce is away on a holiday … Mr Joyce tells me that when he was last in England he left with Thos Cook a somewhat large box with his books and he asks you kindly to have them sent to Paris.

6 August 1934 UP (to Harriet Weaver): NIGHT TELEGRAPH LETTERS / are a cheap and rapid means of sending / a message when the last mail has gone / YOU CAN DICTATE THEM BY TELEPHONE / 36 words for 1s.

6 August 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Please send on this to Mrs J … no papers have been published in Dublin for 15 days past. Strike … Send the [Grace] book only.

9 August 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Paris Goll … Germany Naboukoff. There is of course no allusion in the journal run by Lady Rottenmean's husband for the bullpup fancying British in Paris.

9 August 1934 Letters III (to Helen Joyce): The Gilberts are not here … are in wait … bring them here about the 16 to 20 inst … Cologne is only 14 hours away. Pity we dare not visit it

ca. August 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Are there no more Irish Times? HCE is divorcing ALP i.e, Guinness's brewery is leaving Dublin, it seems.

13 August 1934 Letters III (to Giorgio Joyce): We have been here almost a month … We will go to Luxembourg for a few weeks

13 August 1934 NLMS (from Messrs Monro Saw to Paul Léon): Thomas Cook … charge for two packages . Does Mr Joyce wish both these to be sent to him? (forwarded on 16th Aug)

14 August 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon):

Vervins

mid August 1934 Selected Letters (to Stanislaus Joyce): [Wellington] was never here but the … springs is called after him the Duc de Fer. We may go on to Luxembourg for a week … [we are near] Aix-la-Chapelle where Charlemagne is buried

Grand Hotel Brasseur, Luxembourg

16 August 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): HOTEL BRASSEUR

18 August 1934 NLGC (from Frank Budgen to JJ): I might try to get in touch with a man I know who worked for years for B. and O. (Burns and Oates) (He bears the name of the fourth of those codgers who tote around the dwyergrey ass

21 August 1934 NLRH (from Paul Léon to Bennett Cerf): I share your opinion that it would be grand should you undertake the publication of W.I.P. The contract for it is however signed with Huebsch, and Mr Joyce could not do anything. I do not think that should you come to some agreement with Huebsch he would find any objection to the transferring of the rights to you.

21 August 1934 Letters III (to Giorgio Joyce): In addition to [Sullivan's] daughter and Gillet's son-in-law Mrs Bailly's son is dead after 3 days of ‘fièvre cérébral’ … Good night, dear children. Nighty night, everybody

22 August 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Leaving for Bâle Montreux

Basel

UPLewis 24 August 1934:

Grand Hotel Monney, Montreux

26 August 1934 NLPK (from Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): Friday (?31 August 1934) … Mr Lane … is forming a new company to print ULYSSES.

UPLewis 27 August 1934:

28 August 1934 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver):

Hôtel Richemonde, Geneva

1 September 1934 UP (to Harriet Weaver): [Happy Birthday, Miss Weaver]

2 September 1934 Letters III (to Carola Giedion-Welcker): We are alone here, not knowing a soul.

3 September 1934 NLPK (from J. Ralph Pinker to Paul Léon): Mr Thaddeus Reamy Brenton of Los Angeles Junior College … permission to quote … : “For if the … coarse cart.”

Hôtel de la Paix, Geneva

UPLewis 6 September 1934:

7 September 1934 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver):

8 September 1934 Letters III (to Frank Budgen): Dutch publisher … Carl ver Hulst

13 September 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon):

Carlton Elite Hotel, Zurich

22 September 1934 Letters III (to Frank Budgen): I have brought Lucia here [Lucia Joyce transferred on the 20 Sep to Z'ch; on 28 Sep to Küsnacht]

Neuhausen

UPLewis 14 October 1934:

Carlton Elite Hotel, Zurich

16 October 1934 Letters I (to Giorgio Joyce): Thanks for your wire on the 8th. We and Jolas drove to Rapperswil for tea and then round the lake … A 30-year wedding should be called a ‘findrinny one’. Findrinny is a kind of white gold mixed with silver

20 October 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Please pay Jung, Mrs Raphael (900 frs, the rest in a week or so) … Has Lane arranged for anybody to read the proofs of Ulysses or is he supposed to be printing it? … My wife is again against any return to Paris or setting up a flat there.

21 October 1934 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Léon managed to get leave from the French to come here for 3 days … [letter from Lucia] was sent on the 30th anniversary of my first marriage … if you can get from the London library a copy of the life of Nijinsky by his wife in English and read it, especially the appendix you will get some idea of the danger that is feared

23 October 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Has Heinke sent those 2 books? [Paul Léon: yes] On what date in July did the Circuit Court rule [Aug 7] I have Nijunsky (who I find was a Roman Catholic Pole) … Here is a paper about electricity. Did you send the Volt[gerns] Did Jolas? I never got 'em. Can you send me any recent copy of the N.Y. Herald (U.S. edition) [Yes] I want to see what is on at the theatres … Ask [???] to send me George Sloccombe's new book Crisis in Europe [Yes]

30 October 1934 Letters I (to Giorgio Joyce): We never see anyone except the Giedions once or twice a week

4 November 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): I have just read Irish Times article. This is the first article on me in the Irish press for 20 years.

6 November 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Ver Hulst has not sent a copy of the Mime to Fehr.

12 November 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): I am not well and in bed

20 November 1934 Letters III (to Giorgio Joyce): As reports from Kusnacht are favorable we contemplate going back to Paris though I don't like leaving Lucia for the Xmas … I hope you have a pleasant Thanksgiving dinner next Thursday, (22 November 1934) is it? We met Huddleston in Geneva

21 November 1934 Letters III (to Giorgio Joyce): Mama and I went to ‘school’ … to hear a theologian and again to hear Prof. Fleiner speak of the German state

22 November 1934 NLGC (from F. Raphael to Paul Léon): [Received from M. Paul Léon the sum of 900 francs for 2 notebooks of Mr Joyce.]

30 November 1934 NLPK (from J. Ralph Pinker to Paul Léon): I understand that the next issue of transition is going to come out before very long … Faber and Faber very much hope … they may be allowed to reissue the new fragment in separate form, as with Anna Livia and the others.

10 December 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): PS I also want the book on

?15 December 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): I am suffering from bad nervous exhaustion … It is impossible to write when one is not well … PPS Please send back enclosures / Black Sea in Russian? [Chernomorsky Flot]

17 December 1934 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): I am trying to work for Jolas but have again two crazy women to handle

18 December 1934 Selected Letters (to Frank Budgen): We have been here in Z'ch 3 months … I am trying to write something for the next number of transition. You can imagine how easy it is … We met the Fleiners a few times … I told him I got the idea of the technique of the newest fragment from one of his lectures I was at. I won the final appeal in the U.S. Schluss [Finish].

20 December 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Please send Irish Times.

20 December 1934 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): An hour after our telephone conversation on Tuesday evening (18 December 1934) I received … a long letter from Mr Joyce enclosing a batch of MS of the piece he is working on. He told me that, five weeks before, he decided to go back to Paris, set up the flat and return to Zurich for Christmas … scene … he stayed on.

20 December 1934 Letters III (to Alfred Bergan): We are still detained here and cannot return to Paris till after New Year.

24 December 1934 Letters III (to Giorgio Joyce): The Croppy Boy [song] … Shule Aroon … The Yellow Ale

28 December 1934 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Childermas … Busy all these days writing out words and music of Irish songs to catch Washingtons for N.Y. A cheque for £1-6-6 should go to Manager, Irish Times … for half years subscription to I.T. and I.T. Weekly (19/6 and 7/6). It expires on 31st. I suppose or perhaps Mr Healy took it out in March or april till M or A of '35 … The Black Sea was always bad. The reason they called it Euxine was to flatter the seagod. All the doctors have gone away and I feel so lonely. I will try to keep my word to Mr Jolas but it's very hard … En route pour Niagare

1935

Carlton Elite Hotel, Zurich

8 January 1935 NLPL (to Paul Léon): AVEZ VOUS SOUSCRIT IRISH TIMES OU SONTS JOURNEAUX

8 January 1935 Letters III (to Giorgio Joyce): Here the Land of Saints and Sages [Map]. H. Find Ballynure in Antrim. G. Find Joyce Country in County Galway … locate any places mentioned in any Irish songs G. Sings.

10 January 1935 NLPL (to Paul Léon): I was working today but am quite flattened out by the news that all my money is gone.

10 January 1935 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Also v. Mencken “The American Language” the exact meaning in slang of ‘porkbarrel’ … I was working today but am quite flattened out by the news that all my money is gone. [in Paul Léon hand] humourous metaphor bugaboo / found in Political Americanisms by Ch. Norton N.Y and London 1890 “origin political campaign when Jefferson defeated Adam pre civil war. Government appropriations that are used as political patronage to build up party power.” Maurice Weseen Dictionary of American Slang 60 frs.

15 January 1935 NLPL (to Paul Léon): I want a male god or divine being beginning with C. Cercrops means only marketplace. Unless I fall back on Cosmos. A Greek K I could transform. Is fjaell c or n. Fjaellet or Fjaellers. I think the former. I wish I could find the exact origin of the other word.

15 January 1935 Letters I (to Giorgio Joyce): Lucia … left the sanatorium yesterday … Othmar Schoeck [composer] is a type rather like Beckett who gets up at 2.30 p.m.

16 January 1935 NLPL (from Paul Léon to JJ, carbon on verso of above) Portjuncula: One of 3 churches at or near Assisi repaired by St Francis where according to tradition Jesus Christ appeared to St Francis in 1221 and bade him go to the Pope who would give indulgence to all who would devoutly visit that church. 2 years later Honorius III granted the Pardon of Assisi on the 2nd of August and extended it to the Portjuncula church. Gregory XV in 1622 extended it to all Franciscans between Vespers and sunset on August 2nd. Innocent XI in 1678 extended it in favour of the same church to the souls in Purgatory. Finally the Indulgence of Portjuncula can be gained in all churches in which the order of Franciscans is canonically established. The question of the origin is still doubtful. Early biographers are silent about it.
Fjaell means board — but in the little norwegian-english dictionary it does not give the com. or any other indication.
Porkbarrel. Mencken does not give its meaning — he refers to another book — I will go to Galignani to find out what I can. The origin given by Mencken is the pre-civil war bugaboo or humourous metaphor established during the campaign won by Jefferson against Adam.
The six B and C names of Greek and Roman mythology are: Bacchus / Bellerophon / Boreas / Briseis / Ceres ?cybele / Cassiopea ? Castor ? Clio ? Charites / Cecrops / Centaurus / Cassandra etc etc
[in Paul Léon hand] (1) fjaell en/er fjelg-ag fjael — board (2) Catholic encyclop. date and orig of feast portjuncula (3) mythology 6 or 7 B. C. Greek Names / Bellerophon Bacchantes Boreas Ceres Cybele Cadmus Cassiopea Castor Chomaera Circe

16 January 1935 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Fjaell is the word I wanted to know of. In Modern Norwegian no ‘d’ is in their words after ‘l’ or ‘n’ / Grinn for Grind = a gate, / Fjaell for Fjaeld / Mann for Mand = a man / Get me a god beginning with (gamma). Please send Irish Times regularly as I pass it on to Lucia and in this way she reads a good deal … I can't write letters … I got the books … I think porkbarrel bore connection originally with some river transport … My brother in Triest has been writing constantly for money … What the childless, teetotaller, non smoker does with his money I don't know.

16 January 1935 NLPL (to Paul Léon): p.m. … Have not been able to do any WORK for 4 days, long letters from Gillet about my duty to the arts etc

La Residence, Paris

1 February 1935 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): Many thanks for your telegram telling me of Mr Joyce's safe arrival in Paris.

UPLewis 2 February 1935:

5 February 1935 Letters I (to Giorgio Joyce): Tired after our arrival we could not do as much as usual [for Feb 2] … the furniture is there now and we hope to be there ourselves in a few days [new flat] … What I have written for transition is said to be terribly funny as McGreevy would say though Lord knows how I did it … Last night I took the harem to see Man of Aran where I yawned my head off with boredom

7 rue Edmond Valentin, Paris

13 February 1935 NLPK (from Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): Mr Joyce is now in Paris.

?18 February 1935 Letters III (to Giorgio Joyce): Buy Hughes's Irish County Songs (2 vols) (they are nearly all Ulster songs) … Buy Moore's Irish Melodies and learn the following /a) Fly not yet /b) O, ye dead /c) Quick we have but a second (this needs a lot of breath) /d) The time I lost in wooing e) Silent, O Moyle (this is a lovely air but G. should study the legend of Lir's daughters) … I shall try to get / The little Red Fox by Arthur Somervell /The Queen of Connemara by Alicia Needham / Trottin' to the Fair / Drake's Drum / Eva Toole … Next I have an enormous collection of Irish folk music collected by Petrie and another lot by Joyce (P.W.) I shall send this out soon … We have been here a week … I am afraid G. Antheil … made off with P.W. Joyce's collection of old Irish airs

21 February 1935 NLPK (from Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): the new fragment which is to appear in the next issue of Transition is not of a kind to be published separately — it will be the beginning and end of a section of the second part.

26 February 1935 Letters III (to Lucia Joyce): Go … to Boosey and Co. … send me by mail two copies of the song ‘Off to Philadelphia’ by Battison Haynes

26 February 1935 Letters III (to Giorgio Joyce): I can't write as my eyes … dust of the books I am unpacking …[more songs]

28 March 1935 Letters I (to Lucia Joyce): I will send you Transition when it comes out. The devil knows what it means.

7 April 1935 Letters III (to Lucia Joyce): I have been working all day long

7 April 1935 Letters I (to Harriet Weaver): Perhaps I shall survive, and perhaps the raving madness I write will survive. And perhaps it is very funny. One thing is sure, however. Je suis bien triste.

11 April 1935 NLGC (from Paul Léon to Mme F. Raphael): [sends enclosed cheque for 500 frcs on behalf of Mr Joyce. He will send you the rest as soon as possible.]

15 April 1935 Letters III (to Frank Budgen): Please let me know by return are the names of the boxers ‘Jack Sharkey and Jimmy Wilde’ [FW 307.20] mentioned toward the end of the fragment correct. By the way please send back that proof and do not show it.

27 April 1935 Selected Letters (to Lucia Joyce): Yes. I read in the papers about the fire in the Dublin Plaza … Dame Anna Livia did not do her duty … if you subscribe to the library there ask for The Life of Father Healy. I knew him and think he baptized a boy or girl in my family … Mrs Bailly has also gone to Bray

1 May 1935 Selected Letters (to Harriet Weaver): This morning in the street I found my sight very hazy. I made the mistake of correcting proofs for about 6 hours the other day, as I did not want to be always victimising the Jolases … my wife who personally is probably worth both of her children rolled together and multiplied by three … I have the faithful support of my wife and Léon's loyal friendship

6 May 1935 NLPK (from Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): The coming number of Transition is at last going to be published in a week or a fortnight.

20 May 1935 NLGC (from F Raphael to Paul Léon): [I do not wish to annoy Mr Joyce but do you think he might settle what is due before the holidays?]

ca. May 1935 Letters I (to Lucia Joyce): I am sending you the Irish Times which has an article on Bray

21 June 1935 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I am glad that Mr and Mrs Joyce are planning to come to London next Thursday. (27 June 1935)

24 June 1935 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): The hotel in question is: The Royal Palace Hotel, Kensington High Street W8 … Thank you for enclosing the two sheets of MS on Mr Joyce's behalf.

25 June 1935 Letters I (to Giorgio Joyce): I wanted to go to Denmark but with whom?

25 June 1935 Letters III (to Helen Joyce): I am sending some printed matter but will allow it to speak for itself

29 June 1935 NLGC (from Mme F. Raphael to Paul Léon): Thanks for 500 frs. The sum now due is 1050 francs.

N.D. July 1935 Letters I (to Giorgio Joyce): I am sending you La Semaine à Paris, Irish Free Press, Revue Universelle and Transition. I hope this last one won't aggravate your present state of summer stupor. The footnotes (3), (4) and (5) on the last page but one are all mixed up

6 July 1935 TRANSITION 23 (II.2): published 6 July 1935.

16 July 1935 Letters III (to Giorgio Joyce): [songs]

19 July 1935 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): The third part is practically finished. All the additions have been done on loose sheets during the four weeks of respite Mrs Joyce was able to influence him to have after the bad state he had been in had passed and the news from the Jolases came. The first part is as you know with the publishers.

19 July 1935 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): Of the second part the section of plays is finished. The greater part of the lessons has just come out in Transition. It leaves two sections to be done — the stories (one or two of which are ready) and the going to sleep.

19 July 1935 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): Of the second part the section of plays is finished. The greater part of the lessons has just come out in Transition. It leaves two sections to be done — the stories (one or two of which are ready) and the going to sleep. The Epilogue could be written while the thing went through the press. In fact I should say that six months or a year at most of labour would bring the work to an end. But when and where would we get this lapse of time?, the gaiety, the security the moral support necessary? One remark let fall yesterday brings me to the material side. He was speaking to the Doctor about his work and then turning to me he added: there is not ten cents of money in my work. I can see nothing but a dark wall in front of me, a dark wall or a precipice if you prefer physically, morally, materially.

19 July 1935 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): The state he was in during the last seven or eight days is hard to describe … But it leads to a attitude of attributing a secondary importance to his own work. You know that if there is a feature in his life it is that he never belonged to himself, his family, his friends, but has always belonged to his work. Now … No pains should be spared to bring him back to work … There is not so much that is left to be done. The third part is practically finished. All the additions have been done on loose sheets during the four weeks of respite Mrs Joyce was able to influence him to have after the bad state he had been in had passed and the news from the Jolases came. The first part is as you know with the publishers. Of the second part the section of plays is finished. The greater part of the lessons has just come out in Transition. It leaves two sections to be done — the stories (one or two of which are ready) and the going to sleep. The Epilogue could be written while the thing went through the press. In fact I should say that six months or a year at most of labour would bring the work to an end. But when and where would we get this lapse of time?, the gaiety, the security the moral support necessary? One remark let fall yesterday brings me to the material side. He was speaking to the Doctor about his work and then turning to me he added: there is not ten cents of money in my work. I can see nothing but a dark wall in front of me, a dark wall or a precipice if you prefer physically, morally, materially.

23 July 1935 NLPK (from Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): the exact date of the issue of transition in the Hague was the 6th of July. The issue reached Paris on the 10th.

8 August 1935 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver from Paul Léon): As far as the Thames is concerned Mr Joyce would recommend her to read H.M. Tomlinson's London River, Cassel's pocket library

13 August 1935 Letters I (to Giorgio Joyce): My wife has bought two very nice new pictures. One is by Mr Budgen and the other by Mynheer Vermeer

17 August 1935 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): P.S. I am glad to hear that Mr Joyce is working regularly now.

28 August 1935 Letters I (to Helen Joyce): May the 17 devils take Muscolini and the Alibiscindians

28 August 1935 Letters III (to James Stephens): … the hook-on lens I use for writing was at the optician's being mended

Savoy Hôtel, Fontainbleu

3 September 1935 LLSF (Paul Léon to Lucie Léon) Joyce felt ill on Saturday and yesterday they left for Fontainbleu. They insist I should join them but I have not decided yet.

UPLewis 4 September 1935:

UPLewis 8 September 1935:

Hôtel de France, Versailles

9 September 1935 Letters I (to Lucia Joyce): We were at Fontainebleau for one day only but I think I shall … treat myself to a week's stay at the seaside, starting perhaps tomorrow week

13 September 1935 NLPK (from Paul Léon to J. Ralph Pinker): Mr Joyce … is at present out of town and I am seeing him only once a week … by Tuesday morning (17 September 1935) as I am going down to him on that day in the afternoon.

13 September 1935 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): The news you give of Mr Joyce himself is a shock to me. I had believed he was much better and that he had been working regularly up to the time of going away.

Savoy Hotel, Fontainebleau

18 Sep 1835 Letters I (to C.P. Curran): [portrait by Sean O'sullivan]

29 September 1935 Letters III (to Lucia Joyce): We are taking leave of the grapes and going back to Paris

Le Havre-Paris train, 2 October 1935 (mention in letter 25 October 1935 from William J Walker)

7 rue Edmond Valentin, Paris

7 October 1935 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I wrote to Mr Desmond Flower of the Sunday Times informing him that Mr Joyce was willing for a page of his MS to be exhibited and that I would send one to him on loan as soon as I had the opportunity of going up to town.

15 October 1935 JJQ (to James Stephens): I think I ought to give you the name of the best specialist in this line in the U.S. He is Dr Louis Berman, author of ‘Glands Regulating Human Personality’

6 November 1935 NLGC (from F. Raphael) [Thanks for cheque 1000 Frcs. I hope that you are well and have the strength and the peace for work.]

1936

7 rue Edmond Valentin, Paris

27 January 1936 Letters III (to Frank Budgen): Have finished and sent to F.F. Pt III of W i P. [Dated by JJ: Ellmann misdates it 1938]

27 January 1936 NLMS (from Paul Léon to Messrs Monro Saw): As it is the Director of Public Prosecutions has published his lecture on Obscene Literature in Law and Practice which is a simple revival of the Regina v/Hickling doctrine of 1868. I have made a rather harsh review of it and hope to have it published in the next Law Quarterly or the POLITICA (the organ of the London University where the lecture was delivered). But as this will hardly carry any weight I am trying to have a question put in the H.o.C. arguing that a civil servant cannot publish his views on a question de lege ferenda. But this is much harder and the ground much less secure, than an academic review. … Please keep this information confidential as though both editors are personal friends of mine I doubt very much whether they will have the courage to publish the review.

1 February 1936 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I was glad to hear from Mrs Jolas that he had been working steadily before this eye trouble came on, aided by you … You are indeed to him the most devoted, the most helpful and the most disinterested of friends.

3 February 1936 NLFF (from T.S. Eliot): Mrs Jolas brought in the manuscript of Part III last week. I gave her a receipt for it … I showed the manuscript to our Director of Production, Richard de la Mare, and he felt confident that MacLehose, who are quite at the top of their profession as printers, would be able to handle it as it is. Should there be any difficulty they have expert typists of their own to set it right. But I think the simplest thing will be to have them set up a difficult specimen page. The manuscript, however, seems perfectly orderly, although complicated, and I think it will require great care, but not genius, in composition.

5 February 1936 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): I think that within a day or two the hundred odd corrections to be inserted in Part III will be finished and ready to be sent to Faber and Faber.

16 February 1936 NLFF (from Paul Léon to T.S. Eliot): I hasten to forward you enclosed the last corrections and insertions for Part III of Work in Progress which have been delayed owing to repeated attacks of episcleritis from which Mr Joyce has been suffering during the last seven weeks.

3 March 1936 NLMS (from Paul Léon to Messrs Monro Saw): Mr Joyce is at present suffering a great deal from his eyes and cannot therefore go out.

17 April 1936 NLFF (from T.S. Eliot): We have now made the experiment of having the printers set up the page which you indicated for a test. While it appears to be quite within their powers to print the book from the text as we have it … the text clearly needs typing out first, and this could best be done in Paris in the way originally suggested … We understand if we return the manuscript Léon will have it typed under his supervision, provided we are willing to defray the costs of a typist up to 1000 francs. This we are quite willing to do. It was not clear to me whether you thought the whole of the text should be returned for this purpose, or only the more difficult Part III. It would obviously save a great deal of trouble and expense if you could correct and approve the typescript … I understand that there is no existing duplicate … I am proposing to come to Paris myself in about a month's time … bring the manuscript with me.

7 May 1936 NLFF (from T.S. Eliot): am coming Paris June sixth shall I bring manuscript

3 June 1936 Letters III (to T.S. Eliot) Léon will undertake the work of course but he says it is not the same thing now as it would have been in January when the text, with insertions and alignments, was quite fresh in his mind.

5 June 1936 Letters III (to Mary Colum): Lucia … It has been almost impossible for me to continue writing with such terrible anxiety night and day. Still I am doing what I can.

5 June 1936 Claybook (to Louis Gillet): Yes, I have worked all this time on a chapter which is perhaps the most complacently absurd thing that I ever did till now. I gave it up during these last weeks. I was too depressed to continue the buffoonery. But starting tomorrow I shall set to work again. It is a story of a captain … and a Dublin tailor which my god-father told me forty years ago, trying to explain the arrival of my Viking in Dublin, his marriage, and a lot of things I don't care to mention here

9 June 1936 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): I believe I can cover most of the expenses of publication of my daughter's alphabet. My idea is not to persuade her that she is a Cezanne but that on her 29th birthday … she may see something that may persuade her that her whole life has not been a failure.

3 July 1936 NLFF (from Paul Léon to T.S. Eliot): I beg to inform you that the typing of Parts I and III is progressing with success and I think I will be able to have it sent over to you very soon. Part III with which I started because I knew it better is already finished. It has costed Frs 376. Part I I had to entrust for copy and about half of it is already done. I am taking it up since yesterday with the typist who did Part III, and hope to be through with it in time for Mrs Léon to take it over to London when she goes there on the 12th inst. The first half costed Frcs 200. I am afraid that the whole brunt of Part I is now lying on him and in order to spare time and expense I would be very thankful if you could have sent over to me 4 copies of the cheap edition of ANNA LIVIA PLURABELLE … and 2 copies of the TALES TOLD. I have been able to use HAVETH CHILDERS EVERYWHERE as there are all told but three corrections on it which could be easily done in ink. The corrections on ANNA LIVIA PLURABELLE are however much greater in number and I will have to cut out pages and paste them in their order.

7 July 1936 NLFF (from T.S. Eliot to Paul Léon): [Want] news … progress of Part II … I do not know whether Joyce has found conditions more favourable for working than when I saw him a month ago.

12 July 1936 NLFF (from Paul Léon to T.S. Eliot): We have just finished in time for Mrs Léon who is leaving within an hour and a half to take the MS of Parts I and III over completed. Mr Joyce is working steadfastedly on Part II.

12 July 1936 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): The great problem has been and still is Mr Joyce's daughter … one copy of her book for her birthday … One of its results anyhow has been that Mr Joyce had the visit here of a viscount Carlow who has a hobby in printing and who wants to bring out a small fragment of Wip with lettrines by Lucia. The fragment for want of a better text is the last one which appeared in Transition

12 July 1936 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): ULYSSES is definitely coming out before the end of September. (The sheets for the signed edition are already back in England and the corrections of the proofs is as far as page 500 odd. They have consequently some 200 odd pages to compose.

15 July 1936 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): Mrs Léon rang up yesterday … and gave me directions for fetching the two parcels of the Corrected Parts I and III sent for me by Mr Joyce which she had very kindly brought over with her. I fetched them today from Rutland Court … I was glad to hear from Mrs Léon that Mr Joyce seemed better and that he had been able to work well lately with your help … Mrs Léon has delivered the other parcel to Mr Eliot.

16 July 1936 Selected Letters (to Sean O'Faolain): It was very kind of you to send me the book [Bird Alone].

22 July 1936 Letters III (to Viscount Carlow): Would the piece in this issue of transition with this initial suit you? You may keep the review in any case but I would ask you to return the lettrine if you decide that it is unsuitable for your purpose. I fear it is. The copy I showed you of the Chaucer book was an advance one and as the book itself will not be out till the 10 August I enclose a proof of Louis Gillet's preface

23 July 1936 NLGC (from Maria Jolas to Paul Léon): 544 East 86th St … We … now have settled at the above address for the rest of the summer.

24 July 1936 NLFF (from T.S. Eliot): I very much hope that you find it possible to get on with the completion of Part II.

Hotel de l'Abbaye, Beaujency

30 July 1936 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): If the corrections you mentioned do not reach me tomorrow I will make them after our return.

6 August 1936 NLCV (from Paul Léon to Viscount Carlow): I am sending you enclosed the two lettrines of Miss Lucia Joyce destined for the illumination of the first letter of the text and of the first letter of the notes for Mr Joyce's fragment which you intend to publish. Under separate cover I am sending you the text of the fragment in Transition with corrections … You will see that the printing of the fragment presents considerable difficulties from the point of view of typography. The “captions” on the left margin should be aligned with certain words of the text. They are not quite right in the Transition text and I have therefore undelined the word to which the caption refers and hope you will be able to find them. The large type captions on the right are aligned with the beginning of each paragraph. Two corrections will be sent to you subsequently: (1) A caption on the right margin for the second paragraph. (2) An addition to the caption on the left margin of page 127 reading “Pompeius Magnus”.

Villa Connemara, Villers sur Mer

8 August 1936 NLPL (to Paul Léon): If you have not sent your letter to Miss Weaver you might say … also about Ld Carlow's edition and the 2 extra lettrines of Lucia.

10 August 1936 Selected Letters (to Stephen Joyce): [Fairytale]

Casino de Deauville

10 August 1936 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Your letter came but not the sheets

12 August 1936 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Sheets gone … want another 100£ for Denmark … Thanks for Dansk Boy. No Politikin yet.

13 August 1936 NLPL (to Paul Léon):

18 August 1936 LLSF (from Paul Léon to Lucie Léon): The Joyces left this morning for Liege en route for Copenhagen. Will they get there?

Liège

19 August 1936 NLPL (to Paul Léon):

Hotel Streit, Hamburg

21 August 1936 NLPL (to Paul Léon):HOTEL STREIT REPARTONI SAMEDI MATIN

22 August 1936 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): Mr and Mrs Joyce left Paris Tuesday last (18 August 1936) for Copenhagen as their ultimate destination … Mrs Jolas … could not come near the Joyce's flat for all the time she was in Paris … The Gilberts have not been at the Joyces for now nearly eighteen months.

Turist Hotel, Copenhagen

23 August 1936 NLPL (to Paul Léon): TURISTHOTEL

Elsinore, Denmark

26 August 1936 Letters III (to Claud Sykes): Greetings to the English Players from here in Elsinore

Turist Hotel, Copenhagen

26 August 1936 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Can you send … the Icelandic Polyglott

26 August 1936 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Ulysses came so will send off corrections when I get back.

28 August 1936 NLPL (to Paul Léon): CORRECTIONS TOUTES ENVOYEES VOTRE ADRESSE OUI ACHETEZ ET LIVREZ DE NOTRE PART SANS VISITE MILLE REMERCIEMENTS AVANCE VOTRE SOEUR

28 August 1936 NLGC (from Maria Jolas to Paul Léon): Mr Joyce … his letter reached us just before the “bon à tirer” for the September number of Transition.

29 August 1936 NLCV (from Viscount Carlow to Paul Léon): I would have written to you before to acknowledge the corrected copy of Transition and the two initials, but not only have I been away, but I wished to read and examine the material before writing. I am now ready to start setting as soon as I have cleared away two short stories which should be finished within the week. A certain amount of experimental work will have to be done to see the best way of arranging the page, but that should not take long, and as soon as I have sorted the thing out in my own mind, I shall come to Paris and interview the people who are to reproduce the initials.

30 August 1936 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Please send me 6 Irish Times, otherwise they will heap the house, viz, 2 Saturday issues (with book page) and any other 4

31 August 1936 Letters III (to Carola Giedion-Welcker):

1 September 1936 Letters III (to Viscount Carlow): I am very glad you liked the two lettrines. Three things are lacking in the piece you have, a rubric for paragraph 2, a marginal insertion on the right of the second last page and a title. I shall attend to this when we return to Paris in a week or so and then write to you. I have not the text here.

4 September 1936 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Our plans are to leave in a few days, stay a few days in Hamburg (Streits hotel), stop a night at Cologne … reach Liège and, if possible, rest 4 or 5 days on the outskirts of the town in quiet hotel, reaching Paris about 12 or 15 all subject to change … Sent you list for Lane last night … I wrote to Ld Carlow myself … Please send more Irish Times, chiefly Saturday and Friday issues to me c/o Streits H'b'g.

6 September 1936 NLPL (to Paul Léon): CE SOIR HAMBOURG

Hotel Streit, Hamburg

8 September 1936 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Ulysses: Is this to appear in London on Friday 25? … Any proof which reaches me between date of your departure and Monday 14 will be sent by me by air mail to London within an hour of their receipt. I hoped Wegner could receive them. Rang up. He is away but expected back today … Please forward a few Irish Times (Saturdays and Fridays preferred).

Cologne

8 September 1936 ZJJ (to Carola Giedion-Welcker):

10 September 1936 NLPL (to Paul Léon):

10 September 1936 NLFF (from F.V. Morely to Paul Léon): [Eliot unable to find copy Mesures in his room, will get another copy and study specimen page]

Bonn

7 rue Edmond Valentin, Paris

13 September 1936 Letters III (to Frank Budgen): Just back from Denmark

21 September 1936 Letters III (to Wilhelm Herz): Giorgio and Helen are now back in Paris … We had a lovely day in Cologne thanks to Mrs Herz and yourself

24 September 1936 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): … some four months ago I sent to Mr Eliot a copy of Mesures which was never delivered to him.

4 October 1936 Letters I (to C.P. Curran): I did not know where you were in Belgium this ‘summer’. We passed through and stopped in Liege for some days when going to and coming from Denmark.

5 November 1936 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): Mr Joyce has asked me to forward to you the enclosed pages from a new fragment due to appear in the next number of TRANSITION. Ever since he has returned from Copenhagen he has never been out, or hardly, sees almost nobody, and sits listlessly within his four walls. Just about five days ago he has started to prepare for publication a short new fragment to be issued in Transition, hence the pages included.

9 November 1936 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to JJ): I hope the conducting of the newly christened Russian general towards his début will go smoothly and not cause his presenter too many wakeful nights.

18 November 1936 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): Mr Joyce … black … total solitude … For the moment he is working hard and I believe that the book will be ready within a year.

1 December 1936 Letters III (to Carola Giedion-Welcker): Look out for the next issue of Transition. I have something in it and it is chiefly or in great part about — Gideon. (Book of Judges, chap 6, verse 36 et seq.)

7 December 1936 NLFF (from Paul Léon to T.S. Eliot): Mr Joyce who is very busy on W.i.p. at present asked me … to return you enclosed the three types of printing marking the one he prefers with the red pencil. It seems the most readable type of the three.

16 December 1936 NLVP (from Ben Huebsch to Paul Léon): I learn from Jolas, who is sailing for Europe next week, that he has received a considerable instalment of “Work in Progress” for publication in “transition” …

16 December 1936 NLVP (from Ben Huebsch to Paul Léon): I learn from Jolas, who is sailing for Europe next week, that he has received a considerable instalment of “Work in Progress” for publication in “transition”, and that copy of the book has been sent to Faber and Faber from time to time. Also that Joyce has in mind the idea of publication this year. I wrote to Fabers more than a month ago suggesting that we discuss the manner and place in which the book should be manufactured, proposing that we produce it on this side in order to safeguard the author's copyright, and sell sheets or electrotypes to them. Thus far there has been no reply. It would be to Mr Joyce's advantage in every way if production were to take place in America, for he would thus not only protect his rights here, but he would avoid the need of examining or having examined two sets of proofs. The reading of a single set in itself is sufficiently formidable.

1937

7 rue Edmond Valentin, Paris

4 January 1937 NLCV (from Viscount Carlow to Paul Léon): Viscount Carlow … will be coming to Paris on Thursday, 7th January … He is bringing the proof of the first pages of the story by Mr James Joyce he is printing. In his opinion it does not appear practicable to have the large “R” designed by Lucia Joyce in the footnote. The reason being that the first page is apt to be short and would bring the Capital “A” and the Capital “R” too close together … About half way through the book there is a new section starting with the word “Thanks”, and Viscount Carlow suggests that a capital “T” could be put in there.

10 January 1937 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I have not even yet, however, asked Mr Eliot if he has an extra page 182 of the new typescript but will write to him soon … When I was in Paris Mrs Jolas told me she hoped that Mr Jolas on his return from the U.S.A. would recommend Mr Joyce for the Nobel Prize.

28 January 1937 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I therefore send you herewith the pages you asked for (47-52 of the Mime of Mick, Nick and the Maggies).

29 January 1937 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): Miss Weaver rang us up on her return from Paris asking whether we had a duplicate for page 182 of Mr Joyce's WORK IN PROGRESS. On looking at the typescript we find we do possess a carbon of page 182, and have pleasure in sending it with this.

4 February 1937 YALE (to Viscount Carlow): Many thanks for birthday greetings and charming present. I would like to have my original text for proof correction.

9 February 1937 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): Thanks for the pound note enclosed for the books for Mr Joyce. I posted to him yesterday Ralph Fox's The Novel and the People. I can hear of no book by A. Henderson with a title something like “Communism and the Novel” but there is a book by Philip Henderson The Novel Today which apparently has a communistic tinge about it.

18 February 1937 Letters III (to Viscount Carlow): The proofs have been corrected for several days. I did not send them to Muerren as I thought you would be in London between the 15 and the 18? Where shall I send them now?

18 February 1937 Letters III (to Viscount Carlow): My piece about the Norwegian captain and the tailor was swamped out in the Ohio floods (transition this time being printed in Cincinnati) but it has been reset and I believe they have now given it a second bon à tirer.

27 February 1937 Letters III (to Frank Budgen): It is now reset and you will have it shortly.

4 March 1937 YALE (to Viscount Carlow): (Package cover only: possibly contained proofs of Storiella)

9 March 1937 Letters III (to T.G. Keohler): It was very kind of you to send me a copy of your little book … As I have been carrying your other little book of poems for so many years … inscribing it also?

11 March 1937 NLVP (from Ben Huebsch to Paul Léon): I am glad to know that “Work in Progress” engages Mr Joyce's attention, and that you have the feeling that it will be ready by the Autumn.

30 March 1937 NLVP (from Ben Huebsch to Paul Léon): If Joyce is desirous of having “Work in Progress” published this year it is exceedingly important that we learn very soon when the manuscript will be ready. Needless to say, the production will be a slow task. Besides, in order to secure adequate distribution and to play the work up in all its importance, our travellers, who set out early in June, would require dummies, i.e., specimens of binding with title page, contents and some pages of text. We would want a month or more in which to plan and produce these dummies, hence we should be fully informed during April of the prospects.

Carlton Elite Hotel, Zurich

1 April 1937 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Please forward Irish Times.

6 April 1937 Letters III (to Stephen Joyce): These are the 3 monskeyteers of Zurich

11 April 1937 Letters III (to Giorgio Joyce): Sunday … I have seen Vogt at last. He found my sight much improved … perhaps we will be able to leave at the end of the week

11 April 1937 NLPL (to Paul Léon): See Times L. Supp. (10 Apr) pp 266 and 268.

15 April 1937 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Expect to be back Sat, 9.30 p.m. (17 April 1937)

7 rue Edmond Valentin, Paris

23 April 1937 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to JJ): We are sending you a further batch of the galley proofs of WORK IN PROGRESS — galleys 126-209, two sets, together with the relevant typescript.

26 April 1937 NLJL (from G. Wren Howard to Paul Léon): I have just arranged for a specially qualified reader to compare the Albatross edition, copy of which I brought here with me from Paris, with the John Lane 3 Guinea edition.

27 April 1937 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): Mr Eliot asked me to acknowledge with thanks your letter and the list of misprints in the typescript of WORK IN PROGRESS. We are sending another set of galley proofs to Mr Joyce directly, and will have the misprints corrected.

4 May 1937 NLVP (from Ben Huebsch to Paul Léon): I am ordering Gogarty's memoirs to be sent to Mr Joyce. As to “Wild Apples”, it appears to have been published here in 1929 by Cape who at that time had a New York house. It has long been closed and I am sure that it will be much easier for you to obtain the book from Cape in London than to find it here … I am glad to know that Part I in corrected proof will soon come to us. As to the remainder, we have no course but to wait, and I shall hope to get favourable news when I am in Paris in the early Summer if not before.

9 May 1937 Letters III (to Viscount Carlow): And finally. Faber and Faber have sent me a bundle of proofs of ‘Work in Progress’ and as their printer is nearing Miss Storiella could you send to my friend T.S. Eliot of that firm a list of the few corrections and additions to the text they have being very careful not to forget that marvellous marginal monosyllable ‘Sic’ … transition is still swimming bravely across the seven seas, a wave a week.

19 May 1937 Letters III (to C.P. Curran): To return to Gorman. He wants to be present at the first (and last?) performance of my first (and last?) play in Dublin.

25 May 1937 Letters III (to Alfred Bergan): Mr Devin's song was ‘O boys, keep away from the girls I say’ … He comes into Ulysses under the name of ‘Mr Power’ … The Lord knows whether you will be able to pick the Kersse-McCann story out of my crazy tale. It was a great story of my father's

2 June 1937 CUR L 295 (from Paul Léon to Constantine Curran): [requesting information on] the list of Mr Joyce's Dublin addresses which he gave me for Mr Gorman
41 Brighton Square [1882-1884]
3 or 6 Castlewood avenue Rathmines [1884-1887; should be no. 23]
1 Martello Terrace Bray [1887-1891]
Leoville Carysfort avenue Black Rock [1892-1893]
29 Hardwicke street [also ca. 1893-1894]
[omitted: 14 Fitzgibbon street, ca. 1893-1894]
12 North Richmond street [1895, misplaced and misnumbered; should be no. 13]
2 Millbourne Ave Drumcondra [1894]
29 Windsor avenue Fairview [1896-1899]
[omitted: 13 Richmond Avenue Fairview, 1899-1900]
8 Royal Terrace Philipsburgh Avenue Fairview [1900-1901]
42(?) Glengariff Parade [1901-1902; should be no. 32]
7 St Peter's Tce Cabra [1902-1904]
Martello Tower Sandycove [1904]
60 Shelbourne road Dublin (lodgings) [1904]

3 June 1937 NLFF (from T.S. Eliot to Paul Léon): I must apologize for the delay in answering your letter of the 24th … I have noted that the rest of the galleys of Part III are to be sent to Mr Joyce as quickly as they are ready. As for Part II, Viscount Carlow is coming to see me on Monday, (7 June 1937) but I understand he is only bringing with him the certain parts of Part II which he is to print privately. We dare not ourselves take the responsibility for assembling the parts of Part II published in TRANSITION … as soon as Part II or any considerable section of it is ready … let us have the necessary pages of TRANSITION

ca. June 1937 Letters III (to Stanislaus Joyce): My play Exiles was not given in Dublin. Postponed from 3 May to 24 May and then to 1 Nov. Actor ill.

6 June 1937 Letters III [dated 1938] (to Viscount Carlow): I hope you received the proofs and understood all my scrawls.

8 June 1937 Letters I (to C.P. Curran): [in-law's name O Brion? Byrne? Griffin?] These people would be ideal readers for Work in Progress but for the fact that they feel they could do so much better themselves if only they would take the trouble of so doing. After 15 years I was still tinkering away at it at 5 a.m. this morning.

10 June 1937 Letters III (to C.P. Curran): Maria Jolas left with my concierge for my perusal a copy of A Page of Irish History, a book about U.C. On p 338 I read that in 1897 I opposed Skeffington for the auditorship of the L. & H. Society. This is incorrect. In 1897 I was still in the Senior Grade at Belvedere. I never opposed Skeffington. My contest was some years later against Kennedy. He won by ca 22 to 16 all the U.C. staff voting for him.

30 June 1937 Letters III (to Myron Nutting) I send you a copy of transition

14 July 1937 Selected Letters (to C.P. Curran): My pen is charged with gore because the work on the proofs of Pts I and III of W i P is now so involved that I have to recur to my old habit of coloured inks and pencil …

14 July 1937 Selected Letters (to C.P. Curran): My father's old friend R.J. Thornton (‘Tom Kernan’) used to tell me about Giuglini flying his big kite on Sandymount strand when he was a boy. He went mad some years later. … Selskar Gunn (without an ‘e’) used to come with us to the opera to hear Sullivan. He is the son of Michael Gunn. The brother James was a good friend of my father's and they used to listen at the back of the darkened theatre sometimes when Tietjens and Trebelli were rehearsing. He told me his sister Haidée had drawn his attention to the many allusions to her father and mother (‘Bessie Sudlow’) in W.i.P. … Who is the Val. Vousden whose name I sometimes see. A grandson? I remember the old man … Also at what price can I buy last year's Dublin Directory and Who's Who

14 July 1937 NLCV (from Viscount Carlow to Paul Léon): Viscount Carlow is anxious to have pulled final proofs … and I find that the book of “Storiella as She is Syung” was returned to you a little while ago. Would you be good enough, therefore, to let us have it, in order that we may send Mr Joyce final proofs?

17 July 1937 NLCV (from Paul Léon to Viscount Carlow): The letter just received … disquietens me as both the corrected proofs and the number of Transition have been returned a good month ago. I sent them myself: the corrections by letter post, the Transition number by printed matter.

6 August 1937 NLGC (from G. Griffin to Paul Léon): I am very thankful for your letter and for the copy of transition (Winter number 26) … Just now I have also got a copy of my biography of D'Annunzio which I shall return autographed as soon as I hear from you … I am writing to D'Annunzio to request him to autograph Mr Joyce's copy of La Città Morta … I would like to see the proof sheets of the other copy of Transition which you mentioned, and shall take great care of it and return it promptly.

6 August 1937 Letters I (to C.P. Curran): Here I am at the other rainbow's end, having passed from the ultrared onward. Many thanks for all safely received. I miss [Val Vousden's] Let it Pass and [Percy French's] Andy McElroe. I may send you a further £1 when I look at the catalogue again. I want the music more than the words (those I had already made large use of) as I want to bind the lot into a volume for Giorgio … When you come to Paris bring the P.F. book with you … As for Who's Who and Thom's I really don't need these at all, certainly not at all urgently. They can wait … We shall therefore meet on Oct 1 … Now it seems we may leave on Monday (9 August 1937) for Le Touquet. … Thanks too for the libretto and the Chancellor's verses on J.L.T. [Toole]

6 August 1937 Letters I (to C.P. Curran): I am trying to finish my wip (I work about 16 hours a day, it seems to me) … But every day in every way I am walking along the streets of Dublin and along the strand. And ‘hearing voices’ …

8 August 1937 Selected Letters (to David Fleischmann): I have sent you registered a book … I need to know something about it. I never read it and have nobody to read it to me and it takes too much time with all I am doing. Could you perhaps refresh your memory … and then dictate to your mother (whom I hope will buy me a bunch of new ribbons to spry up — her typewriter) an account of the plot in general as if it were a new book the tale of which you had to narrate in a book review. After that I should like you to mark with blue pencil in the margin the most important pasages of the plot itself and in red pencil here and there wherever the words or dialogue see to call for the special attention of a European. Don't care about spoiling the book. It is a cheap edition. If you can then return it to me soon I shall try to use whatever bears upon what I am doing.

8 August 1937 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I hope Mr Joyce will not collapse working so extremely hard, as you say he is, to finish W.i.P. by February 2nd, 1938.

9 August 1937 Letters III (to Frank Budgen): … could you make for me a précis of the plot of the book I sent you, marking the margins wherever you like in blue when the marked passage is noteworthy and bears on the plot … and in red when there is some attraction in the style or better in the dialogue? In this way I can get an idea of the book in an hour or so. Terribly overworked on proofs of W i P. which I should finish by end of year.

9 August 1937 Letters III (to Giorgio Joyce): Sending you a book about Basques which you may read in the shade.

Hôtel des Trois Rois, Basel

12 August 1937 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Got here all right … You can forward mail. It will reach me. Also papers.

14 August 1937 NLPL (to Paul Léon): We are leaving this p.m. for Rheinfelden … and a p.c. to C. P. Curran. to whom I have not now time to write another long letter saying I forgot The Soldier's Song (words and music), i.e., the new National Anthem.

Hotel Krone am Rhein, Rheinfelden (Hotel zur Kronen)

14 August 1937 NLPL (to Paul Léon):

15 August 1937 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Have you seen the illuminated MSS etc Exhibit at Bibliot. Nat.? If so perhaps they have a catalogue … words of the Soldier's Song sh'd be copied.

16 August 1937 CUR L (from Paul Léon to C.P. Curran): Before leaving for Switzerland Mr Joyce sent me the following list of Irish songs he would like you to get for him … please send them to my address where I have already some — because I will have them all bound together. I have just received from Mr Joyce a letter and a card where he asks to add to the list a song to the name of what I cannot decipher. I think it is The Soldier's Song In case it is unobtainable he would like it to be copied. Mr Joyce's address is Hotel Krone, Rheinfelden Argau, Switzerland. (on envelope by C. P. Curran. Percy French: Mulligan's Masquerade; Ashcroft: Quartet to two, McGinty the Swell of the Sea, Mind you that now; Vousden: Time and Tide.

17 August 1937 Letters III (to C.P. Curran): I see one of your neighbours Mr Lennon has also reached the bench … But most of all what I also want are the following numbers of the Weekly Irish Times. 1933 Jan 7 / Jan 21 / Feb 25 /Oct 14 / 1935 Jan 26 / 1936 Aug 1 (4 copies) / Aug 29 / July 18

17 August 1937 NLGC (from G. Griffin to Paul Léon): Thanks very much for your letter which I have only received. I am returning the copy of D'Annunzio autographed for Mr Joyce. I am also returning in the same parcel the proofs of “The Mime of Nick Mick and the Maggies”. I am keeping the copy of the Convegio for just two days more.

19 August 1937 Letters I (to C.P. Curran): … we are here in Erin-on-the-Rhine. Anna Rhenana runs under my window all night complaining in guttural Schwyz-Duitsch of being pressed into service by me with 500 odd others as train bearers to a drunken draggletail Dublin drab. Lord help me if I come near that warrior-girl Anna Amazonia!

19 August 1937 NLPL (to Paul Léon): I did not get the Weekly Irish Times

20 August 1937 NLPL (to Paul Léon): [??] - Gorky - Soviet = Big Bright Boost K.O. Please take when in my flat book on S. Pat and Boulogne and forward to me registered. What about the dictionary! French-Russian wd do as well … what about the weekly Irish Times? We may move back to Basel in a few days to spend a week there or may not. It is only 16 Km.

21 August 1937 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Dictionary. Ask H Wright if he knows a good legible one. Or a French-Russian will do.

Carlton Elite Hotel, Zurich

25 August 1937 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Dr Von M[?]knopp saw me … He says I am better … can find nothing wrong with my organs … to account for the violent attacks of intestinal pain … It may be due, as my wife thinks, to overwork in Paris … Russia - (The storm is over) Keep till my return sending words of Soldier's Song … Where is Dr Berman's book, I ordered it from Brentano's before I left … I am very weak … I can't work again for some days at least

27 August 1937 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Brentano's. Please phone. If they have not delivered or reported on book ordered from London 3 weeks ago cancel order and transfer to Gal. et Cie. Food and Character by Dr Louis Berman. Methuen. London.

28 August 1937 Letters III (to Frank Budgen): This copy of a Dublin ‘Throwaway’ is a highly entertaining document to John Joyce's son. Whence comes this phantom ship and why?

30 August 1937 Letters III (to Adolph Kastor): Lucia [=] Nijinsky [cured]

31 August 1937 Letters III (to Viscount Carlow): I forget whether it is mentioned on the title page that the lettrine is by my daughter? Is it? … I have been working altogether too hard at my book, now in its final stage. I wish it were in its final-final.

UPLewis 1 September 1937

Grand Hôtel, Dieppe

UPLewis 4 September 1937:

5 September 1937 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Am somewhat better but still too fatigued for 3 weeks to work or write much.

9 September 1937 Selected Letters (to Frank Budgen): Many thanks. Just what I want. Have used a lot of it. The encounter between my father and a tramp (the basis of my book) actually took place at that part of the park. I went to the Br. Consulate and with the official consulted Lloyd's Register 1935. No trace of that phantom ship. Could you trace her. I hope you noted, by the way, the tayleren's Christian name. But one or two questions I mean till you send back the book marked, which do … to Paul Léon … What is Devereux's Christian name? Her name Lil or Lilian? Is Archer (Dangerfield) an Irishman? In what chapter is Sturk's dream of recognition? This point is a fine one, I think, since he saw the deed in a half dream. Why does Archer go back to Chapelizod and put his head in the noose? Yes. I know that sickening thud. But keep on, Bruce, saith the spider. What is the book called? I should subscribe to the Verdant One [Tit Bits].

11 September 1937 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Here is a cheque. Please pay Galignani 150 frs first. I want from him (1) Macpherson's Ossian in any edition (it was in the old Tauchnitz) or on loan (2) The Lost Leader, a play by Lennox Robinson written about 5 years ago (3) Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain, any cheap edition. This, if it can be had at once, should go to Jolas with a letter asking him to make a digest of the plot with especial attention to the book's sequel Huckleberry Finn and also marking in blue in the margin the chief points bearing on the plot and in red the chief highlights of the speech used. They plan to return on the 20th … it is useless to send it later than say the 13th or 15th … I am still not well … I have not been able to do more than 20 hours work since I left. Yet I try to stay on here on account of the fresh air … You will receive a book from Budgen. Keep it for me.

14 September 1937 Letters III (to Viscount Carlow): I got your letter and it will be all right if you put that information in the colophon (but I should like to see the proof, if you can send it, because it should also say that the piece is ‘opening and closing pages of’.

7 rue Edmond Valentin, Paris

15 September 1937 NLMS (from Paul Léon to Messrs Monro Saw): Mr Joyce who has returned to Paris

20 September 1937 Letters I (to Frank Budgen): Got back … I have used almost all of the information you sent but am waiting to amplify it from the text marked by you so you may return it here registered when you like. As regards SS. J.J. the connection is not so much with Shaun the Post as with my father John Joyce. Ther boat is not in Ll's Register for '35

5 October 1937 NLGC (from G. Griffin to Paul Léon): Many thanks for sending me the copy of “English Studies” containing the article on “Ulysses”, which I shall return.

13 October 1937 Letters III (to Frank Budgen): If you have had time to mark that book I should like to have it back soon to see the passages. Am working very hard at W i P and may finish it some near time.

28 October 1937 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): The correcting of proofs of W.i.P. must be an exacting task needing great care and concentration … I am glad to hear that the work on Parts I and III is nearly finished and that Mr Joyce hopes to be able to send the greater part of Part II to the printers early next month.

1 November 1937 Letters III (to Viscount Carlow): Follow me up to CarlowThe Lord in His Mercy be Kind to Belfast

22 November 1937 NLCV (from Viscount Carlow to Paul Léon): Viscount Carlow asks me to thank you for your letter … and to send you the accompanying proof of “Storiella” which is complete except for pages 1, 2, 7 and 8. These pages are already in Paris.

14 December 1937 NLFF (from T.S. Eliot to Paul Léon): I thank you for your letter of 11 December with enclosures. Another section of Part 2, printed evidently by Viscount Carlow, arrived several days ago, but without any covering letter … This portion is the one which formed the subject of conversations between Viscount Carlow and myself some time ago, in consequence of which we gave him a license to publish this section. I take it that I am to understand that the section above-mentioned is the beginning of Part 2, and that the parts enclosed with your letter of 11 December constitute the next section of Part 2. I should be interested to know how much more matter there will be before the book is complete. You speak of a Section 3 to come. Am I to understand that Section 3 will complete Part 2, or will there be further sections? Furthermore I take it that the printed pages which you enclose with your letter of 11 December will make another book … to be published by the Corvinus Press

18 December 1937 NLFF (from Paul Léon to T.S. Eliot): My covering letter got lost … I am sending you with this letter the 1st portion of Section III to be followed in a week or so by the 2nd and final portion. Section IV will follow in due course.

18 December 1937 NLFF (from Paul Léon to T.S. Eliot): My covering letter got lost … Here are the facts: Part II of W.I.P. is to consist of 4 sections; Section I went with my first letter. It is the revise text of the Mime of Mick etc … which was printed several years ago in Holland and distributed in England by yourselves; it has nothing to do with Viscount Carlow. Section II went with my letter of December the 11th. It consists of two portions (beginning and end) printed by Viscount Carlow with your permission and an remaniated text of the Muddest etc … plus several entirely new pages.

18 December 1937 NLFF (from Paul Léon to T.S. Eliot): Parts I and III have been all corrected, the corrections checked by Mr Joyce and [?Beckett]. The main text is being read now by an expert rough-reader of the New York Herald. I take it this work will be finished before the end of the year. All this will constitute by far the greatest body of the text which is to be followed by an epilogue to complete the whole work. In my last letter, I was telling you that as against … Parts I and III, it would be better to compose Part II, Section by Section, as it simplifies the reading

18 December 1937 Letters III (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): Mr Joyce has given me a considerable amount of autograph pages which are destined for you. They are additional pages of corrections and enlargements for Part II of WIP. May I know whether I can send them to your usual address … I am seeing Mr Joyce rather rarely now and then only for work. My part of it seems to be done but it takes some five or six other people to check the corrections, verify the additions and read the proofs. Himself, he does the composing part quite alone and from what I hear of Mr Joyce he works daily to about five in the morning

20 December 1937 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): hold back for a couple of weeks at least the pages of corrections and additions to Part II which Mr Joyce has entrusted to you for me … I am sorry to hear that Mr Joyce is still working at such tremendous pressure and through the greater part of the night.

22 December 1937 YALE (to Viscount Carlow): with best Xmas greetings to Lady Carlow and yourself and wishing you a happy new year / James Joyce / (and family)

24 December 1937 NLVP (from Ben Huebsch to JJ): … all of the Spring books are in work and are being sold to the trade. Thus, from an editorial point of view, our interest is already centred on the Autumn, and if “Work in Progress” is to appear then, we wish to build our list around it. To that end it is desirable that we be informed about certain details and decide our procedure. I should like to know when the manuscript will finally be in Faber's hands so that we may be able to arrange with them as to a common publication date, and possibly to our reproducing their edition by photography.

31 December 1937 Letters III (to Carola Giedion-Welcker): transition held up. At the last moment I decided to collaborate! I hope to finish W.i.P. for 2 Feb.

1938

7 rue Edmond Valentin, Paris

1 January 1938 NLFF (from Paul Léon to T.S. Eliot): Mr Joyce … has been working … for the last six months with a tremendous energy and is sparing no effort for the corrected galleys to be in the hands of the printers by February the 2nd. The eventual alterations and additions which will be made on the revise will be final and not numerous. But if the book is actually not to appear before Autumn it seems useless to work at such top speed at the expense of his health … get into communication with the Viking Press … find out whether it would not be still possible to bring out the book late in spring and if so what earliest date should the final revise be in your possession … Mr Joyce does not intend to give the title of the book, which he has withheld for so long, until the last moment. As to the question of a photographic reproduction of his book in America, barring the question of safeguarding his copyright, he takes no interest whatsoever in it … request … the date when the proofs of the first section of Part II are likely to be back for correction in Paris. Could you when sending these galleys send Mr Joyce also a specimen page, not necessarily printed, of the size you intend to publish the book in.

2 January 1938 Letters III (to Carola Giedion-Welcker): I am working night and day and the last thing I shall publish in serial form will be in the coming transition.

4 January 1938 NLVP (from Paul Léon to Ben Huebsch): Parts I and III have been here in galleys corrected and all the additions made by Mr Joyce, the text itself being verified by two expert proofreaders. They will go back to the London publishers within the next few days, after which the proofs in page will come and be revised quickly. Whatever additions and corrections there might be will neither be numerous nor important in size.

4 January 1938 NLVP (from Paul Léon to Ben Huebsch): Some three fourths of Part II are in London being printed on galleys and we shall probably receive these very soon. The last portion of Part II is being worked on by Mr Joyce at top speed.

4 January 1938 NLVP (from Paul Léon to Ben Huebsch): But the date of publication is a matter of grave concern to him. He has been working on his book now for the last six months with a tremendous energy keeping awake working till five, six or even seven o'clock in the morning in order that it be brought out this summer … fourth of july … Technically the matter stands thus. The book is to consist of four parts. Three large ones and an Epilogue which is at the same time a Prologue. Parts I and III have been here in galleys corrected and all the additions made by Mr Joyce, the text itself being verified by two expert proofreaders. They will go back to the London publishers within the next few days, after which the proofs in page will come and be revised quickly. Whatever additions and corrections there might be will neither be numerous nor important in size. Some three fourths of Part II are in London being printed on galleys and we shall probably receive these very soon. The last portion of Part II is being worked on by Mr Joyce at top speed. Would you therefore let Mr Joyce know by return mail what would be the latest date for you to receive the galleys in New York for the book to come out on the date desired.

6 January 1938 NLFF (from T.S. Eliot to Paul Léon): … surprise … I was no more aware than was apparently Mr Huebsch of how near the book was to completion … although the bulk of the proof had been sent over, some of it a considerable time back, we have had no corrected proof returned to us, and no indication from Mr Joyce that he was working on the proof and intended to let us have it all back at once … impossible … to produce the book in the spring … if we have the complete material in hand in a final form by 2 February, it will I assure you be none too soon for our needs if we are to bring the book out in the autumn … in returning the galleys Mr Joyce should make his divisions very clear, and should state how he wants the page proofs arranged: where he wants sub-headings, and where he would like to have half-titles and titles. By half-titles I mean a blank page with the title of the following section of the book upon it

6 January 1938 NLFF (from T.S. Eliot to Paul Léon): In one of the sections you have recently sent there are side notes. There were no side notes to any of the previous sections of the book, and we had not been warned that side notes might be required in later sections. We had therefore not allowed for this possibility in arranging the format of the page. Does Mr Joyce wish these side notes to be printed in our edition, and if so, will it be satisfactory to him if these notes are indented into the page?

11 January 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I am back here … it would now be safe for you to send … the pages of corrections and enlargements for Part II.

12 January 1938 Selected Letters III (to Giorgio Joyce): Your N.Y. cable came this morning …hope you had not a bad crossing … Lord Carlow was here yesterday with the sheets for me to sign [1st 25 copies Storiella colophon] … Mrs Jolas came back on Sunday. (9 January 1938) Jolas is in Zurich … I am rather tired as I worked very late … Beckett has had a lucky escape … two unbetrothed lovers, both, to wit Enzo and Lucia, are now in the hospital

18 January 1938 NLFF (from T.S. Eliot to Paul Léon): I am enclosing two more specimen pages for Mr Joyce … the last galleys of the remaining matter which we have in hand will be ready by the end of the first week in February. Viscount Carlow came in to see me, and gave me the dummy for the page arrangement of the book, which I have handed to Mr de la Mare. Viscount Carlow also intimated that Mr Joyce would like to have the book published on 4 July. I am afraid that this date also is much too soon to be possible … public holiday in America, and therefore no books can be published there on that day.

20 January 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): Many thanks for … what you say is a first batch of the latest additions to W.i.P.

20 January 1938 Letters III (to Helen Joyce): I have finished the piece for transition

23 January 1938 NLFF (JJ draft of Paul Léon to T.S. Eliot) I spoke with Mr Joyce this morning over the telephone when I rang him up to inform him that I had received 15 short galleys of “Viscount Carlow's printed version corrected”. He asked me to point out for the third time that Viscount Carlow never had anything whatever to do with the version in question which was printed in The Hague and distributed by Faber and Faber in England … Mr H considered publication in July unreasonable … Mr Joyce is perfectly well aware that 4th July is the American National holiday (five members of his family owe their Christian names to this fact, including his son) and it is precisely for this reason, among others, that he wishes his book to be published in England on that day and in the U.S.A. on the eve of that day, his father's birthday. If no intelligent effort will be made to comply with his wishes he sees no use in continuing to work night and day as he has done and plans to leave for Switzerland after his own birthday (2 February) for a holiday of several months, resuming work on his book in the autumn.

24 January 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): Many thanks for sending a second batch of corrections and additions to W.i.P.

25 January 1938 NLCV (from Viscount Carlow to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of 22nd January … the books are being held up by the binders, who have had some difficulty with the colour of the vellum skins.

26 January 1938 NLFF (from Geoffrey Faber to JJ): We could publish on … July 4, provided that (1) we received the rest of the MS within the next two or three weeks (2) both you and we could be sure that the correction of the proofs would not take you too long a time. I propose to treat Mr Léon's letter as if it had not been written, and to end simply with an appeal to you to reconcile yourself to publication in September … and not to carry out the idea of breaking off your work now, just when the completion is in sight.

26 January 1938 NLGC (from G. Griffin to Paul Léon): The files of the Irish Times Weekly Edition are not kept in their London office. They are only kept in the Dublin Office and in the annexe of the British Museum at Hendon.

26 January 1938 NLVP (from Ben Huebsch to Paul Léon): July 4th … would be bad for the new book … I think we ought to have four or five months after receipt of definitive manuscript in which to do the right thing by the book.

2 February 1938 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): I gave Mr Joyce the O'Reilly clan paper which he was glad to have … object was to avoid any application to the Irish Times Office in Dublin … he is reluctant to ask Mr Curran in Dublin to do this kind of thing for him in connection with his book as he is to ask yourself …

2 February 1938 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): We had sent them the typescript of the greater part of Part II before the New Year and we have just got the proof galleys back. Thus it took them five weeks to do half of what they had received and what was in an absolutely clear typescript without many corrections. They have not done yet a part of some 6000 words also in absolute complete form without corrections and additions and the completion of which must have cost Mr Joyce surely more than he has received as advance payment …

2 February 1938 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): As I will probably leave Paris for a few days … to visit my brother in law who has been operated in Lausanne a few days ago … write to you at greater length than … lately or … over the 'phone … Mr Joyce's visit to doctor Collinson yesterday was due to the fact that he had been unable for an hour or so to read anything at all. The doctor found a retinal congestion and advised breaking off immediately all work and go and see Vogt in Zürich … I hope I will be able to persuade him to accompany me to Lausanne from where I will put him on a train to Zürich which is only two hours away … The state of exhaustion which has overwhelmed him is terrible … need … a couple of days complete rest. Part of it is due to the state of exasperation he was in all during last week on account both of his publishers in England and in the U.S.A. They cannot and wish not to accept the date of the 4th of July for the publication of the book. We had sent them the typescript of the greater part of Part II before the New Year and we have just got the proof galleys back. Thus it took them five weeks to do half of what they had received and what was in an absolutely clear typescript without many corrections. They have not done yet a part of some 6000 words also in absolute complete form without corrections and additions and the completion of which must have cost Mr Joyce surely more than he has received as advance payment … They also demand the communication of the title … for the approval of Messrs Boots the Chemist. Mr Joyce is decided to give them the title just before the book is sent to the binder. I sent the other day under Mr Joyce's dictation an extremely curt and frank letter to Mr Eliot. Of course Mr Eliot diplomatically retired from the scene and handed the pen to … Mr Geoffrey Faber who sent a reply couched in very Baldwinian complicatedness. Mr Joyce attaches so little importance to this letter that he has not even answered it yet but in point of fact it may involve an entire change of plans which he had communicated to me in the beginning of the year. For the moment he has spent yesterday and today in his bed where I found him this morning but his does not prejudice his state tonight as from my observations the Irish temperament has some infinite resources which escape my comprehension. I gave Mr Joyce the O'Reilly clan paper which he was glad to have … object was to avoid any application to the Irish Times Office in Dublin … he is reluctant to ask Mr Curran in Dublin to do this kind of thing for him in connection with his book as he is to ask yourself … Nevertheless both your cable and Mr Curran's were on the table beside his bed together with the usual six or seven others, prominent among them being that from a friend an obscure Greek bankclerk without which the feast would not be complete. I have seen these now year after year and in view of the way in which his reputation as a great poet increases in the world it is surprising to find what a minute circle of friends surrounds him … two absentees … his daughter … his son who had to leave suddenly for America a fortnight ago accompanying his wife. Mr Joyce was also sorry as the little volume brought out by Viscount Carlow was not ready for the appointed date … The English binders.

Hôtel de la Paix, Lausanne

7 February 1938 Letters III (to Giorgio Joyce): We stay here a day or two as I want to rest before seeing Vogt. My sight is much easier

UPLewis 8 February 1938:

Carlton Elite Hotel, Zurich

9 February 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I sent to you yesterday two newspapers and some cuttings of which I have not sent duplicates to Mr Joyce.

9 February 1938 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver): Retinal congestion … in consequence of months of day and (literally) allnight work finishing W i P. and I had to leave Paris and come here to see Prof. Vogt. All writing and reading were stopped but it was only strain … I am now allowed 2 or 3 hours a day work … I don't think I ever worked so hard even at Ulysses

11 February 1938 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Please forward my Irish Times and on Monday (14 February 1938) order through Smiths for yourself to send on to me the Dublin Evening Mail, Irish Press and Irish Daily Independent of 2 and 3 instant … broadcast

12 February 1938 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Got Buddha, thanks. Also I.T. … broadcast … nothing appeared in the press … As for H.W. you had great trouble in getting me to Lausanne. I am exhausted after prodigious solitary labour … Will send you 100 frs for the typist as soon as I have it.

16 February 1938 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Am working on slowly at my aubade which ends the book … My address is Villa Tuppenycap, Room 606, Burholzli, Bedlamshire West. Telegram. Cuckoo.

16 February 1938 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Have you the corrections I put into the Zoo piece? Am working on slowly at my aubade which ends the book.

16 February 1938 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Also ask Lord C's sec to send the 2 copies direct here … Another thing I want is 3 copies of Paris-Soir, dimanche 13 … When you write F and F, asking them for the triangle piece you may say that before I left for Switzerland a fortnight ago I asked you when next writing to acknowledge receipt of Geoffrey F's letter to which I will reply shortly … Have you the corrections I put into the Zoo piece? Am working on slowly at my aubade which ends the book … My address is Villa Tuppenycap, Room 606, Burholzli, Bedlamshire West. Telegram. Cuckoo.

20 February 1938 NLPL (to Paul Léon): The proof will go back in the morning registered … I don't know if E.J. can find libretto of [L??? M???] … in any case could you copy out of the Opera Book in my flat (among music books, R, lowest shelf near door) the paper about this opera, date etc. Better type it. And let me know the dates of Le Prophète (1848?) and L'Africane (62?)

21 February 1938 NLFF (from Geoffrey Faber to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of the 17th. I am very sorry to hear that Mr Joyce's eyesight has been suffering from the strain of his work.

22 February 1938 Letters III (to Harriet Weaver):

23 February 1938 NLCV (from Viscount Carlow to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of 17th February. The binders tell me that we shall have the first consignment of “Storiella” on Monday the 28th February … I will at once send two copies to Mr Joyce in Switzerland.

27 February 1938 NLPL (to Paul Léon): The proof won't do. The indented left side notes are now incorporated in the text. Idiots!

28 February 1938 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Since yesterday have an eye attack, not bad yet, right eye. Can't write well. Enclose cheque. Please phone Verve if out, mail air. Ditto transition

2 March 1938 NLCV (from Viscount Carlow to Paul Léon): Two copies … were despatched on Monday (28 February 1938) … still some delay in binding the rest of the books.

7 rue Edmond Valentin, Paris

8 March 1938 Letters I (to Giorgio Joyce): (typed) [visit to soup factory]

11 March 1938 NLFF (from T.S. Eliot): I enclose herewith a specimen page to show the best that can be done with this section. The only possible alteration is to suggest that the notes on the right-hand side should be set in italics instead of capitals. Will you let us know which you prefer? The point is that if we had known at the beginning that one section of the book would present these features, we could have adopted a format which would have made its lay-out easier to arrange … let me know … how much more is to come before the book will be complete? I hope you have been making further progress in Zurich.

18 March 1938 NLFF (from T.S. Eliot to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of the 16th. I … pass it on to Mr de la Mare … I am sorry to hear of the cause of the interruption of Mr Joyce's work … I am very glad to hear that his work has been progressing so well.

28 March 1938 Letters III (to Carola Giedion-Welcker): In fact have been ill [grip] since I left Z'ch. Transition, of course, is not yet out. I send you a copy of Verve [Paris I.2 March-June 1938, p.26]. There are several mistakes in my text — misprints. But I am so tired I can't correct them. It's a pity you didn't quote the sentences about Sihl amd Limmat in your article on me? They are in Anna Livia Plurabelle … my son intends to return now as planned on the 20 April

6 April 1938 Letters III (to Helen Joyce): I had a long letter from David [Fleischman] chiefly about Russian literature and his work. He wants to be a jazz critic … I have not seen Beckett for some weeks

15 April 1938 MERC (Mercanton memoir): Afternoon: Stuart Gilbert and Joyce putting Samoyed words into a passage “not yet obscure enough”. Joyce, notebook in hand, dictated a series of terms to Stuart Gilbert

11 May 1938 Letters III (to Herbert Gorman): I wish some carpet from the Arabian Nights would fly me to the Vosges away from W.i.P. Giorgio and Helen are back and blooming

23 May 1938 NLFF (from T.S. Eliot to Paul Léon): I thank you for your letter of May the 18th … the proofs which you mention in your letter have already arrived … certain points … clear up before he dares to instruct the printers to revise the galleys into page. “It is not clear what is intended by those red pencilled lines that have been put in at various places right across the page. Is it intended that blank lines should be left at those points, or are new pages intended? And if new pages, are those divisions to have separate headings? … good plan if Mr Joyce were to mark clearly on the rest of the galleys as he sends them back to us, exactly where headings are to go in, where new pages to begin, and where half-titles if any are to be inserted, for the different parts. It is of course absolutely essential that I should know about this before the galley proofs are made into pages. Then, does Mr Joyce wish to see revised galley proofs, or can we now safely go into pages on the assumption that the corrections in the revised proofs will only be of literals and will not consist of additions and omissions of any kind? It would of course be disastrous to make heavy corrections in the page proofs of a long book such as this, as any over-running might prove to be extravagantly expensive.” As soon as these points are cleared up the galleys can be paged rapidly and without difficulty.

24 May 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): I think it would be a good plan … to let me have a typewritten copy of those parts of galleys 15 and 16 that you point out as being especially heavily corrected, and I will then send that on to the printers as a further check.

24 May 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Mr Eliot's letter to you of May 23rd, which was written, I think, before your letter of May 18th arrived … two further points … The first is with regard to the musical quotation which has to go on galley 25. Then my second question is: does Mr Joyce intend to give each part of the book a separate title? I think it would be a good plan … to let me have a typewritten copy of those parts of galleys 15 and 16 that you point out as being especially heavily corrected, and I will then send that on to the printers as a further check.

24 May 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): Not knowing of anyone to whom I could entrust the corrections of the new fragment of W.i.P. in Transition I have been through it myself as carefully as I could, letter by letter, comparing it with the latest corrected typescript sent to me, together with the only three pages of corrected proofs sent. I have made in the two copies of transition sent by Mrs Jolas what corrections I found and am posting one of these to Mr Joyce today. In several cases insertions had been made in the wrong places, upsetting the sequence of the sentences. These were the worst errors I found, though there were also several “literals”, as the printers say.

24 May 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): Please give my thanks to Mr Joyce for the further manuscript pages enclosed in your letter. I am sorry to hear that Mr Joyce has had a rather acute eye attack since his return from Zurich.

27 May 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): … your letter to [T.S. Eliot] dated May 25th. You have now made it quite clear to me about the division of the parts into separate sections, and I must apologise for bothering you with the other two queries, as I see that they are answered by the dummy that Viscount Carlow left with us some months ago … I had already returned the galley proofs to our printers for the corrections to be made, when your letter arrived, so I have now asked them to return them to me once more, so that I can make a final check of these section divisions before the pagination is begun.

29 May 1938 Letters III (to Ferdinand Prior): I have received … ‘Danske in Paris’ [The Danes in Paris]. The book is extremely handsome and interests me very much

29 May 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): The missing words (with context) seem to run: — you're marchadant too forte so don't start furlan your ladins till you've learned the lie of her landuage! but as I don't feel entirely sure I am sending herewith the page (15-16, previously 49-50 of transition 26) containing the entire insertion which … return to me.

30 May 1938 Letters III (to Ferdinand Prior): I had asked Mr Jolas to send you a copy of transition … the devil knows whether you will be able to understand what the story means or what this entire wordspiderweb is about.

1 June 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of May 30th. Thank you also for the typescript of galleys 15 and 16 that you sent me with it …

1 June 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): I am sending you a further set of galleys 252-292 with this letter.

2 June 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): Thank you for returning the page.

3 June 1938 Letters III (to Viscount Carlow): Well, I am nearly exhausted, working literally night and day … I received the copies of S.a.s.i.S and they have been greatly admired by all who have seen them … I am asking my friend Eugene Jolas to send you a copy of the last issue of transition which contains a fragment of W.i.P

6 June 1938 NLGC (from Paul Léon to National Geographic Society) Your subscriber Mrs James Joyce asks me to write … Has there been published in any of your issues in the past years (recently) an article on the life of the natives in the Bismarck Archipelago and in the Solomon Islands?

12 June 1938 NLGC (from Maurice Craig to JJ): I have also written today to Mr Sam Henry about “The Lord in his Mercy”. He will probably be able to let you have it, tune and all.

14 June 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): I have now had the new drawing made of the short passage of music for WORK IN PROGRESS and I am sending it on to you, before getting the block made, just in order to make quite sure that no errors have crept in … show it to Mr Joyce.

16 June 1938 Letters III (to Daniel Brody): My book — on which I am working all day and all night as well — is to be published by Faber and Faber (London) and the Viking Press (New York).

16 June 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Our printers have written to us in some uncertainty about the corrections that have to be made in galleys 14 to 17 … They write … “… the corrections on slips 15, 16 and 17 were so complicated that we were sent a typescript in addition to the corrected proof for final checking purposes. We have finished the correction of these slips and on checking them up with the typescript we were surprised to find that there are a considerable number of differences. We enclose herewith slips 15A, 16A and 17A. The letterpress shows the galleys with all the corrections carried out on the type. The manuscript corrections in black ink show the discrepancies between these corrected galleys and the typescript. Would you very kindly settle which of these corrections are to be carried out as it would obviously be dangerous for us to continue with the paging beyond this point if the missing sentences are to be inserted. The paragraphs are so terribly long that the amount of over-running which is caused by each addition is simply appalling.” I am sending you the original corrected galleys, also that new typescript of them that you sent me later, and thirdly, the revised galleys showing the queries that the printers raise in consequence of inconsistencies between the two sets of corrections … consult Mr Joyce about this.

27 June 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you for your two letters of June 22nd and June 24th, which arrived almost at the same time, together with Mr Joyce's corrected galley proofs for episodes 1, 2 and 3 of Part II, his copy for the additional matter at the end of episode 3, and those revised galleys 15a to 17a.

27 June 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you for … those revised galleys 15a to 17a. I have looked through the galleys carefully myself, and I think everything has been made quite clear.

27 June 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): I have noted that you expect to return me that music sheet quite soon. I shall be glad to have it back, as the printers will shortly be held up if I am not able to send them the missing block.

30 June 1938 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): thanks for the corrected transcript of music

2 July 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I have been out of town for a couple of days … this afternoon … found a packet of proof, typescript and a few pages of M.S.

11 July 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I have received … the packet … I am glad to see that it includes a few sheets of Part IV in manuscript and hope that this concluding part of the book will progress steadily and smoothly in spite of the immense amount of work being done concurrently on the proofs of the earlier parts.

11 July 1938 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): As soon as we have the block-makers proofs of the music, I will have it sent over to you.

20 July 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I thank you for sending me … the first corrections of the Transatlantic Review piece of W.i.P.

20 July 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I thank you for sending me … the first corrections of the Transatlantic Review piece of W.i.P. I am posting today, as you request, 5 copies of the Irish Times of July 11 to Mr Joyce and one to Mr Griffin.

22 July 1938 CUR (from Paul Léon to C.P. Curran): Mr Joyce … asks … request to send him the first two numbers of the Old Dublin Historical Record, if available.

25 July 1938 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): In case Mr Joyce is away at present, I am sending you this further set of galleys.

27 July 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I have found, copied and am posting to Mr Joyce tonight the bit on St Patrick that I typed for him when he was at Bognor. You say he has found two of the other bits. There were four. If he finds he wants the fourth I could send it if you would let me know which it is.

27 July 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): The sheets of Part II you spoke of were not enclosed. The envelope contained your letter only.

6 August 1938 Letters III (to Giorgio Joyce): David is coming to tea and after we work till dinner

17 August 1938 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): In your letter you mention four lots copied in Bognor. I spoke with Mr Joyce about them he does not seem to remember four. As it is he has the O'Connor, the Kevin and the St Patrick's parts, if you have a fourth please send it.

17 August 1938 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): … of the short epilogue-prologue … well over … half is also ready and typewritten … I fear a collapse when the work will be finished

17 August 1938 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): On the eve of my departure for a short vacation I feel I ought to write to you in some detail … it is now some eighteen months since he has been working on Work in Progress night and day … I believe that the work will be finished by October, necessitating later only a revise of pages. Part I is practically already completely set in pageform. Part II is in galleys as far as Mr has finished it i.e. there remain some thirty or forty pages to terminate it of which more than half is already in typescript. Part III is complete in galleys and of the short epilogue-prologue … Part IV well over … half is also ready and typewritten … I fear a collapse when the work will be finished … [will be attacked from the left and the right] … His daughter … his daughter in law … It is with these two dramatic figures in front of his mental eyes that he goes on bringing to a conclusion his huge nocturnal comedy … I did forget enclosing parts of the manuscript in my last letter to you but the very next day I had to consult for corrections some of the pages hence I did not send them on. I am enclosing therefore this lot but I have a new one for you ready which I prefer to keep for the moment. In your letter you mention four lots copied in Bognor. I spoke with Mr Joyce about them he does not seem to remember four. As it is he has the O'Connor, the Kevin and the St Patrick's parts, if you have a fourth please send it.

17 August 1938 Letters III (to Helen Joyce): I have not seen or heard from [David] since he left.

19 August 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I have posted to Mr Joyce today the fourth piece I typed out for him when he was at Bognor — Tristan and Isolde.

19 August 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): Many thanks for … page of manuscript and corrections … I have posted to Mr Joyce today the fourth piece I typed out for him when he was at Bognor — Tristan and Isolde.

UPLewis 20 August 1938:

20 August 1938 LLSF (from Paul Léon to Lucie Léon) Tomorrow morning we leave for Lausanne.

Hôtel de la Paix, Lausanne

21 August 1938 Letters III (to Herbert Gorman): Georgio who is in Montreux

22 August 1938 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of August 19th. I have written to our printers telling them to hold up the paging when they have got to the end of Section 2, part II; so I await Mr Joyce's further instructions.

22 August 1938 MERC (Jacques Mercanton memoir): Joyce in Lausanne with Nora and Léon … shows article in Irish Times on UCD … Léon going back … Mercanton asked to get Le Rime of Petrarch and Epithalamion of Spenser for use in I.8 and last pages of the book “extra allusions to rivers” … Joyce reading “I Follow Saint Patrick”

24 August 1938 Letters III (to Maurice Craig): You must have had an inspiring influence on my friend Eugene Jolas for the day after it he suddenly guessed the title of my book which nobody had succeeded in doing for the past sixteen years … The name of the song is … ‘The Lord in His Mercy be kind (not good) to Belfast’. I have been trying for years to get the air and words of it and also of ‘Follow me up to Carlow’

24 August 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of August 21st. We will certainly do as you suggest with regard to page 44 of WORK IN PROGRESS (the page containing the musical fragment) and we will send proofs to Monsieur Edmond Pendleton when the time comes.

24 August 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of August 21st. We will certainly do as you suggest with regard to page 44 of WORK IN PROGRESS (the page containing the musical fragment) and we will send proofs to Monsieur Edmond Pendleton when the time comes. I am arranging for a copy of OUR EXAGMINATION to be sent to Monsieur Jacques Mercanton at once … In reply to your instructions about holding up the pagination when we got to the end of Section 2 of Part II, our printers write as follows: “… In the meantime slips 126-251 [Book III] have not yet been returned to us for paging, though the subsequent slips 252-325 [II.1, II.2, II.3§1] have come back. We have corrected the latter but of course we cannot page until we get the earlier ones. He has also got our proof of slips 292a-292q [II.3§2-4]. This was an additional section of copy that came at a later stage than the bulk. I have checked the position of the end of Section 2 of Part II. It is just a little confusing. Part II, Section 1, consists of slips 292-325 [II.1]; and part II, section 3, begins at slip 277 and presumably ends on slip 292 [II.3§1]. You will see from the above report that in order to enable us to get ahead with the paging, the author must return slips 126-251 and, if possible, also slips 292a-292q.”

24 August 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): In reply to your instructions about holding up the pagination when we got to the end of Section 2 of Part II, our printers write as follows: “… In the meantime slips 126-251 [Book III] have not yet been returned to us for paging, though the subsequent slips 252-325 [II.1, II.2, II.3§1] have come back. We have corrected the latter but of course we cannot page until we get the earlier ones. He has also got our proof of slips 292a-292q [II.3§2-4]. This was an additional section of copy that came at a later stage than the bulk. I have checked the position of the end of Section 2 of Part II. It is just a little confusing. Part II, Section 1, consists of slips 292-325 [II.1]; and part II, section 3, begins at slip 277 and presumably ends on slip 292 [II.3§1]. You will see from the above report that in order to enable us to get ahead with the paging, the author must return slips 126-251 and, if possible, also slips 292a-292q.”

25 August 1938 MERC (Mercanton Memoir): Linnaeus … showed Mercanton a sonnet of Petrarch composed from the names of rivers Non, Tesin, Po, Varo, which he meant to use … extolled marvellous music of Spenser's “Epitalamion” [sic — “Prothalamion”] “Sweet Thames, run softly, till I end my song” … river music bathed his imagination … asked JM to recopy a number of pages of his manuscript for him, typewritten pages in which it was necessary to incorporate numerous additions. He was bringing the dialogue between Patrick (Padraic in Irish) and the Druid to a close … “Among the pages I was to recopy, one had been written that same morning; a page composed 15 years before was supposed to follow it. He was still working at II, though III was already at the printers.”

25 August 1938 MERC (Mercanton Memoir): [Joyce in Lausanne was bringing the dialogue between Patrick (Padraic in Irish) and the Druid to a close] Among the pages I was to recopy, one had been written that same morning; a page composed 15 years before was supposed to follow it. He was still working at II, though III was already at the printers.

1 September 1938 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Thanks for letters and the P[atiors] book. Keep Exag … to order for you Irish Nights Entertainment recently republished in Dublin by ??. The author's name was, I think, Edmund Leamy.

3 September 1938 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of the 1st to Mr de la Mare … I am sending the substance of your letter to the printers and hope they will now have the paging in order.

3 September 1938 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): We did send the musical quotation proof to Mr Pendleton and he has already corrected it and sent it back to us.

ca. 4 September 1938 MERC (Mercanton memoir): J just read a book by Zimmer on Finn “a great shadow” (626.25) he would use … asked [Mercanton} to come next day and read a few pages of Linnaeus to him, proposed an excursion to Fribourg … Irish Times (statue) … “storks”

4 September 1938 Letters I (to P.Ruggiero): Again I have to ask you for your help. How do you begin and end a fairy tale or a little story for children in Greek? … in English you begin: Once upon a time and a very good time it was; and you end like this: So they put on the kettle and they made tea and they lived happily ever after. The Germans say ‘Es war einmal’ and they end ‘Und wenn sie nicht gestorben sind, so leben sie noch heute!’ Of course I do not want the Greek translation of these sentences but something typically Greek (with the Italian translation underneath). Each country has its own expressions for this purpose. I have finished my long book. Thanks to the Almighty … We shall be at Zurich by the end of October, I think, but for heaven's sake don't wait until then to send me your reply.

5 September 1938 NLGC (from Heinrich Zimmer to JJ): I hope the Celtic philology of my father who did the paper about Finn will compensate somewhat the very poor Pidgin-English of his son who did the summary.

6 September 1938 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Spent the day in Fribourg with Mercanton.

6 September 1938 MERC (Jacques Mercanton memoir): back at the hotel he found pages of MS inviting him to more work, clippings of articles about Dublin, letters, a resumé in English of Zimmer's book on Finn MacCool “a great shadow” and the pocket notebook in which he made entries while I read aloud

8 September 1938 Letters III (to Viscount Carlow): I am glad that you rejoice to have an heir to follow you up and also that my longsought song turned up … The allusions so far in my book to Portarlington and Carlow have been of such a drearily commestible kind — scallions, meat and so on — that I shall have to find a place to suggest this ferocious and exciting song.

8 September 1938 Letters III (to Viscount Carlow): I am glad that you rejoice to have an heir to follow you up and also that my longsought song turned up … The allusions so far in my book to Portarlington and Carlow have been of such a drearily commestible kind — scallions, meat and so on — that I shall have to find a place to suggest this ferocious and exciting song. I hope all your little storiellas have been safely disposed of by now and are off the market for their mighty mother is now at last making ready to slide into the unsuspecting sea. I am making a brief holiday here but return to Paris in a few days to hammer on the last plates and paint her title before the skippereen father gives her his blessing

8 September 1938 Letters I (to Louis Gillet): These are the merry circumstances in which I work on my nocturnal comedy — or, at least, what some are pleased to term the purgatory … A strange parallel has occurred in the case of Ulysses — Victor Bérard. His study on Homer came to collaborate my theory of the semitic nature of the Odyssey when I had already written three-quarters of the book. Now I find my theory of the Scandinavian nature of my hero Finn MacCool (the Fingal of Macpherson, father of Ossian and grandfather of Oscar) confirmed by the researches of a German scholar, Zimmer, with whose work I was unfamiliar. It was a young student in Paris who brought my attention to these studies, and it is curious to see, in the resumé which Professor Zimmer of Heidelberg prepared for me of the work of his father, the boldness with which I dared to put the big Norwegian H C E in the skin of a hero of pure Celtic mythology … justified in the Teutonic doctrine with chapter and verse.

11 September 1938 NLPL (to Paul Léon): We plan to leave here tomorrow Friday at 4 p.m. (12 September 1938 was a Monday) and get off at Dijon, hotel de la cloche … I should like to spend a few days in fresh air, or fairly fresh compared to Dijon … Ask F and F for more page proofs as I want to check all Part I together.

11 September 1938 Letters I (to Ben Huebsch): Edward Brauchbar is here on his way to Paris where I am also going on tomorrow

Dijon 12 September 1938?

7 rue Edmond Valentin, Paris

ca. September 1938 Letters III (to Paul Ruggiero): The other day I heard a French singer on the radio singing your song very well, ‘I walked out all alone upon the strand’

20 September 1938 Letters III (to Ben Huebsch): I may go tomorrow to Dieppe for a few days

Hôtel du Rhin et de Newhaven, Dieppe

21 September 1938 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Please order … from Smith's Irish Daily Independent, Irish Free Press, Dublin Daily Mail of 19 and 20 September

21 September 1938 Letters III (to Herbert Gorman): Here we are and it is very rainy indeed. Plan to stay 5-8 days if allowed.

22 September 1938 NLMS (from Messrs Monro Saw to Paul Léon) We have today received from you Mr Joyce's certificate of existence.

23 September 1938 Letters III (to Maurice Craig): Many thanks for the words of the song. Curiously enough I had just asked my friend, M. Mercanton of Lausanne to send it on to you. I hope the Belfast national anthem will also announce itself to me suddenly.

27 September 1938 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Giorgio just rang up from La Baule, hotel Delphin. We go on in the morning

27 September 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): Many thanks for sending me further manuscripts and typescripts of W.i.P.

27 September 1938 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): Many thanks for corrected galleys 292a-292q.

Nante-gare

27 September 1938 NLPL (to Paul Léon):

Adelphi Hotel, La Baule 27/28 Sep - 2 Oct

28 September 1938 NLPL (to Paul Léon): W.i.P. Send back sets of page proofs and the galleys I gave you on Sunday (25 September 1938) … Will correct them with Helen? … Please give my address to concierge and Galignani.

30 September 1938 NLPL (to Paul Léon): received letter, paper and 6 packets not yet opened.

30 September 1938 NLVP (from Ben Huebsch to Paul Léon): I have now consulted with Messrs Faber and Faber and we have arrived at satisfactory arrangements for producing the forthcoming Joyce book in such a way as to save Joyce from examining another set of proofs and yet protect his United States copyright.

7 rue Edmond Valentin, Paris

5 October 1938 Letters III (to Daniel Brody): We came back the day before yesterday … We stayed in La Baule a week … I have come back to put the finishing touches to Work in Progress and in what an atmosphere!

11 October 1938 Letters III (to George Goyert): Work in Progress — pfui! — is almost finished. So am I. Since last October I have been working like a mule at it all day long and almost all night long too

11 October 1938 NLMS (from Messrs Monro Saw to Paul Léon): (on verso in hand of Paul Léon: “oldirdual / chapellledeosi / fone — (stet) — / in 1st Paig”

13 October 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): I wonder … when we may expect to receive the final part of Mr Joyce's MS? … And had not Mr Joyce some special date in his mind when he would like the book to be published, if possible?

6 November 1938 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere): As the repaging of the episode in Part II where the marginal notes appear is a delicate thing, I think it wiser to send you the galleys from which the paging was done as they contain the indications of the exact places where these notes should be placed. May I also remind that both the notes as well as on the right hand side of the text should be aligned to the left.

14 November 1938 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Finished Work in Progress tonight. Many thanks.

18 November 1938 Letters I (to Paul Ruggiero) I have found the record. It is called ‘Un Rève’ … I have finished my book. Next Thursday, (24 November 1938) on the American Thanksgiving Day, Eucharistia, some friends are giving a little supper for me. I should like to sing your song in French and also in Greek. Could you let me have the words in time, clearly written out, with a translation? … By the way, the words are different in the Franch text. There is nothing about the sea in it, no laughter and no blonde, but great sadness … Hurray! I have finished this blasted book.

18 November 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you for your two letters of November 12 and November 15, with which you sent me the typescript of the end of Part II (the end of episode 3 and the whole of episode 4), and pages 1-216 of the proofs with all Mr Joyce's press corrections.

18 November 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you for … pages 1-216 of the proofs with all Mr Joyce's press corrections. I see from your last letter that Mr Joyce would like to see the final revised proofs of those pages on which verbal corrections have been made, but that he does not think it necessary to see any further revised proofs of those pages where merely literal corrections have been made or changes in punctuation. I am glad of that, because there is no time to be spared if spring publication is to be achieved.

18 November 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): I see from your letter that we are to expect the typescript of Part IV early next week and that that completes everything.

18 November 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you for your two letters of November 12 and November 15, with which you sent me the typescript of the end of Part II (the end of episode 3 and the whole of episode 4), and pages 1-216 of the proofs with all Mr Joyce's press corrections. I see from your last letter that Mr Joyce would like to see the final revised proofs of those pages on which verbal corrections have been made, but that he does not think it necessary to see any further revised proofs of those pages where merely literal corrections have been made or changes in punctuation. I am glad of that, because there is no time to be spared if spring publication is to be achieved. I see from your letter that we are to expect the typescript of Part IV early next week and that that completes everything. In the meantime our printers are setting up those final episodes of Part II and I am hoping to be able to send you galleys before long … date of publication … anxious … soon as possible … impossible for me even to begin to estimate … consult further with Mr Huebsch … advisable that we know the title of the book fairly soon.

21 November 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of 19 November which came with … pages 219 to 336 of the paged text. I noted what you say about the wrongly arranged side notes that occur on pages 260 to 308, and I will arrange with our printer for finally revised proofs of those pages … I will let the printer know also about the correction that you have sent me about Section III of Part II.

21 November 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of 19 November which came with pages 1 to 3[2] of Part 4 …

22 November 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you also for pages 337 to 355 of the printed text … printers [will have] galley proofs of those remaining parts of Part 2 … before Friday of this week (25 November 1938) … rest of Part 4 … next week.

22 November 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you also for pages 337 to 355 of the printed text … printers [will have] galley proofs of those remaining parts of Part 2 … before Friday of this week (25 November 1938) … rest of Part 4 … next week.

22 November 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of 20th November with which you sent me Mr Joyce's revised copy for the last four pages of Part 4 … you shall have back the four original pages just as soon as I get them back myself.

[?26] November 1938 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere): On … Thanksgiving day [24 November] a dinner was given in honour of Mr Joyce in which his daughter in law was selected to read aloud the last pages of his book, Mr Joyce therefore interrupted his work on the final corrections of Part III to introduce corrections on these pages with the result that I have now a revised text containing corrections which could normally have been introduced on the galleys. Should the printers not have reached them yet I think it would save them time if they had this text instead of setting what they have. If you agree will you please let me know and I will send you the text immediately, asking you to return again the previous one in order to exclude all possibilities of mistakes.

[?26] November 1938 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere): In this connection and in view of the length of the final paragraph Mr Joyce would like to introduce an alteration on Page 1 of the book. It would consist in the addition of a paragraph after the words “Howth castle and environs”. I don't think the printers have yet started the final paging and I hope this is still possible without too great trouble.

26 November 1938 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere): I am sending you … the corrected revise of the 64 first pages. As you will see, except for the creation of a new paragraph quite near the beginning and two missing hyphens on one page there are no alterations whatever. There won't be any dedication or preface …

26 November 1938 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere): I am sending you enclosed the new version of the last pages of the book …

26 November 1938 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere): I am sending you enclosed the new version of the last pages of the book … Reckon the corrections and additions on the galleys of Part III to be more or less equal to those which were made on those of Part I. Part II on the contrary will have much less corrections (except a little more on Episode IV). By the way the printers have initialled the galleys they sent “End of Episode B” … I had written “End of episode III”.

28 November 1938 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): Here are 3 sets of proofs of the first 64 pages … and galleys of pages 1-18 of Episode B of Part II. Please correct and return a set as soon as possible.

28 November 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): I have just received those final revised proofs of pages 1-64 … I am also sending you galley proofs of the end of Part II.

28 November 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): I have just received those final revised proofs of pages 1-64 … printers have not sent single pages only in revised form … So I am proposing … to send you a final revised proof of the whole book so that Mr Joyce's last corrections may be checked carefully before we go to press. The rest of the proofs of the parts that you have already returned will be coming to you in revised form in daily batches. I am also sending you galley proofs of the end of Part II.

29 November 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Many thanks for your letter of November 26th with which you sent me back Mr Joyce's corrected galleys for part II, showing the side-notes. I think our printers will certainly be glad to have these proofs by them when they come to revising the page proofs with regard to the side-notes.

29 November 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you also for telling me about Mr Joyce's final corrections to part II. Yes, do please let me have them and I will send them on to the printers straightaway, so that they may include all these corrections, if possible, before they send out any further proofs. I will ask them to return the duplicate copy that they have already, when I send them the new copy … With regard to the corrections that Mr Joyce wants to make on page 1 of the book: perhaps you would be kind enough to note this on those final revised proofs that I sent you yesterday before you return them to me for press. I very much hope that Mr Joyce won't want to make any other corrections of this nature in the final proofs … since the book is now completely made up into its final pages up to page 350 approximately.

2 December 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon) Thank you for your letter of November 26th with which you sent me a further revised typescript for the last pages of Mr Joyce's book. I will let the printers have it … [and] ask them to return us the previous copy, which shall come back to you shortly …

2 December 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon) … The first 64 pages … have not yet reached me.

5 December 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): Mr Joyce telephoned me on the evening of November 13th that he had finished Work in Progress that night. No doubt he has had many proofs to correct since but I hope these too are finished or almost finished.

5 December 1938 Letters III (to Edouard Dujardin): I have received ‘We'll to the Woods No More’ [trans Stuart Gilbert]

6 December 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Our printers have just pointed out to us that the final pages … have already been sent out in proof set up from the second lot of copy that you sent us … [they] are now going to prepare revised proofs of the last pages … using that new copy that you sent us, which arrived too late to prevent the earlier copy been set up and I am hoping to send you new proofs quite soon.

7 December 1938 NLVP (from Ben Huebsch to Paul Léon): ABSENCE REPLY LETTER SEPTEMBER 20 IMPEDES PUBLICATION BECAUSE PAPER LIMITED EDITION CANNOT BE ORDERED UNTIL WE TELL FABER QUANTITY REQUIRED STOP SIMULTANEOUS ESSENTIAL TO COPYRIGHT THEREFORE DELAY INTERFERES BOTH EDITIONS STOP PLEASE ANSWER EXPLICITLY IMMEDIATELY

8 December 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of December 6th, which evidently crossed mine of the same date and answers one of your questions. I have been considering … how soon … send Mr Joyce an advance copy of his book … by February 2nd … What is really urgent now … is that I should have back the rest of the galley proofs … page proofs should be sent for press quickly

9 December 1938 Letters III (to Paul Ruggiero): I am writing this in bed, where I have been ailing for about a week … I still have proofs to correct. If it were only all finished

ca. December 1938 NLPL (to Paul Léon): [draft of letter to be sent to Harriet Weaver] Say that the flat is given up … The book was finished in its structure on the 13th November but there are about 1000 pp of proofs to be carefully read … As regards the book itself it is now for all practical purposes finished. Thousands, hundreds of thousands of its words have passed through my typewriter and I can easily understand how any person who is concerned with the very grave social, political and economic problems of this oppressive period will be painfully affected by its colossal triviality, its colossal accumulations of words meaningless, I suppose, for the ordinary intelligent reader of today. For I cannot see anywhere the slightest attempt in it to focus or still less to solve these pressing problems.
But it is impossible to deny that he has acted according to his conscience and that he has actually consumed almost all his substance, physical and spiritual, moral and material, in the writing of a work … likely to be received with derision by his illwishers and with pained displeasure by his true friends.
Ha! Ha!

P.S. I have seen Mrs Joyce. She suspected, it seems, that something was wrong but I did not tell h[er] or his son the facts as they were. She told me that he was in a state of exhaustion over the closing pages of the book which he had written in a state of the greatest tension. It deals with the mixing of the fresh water of the Liffey and the salt water of the Irish Sea at the Dublin estuary!!!

Ha! Ha! Ha!

During the recent crisis in this country — a crisis which I suppose you followed with the closest attention — he seemed to be much more excited by the gramophone record of a Greek song he used to sing which he had unexpectedly discovered than by the seething conflicts which were raging around him, so fascinating to students of constitutional development but so trying, as we all know, in actual fact.

>

14 December 1938 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): two days after the reception of your letter … Mr Joyce … Bois de Boulogne … sudden collapse … overwork … too little sleep … but of course he has not stopped working … 355 pages have been finally revised … And this makes me think and wonder how this work thousands and tens of thousands words which have passed through my typewriter can with all their obvious triviality and to my mind often meaninglessness keep him in such suspense — in a moment when the triviality is standing in such gross relief on the background of the weighty and tragic events which surround us, are facing us or looming in the nearest future. However I cannot judge but I still dread the moment when it will be finished … I will try to send you all the matter I can but I am still holding back the end of Part II and Part IV until I have the pages for revise.

15 December 1938 NLGC (H.P. Boland to Paul Léon): I enclose a receipt for the subscription of Mr James Joyce to the Parnell Grave Memorial fund … Five Pounds Five Shillings.

15 December 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): I was glad to have the batch that I received from you this morning, the 30 galleys to follow on page 355. Yes, I think it best perhaps to complete the correction on the remaining galleys in advance of the page proofs that you still have …

15 December 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you for your two letters of December 17th and … December 10th … delayed in the post. The page proofs up to p.256 have arrived safely, so our printers will now have quite a fair amount of printing to get on with … rest of the galley proofs for revising in page form — I was glad to have the batch that I received from you this morning, the 30 galleys to follow on page 355. Yes, I think it best perhaps to complete the correction on the remaining galleys in advance of the page proofs that you still have … The additional correction that you sent me for p.197 has bee noted. I was most interested to hear about the title … may I tell [Mr H] about it? … Regarding the cover … any preference about colour? …P.S. I spoke to Mr Eliot about the unpublished poem of Lord Byron's and he thanked you for telling him about it and said that he would be writing to you shortly. P.P.S. I am sending you with this letter the new galley proofs for the last pages of the book.

20 December 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): … title … secret … reasons[?] … I have just received your letter of December 18th … I have noted Mr Joyce's wishes about the title-page and about the binding for the book and its jacket … He shall have proofs of the preliminary pages shortly, and I shall be sending him specimens for the binding early in the New Year.

21 December 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): The collapse … seems quite understandable on Dr Fontaine's diagnosis … rest … I feel rather doubtful … when there are still hundreds of pages of proofs to go through.

22 December 1938 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere): Further to my letter of today: I have now spoken with Mr Joyce regarding the title. His desire for secrecy is mainly meant for America and has a particular American Irish element in view. We have received information concerning the powerful pressure which was brought to bear … in America by these elements during … Ulysses case … this influence … was not favourable. This confirmed Mr Joyce in his original reluctance to make known the title of his new book. The title itself is a form somewhat changed of the title of a song of the comic Irishman musichall type, popular some sixty years ago. The changed form is meant to cover the Nordic Celtic sagas continually suggested in the book. It offers however a very good opportunity for advance attacks at the present time when so much hectic national spirit is abroad. It is not easy for me not knowing English equivalents to suggest a parallel in English but perhaps some song lampooning the present English Royal Family might serve the case. If you know the French music-hall song made so popular by Georgius called “Les Noces à Rebecca”, it might give you an idea of what, I think, he means, if you substitute for another … susceptible Jewish sentiment an equally susceptible Celtic one.

22 December 1938 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): Many thanks for corrected galleys 126-142 … (episode I of Part III).

22 December 1938 NLVP (from Paul Léon to Ben Huebsch): Work in Progress is now finished and entirely galleyed. More than half of it is already finally paged and Mr Joyce is in the throws of proof correction.

23 December 1938 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of December 21st with which you returned to me for revising in page form galleys 126-142

23 December 1938 CUR L 300.1 (Paul Léon to C.P. Curran): Mr Joyce asks me to write to you to beg you if possible to find him in the course of the week a criticism in the newspapers of a pantomime produced in Dublin in 1844 called Harlequin, Shaun and Lanthero — [must be Xmas or Lent or Easter] You had also promised to get him a Directory for last year — would it be possible to get it this week? W.i.p is finished and he wants to finish reading the galleys by the end of the week and year — so everything extremely urgent

28 December 1938 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): Thank you for your three letters to Mr de la Mare … away till Monday (2 January 1939) … on his return he will deal with … the colour of the binding. The corrected galleys I have sent on to the printers straight away (Section 2 of Part III).

30 December 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I was out of town till yesterday and on my return found six registered envelopes containing proofs and a very heavy package containing a copy of the Matisse edition of Ulysses … I like the format of the paged proofs … P.S. In looking through the first few pages of Part I I have noticed four errors: p.4, line 6. Surely there should either be a comma after larms (not a full stop) or else a capital A for appalling. p.5, par 3, line 15. for some day read some say, — according to the original text p.9 line 4 for linew read lines — p.10 line 15 for boy Hney read boy. Hney

30 December 1938 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I like the format of the paged proofs … P.S. In looking through the first few pages of Part I I have noticed four errors: p.4, line 6. Surely there should either be a comma after larms (not a full stop) or else a capital A for appalling. p.5, par 3, line 15. for some day read some say, — according to the original text p.9 line 4 for linew read lines — p.10 line 15 for boy Hney read boy. Hney

30 December 1938 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): Many thanks for your letter … of 28th December and for the corrected pages 257-355 revised for press, provided Mr de la Mare thinks the red ink instructions are clear.

1939

7 rue Edmond Valentin, Paris

1 January 1939 Selected Letters (to Livia Svevo): I have at last finished finishing my book. For three lustra I have been combing and recombing the locks of Anna Livia. It is now time that she tread the boards. I hope that Bernice will intercede for her little sister so that she may find in this vast world, thanks to the gods, “at least one solitary Deo Gratias”.

Versailles

UP Lewis 2 January 1939:

2 January 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): I have just been looking through the corrected galley proofs of episode 3 of Part III that you sent me with your letter of January 31st … puzzled … episode 3 begins at the top of galley 173, but there is no indication in the first line at the top of that galley … that line begins with a small letter and without any indentation. Is that intended …? … telegraph to me to let me know … I am rather worried by the vast number of corrections for these galley proofs. How on earth we are going to get through by February 2nd I really don't know …

2 January 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): agree … safer to let you see further revised proofs of pages 257-320, so that you may be satisfied about the alinement of the side-notes … now asking our printers to … send you all further proofs direct … return the proofs … to me here … I was glad to have that sample of saffron colour that Mr Joyce wants to have for the binding.

7 rue Edmond Valentin, Paris

3 January 1939 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): Many thanks for the corrected galleys of the last episode of Part III.

5 January 1939 CUR L 301 (Paul Léon to C. P. Curran): Mr Joyce … is so exhausted writing the end of his book — the passing out of the Liffey — and still so busy over the galleys to be corrected that he is utterly incapable to hold a pen for the moment. The date of the Pantomime he had asked for was 1844 (my bad writing made you think 77) — but if it is too difficult it can be left alone, However, here is a last request. Could you call up the Gaiety Theatre and ask them in what year (recently) they staged the Pantomime Humpty Dumpty — and then get the number containing the review of it of the Irish Times or any other paper — cut it out and send it to him — as quickly as possible — as next week he will get already the text paged when it won't be possible to make any additions any more. A special copy for him is promised for February the 2nd to be followed in a fortnight or so by the regular publication.

UPLewis 7 January 1939:

9 January 1939 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): Final galleys safely received.

10 January 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Very many thanks for your letter of January 7th … the final batch of Mr Joyce's galley proofs — the complete galley proofs of Part IV … It is a relief to me to know that you think a second revise of the page proofs will not be necessary for the rest of the pages of the book

10 January 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): … I was very glad to hear that Mr Joyce approves the specimen of cloth that I sent him … I am quite clear about his wishes for the colour of the lettering and I will see that it is light yellow and not gold … A first proof of the jacket is now being prepared.

12 January 1939 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere): Here are the two last quires of the second revise of the marginal notes, received yesterday. Barring slight corrections on page 303 and 304, there is a question of page 307. I strongly object to the indentation of the text as it spoils the idea of a text-book annotated by studying children. Could not the solution be adopted of increasing the spaces between the lines and between the words as this is sometimes done in text-books. … I also omitted yesterday one correction on the first revise of page 308. It is also enclosed.

12 January 1939 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere): I am sending you enclosed … corrections of the Galleys of Part IV, in order to reduce as far as possible any corrections for the first revise.

12 January 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of January 10th, with which you returned to me for press pages 257-288 and 385-416

12 January 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of January 10th, with which you returned to me for press pages 257-288 and 385-416, and sent me additional corrections for ‘new matter galleys 48 to 53’ — I telephoned to the printers this morning asking them not to send out the page proofs made up from these last galleys until they received the further corrections. I very much hope there won't be any more late corrections … I have asked our printers to send you 3 sets in future of all the proofs that they send you direct, and I have asked them also to send you a further set of all the proofs they have sent you direct up till now.

13 January 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): I have also sent our printers the further corrections that you sent me for part IV and that additional correction for page 380.

13 January 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): I am very much afraid that your further corrections for pages 306 and 307 will need to be shown to you again, so I am asking our printers to send you further revised proofs of those pages. You know the difficulty about these side-notes has been caused by Mr Joyce not telling us about them when the we originally started setting the book up, and much of what you have been asking us to do recently has been almost impossible to do well on account of that fact …

13 January 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of January 12th and for your corrections for pp.289-320. I am passing pages 289-304 for press, but I am very much afraid that your further corrections for pages 306 and 307 will need to be shown to you again, so I am asking our printers to send you further revised proofs of those pages. You know the difficulty about these side-notes has been caused by Mr Joyce not telling us about them when the we originally started setting the book up, and much of what you have been asking us to do recently has been almost impossible to do well on account of that fact … I have also sent our printers the further corrections that you sent me for part IV and that additional correction for page 380.

14 January 1939 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere): I am enclosing two new quires received and corrected.

16 January 1939 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere): Here are the quires received this morning … this seems to be the crucial week … Mr Joyce … tells me that he had written at length to Mr T.S. Eliot many months ago and even sent a special “ambassador” with the “maquette” of the book. In addition, he had this ambassador — Viscount Carlow — show your firm the publication made of the most difficult part of the episode (difficult typographically) with the request to follow it closely. This however has apparently not been done quite. As far as the type and the pages are concerned, he tells me, that several years ago after several attempts to obtain what he wanted he abandoned the idea as he was given to understand that your firm knew better what would please the reader. From what I have been able to hear from the few persons who have seen the pages it seems however that a slightly larger type and freer disposition on the pages would have been a help to the readers who find them a little crowded.

17 January 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): I have to acknowledge your two letters of the 14th and of the 16th of January, with which you returned to me for press three further quires of the page proofs. Our printers … found those additional corrections for the last galleys, which you have sent me from time to time, most troublesome. To tell you the truth, I think they are reaching the end of their tether — they have had an appalling job getting through all these revised proofs at such high speed, and they have only done so by working constant overtime at night …with regard to the title-page: I am sending you first proofs with this letter … a preliminary proof of the jacket of the book within a day or two … The price … is 25/- … not before April … I have no suggestion to make in explanation of the enquiries you have been getting for the words of Tim Finnegan's Wake — I am quite sure that no-one outside this office, except our printer, yet knows of the title, and I have not yet told Mr Huebsch. P.S. Our printers found it quite impossible to change the style of the dialogue in the way you had suggested, because at the time you wrote all the earlier pages of the book had been printed and to have changed the style of the latter pages would have overrun the text right to the end of the part that was then made up, which would not only have been prohibitively expensive … this is a point that should have been raised at the time the galley proofs were sent to me

17 January 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Our printers … found those additional corrections for the last galleys, which you have sent me from time to time, most troublesome. To tell you the truth, I think they are reaching the end of their tether — they have had an appalling job getting through all these revised proofs at such high speed, and they have only done so by working constant overtime at night

20 January 1939 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): Considering the number of corrections in signature U … I think it will be adisable to have a revise …

20 January 1939 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): There is a further point you will see that I have marked on the typewritten sheet of corrections accompanying the proofs three instances in which the sheet differs from the corrections marked on the proofs. Will you please check whether the proper alterations have been made by the printer? [corrections for p621, p616 on verso in Paul Léon hand]

24 January 1939 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): We have just received your express letter with further corrections for the proofs already returned to press. We have sent off your letter to the printers tonight.

24 January 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): I had a further look at those proofs that arrived today and about which I spoke to you on the telephone this morning … decided … not to bother you with further revised proofs … they sent off to you yesterday the remaining page proofs of the end of the book, and they will be sending you either today or tomorrow the revised proofs of that signature that was so heavily corrected … Would … Mr Joyce … like the title of the book to be printed in red on the title-page, the rest of the wording being left in black, of course.

24 January 1939 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): Many thanks for sending me … in the midst of your “greatest of rushes” the two big envelopes containing the ends of Sections III, IV of Part II of W.i.P. … Four further packets have reached me … mostly corrected galley proofs of Part III.

26 January 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): I have just received your letter of January 25th, two quires only out of the last three … the last one of all … has just arrived … When I write again, I will let you know which signatures of the book, if any, will still remain to be printed after that first copy is despatched, just in case Mr Joyce might find any final corrections to make in those pages.

27 January 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): We verified your final correction for p.614 after you rang up today, and all is well.

27 January 1939 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): We had your letter and the copy of the telegram to Glasgow and I rang up MacLehose and confirmed it with them. So I think that is all right.

28 January 1939 Selected Letters (to Viscount Carlow): Is it quite certain that you will be in Paris on Thursday morning next (2 February 1939) … you will be very welcome both. It is at my son's place this year 17 Villa Scheffer, Paris XVIe … My book is to be sent over Wednesday (1 February 1939) by air express … Perhaps you could ring up Faber and Faber. The person who is in charge of the book there is Mr de la Mare. The book is to be sent from the Glasgow printers or binders on Monday (29 January 1939) … I am still very exhausted but will try to be better by Thursday … Incidentally you will discover the title of the book which my wife has kept secret for seventeen years, being the only one who knew it

29 January 1939 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere): I want to avail myself of the last paragraph of your letter of the 26th … there are two final corrections to be introduced in the book. One is quite simple … On page 614 line 21 from top after the end of the paragraph finishing with the word “word” please insert the following new sentence in the same paragraph: Today's truth, tomorrow's trend. But to balance this a corresponding sentence has to be introduced previously. And the best place for it is the heavily corrected page 526. As it now stands the corrections should be introduced on line 15 from foot. After the sentence “And the maid of folley will go where glory” and before the sentence beginning with the words “Sure, I thought”, a new sentence should be added as follows: Trothed today, trenned tomorrow. The indication of the line as above holds good only on the first revise because it is a heavily corrected page where new paragraphs have been introduced so that will change the disposition of the text. As it is so heavily corrected however I think that you have not given your final approval to the quire, hence I hope it can be done without too great a trouble.

29 January 1939 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere): … there are two final corrections to be introduced in the book. One is quite simple … On page 614 line 21 from top after the end of the paragraph finishing with the word “word” please insert the following new sentence in the same paragraph: Today's truth, tomorrow's trend. But to balance this a corresponding sentence has to be introduced previously. And the best place for it is the heavily corrected page 526. As it now stands the corrections should be introduced on line 15 from foot. After the sentence “And the maid of folley will go where glory” and before the sentence beginning with the words “Sure, I thought”, a new sentence should be added as follows: Trothed today, trenned tomorrow.

30 January 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): I am sorry to say that your letter of January 29th with a further correction for page 526 as well as for page 614 came too late. It is still possible to make the correction on page 614 before those final sheets are printed off, but the printing of page 526 had already been completed when your letter came. What is to be done? I am not giving the printers any instructions about the correction on p.614 until I hear from you again, as I gather … that the correction on that page depends upon the earlier one on p.526. The pages of the book that still remain to be printed are as follows: pp.481-512 and 577-628 — and the preliminary pages of course. So if you have any final corrections for those pages, they will still be on time — but please don't take this as an invitation! And may I please have them at once. The advance copy of the book will definitely be sent off to you today by air mail.

30 January 1939 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere): The book has just arrived … On my coming home I telephoned you … the first addition: Trothed today, trenned tomorrow. can come as a separate sentence on page 486 line 10 from foot after the sentence ending with the word “essaying”. The second addition: Today's truth, tomorrow's trend. will come in the place indicated in my previous letter. This settles the book and there won't be any more corrections forthcoming.

31 January 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): We want to persuade Mr Joyce to our way of thinking with regard to the jacket and not to adopt his own suggestion of making its layour similar to the layout of the title-page. The point really is this: the jacket of a book is something ephemeral that is intended partly for protecting it from dust while it is in the bookshops, but nowadays much more importantly as a piece of advertising matter — It is a poster in miniature that has to proclaim the title of the book … and the author's name as promiently as it can from the bookshop window … Mr Joyce's name should be printed really big.

31 January 1939 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): Many thanks for … corrected proof etc.

1 February 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you so much for your letter of January 30th. I was truly delighted to hear that Mr Joyce was pleased with the appearance of his book. I think you have made it quite clear about those two final corrections, so I will now tell the printers to finish off the machining. Please let me know … of the criticisms, if any, Mr Joyce has to make about the binding, on which I do not care very much for the style of lettering at present … also if he agrees to leave the design of the jacket to our discretion.

4 February 1939 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I received safely yesterday … corrected proof of Part IV some MS pages and another envelope containing proof of the title page — letting me into the secret of the name — which I like.

6 February 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter of February 2nd. I am very glad to hear that Mr Joyce agrees to our treating the jacket in the way that we think best, but in any case I shall show him a proof of it. I shall also be sending him … revised proofs of the preliminary pages showing my new setting of the title-page.

7 February 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): I am sending you with this letter the revised proofs of the title-page … I am sending you alternative proofs, one set printed in black only, and the second set in black and saffron yellow … I myself prefer the printing in black only … use whichever Mr Joyce prefers.

7 February 1939 NLVP (from Paul Léon to Ben Huebsch: draft in JJ hand): “… enormously heavy expenses in connection with typings, retypings, settings and resettings, to say nothing of the very considerable telephone and telegram bill for communicating between Paris and London, particularly during these last weeks … he knows perfectly well why he wants the American publication of his book to follow as soon as possible the publication of its title … Your persistent inaction impeding immediate English appearance book besides being prejudicial vital interests same in America author proposes you retire from publication transferring existing contract rights intact Random House if latter accepts against cable refund from him of advance royalties with suitable compensatory interest. Leon.”

12 February 1939 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere): I am enclosing the title-page with the indication of the changes Mr Joyce would like you to make. I hope that they are not impossible either technically or from the point of bibliophily … send advance copies abroad … unbound but containing the full text … Mr Gillet.

13 February 1939 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): We await approval new titlepage urgent

14 February 1939 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): I have stopped from sending you the revise in page form as after page 355 we ceased receiving the second revise (as there was not time to be wasted if the book was to come out on the 2nd of February) and the first one was being sent only in two copies direct from the printers of which one went back corrected to Messrs Faber and Faber and the second is still with Mr Joyce. No doubt at some later date he will give it to me for you but as it is it must have hardly any corrections by him and whatever writing there is on it must be in either Mr Gilbert's his son's or Mr Jolas's or finally my hands … One completely ready and bound volume did reach him for his birthday.

14 February 1939 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): The enclosed Ms proofs have turned up in the course of the progressive dismantling of Mr Joyce's flat which he is due to leave in mid-April as he is giving away the greater part of his books and furniture … No doubt some other scraps of forgotten Ms will turn up also and I will forward them to you immediately. I have stopped from sending you the revise in page form as after page 355 we ceased receiving the second revise (as there was not time to be wasted if the book was to come out on the 2nd of February) and the first one was being sent only in two copies direct from the printers of which one went back corrected to Messrs Faber and Faber and the second is still with Mr Joyce. No doubt at some later date he will give it to me for you but as it is it must have hardly any corrections by him and whatever writing there is on it must be in either Mr Gilbert's his son's or Mr Jolas's or finally my hands … One completely ready and bound volume did reach him for his birthday.

16 February 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Very many thanks for your letter of February 12th with which you sent me Mr Joyce's final corrections for the title-page. I am arranging, as he wishes, for his name to be printed on a separate line from the word “by” and for it to be a size smaller … actual bulk … before binding, will be 1 7⁄16 inches … Yes … Monsieur Gillet an unbound advance copy.

19 February 1939 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): Many thanks for … the further corrected galleys he found of Part IV episode IV … I shall be greatly and undeservedly honoured if Mr Joyce does finally send me the advance copy he received on his birthday, with corrections made on it, though not in his own hand

23 February 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Many thanks for your letter of February 18th … we should send an advance copy also to Monsieur Edmond Jaloux.

6 March 1939 NLGC (from Charles M. Saffer to Paul Léon): Two months ago, I sent to Mr James Joyce, through you, at his request, a six page typewritten letter concerning the parallelism between the development of his writing and the advance of science.

10 March 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): We shall be able to bring the book out on May 4th … necessity of using gold for the lettering … But Mr Joyce's plan for the contrasting yellow can be kept by colouring the top edges of the book with the yellow that I used on the previous specimen for the lettering … I am also carrying out his colour scheme on the jacket of the ordinary edition.

13 March 1939 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): I received safely on Saturday … a number of sheets of Mr Joyce's notes for certain episodes of Ulysses and some corrected typescript of Haveth Childers Everywhere and today have received two packets of older corrected proofs of W.i.P. and your letter.

17 March 1939 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Geoffrey Faber): I return herewith the specimen cover.

17 March 1939 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): I beg to be excused for not having warned that the rest of the sheets and proofs was to be taken by my wife but she made up her mind on the trip without any warning and it was the easiest way to take them over … I enclose herewith a cutting from the Paris New York Herald about Mr Joyce's agent who absconded with some royalties.

17 March 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): Your letter to me of March 11th

20 March 1939 NLAB (from Albatross Press to Paul Léon): RECU de Monsieur Paul Léon … un exemplaire corrogé des épreuves du livre de James Joyce intitulé FINNEGANS WAKE.

22 March 1939 NLMS (JJ finished signing FW):

28 March 1939 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere): French critics … have not as yet received any copies.

29 March 1939 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): Mr Eliot sent off the unbound copies … to Gillet and … Jaloux yesterday.

30 March 1939 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): … send you the finished jacket

2 April 1939 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere): I have shown the jacket to Mr Joyce and I only hope that it is not definite yet. (1) The front and back of it as they stand now could not possibly do. As printed in the same characters the title and the name of the author make a sentence which will be the standing joke everywhere and the addition of the word “by” is thus made absolutely necessary … (2) The back also being printed in equal characters does not look beautiful and should be changed in the same idea.

2 April 1939 NLHW (from Paul Léon to Harriet Weaver): Taking up the question mentioned in your last letter … Mr Beckett has also been visiting her weekly but these are the only two persons who see her at all … Mr Joyce … has taken a small flat 34 rue des Vignes (Paris XVI°) in which he should move on April the 15th … Finnegans Wake … the sheets for the limited edition have not apparently left London yet for the U.S. … he feels that day by day his work of 16 years and all his exertions and planning are being wrecked by sheer incompetence of the publishers. A partial confirmation of this he sees in the publication of a novel “The reincarnation of Finn MacCool” which has just appeared … you must have heard … of the lamentable situation created for Mr Joyce by the sale in lots of some of his manuscripts to public institutions in the U.S. He might suddenly see himself confronted with publications of texts many years old and which were not intended for publication … Speaking about manuscripts I do not think you have received everything which exists but I am afraid that some of it will have to wait as whatever is still to be sent must be packed with all the books and papers destined for the new apartment.

12 April 1939 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere): Would you kindly have the copies papercovered in the usual dummies as the copy which he has seen at Mr Gillet's does not look anything but nice. France: Mr Georges Pélorson, 60 Blvd de Courcelles, Paris XVII°; Mr Armand Petitjean, 9 Chemin des Vallières, Ville d'Avray (S and O). One copy to himself for lending purposes. Switzerland: Mr Jacques Mercanton, Primerose, 1, Lausanne. “Denmark” M. P. Kristensen, “Politiken” Copenhagen, M. Fr. Møller “Extrabladet” Copenhagen. Holland: Mr van der Vat ? Corfstraat 5, Alkmaar, Netherlands. … 3000 copies of the first edition.

Hôtel d'Iéna, Place d'Iéna, Paris

15 April 1939 NLMS (from Paul Léon to Messrs Monro Saw): As you will see from the letter signed by Mr Joyce as from today he has moved to a new apartment, 34 rue des Vignes, Paris 16°, but until it is fixed which will probably take a week or so he is staying at the Hôtel d'Iéna, Place d'Iéna, Paris XVI°/

34 rue des Vignes, Paris

24 April 1939 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): your letter of the 20th. I am afraid we had already sent the proof to Prof. Zimmer in Germany … we will send another to Oxford.

27 April 1939 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): your letter of the 25th.

28 April 1939 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): Thank you for your letter telling me that Mr Joyce has moved to his new address — and enclosing a copy of the letter you were sending to the amazing person in the USA who wanted to publish part of Mr Joyce's earliest manuscripts of “A Portrait of the Artist” … I received two days ago from Messrs Faber and Faber an advance copy. The book seems to me very well produced — after this long time.

4 May 1939 BLHW (to Harriet Weaver): Madam, With reference to a commission given to me some time ago by your good self I have pleasure in informing you that the order in question has now been duly executed as per instructions furnished on your behalf by the Rev. James Cropper M.A., late of Penrith, England. I have therefore this day delivered the goods and trust that the same will be found satisfactory. Assuring you of my appreciation of your esteemed patronage, I am, Madam, your obedient servant, James Joyce.

4 May 1939 NLMS (from Faber and Faber to Messrs Monro Saw) Corrections £124.0.4 (£178.17.0) … The high cost of corrections results from the great number of alterations made in the proofs by Mr Joyce.

8 May 1939 NLGC (from David Fleischman to JJ): And pleaser notice that I make many fewer typographical errors on this typewriter than on yours, which has a French keyboard.

10 May 1939 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): We think there is an error on page 34 … lines 11 and 12 from the foot have been transposed. Can you confirm this and we will alter this for a subsequent edition.

16 May 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): P.S. You have not yet answered my query about the transposition on page 34.

16 May 1939 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere) the error on Page 34 line 11/12 from foot … is of course a mistake and the lines need transposing. But I must add that having looked carefully through the page of the revise I find that the mistake must have occurred after the second revise the copy of the first being quite correct.

15 June 1939 NLFF (from Richard de la Mere to Paul Léon): But, since Mr Joyce feels so strongly on this point, we are going to reconsider The Irish Times for an advertisement … in the current issue of The Bookseller … it is listed as being among the first twelve best-sellers.

26 June 1939 NLFF (from Morley Kennerley to Paul Léon): We should very much appreciate your letting us know what you would like us to say in the Irish Times advertisement. Should you wish us to use quotes from reviews the best ones are, I think, those which have appeared in the Listener and New Statesman. The Schoolmaster gave the book an excellent notice but a quote from that paper would not be particularly effective.

22 July 1939 NLFF (from Paul Léon to Richard de la Mere): Mr Joyce has been looking at FINNEGANS WAKE several times lately and every time he finds some misprints. In view of the possible necesity of a second edition of the book I think it will be well to start making the corrections right away. May I submit to you the following suggestion. You will remember that the sewn sheets sent to Monsieur Gillet were not the very best thing possible. Could not the correction be made on them and his copy substituted by a regular presscopy … Mr Joyce would then make the necessary corrections on them and return them to you. He says to me that he is sure the misprints must have crept in after his reading of the first proofs as he did not pass a single letter.

end July 1939 Letters I (to Frank Budgen): The part of F.W. accepted as easiest to read is section pp. 104 et seq and the most difficult of all … pp. 260 et seq—yet the technique here is a reproduction of a schoolboy's (and schoolgirl's) old classbook complete with marginalia by the twins, who change sides at half time, footnotes by the girl (who doesn't), a Euclid diagram, funny drawings etc. It was like that in Ur of the Chaldees too, I daresay.

28 July 1939 NLPL (to Paul Léon):

Hotel de la Paix, Lausanne

10 August 1939 NLPL (to Paul Léon): If the Viking Press will do a cheaper edition at once what about the corrections? Could they at least add a sheet or so of corrigenda? If L.G. has not sent back the old sheets wire him to do so. To you. I'll start the correcting at once.

13 August 1939 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Thanks for 2 letters rec'd … Does the Golf Hotel know anything about F.W. no 1? I hope it is not lost … We probably go to Bern … on Monday. (14 August 1939) Please buy the Sunday Times tomorrow.

Hotel Schweizerhof, Bern

15 August 1939 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Also please send me Vol I of Phineas Finn which is on top of the bookshelves … Now for L.G. There are 4 versions of ALP, Navire d'Argent, edition de luxe with preface by Colum, Faber and Faber pamphlet and the final … I don't think there is much difference between 2 and 3.

17 August 1939 NLHW (from Harriet Weaver to Paul Léon): Many thanks for … the further pages of corrected typescript of F.W. that you had found.

18 August 1939 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Friday. (18 August 1939) I sent back Phineas Finn vol 2 which is only in the way.

19 August 1939 NLPL (to Paul Léon): Saturday. (19 August 1939) Please tell F and F to send me the unbound sheets of F.W. so that I may begin to correct before it's too late. It's a pity to spoil a bound book. Tell L.G. to keep the press copy also but suggest he send to some literary colleague.

Grand Hotel Monney, Montreux

22 August 1939 NLPL (to Paul Léon): We are here.

24 August 1939 NLPL (to Paul Léon):

Hotel Majestic, La Baule

28 August 1939 NLPL (to Paul Léon):

30 August 1939 NLPL (to Paul Léon):

30 August 1939 NLFF (from Faber and Faber to Paul Léon): We perfectly agree to your suggestion and send you a loose copy for Mr Joyce's corrections.

Hotel St Christophe, La Baule

(cef. Ellmann JJ 3 September 1939)

4 September 1939 NLPL (to Paul Léon):

13 October 1939 NLPL (to Paul Léon):

1940

28 July 1940 Letters I (to Carola Giedion-Welcker): Many thanks for your kind offer of hospitality

4 August 1940 Letters I (to Paul Ruggiero): We are planning to go to Zurich all of us together. I have written to the Swiss Legation asking for our permits

5 August 1940 Letters I (to Ben Huebsch): cable to me at the U.S. embassy in Vichy through the State Department at Washington whatever sum … British subjects … are under the protection of the U.S. embassy … Mr Robert Murphy, acting chargé d'affaires in the absence of Mr William Bullitt, received me the other day in Vichy

5 August 1940 Letters III (to Jacques Mercanton): I should like to move [Lucia] — with the permission of the German, French and Swiss authorities — to your country and even to go with her. I have written to this effect to the Swiss Legation at Lyons, quai du General Sanais. Up to now I have had no reply.

7 August 1940 Letters I (to James Johnson Sweeney): I sent two airmail letters yesterday to N.Y., one to Mr Cerf, one to the Viking Press … I also asked Mr Cerf for an advance of royalties … I have asked the Swiss authorities whether they permit British subjects to enter Switzerland … no reply has come after about 20 days

13 August 1940 Letters III (to Jacques Mercanton): we are in the process of asking permission to enter Switzerland — we, that is, my son with his son (aged eight), I and my wife and my daughter … I asked the price at Burghölzli, Zurich, where she has once been … her case is cyclothimia dating from the age of seven and a half

30 August 1940 Letters III (to Carola Giedion-Welcker):: I wrote next to the Burghölzli which replied asking 25 francs … The Swiss consulate at Lyons has sent me forms to fill out

1 September 1940 Letters III (to Carola Giedion-Welcker): My son and I applied last week for entry into Switzerland … On the form to be filled out there was the paragraph, References in Switzerland. I gave the names of Giedion, Vogt, Moser and Schoeck [also Prager] … As for a material guarantee I asked the Brauchbar firm to give it. It is not strictly necessary for as soon as we are in Switzerland we shall be almost at once financially independent

7 September 1940 Letters I (to Maria Jolas): I wrote to the clinique near Vallorbe … The Irish Legation wired again to Dublin but had no reply

14 September 1940 Letters III (to Jacques Mercanton): The German authorities have given me to understand verbally that they would grant my daughter permission to leave the occupied zone … It remains to be seen also whether the exit permit from the unoccupied zone for which we have applied to the French authorities will be granted us and when

16 September 1940 Letters III (to Gustav Zumsteg): received … copy of your letter to M. Georges Haldenwang, to whom I wrote after telephoning you but without giving details. I shall send these tomorrow to him in a separate letter. However he knows the name and the number of applicants for entrance. Our demands for entrance should have been at the Swiss consulate in Lyons on Sunday morning and I telegraphed you this morning asking you to verify this … I am in correspondence with the Maison de Santé Pré Carré, Corcelles … Our applications for exits from France … passed through the sous-préfecture of this department this morning, whence they will be forwarded for consideration to the Minister of the Interior in Vichy

22 September 1940 Letters I (to James Johnson Sweeney): I waited for three weeks and then cabled Serf … nearly another fortnight has now passed, and nothing has arrived … I applied to the German authorities for permission for her, a British subject, to leave. This was granted. I then applied to the American Red Cross to arrange for transport. No reply. … I wrote through the Vichy Embassy courier to the U.S. Embassy unit which still remains in Paris, asking, as against my signature on note of hand, that the sum of Frs 1500 a month should be paid to Dr Delmas for my daughter … guarantee … placed my application in the hands of a Swiss lawyer in Geneva … I have applied to the French authorities for permission for our exit from the unoccupied zone. I applied also to one or two friends here, Louis Gillet, Fernand Léger … and Armand Petitjean to help my request … The address of the U.S. Embassy at Vichy is: 113, Boulevard des Etats-Unis, and the official who seems to be in charge, replacing Mr Robert Murphy … is Mr Woodruff Wallner

13 October 1940 Letters III (to Carola Giedion-Welcker): Thanks for your letter of the 9th which I sent on to M. Georges Haldenwang, 6 rue du Rhône, Geneva, to whom I have entrusted our case on the recommendation of M. G. Zumsteg of the A.B.C. Company at Lyons

14 October 1940 Letters III (to Jacques Mercanton): I have written a very long letter to Pré Carré

14 October 1940 BLHW (from Harriet Weaver): I am informed that there is now a likelihood of letters from this country getting through to persons in most parts of unoccupied France whether sent by ordinary post or by air mail, the latter being recommended for speed. … After protracted enquiry and negotiation Messrs Monro, Saw succeeded a short time ago in securing the dispatch to you of a sum of £50 in francs. It had at first been stated that the money would go through the Bank of England and that no notification of its safe delivery to you could be given. Later the Irish High Commission was brought in and in a letter to Messrs Monro, Saw written on October 30th his secretary says that “it is learned from the home department that the Irish Minister at Vichy has been requested by cable to pay to Mr Joyce the equivalent in French francs of the sum of £50, as arranged. The cost of the cables exchanged with the Minister at Vichy in regard to this matter amounted to £2.11.0 … In regard to future remittances I am to state that it is anticipated that it will be possible to have such remittances made to Mr Joyce provided that the amounts involved are not at a rate in excess of £30 per month”. If possible will you please let either me or your solicitors know if the money reached you safely.

15 October 1940 Letters I (to Paul Ruggiero): It is 5 weeks since I applied to the consulate at Lyons for entry permit to Zurich … I am in correspondence with the the Maison de Santé Pré Carré, Corcelles, Chavornay, Vaud, for my daughter, 8 fr. 50 per day

17 October 1940 Letters III (to Edmund Brauchbar): I have written the U.S. Legation at Berne to find whether I shall have the same difficulties with the State Department if and when I reach Switzerland.

25 October 1940 Letters I (to Paul Ruggiero): The French authorities have granted us exit permits and we plan to leave tomorrow if we have the Swiss entry visas. My lawyer is M. Georges Haldenwang, 6 rue du Rhône at Geneva

29 October 1940 Letters III (to Gustav Zumsteg): The Legation of the U.S.A. at Berne writes me that when I reach Switzerland I can receive my money from New York … As for the financial guarantee, since Mr R. Brauchbar has not given it (at least up to 27 October) my friends the Giedions have given it.

1 November 1940 Letters III (to Carola Giedion-Welcker): In view of your postcard of the other day I began to believe the question of the financial guarantee was settled once and for all.

3 November 1940 Letters III (to Edmund Brauchbar): The U.S.A. legation at Berne to which I wrote informs me … I can receive money from the U.S.A., that is, if anybody sends it. I hope he is right.

3 November 1940 Letters I (to Louis Gillet): Yes, the ministry has given the order on the 18th October

8 November 1940 Letters I (from Carola Giedion-Welcker): … have given me the name and address of a Mr Sean Lester, rue Contamines 9, Geneva. I am told he is very nice and knows Ulysses very well

11 November 1940 Letters I (to Carola Giedion-Welcker): I repeat. The German authorities immediately gave the exit permit for my daughter … I thank you for having given the financial guarantees … I wrote a few words to [Othmar] Schoeck

20 November 1940 Letters III (to Carola Giedion-Welcker): I received this letter four days ago from Mr Gia Augsbourg. I answered him. He arrived here this morning … His address is Villa Elisol, Prèchy, Lausanne. He promised me to see the Irish minister at Vichy, Mr S. Murphy (who, you will recall, intervened successfully with the occupying authorities in Paris for the departure of my daughter) and also to speak to the Swiss minister to Vichy, Mr Struck [Walter Stucki]

23 November 1940 Letters I (to Louis Gillet): The plan for the transfer of my daughter which I believed was all arranged is now up in the air

26 November 1940 Letters I (to Paul Ruggiero): I sent a telegram to you and also to M. Augsbourg … the evening of the 20th, the same day … M. Augsbourg is the person chosen by the maison de santé Pré-Carré to meet my daughter at the line of demarcation and accompany her in Switzerland. He came to S. Gérand on his own bat to see me and talk to me on the subject, being in France 8 or 10 days. I gave him the address of the Irish Legation … I telephoned this morning to the Irish Legation at Vichy. They told me that M. Augsbourg had not been to the Legation to see the Minister

28 November 1940 Letters III (to Carola Giedion-Welcker): I received this morning the two letters attached. … The Germans granted the exit permit for Lucia three months ago … Now the permit arrives and the exit permit is revoked! … in Switzerland I would be able to do more than here. I telephoned the Irish Legation and the minister is giving me a letter of introduction to Mr Sean Lester at Geneva. I think he could intervene effectively with the help of the International Red Cross. I do not find his address. If you know it you can send him one of these copies and explain the matter to him. If you can let me have his address by wire before we leave I shall go see him with the minister's letter when I am in Lausanne … The name of the chargé d'affaires at the Irish Legation at Berne is Mr Frank Cremins. Keep the other copies for him but do not send them on for the moment. The other man, Lester, will be more useful, I think. There is also Count O'Kelly, chargé d'affaires of Ireland in Paris whom I know

1 December 1940 Letters I (to Paul Ruggiero): the exit permit for Lucia, given on the 4th of August, has been revoked

6 December 1940 Letters I (to Carola Giedion-Welcker): Having read the letters enclosed and having communicated the contents to Ruggiero would you be good enough to send them immediately to M. Augsbourg at Villa El-Sol, Prilly, Lausanne? I hope that is his real address. I have written myself to M. Lester directly [re American Red Cross intervention for Lucia] … I received also on Monday a reply to a long telegram I sent to Vichy on Friday from Petitjean